Re: Cost of New IPhone


Gene
 

I said in another message that I wasn't talking about cellular phones.  Not as clear voice transmission?  That is an incorrect overgeneralization, since we are talking about cellular phones. 
Some companies provide better sound quality than others.  I've heard plenty of good voice quality with cellular phones. 
 
And fiber optic voip phone service, as my phone company provides it, is identical in quality and volume to copper phone service.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, September 14, 2017 5:41 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Cost of New IPhone

 
You claim that signing up for Lifelock protection is like an insurance policy.  Well, for me maintaining my land line service is an insurance policy.  According to you, the probability of a natural disaster striking a major metropolitan area is low, so why hang on to antiquated technology?  Well, nobody ever thought Hurricane Sandy would cause such catastrophic damage in a city like New York.  Nobody ever thought they would see rowboats floating along lower Broadway near the Battery.  But it happened.  And many experts insist that it could happen again because of climate change, which the current president dismisses as a hoax.  There is currently no cell phone on the market that is as reliable as a land line phone tethered to an underground copper wire network, nor is there any cell phone that provides loud and clear sound quality comparable to a land line phone.  So stick to your cell phone if it makes you feel safe and secure. I’ll stick to my reliable land line phone.
 
Gerald
 
  
From: Gene
Sent: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 7:01 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Cost of New IPhone
 
your ability to sling ad homanem arguments on completely unrelated subjects is astounding and reduces your arguments, whether valid or not by making them petty and vinddictave, and inaccurate.  I now use Life Lock.  I signed up with them because it appeared to me that my former service was not as thorough.  I'm willing to consider alternatives as I get more information.  for example, I've read argguments that taking steps such as freezing your credit bureau accounts and taking a few other actions may render credit protection of considerably less importance and that it may be that credit protection isn't particularly useful.  Which side is right?  I don't know.  Is either side right?  I don't know.  but at this time, I choose to spend some money for what may be protection that may be of some value.  That isn't paranoia.  It may not be necessary, but hardly paranoid.  but to say that I can't live without something is simply an ad hominem argument and is completely unrelated to the subject we are discussing.
 
Now, to return to the subject we were discussing:
Things may have changed.  A year or two ago, I read articles about the soon to come demise of the old copper system.  Your information is worth considering and may indicate that the copper system will be around longer than was previously thought.  But it's dying, whether a faster or a slower death. 
 
The extreme what ifs are hardly a proper way to determine how to spend money by businesses or governments or people.  What if this horrible very low probability event occurred?  What if that very unlikely low probability ev ent occurred?  Before you know it, we would be personally bankrupt and bankrupt as a country by preparing for every single what if event. 
 
If you want to use the copper network and if others do, fine.  But you aren't assessing the risks and benefits.  There may be certain parts of the country that are more prone to disasters where it makes more sense to do so.  But saying, in general, that people should cling to the old copper network, paying considerably more money each month for slower Internet service than if they switch to fiber optic service if they don't live in high probability disaster areas, is simply not rational cost/benefit analysis.  Chicago, new York City, Madison Wisconsin, and so on, are low probability candidates for the kinds of terrible disasters you are worried about.  Yet you cling to the copper network because of a low or very low probability "what if." 
 
What about emergency generators to keep your modem working and kieep your phone service during emergencies?  What about the battery backup feature you can get for disasters?  I don't know if the battery backup runs down even if you don't use the service or if you can stretch it out for a long time if you use it sparingly. 
 
To take another example, I live on the third floor of a building that has stairs.  there is a very low probability that I'll fall down the stairs.  Should I not live in the building for that reason when there are many things aoub t the building and the community I like?  Just seizing on one possible problem or known deficiency to the exclusion of all sorts of other factors is not proper decision-making.  It is elevating one possibility over everything else and not doing any sort of cost/benefit analysis nor considering whether the probability is high enough to be worth worrying about.  and all sorts of decisions people make every day are based on probabilities, whether they consider them consciously or not.  Is it worth the risk of crossing a street to go somewhere when you consider the low probability of me being hit by a car when compared with the benefits of crossing the street?  and so on for decision after decision.
 
there is the very low probability of such a disaster in the area where you live and there is also the very low probability that you will have a heart attack or a stroke or some other such emergency while service is out.  If you want to spend perhaps forty dollars more a month for the combination of much slower Internet speed and standard phone service, which except for the possibility of loss during a disaster, is indistinguishable in quality from fiber optic service, that's your privelege.  But advocating repeatedly that everyone should have this fear and that it is on its face, without question, the correct decision and policy all over the country is just wrong. 
 
Have you seen what happens to your beloved phone service during a disaster or some sort of more or less emergency?  During the 1967 blizzard in Chicago, as a teenager, I saw how people had to wait often minutes for a dial tone during the first day or two of the extreme blizzard.  The system was overloaded.  So don't assume that just having wired service is some sort of paradise during disaster. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----

Sent: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 4:35 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Cost of New IPhone
 
 
You are totally wrong about this issue.  For a blind person living alone, especially seniors with medical and physical problems, having reliable phone service in an emergency is absolutely essential, and could mean the difference between life and death. What if you suddenly had a heart attack or stroke?  How would you summon help if you don’t have a working phone?  Do you really believe that this could never happen to you?  Well, it happened to dozens of people in New Orleans, most of them disabled or seniors or both  after Hurricane Katrina who died because they did not have working phones to get help.  And contrary to your unfounded assertion, copper wiring isn’t going to be replaced in many parts of the country for many years, if ever.  It turns out that Verizon underestimated the cost of installing fiber optic cable in many urban areas, and in some cases has even renegged on contractual obligations to install it.  Here in New York, Verizon has abandoned plans too install fiber optic cable in all parts of the city, which is suing them for breach of contract.  And the state public service commision has forbidden them from removing copper wiring and replacing it with fiber optic cable: they must keep the copper wiring in place if they want to also install fiber optic cable. So I expect reliable copper wiring to be around where I live for a very long time.  And as long as we’re on the subject of paranoia, you’re the one who can’t live without Lifeloc “protection”, a service of dubious value from a company that has been heavily fined by the FTC for engaging in fraudulent and deceptive business practices.
 
Gerald
 
 
 
From: Gene
Sent: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 4:10 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Cost of New IPhone
 
Maybe those people have much more to worry about than phone service.  And if you live in areas not prone to natural disasters putting ttoo much emphasis on this possibility is misplaced luddite paranoia.  It's like the old get a horse crowd.  If something so severe occurs in an area that power is lost and may be lost for weeks, for a lot, perhaps most people, being able to make calls would be, I would think a distant problem compared for example, to getting fresh watter, getting food, and perhaps finding a tolerable shelter. 
 
And sooner or later, it will be academic anyway.  the old archaic copper network is going to be completely shut down.  already, so many people have stopped using it that it is unreasonably costly to maintain per user.  I wouldn't be surprised if no more copper networks exist within three to four years. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 11:44 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Cost of New IPhone
 

Good for him!  Millions of people who live in Florida and Texas who now have
no power, and may not have it restored for weeks probably regret giving up
their reliable copper-wire land line phones in favor of cell phones that
they cannot use until the power is restored and the cell towers rebuilt.

Gerald



-----Original Message-----
From: Carolyn Arnold
Sent: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 12:14 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Cost of New IPhone

I'd dump that thing today, but my husband wants to keep the thing.

Best from,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Gerald Levy
Sent: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 11:23 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Cost of New IPhone


But what about the cost of your land line phone?

Gerald



-----Original Message-----
From: Carolyn Arnold
Sent: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 11:14 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Cost of New IPhone

We can get two lines at Consumer, and our AARP membership for about $40 for
the two lines plus tax, of course, about $45 a month. I have a few friends
who has it and are very satisfied with performance and service.

Best from,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
heather albright
Sent: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 11:07 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Cost of New IPhone

No just sign up for the membership threw the main site. It is 10 dollars but
it will take like over 100 dollars off the phone. My plan was like 130 but,
I only pay 105 a month. So add the savings 1560 1260 equals 300 a year you
can save. Heather



Heather Albright
Blindness is a characteristic, not a handicap!" Dr. Kenneth Jernigan ham
call sign:
kd5cbl
e-mail:
kd5cbl@...



From: Peter Spitz <mailto:peter.a.spitz@...>
Sent: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 9:56 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Cost of New IPhone



OK, this is a stupid question but do you have to be a member of the

NFB to qualify for the discount?



Peter



On 9/13/17, heather albright <kd5cbl@...> wrote:

> That is why I have te-mobile and the NFB discount. Now my mom is over 55
> so

> she wants to sign us for that plan for unlimited for 60 for two lines. If

> you have more than one line and over age 55 or if the other person is over

> 55, I highly recommend this plan. It is 60 no taxes. Cheers Heather

>

> Heather Albright

> Blindness is a characteristic, not a handicap!" Dr. Kenneth Jernigan

> ham call sign:

> kd5cbl

> e-mail:

> kd5cbl@...

>

> From: Carolyn Arnold

> Sent: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 9:42 AM

> To: main@TechTalk.groups.io

> Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Cost of New IPhone

>

> Yet my Verizon bill is as high as when I started with the

> iPhone 4S that supposedly was a penny or 99 cents, I can't

> remember which, but less than a dollar. So I checked with

> Verizon to see if the two of us could go cheaper now, over

> three years later with prepaid - no go, same price.

>

> Best from,

>

> Carolyn

>

> -----Original Message-----

> From: main@TechTalk.groups.io

> [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Pablo Morales

> Sent: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 7:30 AM

> To: main@TechTalk.groups.io

> Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Cost of New IPhone

>

> Yes, they do. When every month they have problems to pay

> their bills, or when they try to buy something and they

> can't save money is when they notice it. The problem is that

> they are not understanding how works this business.

> We notice it, but whe are not thinking why it happen.

>

>

> -----Original Message-----

> From: main@TechTalk.groups.io

> [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Pamela

> Dominguez

> Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 5:14 PM

> To: main@TechTalk.groups.io

> Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Cost of New IPhone

>

> Most people don't notice that, or they don't seem to care,

> as long as they don't see the price all at once.  Pam.

>

> -----Original Message-----

> From: Rob Hudson

> Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 5:01 PM

> To: main@TechTalk.groups.io

> Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Cost of New IPhone

>

> Carlos <carlos1106@...> wrote:

>> Most people get an iPhone the same way they get any other

> expensive

>> smart phone, as part of a contract or deal with the cell

> provider.

>

> Yeah but then you get gouged with interest and other

> surcharges, which makes the phone more expensive over the

> term of the contract lol. So it's probably cheaper

> relatively speaking to just plunk down your credit card and

> go on that canned tuna diet.

>

>

>

>

> ---

> This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.

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