Re: Help with a Gusto 3


Onwardbob
 

Hi, I downloaded this, forget where, but her goes.
The buttons on the Gusto are not particularly tactile, and pretty typical of
this type of phone. The 5 is slightly marked, but the gaps between buttons
and rise at the center of the buttons are slight. Above the number keys
there are Send on the left (above the 1), Clear in the middle (above the 2),
and End/Start on the right (above the 3). Above the Clear key sits the
four-directional ring that serves to navigate up, down, left, and right. At
the center of that ring is the OK button. Above Send there is a programmable
ICE (In Case of Emergency) button, while above the End key there is a (text)
Message key. Across the top of the main keypad, from left to right directly
below the screen, are the left soft key, the Voicemail key, and the right
soft key. Along the left side of the phone, there are Volume up/down keys
and, toward the bottom, a micro USB connection. On the right side of the
phone, at the top, is an audio jack for corded headphones, with below it a
camera button and then a speaker button.
The phone has a startup sound, as most do, but the rest of the setup is
mute. You can OK the language, and then hit Send to call Verizon to
activate, which walks you through the process. With Full Readout off, the
menus still have tones, with a different tone to mark the end of a menu. To
turn on Full Readout, the most complete speech option, hit the left soft key
to get into menus. Settings is the ninth option if you're navigating down
with the four-way key. Hit OK. Accessibility is the fourth option down with
the four-way key. OK that. The first option there is Easy Setup, but as that
does not talk, it is simplest to navigate down to the second option and hit
OK on Full Readout. Then navigate up once to set Full Readout to On, and
press OK. This triggers a tutorial which describes the keys and how Full
Readout works, which is a nice addition. The other audio options are Menu
Readout, Digit Dial Readout, Alert Readout, Flip Open & Talk, Text Message
Readout, and Browser Readout. All of these do pretty much exactly what the
name indicates, and while personally I am not convinced that all of these
separate options are necessary, it shows a sensitivity to individual
customer needs that the phone is so customizable. The options are combinable
for further customization, with the exception of Full Readout, which enables
all of the other speech options, including Flip Open & Talk. That last one
is actually a little annoying if you don't want to use voice commands, but
overall the setup is straightforward and the speech functions are quite
complete.
Voice Commands, as triggered when you open the phone with Full Readout or
Flip Open & Talk on, works, but strangely does not read the list of
available commands, making it harder for a blind person to use. Between that
odd oversight and the fact that you can't use Full Readout without using
Voice Commands, it is a hindrance as well as a boon.
The last option in the Accessibility submenu is Speech Rate, which offers
five settings, slow to fast. The speech is pretty clear and the fast readout
is faster than what is typically on feature phones. Regardless of chosen
speech, however, the speech does lag a fair bit behind button presses, and
that will slow the user down.
The Contacts, Messages, and Recent Calls submenus are accessible, but the
real surprise of this little phone is that the browser works with speech.
What's more, it has a little tutorial on the topic that auto-starts when you
open the browser with Full Readout for the first time. Like other tutorials,
it is "skippable" for those who wish to, but it's a useful tool, and lets
the user know how they can navigate. A nifty feature is that you can use the
Camera button to silence speech and the Speaker button to trigger reading
the page. A feature phone is not going to be the best vehicle for using the
internet, but it's great to see that such an effort has been made to make
much of its functionality available to the blind.
Media Center, Tools, My Pictures, and Settings all work fine with Full
Readout. The odd one out in this line-up is email, which when you open it
does not read the setup message, leaving the user without the option of
turning on email. A notable submenu item that does work here is Bluetooth,
in which everything but the "searching" message is read. There is a readout
when all available devices have been found and you can navigate that list as
you would any other on this phone.
The Samsung Gusto 3 is a vast improvement over the Gusto 2; what's more, it
is easily the best offering from Verizon that has come to our attention in
talking feature phones. It's easy to use; and while better control over
Voice Commands, talking setup, and access to email would be very helpful,
it's nonetheless hard to deny that this is great leap forwards, and one I
will gladly recommend for those users who want an inexpensive, simple phone
to call, text, and maybe connect to a Bluetooth earpiece.

The buttons on the Gusto are not particularly tactile, and pretty typical of
this type of phone. The 5 is slightly marked, but the gaps between buttons
and rise at the center of the buttons are slight. Above the number keys
there are Send on the left (above the 1), Clear in the middle (above the 2),
and End/Start on the right (above the 3). Above the Clear key sits the
four-directional ring that serves to navigate up, down, left, and right. At
the center of that ring is the OK button. Above Send there is a programmable
ICE (In Case of Emergency) button, while above the End key there is a (text)
Message key. Across the top of the main keypad, from left to right directly
below the screen, are the left soft key, the Voicemail key, and the right
soft key. Along the left side of the phone, there are Volume up/down keys
and, toward the bottom, a micro USB connection. On the right side of the
phone, at the top, is an audio jack for corded headphones, with below it a
camera button and then a speaker button.
The phone has a startup sound, as most do, but the rest of the setup is
mute. You can OK the language, and then hit Send to call Verizon to
activate, which walks you through the process. With Full Readout off, the
menus still have tones, with a different tone to mark the end of a menu. To
turn on Full Readout, the most complete speech option, hit the left soft key
to get into menus. Settings is the ninth option if you're navigating down
with the four-way key. Hit OK. Accessibility is the fourth option down with
the four-way key. OK that. The first option there is Easy Setup, but as that
does not talk, it is simplest to navigate down to the second option and hit
OK on Full Readout. Then navigate up once to set Full Readout to On, and
press OK. This triggers a tutorial which describes the keys and how Full
Readout works, which is a nice addition. The other audio options are Menu
Readout, Digit Dial Readout, Alert Readout, Flip Open & Talk, Text Message
Readout, and Browser Readout. All of these do pretty much exactly what the
name indicates, and while personally I am not convinced that all of these
separate options are necessary, it shows a sensitivity to individual
customer needs that the phone is so customizable. The options are combinable
for further customization, with the exception of Full Readout, which enables
all of the other speech options, including Flip Open & Talk. That last one
is actually a little annoying if you don't want to use voice commands, but
overall the setup is straightforward and the speech functions are quite
complete.
Voice Commands, as triggered when you open the phone with Full Readout or
Flip Open & Talk on, works, but strangely does not read the list of
available commands, making it harder for a blind person to use. Between that
odd oversight and the fact that you can't use Full Readout without using
Voice Commands, it is a hindrance as well as a boon.
The last option in the Accessibility submenu is Speech Rate, which offers
five settings, slow to fast. The speech is pretty clear and the fast readout
is faster than what is typically on feature phones. Regardless of chosen
speech, however, the speech does lag a fair bit behind button presses, and
that will slow the user down.
The Contacts, Messages, and Recent Calls submenus are accessible, but the
real surprise of this little phone is that the browser works with speech.
What's more, it has a little tutorial on the topic that auto-starts when you
open the browser with Full Readout for the first time. Like other tutorials,
it is "skippable" for those who wish to, but it's a useful tool, and lets
the user know how they can navigate. A nifty feature is that you can use the
Camera button to silence speech and the Speaker button to trigger reading
the page. A feature phone is not going to be the best vehicle for using the
internet, but it's great to see that such an effort has been made to make
much of its functionality available to the blind.
Media Center, Tools, My Pictures, and Settings all work fine with Full
Readout. The odd one out in this line-up is email, which when you open it
does not read the setup message, leaving the user without the option of
turning on email. A notable submenu item that does work here is Bluetooth,
in which everything but the "searching" message is read. There is a readout
when all available devices have been found and you can navigate that list as
you would any other on this phone.
The Samsung Gusto 3 is a vast improvement over the Gusto 2; what's more, it
is easily the best offering from Verizon that has come to our attention in
talking feature phones. It's easy to use; and while better control over
Voice Commands, talking setup, and access to email would be very helpful,
it's nonetheless hard to deny that this is great leap forwards, and one I
will gladly recommend for those users who want an inexpensive, simple phone
to call, text, and maybe connect to a Bluetooth earpiece.



BOB SOUTAR.ONWARD THRU THE FOG

-----Original Message-----
From: Marie [mailto:magpie.mn@gmail.com]
Sent: Saturday, October 03, 2015 10:21 AM
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Help with a Gusto 3

If anyone on the list is using the Gusto 3 and has an accessible user guide,
or even some tips on initial setup, I would appreciate a little help.
Thanks, Marie

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