Re: the DTBM machine from nls


David Goldfield <david.goldfield@...>
 

I think that the only issue that I had with my NLS record player was that the disk would stop prematurely before the side was completed. I believe this was a flaw in my particular machine. They were supposed to stop once the arm moved past a certain spot on the record so that it wouldn't get stuck and spin all night if you fell asleep during the book. The problem is that my player wasn't calibrated properly and stopped before it was supposed to, which was very annoying as you never want to miss any part of a book!

David Goldfield, Assistive Technology Specialist WWW.David-Goldfield.Com

On 2/5/2019 8:52 PM, Ron Canazzi wrote:

Well, as long as we're relying on anecdotal evidence only:

1.  Everyone I ever knew (probably about 30 or 40 people all together) who used those flexible discs complained about them.

2.  If they were the be all and end all as you seem to be saying, then why did they discontinue them and even replace most of them with cassettes and much later Daisy?


On 2/5/2019 1:52 PM, Gene wrote:
I don't know what model of machine you used, and, whatever it was, mYT not have mattered.  The weight of the arm may not have been adjusted properly or perhaps there was some other problem.  I am not saying your problem was caused by you.  I'm saying it wasn't representative.  Your experience isn't typical.  I haven't heard anyone complain about the skipping issue before.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, February 05, 2019 12:44 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] the DTBM machine from nls

Well I used to get those flexible discs for books that were brand new or nearly brand new and on my NLS provided talking book record player, they always used to skip and have pretty poor audio.  Just because a record skips does not mean that it is user caused.  I used to buy a lot of albums and a few of them brand new out of the shrink wrap and packaging skipped.  Fortunately very few LP albums back in the day had this issue, but I can't say the same for the flexible discs.



On 2/5/2019 8:14 AM, Gene wrote:
For some reason, you may have had problems with sound sheets.  I didn't and I have never heard such complaints before.  I therefore conclude that it worked well.  Popular books were released using sound sheets, or as the Library called them, flexible disks.  Those were for temporary circulation for highly demanded items and they were retired after awhile and the remaining demand was left to cassettes alone.  I got some of these books as well as numerous magazines and had no problems except the usual user caused ones such as scratches.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, February 05, 2019 7:00 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] the DTBM machine from nls

I remember when not only were the disc players the only game in town, but they were 3 times bigger thanhe cassette machine and you got a choice of 16 RPM records which were huge and it took several dozen to read a book like 'Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire' by Edward Gibbon.  In addition they brought out a new super high tech disc that was very light and flexible called an 'ebitone sound sheet.'  The problem with that was that it hardly ever played consistently through a side without skipping, was easy to damage and sounded horrible. I remember!


On 2/5/2019 7:03 AM, chris judge wrote:

I sure do remember that. We also had a huge cartridge, although that was even before my time, and I’m 52.

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Pamela Dominguez
Sent: Tuesday, February 05, 2019 7:43 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] the DTBM machine from nls

 

I have heard people complain that the player is too big.  They also did that with the cassette one, which was bigger.  But whenever I heard that, I thought:  “You should have been around when the talking book records were the only thing there was!  Pam.   

 

 

Sent: Tuesday, February 05, 2019 6:34 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] the DTBM machine from nls

 

 

If blind consumers want a small DTB player they can carry around, they have the option of purchasing a third-party media player like  a Victor Stream with their own money.  And if they already own a smart phone, they can download apps for playing NLS  books on it.  And if the unemployment statistics from the blindness organizations are accurate, then 70% of all blind people are unemployed, which means that they are just sitting around at home most of the time and therefore don't need aTalking Book machine that's especially small or portable.  The current DTB player has everything in one package and is convenient and easy to use.  Replacing it with a smaller, less convenient smart phone-based device that might require a separate external speaker to obtain decent sound would be the epitome of bureaucratic stupidity.

And you claim that a large DTB player is not what a lot of people want.  Is that so?  I challenge you tojustify this assertion with facts, not personal opinion, which you are always so quick to criticize me and others of doing.

 

 

Gerald

 

 

On 2/4/2019 10:10 PM, Gene wrote:

There are real advantages to having a small unit that people can easily carry around.  For many people, it is far more convenient to have a small, good sounding speaker separate from a small device where you have the option to use the internal speaker or connect an external one.  How much trouble is it to plug a patch cord into a small speaker and plug the other end into an earphone jack on a small play device.  I suspect that one reason so many people use small devices now that can play such books is because they don't want to carry around a big machine. 

 

The Books for the Blind program has always had large portable machines, not what a lot of people want. 

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Monday, February 04, 2019 8:52 PM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] the DTBM machine from nls

 

And I know there will be people who will say “Hook it up to a blue tooth speaker”.  I, for one, don’t see why I should have to have two devices to get the good sound that should come out of one!  Pam.

 

Sent: Monday, February 04, 2019 5:31 PM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] the DTBM machine from nls

 

 

No, my concerns are not based on assumptions.  They are based on personal experience.   I have actually compared my friend's IPhone in speakerphone mode directly with the sound output from my advanced DTB player, and it paled in comparison.  It is nowhere near as loud.  If you are hearing impaired like me and thousands of other NLS patrons, no smart phone could ever be modified to sound as loud and clear as the DTB player.  There are bluetoot hearing aids on the market that work with the IPhone, but at $8000 a pair, they are way beyond the budget of the average blind consumer who lives on a fixed income.  And while the largest smart phone may be larger than a Hershey bar, the DTB player is the size of a case of Hershey bars.  Replacing the DBB player with a smaller smart phone-based device to me is just a bad idea.

 

Gerald

 

 

On 2/4/2019 5:00 PM, Gene wrote:

As I said in another message, you hate smart phones and I doubt you have laid hands on many, if any.  They are increasingly large these days and screen size is an area of competition.  They are much larger than Hershey bars.  I have a feature phone, not a smart phone, which is about the size of  a Hershey bar.  The design is actually referred to as a candy bar phone.  That is a phone that isn't a flip phone, is a feature phone, and is about that size.  Have you heard a smart phone's audio or are you assuming how they sound?  It's remarkable how good, for their size, very small speakers can be made to sound these days.  I had pocket radios in the early sixties with much larger speakers and smart phones sound as good or better.  If you haven't seen or heard actual smart phones, your comments are based on assumptions and preconceptions. 


Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Monday, February 04, 2019 1:42 PM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] the DTBM machine from nls

 


The advanced DTB player was well designed to begin with.  The buttons
are large and well differentiated.  The sound output is loud and clear,
even for someone like me who is severely hearing impaired and wears
hearing aids.  Now the NLS is considering replacing this generation of
DTB players with a smart phone device that would be the size of a
Hershey bar on which it would be physically impossible to replicate the
key layout or sound quality of the DTB player.  To me, this would be a
huge step backwards.


Gerald



On 2/4/2019 1:48 PM, chris judge wrote:
> It's interesting. I live in Canada, so I've never laid eyes, oops, sorry, hands, on one of these advanced NLS players, but, and if I'm wrong, please correct me, but I can't see them being more complicated than a victor reader stream?
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave
> Sent: Monday, February 04, 2019 2:27 PM
> To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [TechTalk] the DTBM machine from nls
>
> <Laughing>  Gerald,  you make me laugh sometimes.
>
>
> I still Highly recommend you move out of New York city, doing so will Mellow you a bit.
>
>
> Now, I am wondering why NLS would want to ruin a Good thing by bringing in the Next Generation of Talking Book Players, and they are some Spin Off of a Smart Phone.
>
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> As for the Older Folks not being able to use one of the NLS versions of their Player, I don't know what to make of this.  I have seen for myself, when an older person loses their sight, they tend to give up. They can't do anything for themselves etc.
>
>
> So they never learn how to cook, or even pour Milk into a Glass. they
> insist that someone do it for them, after all they are blind.
>
>
> So, the previous two generations of the NLS player were about as easy as
> it gets.  Probably fewer Buttons than one of the old Cassette players.
>
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> If the older folks can't operate one of the current NLS Players, I am
> not sure why the Government is thinking  the old folks will be able to
> use a Smart Phone like device to get their books.
>
>
>
> Anyway, guess we all will need to wait and see what actually comes of
> all of these rumors.
>
>
> Grumpy Dave
>
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-- 
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-- 
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
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-- 
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They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"

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