Re: Turbo boost?


Joseph Lee <joseph.lee22590@...>
 

Hi,
Major correction, actually: K identifies "unlocked" - that is, you can set CPU speed to however you want as long as the motherboard and the CPU can tollerate it; it has nothing to do with CPU speed percentage at all.
For reference, the set of known CPU suffix identifiers are:
* None: desktop
* S (older processors): lower voltage desktop
* T: Ultra-low voltage desktop
* H or M: mobile
* Q (older processors): quad-core mobile
* R (older processors): non-removable desktop with high-end graphics
* U: Ultra-low voltage mobile
* Y: extremely low voltage mobile
* K: unlocked desktop and mobile
* X: extreme desktop (and older extreme mobile processors)
The ones designated "low voltage" (S, T, U, Y) draw less power. These days, desktop processors with no suffixes are equivalent in power draw to S processors.
Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Austin Pinto
Sent: Monday, September 2, 2019 7:58 AM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Turbo boost?

hi Marie.
most of the systems now a days come with a turbo boost enabled cpu.
turbo boost is when the cpu increases the clock speed to up to 10% when it is under heavy use of about 90% so yes. if you are purchasing a system its better to have it.
if you are purchasing a desktop its better to go for a k version of a cpu.
for example 8100k in place of 8100u.
the cpu ending with k is 10% faster than normal cpu.
also if you are purchasing a desktop or a laptop you must take help and check the bios to see if turbo boost is enabled.
i have seen systems with turbo boost supported cpu but turbo boost disabled in the bios.
on laptops this is done to give you that little battery savings

On 9/2/19, Marie <magpie.mn@...> wrote:
I hear the term, turbo boost for processors and would like a surface
explanation on how and when it works. I assume it will increase the
processing power for certain activities but , when and where? And how
much importance should I give it if looking at purchasing a system?
Thanks for enlightening me.
Marie

The real definition of "never mind" is "you should've understood me
the first time."




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