Re: the google home: early impressions


Christopher Hallsworth <challsworth2@...>
 

The same can be said for the Dot and the Tap as well.

On 6 Jan 2017, at 10:59, Tim Grady <timfgrady758@gmail.com> wrote:

As far as I’m concerned, one of the distinct advantages of the echo is that you don’t need a cell phone to set it up. it can be done with a computer, just like the chromecast.
On Jan 5, 2017, at 10:47 PM, Melissa <angel.melissa0107@gmail.com> wrote:

Got it set up with no sighted assistance required. The app on the
Iphone is easier to use than the alexa app.

On 1/5/17, Melissa <angel.melissa0107@gmail.com> wrote:


Sent from my iPhone

On Jan 5, 2017, at 6:21 PM, Joe Giovanelli <joegio100@gmail.com> wrote:

Hello All,

Alexa has competition. Last November Google introduced its device: the
Home. I just got mine set up this afternoon and thought you'd like some
early thoughts.

Physically, this unit is perhaps a bit more than the height of the Echo.
Its diameter is just a shade smaller, but it tapers a bit as one moves
toward the top. The top surface slopes down for an inch or two. This part
of the Home is a touch surface. Sliding on it in a clockwise direction
increases the audio level. Moving counterclockwise lowers it. Tapping the
surface pauses or resumes play.

The lower portion of the Home feels like a cloth mesh. This mesh can be
removed and replaced by a mesh, or screen, of a different color.

With this removed, we can see three small speakers. One faces left and
one faces right. These are the mid/high-end drivers. The remaining
loudspeaker faces forward and is the subwoofer. It is capable of wide cone
excursions and can produce considerable low-frequency response down to
perhaps 55 Hz. Believe me! this is very impressive, although somewhat
boomy at times. Overall, the sound is better than that of the Amazon
Echo.

There is no jack for obtaining audio to a sound system. This reminds me of
how Apple has removed audio jacks from some of its devices. Audio can
still feed a sound system via a small device known as a Google Audio
Crhomecast. TV can be supported by a Video Chromecast. (I do not have that
unit so cannot discuss it.)

The price of the Google Home is $130. The Audio Chromecast costs $35.

Like the Echo, the Home must be set up using a Google Home app. There are
28 steps to set it up. I had an experienced sighted helper and he got it
going in a bit over a half hour.

Again, like the Echo, most items are opened, or linked, via the app. Some
services have a monthly charge. Lots of music can be heard at no charge.
Pandora and Google Play can be heard that way. If, however, you ask to
hear a particular artist, you'll hear him or her but mixed with other
artists.

The Audio Chromcast must be linked to the Home. If you give each device
its own name, you can hear your selection from the device you ask for when
requesting an item.

If no name is called, the sound will emanate from the Home. Like the Echo,
the Home uses a wake up word, either Okay Google or Hey Google.

I wish this list could accept attachments. I could have described the
equipment in greater detail, and you could have heard the amazing sound
this equipment can produce.

This does it for now. I look forward to hearing from others as they
experiment with this product. If you find that I made any errors in this
presentation, I look forward to knowing about them.

Joe Giovanelli, W2PVY


Thank you Joe would you be willing to send me an attachment I just got one
for my husband for his birthday and I'm hoping that I can set it up
without cited help thank you so much for your review





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