Re: need tutorials for learning how to use NVDA.


chris judge
 

How true. I remember, about a million years ago, when windows 95 was out. I
finally acquired jaws 3, or 3.1, can't remember the version now, no matter.
I was told to go home and listen to the training material, but as I had only
the vaguest understanding of windows in general, telling me to go home and
listen to the material was like telling my cat to digest and understand the
complex world of mutual funds.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Ann Parsons
Sent: January 30, 2018 8:34 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] need tutorials for learning how to use NVDA.

Hi all,

Eleni, your question is illustrative of why some techies are bad teachers.

The manual for anything is helpful only if one is able to understand the
manual and its concepts. A manual, by its very nature is a streamlined,
direct listing of how to use something. It is not
designed to review concepts which are assumed to be already known.
this is why when techies say to newbies RTFM, it is so patronizing and so
truly thoughtless.

One cannot benefit from a manual until or unless one knows what the item
showcased does, and how it works. Otherwise a manual is, if you'll pardon
me, Greek to the newbie or novice user.

For example, reading the NVDA manual and covering 'review mode' or whatever
it's called in NVDA-dom will make absolutely no sense to a user who doesn't
understand what a review mode is for and why it is
beneficial for a screen reader user. Even things like talking about
the desktop mean nothing if the user doesn't understand what a desktop is
and how it works.

A tutorial, on the other hand, presents knowledge in small chunks, one at a
time. Each chunk has exercises to help a user practice the concepts and
information presented. By using this type of learning, a newbie user or one
who prefers learning this way, can acquire the same knowledge which is in
the manual, but in addition he or she is given concepts which will allow the
user to use manuals in the future.

If you know your concepts and you know what you're looking for in a manual,
they can be quite helpful, but if you don't understand what you're reading,
they can be frustrating and can cause a lot of unnecessary emotional stress.

You want to learn about Linux, Eleni, fine, you'll have to learn to read and
understand Man Pages. Happy Learning.

Ann P.

Original message:
I'm glad that this exists for those who need it, but what's wrong with
the user guide? Why is it not a good way to learn about NVDA? It
explains practically everything. Plus, there's a quick reference
guide with just the commands for when you need to find an answer
without a detailed explanation as to what something does.
On 30/01/2018, chris judge <chrisjudge1967@gmail.com> wrote:
Joseph Lee's tutorials are spectacular. If he doesn't send it first,
I'll send you the link hwen I find it.


From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On
Behalf Of Jim Rawls
Sent: January 29, 2018 2:17 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] need tutorials for learning how to use NVDA.


Hi all, I have never used NVDA and have decided to learn how to use
it. I am using windows ten, and jaws 18. If anyone has a link, or
some links for NVDA I would appreciate you sharing them with me.
Thanks in advance. Jim





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Ann K. Parsons
Portal Tutoring
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"All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost."

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