Re: o c r and scanning; was future of screen read market


Jeremy <jeremy.richards7@...>
 

This was the idea behind the Pearl camera and such, right? This camera takes a snapshot of the textbook page or pages then quickly renders them. I used one, and I'm still iffy about it since its quite a sizeable contraction, and while fast at scanning and rendering OCR, it does not increase accuracy.

JR

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Carlos
Sent: Sunday, June 19, 2016 8:18 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] o c r and scanning; was future of screen read market

But again the device you are describing already exists. A scanner with a document feeder. It is simply that no document feeder I am aware of has yet been developed which can scan a book without breaking the binding. That is not to say such a system may not some day be developed,but if it were easily doable with current technology, it would most likely have already been done.
I do vaguely remember reading about a system that did not require breaking the binding, but I don't remember the specifics at the moment.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Bhavya shah" <bhavya.shah125@...>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, June 19, 2016 10:57 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] o c r and scanning; was future of screen read market


Hi Carlos,
Could you elaborate on 'typical factors' that can adversely affect
scanning? Just wondering...
Gene,
I do not have a flatbed scanner of my own, but in the institution
which allows me to use their resources, there is one scanner big
enough to accomodate two pages at once, but the remaining two or three
aren't big enough. What is a book scanner though, and how is it
different and more advantageous than a flatbed scanner? I am
particularly novice when it comes to OCR and scanners mostly due to
inexperience (my mom does most of the basic scanning, OCRing and
proofreading work for me)...
The device I am conceptualizing may be somewhat restrictive in its
usage cases and possibly expensive, but I expect that many large scale
accessible book conversion organisations (big ones like Bookshare and
smaller ones too) would be interested in such a device. An analogy I
could give is Braille printing houses willing to invest in powerful
and pricey Braille embossers.
Thanks.

On 6/19/16, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
That doesn't sound practical to me. I don't know if it's possible,
but it sounds as thogh it would be aimed at such a small market that
it would be prohibitively expensive. I don't know if any places like
Google have some sort of automated system but again, if so, I would
expect it to be prohibitibely expensive. Also, a lot of the problems
you are discussing would either disappear or be greatly reduced if
you had a book scanner instead of a typical flat bet scanner. You
wouldn't damage the binding and pages would be properly aligned. On
flat bed scanners, it is much easier to scan two pages at once. Why
are you scanning one at a time using a flatbed scanner? If your OCR
program is set up properly, it will produce two separate pages if you
scan in this way, but you have to have your program set up to do
this.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Bhavya shah
Sent: Sunday, June 19, 2016 9:25 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] o c r and scanning; was future of screen read
market


Hi Monty,
The binding of the book cannot be removed, as it may be a temporarily
borrowed possession of another, or just cannot be physically modified
due to any other factor or reason. A book in the way it is printed
should be scanned page by page automatically in a mechanized way,
fast, accurate, and non-erroneous.
Thanks.

On 6/19/16, Monte Single <mrsingle@...> wrote:
Yes, what you are talking about is a scanner with an automatic
document feeder. This requires removing the book binding so all
pages are separate from each other.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On
Behalf Of Bhavya shah
Sent: June-19-16 8:02 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] o c r and scanning; was future of screen
read market

Hi,
This is a pretty unrelated and random idea that struck me a week or
two ago, when I was having a chat with a fellow senior school
student about our common computer science aspirations and how
assistive technology could be improved. Since then, I was trying to
identify some evident challenges that I faced and could be seemingly
readily enhanced.
Currently, the process of scanning a hard copy book (paperback) is
particularly cumbersome - quality depends not only on the OCR engine
and scanner's resolution, but also on how well the person scanning
adjusts the book so that the contents of the respective page come in
completely and not partially, and bits of other pages don't get
intertwined. This adjustion is prone to human errors, and OCR
results may be significantly dteriorated by man's imperfection, and
this may sometimes be a very irksome and laborious process.
Is there a device available today in which when a hard copy book is
put, it automatically distinguishes between the area of one page as
opposed to the other, automatically adjusting the portion to be in
scanning focus, and automatically turning pages and repeating the
previous additional checks?
If
the task of scanning could also be machine automated, that could
potentially massively boost scanning quality, speeds and
consequently, from a larger perspective, availability of high
quality electronic format accessible reading material.
Thanks.

On 6/19/16, Lenron <lenron93@...> wrote:
I have the Open book software and the Pearl camera. The little I
have used it it has worked pretty well. I have been wanting to sell
them for a while now. Because I am not using it as much as i
thought I would.

On 6/19/16, Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
<ukekearuaro@...> wrote:
Hi Everyone:

Anyone in the house used the EyePal? What are your thoughts and
experiences regarding this device? For instance, does it come
only with a proprietary OCR software or can I run my Abbyy
FineReader using it?

I might be able to grab one for scanning purposes; but before I
do, I'd like to hear from someone who might have played with one
for an extended period of time. Much thanks!!

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado






--
Lenron Brown
Cell: 985-271-2832
Skype: ron.brown762




--
Warm Regards
Bhavya Shah
Using NVDA (Non Visual Desktop Access) free and open source screen
reader for Microsoft Windows To download a copy of the free screen
reader NVDA, please visit http://www.nvaccess.org/ Using Google
Talkback on Motorolla G second generation Lollipop 5.0.2 Reach me
through the following means:
Mobile: +91 7506221750
E-mail id: bhavya.shah125@...
Skype id : bhavya.09







--
Warm Regards
Bhavya Shah
Using NVDA (Non Visual Desktop Access) free and open source screen
reader for Microsoft Windows To download a copy of the free screen
reader NVDA, please visit http://www.nvaccess.org/ Using Google
Talkback on Motorolla G second generation Lollipop 5.0.2 Reach me
through the following means:
Mobile: +91 7506221750
E-mail id: bhavya.shah125@...
Skype id : bhavya.09



--
Warm Regards
Bhavya Shah
Using NVDA (Non Visual Desktop Access) free and open source screen
reader for Microsoft Windows To download a copy of the free screen
reader NVDA, please visit http://www.nvaccess.org/ Using Google
Talkback on Motorolla G second generation Lollipop 5.0.2 Reach me
through the following means:
Mobile: +91 7506221750
E-mail id: bhavya.shah125@...
Skype id : bhavya.09


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