Re: blood pressure moniter


Gerald Levy
 


To prove that your method works as accurately and reliably  as you claim, have you ever taken your talking upper-arm blood pressure monitor to your doctor's office, taken your blood bressure yourself under his supervision using your technique of sliding the fastened cuff over your hand and then pushing it up into position around your upper arm  and then having the doctor take your pressure again his way with a professional-grade monitor or even your own monitor and comparing the results?


Gerald



On 10/15/2019 9:01 AM, Gene wrote:
If it has nothing to do with being blind or sighted, then a blind person can do it as well as a sighted person can.  And despite what you say, there is no logical reason why my system won't work well.  Maybe they are taught to do it your way because different people have different size arms and they want to start fresh with different people.  You completely neglect to take that into consideration.  Using the cuff on the same person with the same size arm removes the need to use the method you describe. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 7:39 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter


Where did you receive your medical training?  Wrapping a blood pressure cuff around your upper arm has nothing whatsoever to do with being blind or sighted or "common sense".  It is a matter of proper technique.  Medical students spend countless hours in medical school and residency learning the proper way to take a patient's blood pressure.  They are never taught to fasten the cuff first and then slide it over the patient's hand and then slide it up in place around the upper arm.  They are taught to have the patient rest his elbow on a flat surface and then wrap the cuff snugly around the upper arm.  This is the only proper technique for obtaining consistently accurate readings.  Doing it your way is considered unacceptable.  I know what I'm talking about because I was pre-med in college and kept up with some of my classmates who went on to medical school and became doctors.  But if your technique works for you, then keep doing it this way.  But don't sit there and accuse doctors of not knowing anything about blindness, because wrapping a blood pressure cuff properly to get accurate results has nothing to do withbeing blind or sighted.


Gerald



On 10/15/2019 7:30 AM, Gene wrote:
As far as doctors telling blind people what they can and can't do, their advice is no more accurate than anyone else's.  They are doctors.  That doesn't mean they know anything about blindness and I evaluate their advice on the basis that if it makes sense, fine, if it doesn't, well, that's just one more sighted person who thinks he knows about blindness who, as is so often the case, doesn't. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 6:20 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter


Really?  Once you slide the cuff in place around your upper arm, if you unfasten the velcro fasteners to make the cuff tighter with your free hand , it is liable to fall off or slide out of place unless you have somebody else on hand to help you adjust it.  My doctor has advised me never to attach the cuff this way because it could result in inaccurate readings.  He suggested that if I didn't have another person on hand to wrap the cuff properly around my upper arm, then I should consider a wrist monitor instead.   


Gerald



On 10/14/2019 11:57 PM, Gene wrote:
You could easily tighten it and experiment. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, October 14, 2019 10:44 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter

That would be my problem, Gerald.  I would make it too loose.

Jan


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