Re: When did 'ribbons' start to appear


Carolyn Arnold
 

Be all of that as it may, ribbons are here, that is what we have. I have no idea in the world how anyone can work with "Virtual ribbons," but otherwise, ribbons are the only game in town. That's it.

Cordially,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Thursday, January 25, 2018 4:35 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear

If you don't know what menu something is in, you may have to look through two or three menus. And not just that, menus had more dialogs whereas ribbons have taken a good deal of items and shown them in ribbons so you see a good deal more program functions very quickly.

Would you want a sighted person who knows nothing of how blind people use computers to insist that x or y way is better for a blind person? Aren't you doing that regarding sighted people? You don't use computers as a sighted person, yet you are prescribing how things should be organized for sighted people and criticizing a means of organization based on what? Have you used ribbons enough to really understand their organization and compare them with menus? Do you know enough about ribbons to get an idea of how convenient they are for sighted people? Frankly, I think that if you were comfortable with ribbons, you wouldn't be complaining.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Eleni Vamvakari <mailto:elvam2167@gmail.com>
Sent: Thursday, January 25, 2018 2:57 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear

Change for the sake of change is not a good thing. I always say if it's not broken, don't fix it. If a change will bring about something that truly enhances the experience of working with something, fine.
Otherwise, it's not worth it. Again, using television as an example, Changing from dials to buttons was a good thing. Putting the numbers on the television, along with having a remote control which did the same thing was excellent. Removing the numbers from the television so that, if you lost the remote, you couldn't simply enter the channel, was a bad thing. I also see no need for such a huge variety of channels. It's not all about being blind either. Even though I think it's easier to fix a dialup connection as opposed to a cable modem when things go wrong, because I can't see the colours on the latter, I can certainly understand that switching to a cable connection, or even using my hotspot, which I can't see to know when it is on or when the battery is low, makes a lot of sense.

Doing something quickly and doing something well are two different things. Life is not all about speed. Regardless, it only takes a few keystrokes or mouse clicks to use a menu and to see what it contains.
Some sighted people don't like ribbons either, and there are actually some who use the keyboard as we do, and who do things quicker than their counterparts who use a mouse. Likewise, it is much quicker and more efficient to simply set a dial on a microwave to two minutes, which also turns it on in the process, than to have to type 02 00 start on a touchscreen, or set a specific type of food, or to hit clear and then enter it all over again, whereas if you make a mistake on one with a dial, you simply turn it back or forward to adjust it.
The same is true for all other appliances, particularly ones where you have to keep hitting up and down arrows to adjust settings. Yes, there is the added annoyance that I can't see the screens, but the logic of my previous statements would still hold true, even if I could.

On 25/01/2018, Missa <Melissa.J.Hammitt@gmail.com <mailto:Melissa.J.Hammitt@gmail.com> > wrote:
I remember my mom telling me a story about my papaw ... when cassette
tapes came out he swore that they were a fad and would go away
soon....
Sometimes advancements stay and sometimes they go away. I can't think
of just one off the top of my head right now, but I can remember
"advancements" being invented that didn't go far or stand the test of
time.
How many remember the hype over new social media platforms that had
come out in the past few years? Aloe and one I think called orange or
peach? It was some fruit name I think. Either way they didn't last at
all ... while facebook and twitter have been here ... and even though
they change a lot and sometimes have done so too much people are just
too used to them to stop using them. I stopped using twitter because I
just couldn't see how to keep up with it and I can't type one handed
with my phone--plus I talk too much and the limitations irked me.
The only reason I use FB now is to keep up with my workout bootcamp
thing I joined last year and the few friends I started to have through
them. I'm still woefully behind with that, but man I'm trying to think
if being totally ignorant is worth being freaked out 24/7 by reading
what passes for news on FB. I see some of the things family members
and friends post and just think "WTF??"
Sorry I know that wasn't duley related to ribbons but I thought of
this tangent when I read the last few responses.

Melissa
On 1/25/18, Jim Wohlgamuth <wohlggie@gmail.com <mailto:wohlggie@gmail.com> > wrote:

I agree with you eleni as well as Gene. You know we all benifit from
advances in technology in one way or an other. I believe there were
those that complained loudly about the invention of the motor car and
I will bet there isn't one of us that doesn't use some form of
transportation. The reason things get 'dumb down' is to make things
more efficient for the most part. A perfect example of that is the
television, When I was a kid we had aTV with an antenna and we were
able to receive only a few channels Now we have in some cases
hundreds of choices and yes I love it! What I am saying is that the
reason things change for the most part is for the betterment of
society. I railed against ribbons when they first came out, but they
are just a part of my computer use now Just my opinions-Catch Ya
Later! de <KF8LT><Jim>.
On 24-Jan-18 20:37, Eleni Vamvakari wrote:
Computers and Windows have been dumbed down a great deal in general.
We live in a society where everyone wants everything immediately,
and where people rely on technology to think for them, instead of
taking a few seconds to do things and/or thinking for themselves.
That's not arrogance. It's just truth.

On 24/01/2018, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com <mailto:gsasner@ripco.com> > wrote:
It's really arrogant to disparage the way sighted people do things
just because blind people don't. It isn't a question of laziness.
It's a question of using vision efficiently.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 7:19 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear


So basically, they exist because sighted people are too lazy to
open a menu and view the options. Ah well. Good luck to the
ribbon users, and I mean that sincerely. *smile*

On 24/01/2018, David Moore <jesusloves1966@gmail.com <mailto:jesusloves1966@gmail.com> > wrote:
Ribbons were implemented for the sighted to see more options in
front of their eyes. We just have to learn to use them. After
practice, I can use them just as much as the menus.
There are many more key tips on ribbons that you can memorize, and
can do more with key commands by using ribbons.
David Moore
Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 8:11 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear

I don't see a reason to complicate things. Hence, I never
understood the reason behind ribbons. What is wrong with simply
pressing alt to enter a menu, and either up and down arrows to
read it, or left and right arrows to switch to another menu?

On 24/01/2018, janet gross <janet.harvard@outlook.com <mailto:janet.harvard@outlook.com> > wrote:
Nancy,
As far as I know, I think ribbons started with Microsoft in 2007.
Someone
else might have more detailed information though. Ribbons aren't
a bad thing either. Some people just don't like them, or they
might have a difficult time learning how to use them. Some
people just don't like change either. Some people just don't
want or they don't have to be bothered with learning ribbons.
Janet

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Nancy Hill
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 5:45 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear

All this 'ribbon' talk got me to wondering about when 'ribbons'
started.


Would some kind person give a bit of history about ribbons such
as when they were started and what programs have them?


I have no clue and would love the education.


Thanks!


Nancy







--
Facebook: elvam2167@gmail.com <mailto:elvam2167@gmail.com>

anyaudio.net: elvam2167

Skype: elvam2167




--
Facebook: elvam2167@gmail.com <mailto:elvam2167@gmail.com>

anyaudio.net: elvam2167

Skype: elvam2167








--
Facebook: elvam2167@gmail.com <mailto:elvam2167@gmail.com>

anyaudio.net: elvam2167

Skype: elvam2167

Join main@TechTalk.groups.io to automatically receive all group messages.