Date   

Re: Recommendations for a new laptop

Kathy Pingstock
 

How big should the state Drive be and what our opinions about the two and one laptops

Kathy


On Jun 16, 2021, at 12:10 PM, Howard Traxler <htraxler7@...> wrote:

 You say:
Microsoft doesn’t make the next version of Windows markedly more demanding than the last version. 

Look at history
MS DOS
Windows 2.5
Windows 3.1
Windows 95
Windows 98
Windows ME
Windows XP
Windows Vista
Windows 7
Windows 8
and Windows 10

Seems to me that each step (almost) required all new hardware.

On 6/16/2021 11:04 AM, Gene wrote:
I mean that, as far as I know, Microsoft doesn’t make the next version of Windows markedly more demanding than the last version. 
 
Gene
-----Original Message-----
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 11:00 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop
 
I don’t know how much more you spend for 16GB of RAM but I see no reason to worry about Windows 11.  Microsoft doesn’t go around making new versions markedly more demanding.  And has anyone reliable who writes technical articles said that Windows 11 will require more ram or computing power?  While I don’t follow these things, at the same time, I have seen nothing indicating that people who had machines that ran Windows 8 needed more powerful machines to run Windows 10. 
 
I don’t know how much more you spend for 16GB of RAM when buying a new machine and having the extra RAM added.  If it is a small amount like twenty-five or thirty dollars, it isn’t worth worrying about mmuchif at all for a lot of people. 
 
I’m not particularly concerned with the amouhnt of RAM except in the context of what I consider the very questionable generalization about future proofing a machine.  though I also am commenting because I just don’t think a typical computer user needs more or will benefit significantly more by adding ram. 
 
also, it is my impression that Windows 10 handles memory more efficiently than Windows 8 did.  I’m challenging the idea that you need to spend more money and go beyond specifications that work well today to future pproof a machine.  Many considerations enter into the question.  How do you intend to use the machine?  How much do you care about speed?  What sorts of changes in Windows and programs can accurately be predicted that will make your computer not be able to work with software over many years and Windows as it changes?  And how much more money are we talking about? 
 
And to explain my point further, if you apply the future proof argument or extrapolation to other areas, what are the results?  Do you end up advocating a much more powerful processor than that which works well now with Windows 10?  In the end, adding, with all these upgrades, 100 dollars, or 150 dollars to the price of a machine.  A little here and a little there and you may be talking about enough money to matter to people who want to be careful or reasonably careful about how much they spend.
 
I really doubt that Microsoft is going to create the kind of bad will and anger among its customers by making Windows 11 require enough more computer resources to make a lot of users’ machines obsolete or require them to spend money to upgrade their machines.
 
In short, my main point is that once you start applying the future proof argument, where does it lead and how much money is involved? 
 
Gene
-----Original Message-----
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 10:29 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop
 

Plus with Windows 11coming out, we don’t know the hardware requirements of that OS yet. Nor do we know  if JAWS will have new hard where requirements either.

I agree with Chris completely on this.

I’d go with 16GB to be safe.

My opinion is you don’t buy a laptop minimal specs just to last a year or two. You buy enough that will carry  you thru for a while.

I’d also go with a Core I5 11th gen.

Do you just want a clamshell laptop or w would you like to have it convert over to a tablet?

Is a keyboard with a  NumLock important to you?

John

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of chris judge
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 9:41 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

Hi Kathy.

 

In my experience, as one who uses jaws and the Microsoft office suite all the time, I can state that the two features that will make you happy are a solid state hard drive, and 16 gig of ram. Sure it is true that 8 gig will suffice, but I have 16 ram and solid state hard drives in all of my computers now and they work great. The difference in cost between 8 gig of ram and 16 gig is almost negligible.

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kathy Pingstock
Sent: June 16, 2021 10:23 AM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

I will not be traveling with my laptop. I am doing a ministry through our church so I use the Internet a lot. I also print out braille so I have a Duxberry program and of course I use the latest jaws I just wanted to make sure that I have enough memory in my computer for it to last me for a little bit I also like to keep books on my computer because I download from bard as well

I do not want a slow computer

 

Kathy Sent from my iPhone

 

On Jun 15, 2021, at 9:04 PM, John Holcomb II <jhii926@...> wrote:



What do you do with your laptop? How much is your budget?

Will you be traveling a lot with this and need a good  battery ?

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kathy Pingstock
Sent: Tuesday, June 15, 2021 2:11 PM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

Good afternoon to all

 

I need to purchase a new laptop, I need help with how much memory and everything I need for my laptop I use the latest jaws  and I use office products I’d like to do the Internet as well I’m not good at this part when it comes to purchasing a laptop and everything I should have in it

 

 

Kathy



Windows11:Welcome to new group

Akash Kakkar
 

Hey all,
So most of us who are connected to tech news are well aware that
Microsoft is launching new windows on 24th of june and most probably
it will be called "Windows11".
I know that you are all are very excited to try out the new version of
Windows and eagerly waiting for the june 24th event.
So, please allow me to welcome you all in brand new windows group
which is created for all of us keeping diversity, and inclusion in
mind.
This new group is created for everyone so that we all can discuss
anything related to new Windows Operating system.
To subscribe to the group please send a mail to:
windows+subscribe@groups.io
Use:
windows@groups.io
address for posting to the group
Let's start rolling #Windows11 discussions!
I hope our journey with this new Windows will be fruitful and I
welcome you all in the group in advance.
with regards,
Akash


Re: Recommendations for a new laptop

Gene
 

I've seen different statements.  I've seen a number of articles online saying it makes little difference for computer use as a typical user uses it, and I've seen statements on lists saying it makes a general difference.


I'd like to try the same machine with 8 and 16GB of RAM but I don't expect to be able to try that test. 


I like a computer that is reasonably fast but I'm not particularly concerned with a little faster or slower performance.  Most of my time is used by working with programs or doing things where speed doesn't matter to any extent like streaming or listening to audio, browsing or working with e-mail.  that means I am using most of my time doing something like reading, writing, or listening..  I don't care if something like a file opens a second or two faster or slower or if a player starts to play in two or three seconds or one second. 


Other people may care about such differences, but are these the kinds of differences we are discussing? 


Since RAM isn't very expensive now, I'm discussing this quite a bit from interest.  Some people may want to save forty or fifty dollars and others may not care much.  Still, I think it should be clarified what we are talking about.


Gene

On 6/16/2021 12:53 PM, Brian Zolo wrote:

Hey there, Gene, Brian Zolo here in Gahanna, Ohio.  I must respectfully disagree when it comes to the question of 8 gigs versus 16 gigs and jaws with windows ten.  I’ve been an employee of the department of defense now for 35 and one half years and in the work arena, jaws as well as your apps perform much better with 16 gigs of ram than with 8 gigs of ram and I’ve found the same with my home laptops.  The extra ram pays off with better performance.  Have a great day!  BZ!

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 12:00 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

I don’t know how much more you spend for 16GB of RAM but I see no reason to worry about Windows 11.  Microsoft doesn’t go around making new versions markedly more demanding.  And has anyone reliable who writes technical articles said that Windows 11 will require more ram or computing power?  While I don’t follow these things, at the same time, I have seen nothing indicating that people who had machines that ran Windows 8 needed more powerful machines to run Windows 10. 

 

I don’t know how much more you spend for 16GB of RAM when buying a new machine and having the extra RAM added.  If it is a small amount like twenty-five or thirty dollars, it isn’t worth worrying about mmuchif at all for a lot of people. 

 

I’m not particularly concerned with the amouhnt of RAM except in the context of what I consider the very questionable generalization about future proofing a machine.  though I also am commenting because I just don’t think a typical computer user needs more or will benefit significantly more by adding ram. 

 

also, it is my impression that Windows 10 handles memory more efficiently than Windows 8 did.  I’m challenging the idea that you need to spend more money and go beyond specifications that work well today to future pproof a machine.  Many considerations enter into the question.  How do you intend to use the machine?  How much do you care about speed?  What sorts of changes in Windows and programs can accurately be predicted that will make your computer not be able to work with software over many years and Windows as it changes?  And how much more money are we talking about? 

 

And to explain my point further, if you apply the future proof argument or extrapolation to other areas, what are the results?  Do you end up advocating a much more powerful processor than that which works well now with Windows 10?  In the end, adding, with all these upgrades, 100 dollars, or 150 dollars to the price of a machine.  A little here and a little there and you may be talking about enough money to matter to people who want to be careful or reasonably careful about how much they spend.

 

I really doubt that Microsoft is going to create the kind of bad will and anger among its customers by making Windows 11 require enough more computer resources to make a lot of users’ machines obsolete or require them to spend money to upgrade their machines.

 

In short, my main point is that once you start applying the future proof argument, where does it lead and how much money is involved? 

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 10:29 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

Plus with Windows 11coming out, we don’t know the hardware requirements of that OS yet. Nor do we know  if JAWS will have new hard where requirements either.

I agree with Chris completely on this.

I’d go with 16GB to be safe.

My opinion is you don’t buy a laptop minimal specs just to last a year or two. You buy enough that will carry  you thru for a while.

I’d also go with a Core I5 11th gen.

Do you just want a clamshell laptop or w would you like to have it convert over to a tablet?

Is a keyboard with a  NumLock important to you?

John

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of chris judge
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 9:41 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

Hi Kathy.

 

In my experience, as one who uses jaws and the Microsoft office suite all the time, I can state that the two features that will make you happy are a solid state hard drive, and 16 gig of ram. Sure it is true that 8 gig will suffice, but I have 16 ram and solid state hard drives in all of my computers now and they work great. The difference in cost between 8 gig of ram and 16 gig is almost negligible.

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kathy Pingstock
Sent: June 16, 2021 10:23 AM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

I will not be traveling with my laptop. I am doing a ministry through our church so I use the Internet a lot. I also print out braille so I have a Duxberry program and of course I use the latest jaws I just wanted to make sure that I have enough memory in my computer for it to last me for a little bit I also like to keep books on my computer because I download from bard as well

I do not want a slow computer

 

Kathy Sent from my iPhone

 

On Jun 15, 2021, at 9:04 PM, John Holcomb II <jhii926@...> wrote:



What do you do with your laptop? How much is your budget?

Will you be traveling a lot with this and need a good  battery ?

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kathy Pingstock
Sent: Tuesday, June 15, 2021 2:11 PM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

Good afternoon to all

 

I need to purchase a new laptop, I need help with how much memory and everything I need for my laptop I use the latest jaws  and I use office products I’d like to do the Internet as well I’m not good at this part when it comes to purchasing a laptop and everything I should have in it

 

 

Kathy


Re: Recommendations for a new laptop

Howard Traxler
 

Well, thank God for Microsoft!!


On 6/16/2021 12:28 PM, Gene wrote:
We’ll see how soon information that is detailed enough to make any such determination becomes available.  Meantime, I simply don’t believe that Microsoft is going to engage in such selfdefeating bad business practice as to make a lot of current machines not work well in Windows 11.  Microsoft wants goodwill and it wants to encourage people to use Windows 11, not to have bad reports that cause people to hang back as long as possible and continue to use Windows 10.
 
Gene
-----Original Message-----
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 12:09 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop
 

 

That's why it would make sense to find out the details about the new OS Microsoft plans to unveil on June 24, which is rumored to be designated as Windows 11 before making any recommendations about a new laptop. If Windows 11 is substantially different than Windows 10, then buying a Windows 10 laptop now and upgrading it to Windows 11 later might result in less than optimum performance.  


Gerald



On 6/16/2021 12:49 PM, chris judge wrote:

I upgraded three computers from windows 7 to windows 10, and in all cases the performance was less than steller.

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: June 16, 2021 1:18 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

That isn’t  true as a generalization.  It may have been true when upgrading from certain versions, I don’t know.  But it is not true as a generalization.  What do you mean by new hardware?  Look at all the people who upgraded from Windows 7 and Windows 8 to Windows 10.  The major thrust of the introduction of Windows 10 for the first year was to get people to upgrade their existing computers.  If Microsoft had not been able to offer Windows 10 as an upgrade, they would have suffered an enormous lack of adoption until people bought new computers over time. 

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 11:10 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

You say:
Microsoft doesn’t make the next version of Windows markedly more demanding than the last version. 

Look at history
MS DOS
Windows 2.5
Windows 3.1
Windows 95
Windows 98
Windows ME
Windows XP
Windows Vista
Windows 7
Windows 8
and Windows 10

Seems to me that each step (almost) required all new hardware.

On 6/16/2021 11:04 AM, Gene wrote:

I mean that, as far as I know, Microsoft doesn’t make the next version of Windows markedly more demanding than the last version. 

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 11:00 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

I don’t know how much more you spend for 16GB of RAM but I see no reason to worry about Windows 11.  Microsoft doesn’t go around making new versions markedly more demanding.  And has anyone reliable who writes technical articles said that Windows 11 will require more ram or computing power?  While I don’t follow these things, at the same time, I have seen nothing indicating that people who had machines that ran Windows 8 needed more powerful machines to run Windows 10. 

 

I don’t know how much more you spend for 16GB of RAM when buying a new machine and having the extra RAM added.  If it is a small amount like twenty-five or thirty dollars, it isn’t worth worrying about mmuchif at all for a lot of people. 

 

I’m not particularly concerned with the amouhnt of RAM except in the context of what I consider the very questionable generalization about future proofing a machine.  though I also am commenting because I just don’t think a typical computer user needs more or will benefit significantly more by adding ram. 

 

also, it is my impression that Windows 10 handles memory more efficiently than Windows 8 did.  I’m challenging the idea that you need to spend more money and go beyond specifications that work well today to future pproof a machine.  Many considerations enter into the question.  How do you intend to use the machine?  How much do you care about speed?  What sorts of changes in Windows and programs can accurately be predicted that will make your computer not be able to work with software over many years and Windows as it changes?  And how much more money are we talking about? 

 

And to explain my point further, if you apply the future proof argument or extrapolation to other areas, what are the results?  Do you end up advocating a much more powerful processor than that which works well now with Windows 10?  In the end, adding, with all these upgrades, 100 dollars, or 150 dollars to the price of a machine.  A little here and a little there and you may be talking about enough money to matter to people who want to be careful or reasonably careful about how much they spend.

 

I really doubt that Microsoft is going to create the kind of bad will and anger among its customers by making Windows 11 require enough more computer resources to make a lot of users’ machines obsolete or require them to spend money to upgrade their machines.

 

In short, my main point is that once you start applying the future proof argument, where does it lead and how much money is involved? 

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 10:29 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

Plus with Windows 11coming out, we don’t know the hardware requirements of that OS yet. Nor do we know  if JAWS will have new hard where requirements either.

I agree with Chris completely on this.

I’d go with 16GB to be safe.

My opinion is you don’t buy a laptop minimal specs just to last a year or two. You buy enough that will carry  you thru for a while.

I’d also go with a Core I5 11th gen.

Do you just want a clamshell laptop or w would you like to have it convert over to a tablet?

Is a keyboard with a  NumLock important to you?

John

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of chris judge
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 9:41 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

Hi Kathy.

 

In my experience, as one who uses jaws and the Microsoft office suite all the time, I can state that the two features that will make you happy are a solid state hard drive, and 16 gig of ram. Sure it is true that 8 gig will suffice, but I have 16 ram and solid state hard drives in all of my computers now and they work great. The difference in cost between 8 gig of ram and 16 gig is almost negligible.

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kathy Pingstock
Sent: June 16, 2021 10:23 AM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

I will not be traveling with my laptop. I am doing a ministry through our church so I use the Internet a lot. I also print out braille so I have a Duxberry program and of course I use the latest jaws I just wanted to make sure that I have enough memory in my computer for it to last me for a little bit I also like to keep books on my computer because I download from bard as well

I do not want a slow computer

 

Kathy Sent from my iPhone

 

On Jun 15, 2021, at 9:04 PM, John Holcomb II <jhii926@...> wrote:



What do you do with your laptop? How much is your budget?

Will you be traveling a lot with this and need a good  battery ?

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kathy Pingstock
Sent: Tuesday, June 15, 2021 2:11 PM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

Good afternoon to all

 

I need to purchase a new laptop, I need help with how much memory and everything I need for my laptop I use the latest jaws  and I use office products I’d like to do the Internet as well I’m not good at this part when it comes to purchasing a laptop and everything I should have in it

 

 

Kathy

 



Re: Recommendations for a new laptop

Brian Zolo
 

Hey there, Gene, Brian Zolo here in Gahanna, Ohio.  I must respectfully disagree when it comes to the question of 8 gigs versus 16 gigs and jaws with windows ten.  I’ve been an employee of the department of defense now for 35 and one half years and in the work arena, jaws as well as your apps perform much better with 16 gigs of ram than with 8 gigs of ram and I’ve found the same with my home laptops.  The extra ram pays off with better performance.  Have a great day!  BZ!

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 12:00 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

I don’t know how much more you spend for 16GB of RAM but I see no reason to worry about Windows 11.  Microsoft doesn’t go around making new versions markedly more demanding.  And has anyone reliable who writes technical articles said that Windows 11 will require more ram or computing power?  While I don’t follow these things, at the same time, I have seen nothing indicating that people who had machines that ran Windows 8 needed more powerful machines to run Windows 10. 

 

I don’t know how much more you spend for 16GB of RAM when buying a new machine and having the extra RAM added.  If it is a small amount like twenty-five or thirty dollars, it isn’t worth worrying about mmuchif at all for a lot of people. 

 

I’m not particularly concerned with the amouhnt of RAM except in the context of what I consider the very questionable generalization about future proofing a machine.  though I also am commenting because I just don’t think a typical computer user needs more or will benefit significantly more by adding ram. 

 

also, it is my impression that Windows 10 handles memory more efficiently than Windows 8 did.  I’m challenging the idea that you need to spend more money and go beyond specifications that work well today to future pproof a machine.  Many considerations enter into the question.  How do you intend to use the machine?  How much do you care about speed?  What sorts of changes in Windows and programs can accurately be predicted that will make your computer not be able to work with software over many years and Windows as it changes?  And how much more money are we talking about? 

 

And to explain my point further, if you apply the future proof argument or extrapolation to other areas, what are the results?  Do you end up advocating a much more powerful processor than that which works well now with Windows 10?  In the end, adding, with all these upgrades, 100 dollars, or 150 dollars to the price of a machine.  A little here and a little there and you may be talking about enough money to matter to people who want to be careful or reasonably careful about how much they spend.

 

I really doubt that Microsoft is going to create the kind of bad will and anger among its customers by making Windows 11 require enough more computer resources to make a lot of users’ machines obsolete or require them to spend money to upgrade their machines.

 

In short, my main point is that once you start applying the future proof argument, where does it lead and how much money is involved? 

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 10:29 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

Plus with Windows 11coming out, we don’t know the hardware requirements of that OS yet. Nor do we know  if JAWS will have new hard where requirements either.

I agree with Chris completely on this.

I’d go with 16GB to be safe.

My opinion is you don’t buy a laptop minimal specs just to last a year or two. You buy enough that will carry  you thru for a while.

I’d also go with a Core I5 11th gen.

Do you just want a clamshell laptop or w would you like to have it convert over to a tablet?

Is a keyboard with a  NumLock important to you?

John

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of chris judge
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 9:41 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

Hi Kathy.

 

In my experience, as one who uses jaws and the Microsoft office suite all the time, I can state that the two features that will make you happy are a solid state hard drive, and 16 gig of ram. Sure it is true that 8 gig will suffice, but I have 16 ram and solid state hard drives in all of my computers now and they work great. The difference in cost between 8 gig of ram and 16 gig is almost negligible.

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kathy Pingstock
Sent: June 16, 2021 10:23 AM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

I will not be traveling with my laptop. I am doing a ministry through our church so I use the Internet a lot. I also print out braille so I have a Duxberry program and of course I use the latest jaws I just wanted to make sure that I have enough memory in my computer for it to last me for a little bit I also like to keep books on my computer because I download from bard as well

I do not want a slow computer

 

Kathy Sent from my iPhone

 

On Jun 15, 2021, at 9:04 PM, John Holcomb II <jhii926@...> wrote:



What do you do with your laptop? How much is your budget?

Will you be traveling a lot with this and need a good  battery ?

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kathy Pingstock
Sent: Tuesday, June 15, 2021 2:11 PM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

Good afternoon to all

 

I need to purchase a new laptop, I need help with how much memory and everything I need for my laptop I use the latest jaws  and I use office products I’d like to do the Internet as well I’m not good at this part when it comes to purchasing a laptop and everything I should have in it

 

 

Kathy


Re: Recommendations for a new laptop

Monte Single
 

To upgrade  a laptop from 8 to 16 gig of ram will cost about 40 u s dollars for parts.  I’m sure you could pay 40 bucks more to hire someone to do it,  but if  you are buying a new machine, you will likely just pay for the part.

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: June 16, 2021 11:16 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

However, I doubt that upgrading from Windows 8 to Windows 10 produced the same decline in performance.  If a computer runs well in Windows 10, I doubt that upgrading it to Windows 11 will cause a decline in performance that amounts to anything if at all for most users.  If a machine is on the borderline using Windows 10, with barely adequate performance, perhaps upgrading will result in worse performance that matters.  I doubt it will matter either at all or to any extent for most users.

 

If someone is worried and wants to spend a little more money, I’m not going to make an issue of that.  If someone spends one-hundred or two hundred dollars or more because of such concerns, I think that is not a good idea.

 

Of course, I don’t know that what I am saying is the case, but I think it is.  I don’t think Microsoft will release a new version of Windows that impairs performance for a lot of people who are currently using Windows 10 with relatively new or new machines.  If nothing else, that’s really bad business.

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 11:49 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

I upgraded three computers from windows 7 to windows 10, and in all cases the performance was less than steller.

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: June 16, 2021 1:18 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

That isn’t  true as a generalization.  It may have been true when upgrading from certain versions, I don’t know.  But it is not true as a generalization.  What do you mean by new hardware?  Look at all the people who upgraded from Windows 7 and Windows 8 to Windows 10.  The major thrust of the introduction of Windows 10 for the first year was to get people to upgrade their existing computers.  If Microsoft had not been able to offer Windows 10 as an upgrade, they would have suffered an enormous lack of adoption until people bought new computers over time. 

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 11:10 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

You say:
Microsoft doesn’t make the next version of Windows markedly more demanding than the last version. 

Look at history
MS DOS
Windows 2.5
Windows 3.1
Windows 95
Windows 98
Windows ME
Windows XP
Windows Vista
Windows 7
Windows 8
and Windows 10

Seems to me that each step (almost) required all new hardware.

On 6/16/2021 11:04 AM, Gene wrote:

I mean that, as far as I know, Microsoft doesn’t make the next version of Windows markedly more demanding than the last version. 

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 11:00 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

I don’t know how much more you spend for 16GB of RAM but I see no reason to worry about Windows 11.  Microsoft doesn’t go around making new versions markedly more demanding.  And has anyone reliable who writes technical articles said that Windows 11 will require more ram or computing power?  While I don’t follow these things, at the same time, I have seen nothing indicating that people who had machines that ran Windows 8 needed more powerful machines to run Windows 10. 

 

I don’t know how much more you spend for 16GB of RAM when buying a new machine and having the extra RAM added.  If it is a small amount like twenty-five or thirty dollars, it isn’t worth worrying about mmuchif at all for a lot of people. 

 

I’m not particularly concerned with the amouhnt of RAM except in the context of what I consider the very questionable generalization about future proofing a machine.  though I also am commenting because I just don’t think a typical computer user needs more or will benefit significantly more by adding ram. 

 

also, it is my impression that Windows 10 handles memory more efficiently than Windows 8 did.  I’m challenging the idea that you need to spend more money and go beyond specifications that work well today to future pproof a machine.  Many considerations enter into the question.  How do you intend to use the machine?  How much do you care about speed?  What sorts of changes in Windows and programs can accurately be predicted that will make your computer not be able to work with software over many years and Windows as it changes?  And how much more money are we talking about? 

 

And to explain my point further, if you apply the future proof argument or extrapolation to other areas, what are the results?  Do you end up advocating a much more powerful processor than that which works well now with Windows 10?  In the end, adding, with all these upgrades, 100 dollars, or 150 dollars to the price of a machine.  A little here and a little there and you may be talking about enough money to matter to people who want to be careful or reasonably careful about how much they spend.

 

I really doubt that Microsoft is going to create the kind of bad will and anger among its customers by making Windows 11 require enough more computer resources to make a lot of users’ machines obsolete or require them to spend money to upgrade their machines.

 

In short, my main point is that once you start applying the future proof argument, where does it lead and how much money is involved? 

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 10:29 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

Plus with Windows 11coming out, we don’t know the hardware requirements of that OS yet. Nor do we know  if JAWS will have new hard where requirements either.

I agree with Chris completely on this.

I’d go with 16GB to be safe.

My opinion is you don’t buy a laptop minimal specs just to last a year or two. You buy enough that will carry  you thru for a while.

I’d also go with a Core I5 11th gen.

Do you just want a clamshell laptop or w would you like to have it convert over to a tablet?

Is a keyboard with a  NumLock important to you?

John

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of chris judge
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 9:41 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

Hi Kathy.

 

In my experience, as one who uses jaws and the Microsoft office suite all the time, I can state that the two features that will make you happy are a solid state hard drive, and 16 gig of ram. Sure it is true that 8 gig will suffice, but I have 16 ram and solid state hard drives in all of my computers now and they work great. The difference in cost between 8 gig of ram and 16 gig is almost negligible.

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kathy Pingstock
Sent: June 16, 2021 10:23 AM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

I will not be traveling with my laptop. I am doing a ministry through our church so I use the Internet a lot. I also print out braille so I have a Duxberry program and of course I use the latest jaws I just wanted to make sure that I have enough memory in my computer for it to last me for a little bit I also like to keep books on my computer because I download from bard as well

I do not want a slow computer

 

Kathy Sent from my iPhone

 

On Jun 15, 2021, at 9:04 PM, John Holcomb II <jhii926@...> wrote:



What do you do with your laptop? How much is your budget?

Will you be traveling a lot with this and need a good  battery ?

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kathy Pingstock
Sent: Tuesday, June 15, 2021 2:11 PM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

Good afternoon to all

 

I need to purchase a new laptop, I need help with how much memory and everything I need for my laptop I use the latest jaws  and I use office products I’d like to do the Internet as well I’m not good at this part when it comes to purchasing a laptop and everything I should have in it

 

 

Kathy

 


Re: how to get access to an IPad

Carolyn Arnold
 

I didn't realize it was there, but checked also, and it is there! Thanks again, learning a little more today than I knew yesterday.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 1:26 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] how to get access to an IPad

I just checked and reply to sender is present in TechTalk messages.
I’m not sure why you don’t see it. If you look again and still don’t, let me know and we can discuss the question further.

I’ll explain that I discussed how to send mail privately without using the llink because there are a lot of listserves that don’t have such a link. Also, people who read mail as text won’t see the link.

I also think that it is of benefit to learn more about using one’s e-mail program. It may help and encourage the user to look around and find useful things he/she doesn’t know about.

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: Marie Nelson <mailto:scribbles.mn@gmail.com>
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 12:08 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] how to get access to an IPad


Several of the lists I am subscribed to in Groups.io, there is a link which is stated as: reply to sender. This works quite nicely in any email client you choose to use. Could this be added to the TechTalk emails?

Marie





From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Tuesday, June 15, 2021 11:26 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] how to get access to an IPad



I found out that the more simple method I gave originally will work in Thunderbird a lot of the time. I’m not sure how often it may not work. So try the more simple method first. I’ll give it again below with an additional step or two and an additional comment or two..



If it doesn’t work for the e-mail message you are using, try the more complicated method.



Open the message.

Shift tab once.

Tab once.

Open the context menu.

Down arrow to compose message to, then press enter.

A message will open and you will be in the subject line.

Shift tab once.

Left arrow once.

You will hear the address announced.

If you want to hear it again, use read current line.

If it is correct, tab to the subject line, write the subject, then tab to the message body and write and send the message.



If you don’t hear the correct address, use the procedure I gave in my second description. Here is what you do:

You can continue to work with the same message. If the address is not correct, and you will know it because it will say something that makes no sense such as at groups.io at the end:

Press enter once.

press home.

Right arrow until you get to the equals sign. Then right arrow one more time.

Hold shift and press end. Then press delete.

then right arrow until the end of the proper address.

You will see a second at sign after the end of the proper address.

Stop on it.

Press shift and press end while holding shift.

Press delete.

You now have the correct address and can continue to the subject line to fill it out and then to the message body to write and send the message.



Gene

From: Gene <mailto:gsasner@gmail.com>

Sent: Tuesday, June 15, 2021 7:59 PM

To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] how to get access to an IPad



Let us know if you try my method. If done correctly, it will work.



Gene

-----Original Message-----

From: Nancy Hill <mailto:girlyscream@comcast.net>

Sent: Tuesday, June 15, 2021 7:40 PM

To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] how to get access to an IPad



Ashley, will you reply directly to me. I just have not been successful.


Many thanks,

nancy

On 6/15/2021 7:26 PM, Nancy Hill wrote:
Ashley, I hit CTRL R so I hope this goes only to you.


Thanks,

nancy

On 6/15/2021 7:04 PM, Ashley Breger via groups.io wrote:
Hello, if you want to contact me off list I would be happy to give
you instructions on how to gain access to the iPad. Email me back off
the list for assistance with this problem

Ashley

On Jun 15, 2021, at 5:56 PM, Nancy Hill <girlyscream@comcast.net
<mailto:girlyscream@comcast.net> >
wrote:

Group,


I have a good friend whose Mom passed away unexpectedly last year.
In going through her things she found an I Pad that is fairly new,
but she can not gain access to it.


What must my friend do to be able to gain access to this almost new
IPad?


Thanks for your help and advice.


nancy












Re: Recommendations for a new laptop

Gene
 

I didn’t say that over time more powerful hardware isn’t needed.  but it isn’t necessarily true that when you upgrade to the next version of Windows, or at times if you skip a version, then upgrade, that more powerful hardware would be needed.
 
If you are running a machine that is just addequate for the version of Windows you are running, then it is more likely you will need a more powerful computer. 
 
Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: Loy
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 12:27 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop
 
There has diffentlly been aslow need  for increased hardware updates over the past 25 years. My first computer was a 486 with a very small hard drive, I think it was 200 MB and I thought I would never be able to fill it up. and only 4 MB memory. Now most computers come with a 1 TB hard drive and 8 GB memory Most computers that came with Windows 7 would most likely need some hardware upgrades to run Win 10 successfully..
.
----- Original Message -----
From: Gene
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 12:04 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop
 
I mean that, as far as I know, Microsoft doesn’t make the next version of Windows markedly more demanding than the last version. 
 
Gene
-----Original Message-----
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 11:00 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop
 
I don’t know how much more you spend for 16GB of RAM but I see no reason to worry about Windows 11.  Microsoft doesn’t go around making new versions markedly more demanding.  And has anyone reliable who writes technical articles said that Windows 11 will require more ram or computing power?  While I don’t follow these things, at the same time, I have seen nothing indicating that people who had machines that ran Windows 8 needed more powerful machines to run Windows 10. 
 
I don’t know how much more you spend for 16GB of RAM when buying a new machine and having the extra RAM added.  If it is a small amount like twenty-five or thirty dollars, it isn’t worth worrying about mmuchif at all for a lot of people. 
 
I’m not particularly concerned with the amouhnt of RAM except in the context of what I consider the very questionable generalization about future proofing a machine.  though I also am commenting because I just don’t think a typical computer user needs more or will benefit significantly more by adding ram. 
 
also, it is my impression that Windows 10 handles memory more efficiently than Windows 8 did.  I’m challenging the idea that you need to spend more money and go beyond specifications that work well today to future pproof a machine.  Many considerations enter into the question.  How do you intend to use the machine?  How much do you care about speed?  What sorts of changes in Windows and programs can accurately be predicted that will make your computer not be able to work with software over many years and Windows as it changes?  And how much more money are we talking about? 
 
And to explain my point further, if you apply the future proof argument or extrapolation to other areas, what are the results?  Do you end up advocating a much more powerful processor than that which works well now with Windows 10?  In the end, adding, with all these upgrades, 100 dollars, or 150 dollars to the price of a machine.  A little here and a little there and you may be talking about enough money to matter to people who want to be careful or reasonably careful about how much they spend.
 
I really doubt that Microsoft is going to create the kind of bad will and anger among its customers by making Windows 11 require enough more computer resources to make a lot of users’ machines obsolete or require them to spend money to upgrade their machines.
 
In short, my main point is that once you start applying the future proof argument, where does it lead and how much money is involved? 
 
Gene
-----Original Message-----
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 10:29 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop
 

Plus with Windows 11coming out, we don’t know the hardware requirements of that OS yet. Nor do we know  if JAWS will have new hard where requirements either.

I agree with Chris completely on this.

I’d go with 16GB to be safe.

My opinion is you don’t buy a laptop minimal specs just to last a year or two. You buy enough that will carry  you thru for a while.

I’d also go with a Core I5 11th gen.

Do you just want a clamshell laptop or w would you like to have it convert over to a tablet?

Is a keyboard with a  NumLock important to you?

John

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of chris judge
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 9:41 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

Hi Kathy.

 

In my experience, as one who uses jaws and the Microsoft office suite all the time, I can state that the two features that will make you happy are a solid state hard drive, and 16 gig of ram. Sure it is true that 8 gig will suffice, but I have 16 ram and solid state hard drives in all of my computers now and they work great. The difference in cost between 8 gig of ram and 16 gig is almost negligible.

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kathy Pingstock
Sent: June 16, 2021 10:23 AM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

I will not be traveling with my laptop. I am doing a ministry through our church so I use the Internet a lot. I also print out braille so I have a Duxberry program and of course I use the latest jaws I just wanted to make sure that I have enough memory in my computer for it to last me for a little bit I also like to keep books on my computer because I download from bard as well

I do not want a slow computer

 

Kathy Sent from my iPhone

 

On Jun 15, 2021, at 9:04 PM, John Holcomb II <jhii926@...> wrote:



What do you do with your laptop? How much is your budget?

Will you be traveling a lot with this and need a good  battery ?

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kathy Pingstock
Sent: Tuesday, June 15, 2021 2:11 PM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

Good afternoon to all

 

I need to purchase a new laptop, I need help with how much memory and everything I need for my laptop I use the latest jaws  and I use office products I’d like to do the Internet as well I’m not good at this part when it comes to purchasing a laptop and everything I should have in it

 

 

Kathy


Re: how to get access to an IPad

Carolyn Arnold
 

I agree with you, Gene.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 11:28 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] how to get access to an IPad

Some people want to take things off list believing that others may not be interested because the topic is too limited or too technical. At times, thatis correct, but in my observation, it far more often results in people not learning things they would like to know.

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: John Holcomb II <mailto:jhii926@gmail.com>
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 10:21 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] how to get access to an IPad

Yeah I find it a little odd that she'd ask for private emails too.
John


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of chris judge
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 5:08 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] how to get access to an IPad

Is this something you can share with the group?

Chris Judge


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ashley Breger via groups.io
Sent: June 15, 2021 8:05 PM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] how to get access to an IPad

Hello, if you want to contact me off list I would be happy to give you instructions on how to gain access to the iPad. Email me back off the list for assistance with this problem

Ashley

On Jun 15, 2021, at 5:56 PM, Nancy Hill <girlyscream@comcast.net> wrote:

Group,


I have a good friend whose Mom passed away unexpectedly last year. In going through her things she found an I Pad that is fairly new, but she can not gain access to it.


What must my friend do to be able to gain access to this almost new IPad?


Thanks for your help and advice.


nancy






Re: Recommendations for a new laptop

Gene
 

We’ll see how soon information that is detailed enough to make any such determination becomes available.  Meantime, I simply don’t believe that Microsoft is going to engage in such selfdefeating bad business practice as to make a lot of current machines not work well in Windows 11.  Microsoft wants goodwill and it wants to encourage people to use Windows 11, not to have bad reports that cause people to hang back as long as possible and continue to use Windows 10.
 
Gene

-----Original Message-----
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 12:09 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop
 

 

That's why it would make sense to find out the details about the new OS Microsoft plans to unveil on June 24, which is rumored to be designated as Windows 11 before making any recommendations about a new laptop. If Windows 11 is substantially different than Windows 10, then buying a Windows 10 laptop now and upgrading it to Windows 11 later might result in less than optimum performance.  


Gerald



On 6/16/2021 12:49 PM, chris judge wrote:

I upgraded three computers from windows 7 to windows 10, and in all cases the performance was less than steller.

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: June 16, 2021 1:18 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

That isn’t  true as a generalization.  It may have been true when upgrading from certain versions, I don’t know.  But it is not true as a generalization.  What do you mean by new hardware?  Look at all the people who upgraded from Windows 7 and Windows 8 to Windows 10.  The major thrust of the introduction of Windows 10 for the first year was to get people to upgrade their existing computers.  If Microsoft had not been able to offer Windows 10 as an upgrade, they would have suffered an enormous lack of adoption until people bought new computers over time. 

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 11:10 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

You say:
Microsoft doesn’t make the next version of Windows markedly more demanding than the last version. 

Look at history
MS DOS
Windows 2.5
Windows 3.1
Windows 95
Windows 98
Windows ME
Windows XP
Windows Vista
Windows 7
Windows 8
and Windows 10

Seems to me that each step (almost) required all new hardware.

On 6/16/2021 11:04 AM, Gene wrote:

I mean that, as far as I know, Microsoft doesn’t make the next version of Windows markedly more demanding than the last version. 

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 11:00 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

I don’t know how much more you spend for 16GB of RAM but I see no reason to worry about Windows 11.  Microsoft doesn’t go around making new versions markedly more demanding.  And has anyone reliable who writes technical articles said that Windows 11 will require more ram or computing power?  While I don’t follow these things, at the same time, I have seen nothing indicating that people who had machines that ran Windows 8 needed more powerful machines to run Windows 10. 

 

I don’t know how much more you spend for 16GB of RAM when buying a new machine and having the extra RAM added.  If it is a small amount like twenty-five or thirty dollars, it isn’t worth worrying about mmuchif at all for a lot of people. 

 

I’m not particularly concerned with the amouhnt of RAM except in the context of what I consider the very questionable generalization about future proofing a machine.  though I also am commenting because I just don’t think a typical computer user needs more or will benefit significantly more by adding ram. 

 

also, it is my impression that Windows 10 handles memory more efficiently than Windows 8 did.  I’m challenging the idea that you need to spend more money and go beyond specifications that work well today to future pproof a machine.  Many considerations enter into the question.  How do you intend to use the machine?  How much do you care about speed?  What sorts of changes in Windows and programs can accurately be predicted that will make your computer not be able to work with software over many years and Windows as it changes?  And how much more money are we talking about? 

 

And to explain my point further, if you apply the future proof argument or extrapolation to other areas, what are the results?  Do you end up advocating a much more powerful processor than that which works well now with Windows 10?  In the end, adding, with all these upgrades, 100 dollars, or 150 dollars to the price of a machine.  A little here and a little there and you may be talking about enough money to matter to people who want to be careful or reasonably careful about how much they spend.

 

I really doubt that Microsoft is going to create the kind of bad will and anger among its customers by making Windows 11 require enough more computer resources to make a lot of users’ machines obsolete or require them to spend money to upgrade their machines.

 

In short, my main point is that once you start applying the future proof argument, where does it lead and how much money is involved? 

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 10:29 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

Plus with Windows 11coming out, we don’t know the hardware requirements of that OS yet. Nor do we know  if JAWS will have new hard where requirements either.

I agree with Chris completely on this.

I’d go with 16GB to be safe.

My opinion is you don’t buy a laptop minimal specs just to last a year or two. You buy enough that will carry  you thru for a while.

I’d also go with a Core I5 11th gen.

Do you just want a clamshell laptop or w would you like to have it convert over to a tablet?

Is a keyboard with a  NumLock important to you?

John

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of chris judge
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 9:41 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

Hi Kathy.

 

In my experience, as one who uses jaws and the Microsoft office suite all the time, I can state that the two features that will make you happy are a solid state hard drive, and 16 gig of ram. Sure it is true that 8 gig will suffice, but I have 16 ram and solid state hard drives in all of my computers now and they work great. The difference in cost between 8 gig of ram and 16 gig is almost negligible.

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kathy Pingstock
Sent: June 16, 2021 10:23 AM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

I will not be traveling with my laptop. I am doing a ministry through our church so I use the Internet a lot. I also print out braille so I have a Duxberry program and of course I use the latest jaws I just wanted to make sure that I have enough memory in my computer for it to last me for a little bit I also like to keep books on my computer because I download from bard as well

I do not want a slow computer

 

Kathy Sent from my iPhone

 

On Jun 15, 2021, at 9:04 PM, John Holcomb II <jhii926@...> wrote:



What do you do with your laptop? How much is your budget?

Will you be traveling a lot with this and need a good  battery ?

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kathy Pingstock
Sent: Tuesday, June 15, 2021 2:11 PM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

Good afternoon to all

 

I need to purchase a new laptop, I need help with how much memory and everything I need for my laptop I use the latest jaws  and I use office products I’d like to do the Internet as well I’m not good at this part when it comes to purchasing a laptop and everything I should have in it

 

 

Kathy

 


Re: Recommendations for a new laptop

Loy
 


There has diffentlly been aslow need  for increased hardware updates over the past 25 years. My first computer was a 486 with a very small hard drive, I think it was 200 MB and I thought I would never be able to fill it up. and only 4 MB memory. Now most computers come with a 1 TB hard drive and 8 GB memory Most computers that came with Windows 7 would most likely need some hardware upgrades to run Win 10 successfully..
 .

 ----- Original Message -----
From: Gene
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 12:04 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

I mean that, as far as I know, Microsoft doesn’t make the next version of Windows markedly more demanding than the last version. 
 
Gene
-----Original Message-----
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 11:00 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop
 
I don’t know how much more you spend for 16GB of RAM but I see no reason to worry about Windows 11.  Microsoft doesn’t go around making new versions markedly more demanding.  And has anyone reliable who writes technical articles said that Windows 11 will require more ram or computing power?  While I don’t follow these things, at the same time, I have seen nothing indicating that people who had machines that ran Windows 8 needed more powerful machines to run Windows 10. 
 
I don’t know how much more you spend for 16GB of RAM when buying a new machine and having the extra RAM added.  If it is a small amount like twenty-five or thirty dollars, it isn’t worth worrying about mmuchif at all for a lot of people. 
 
I’m not particularly concerned with the amouhnt of RAM except in the context of what I consider the very questionable generalization about future proofing a machine.  though I also am commenting because I just don’t think a typical computer user needs more or will benefit significantly more by adding ram. 
 
also, it is my impression that Windows 10 handles memory more efficiently than Windows 8 did.  I’m challenging the idea that you need to spend more money and go beyond specifications that work well today to future pproof a machine.  Many considerations enter into the question.  How do you intend to use the machine?  How much do you care about speed?  What sorts of changes in Windows and programs can accurately be predicted that will make your computer not be able to work with software over many years and Windows as it changes?  And how much more money are we talking about? 
 
And to explain my point further, if you apply the future proof argument or extrapolation to other areas, what are the results?  Do you end up advocating a much more powerful processor than that which works well now with Windows 10?  In the end, adding, with all these upgrades, 100 dollars, or 150 dollars to the price of a machine.  A little here and a little there and you may be talking about enough money to matter to people who want to be careful or reasonably careful about how much they spend.
 
I really doubt that Microsoft is going to create the kind of bad will and anger among its customers by making Windows 11 require enough more computer resources to make a lot of users’ machines obsolete or require them to spend money to upgrade their machines.
 
In short, my main point is that once you start applying the future proof argument, where does it lead and how much money is involved? 
 
Gene
-----Original Message-----
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 10:29 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop
 

Plus with Windows 11coming out, we don’t know the hardware requirements of that OS yet. Nor do we know  if JAWS will have new hard where requirements either.

I agree with Chris completely on this.

I’d go with 16GB to be safe.

My opinion is you don’t buy a laptop minimal specs just to last a year or two. You buy enough that will carry  you thru for a while.

I’d also go with a Core I5 11th gen.

Do you just want a clamshell laptop or w would you like to have it convert over to a tablet?

Is a keyboard with a  NumLock important to you?

John

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of chris judge
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 9:41 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

Hi Kathy.

 

In my experience, as one who uses jaws and the Microsoft office suite all the time, I can state that the two features that will make you happy are a solid state hard drive, and 16 gig of ram. Sure it is true that 8 gig will suffice, but I have 16 ram and solid state hard drives in all of my computers now and they work great. The difference in cost between 8 gig of ram and 16 gig is almost negligible.

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kathy Pingstock
Sent: June 16, 2021 10:23 AM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

I will not be traveling with my laptop. I am doing a ministry through our church so I use the Internet a lot. I also print out braille so I have a Duxberry program and of course I use the latest jaws I just wanted to make sure that I have enough memory in my computer for it to last me for a little bit I also like to keep books on my computer because I download from bard as well

I do not want a slow computer

 

Kathy Sent from my iPhone

 

On Jun 15, 2021, at 9:04 PM, John Holcomb II <jhii926@...> wrote:



What do you do with your laptop? How much is your budget?

Will you be traveling a lot with this and need a good  battery ?

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kathy Pingstock
Sent: Tuesday, June 15, 2021 2:11 PM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

Good afternoon to all

 

I need to purchase a new laptop, I need help with how much memory and everything I need for my laptop I use the latest jaws  and I use office products I’d like to do the Internet as well I’m not good at this part when it comes to purchasing a laptop and everything I should have in it

 

 

Kathy


Re: how to get access to an IPad

Gene
 

I just checked and reply to sender is present in TechTalk messages. 
I’m not sure why you don’t see it.  If you look again and still don’t, let me know and we can discuss the question further.
 
I’ll explain that I discussed how to send mail privately without using the llink because there are a lot of listserves that don’t have such a link.  Also, people who read mail as text won’t see the link. 
 
I also think that it is of benefit to learn more about using one’s e-mail program.  It may help and encourage the user to look around and find useful things he/she doesn’t know about.
 
Gene

-----Original Message-----
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 12:08 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] how to get access to an IPad
 

Several of the lists I am subscribed to in Groups.io, there is a link which is stated as: reply to sender. This works quite nicely in any email client you choose to use. Could this be added to the TechTalk emails?

Marie

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Tuesday, June 15, 2021 11:26 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] how to get access to an IPad

 

I found out that the more simple method I gave originally will work in Thunderbird a lot of the time.  I’m not sure how often it may not work.  So try the more simple method first.  I’ll give it again below with an additional step or two and an additional comment or two.. 

 

If it doesn’t work for the e-mail message you are using, try the more complicated method.

 

Open the message.

Shift tab once.

Tab once.

Open the context menu.

Down arrow to compose message to, then press enter.

A message will open and you will be in the subject line.

Shift tab once.

Left arrow once.

You will hear the address announced.

If you want to hear it again, use read current line.

If it is correct, tab to the subject line, write the subject, then tab to the message body and write and send the message.

 

If you don’t hear the correct address, use the procedure I gave in my second description.  Here is what you do:

You can continue to work with the same message.  If the address is not correct, and you will know it because it will say something that makes no sense such as at groups.io at the end:

Press enter once.

press home. 

Right arrow until you get to the equals sign.  Then right arrow one more time.

Hold shift and press end.  Then press delete.

then right arrow until the end of the proper address.

You will see a second at sign after the end of the proper address.

Stop on it.

Press shift and press end while holding shift.

Press delete.

You now have the correct address and can continue to the subject line to fill it out and then to the message body to write and send the message. 

 

Gene

From: Gene

Sent: Tuesday, June 15, 2021 7:59 PM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] how to get access to an IPad

 

Let us know if you try my method.  If done correctly, it will work. 

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

From: Nancy Hill

Sent: Tuesday, June 15, 2021 7:40 PM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] how to get access to an IPad

 

Ashley, will you reply directly to me.  I just have not been successful.


Many thanks,

nancy

On 6/15/2021 7:26 PM, Nancy Hill wrote:
> Ashley, I hit CTRL R so I hope this goes only to you.
>
>
> Thanks,
>
> nancy
>
> On 6/15/2021 7:04 PM, Ashley Breger via groups.io wrote:
>> Hello, if you want to contact me off list I would be happy to give
>> you instructions on how to gain access to the iPad. Email me back off
>> the list for assistance with this problem
>>
>> Ashley
>>
>>> On Jun 15, 2021, at 5:56 PM, Nancy Hill <girlyscream@...>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>> Group,
>>>
>>>
>>> I have a good friend whose Mom passed away unexpectedly last year. 
>>> In going through her things she found an I Pad that is fairly new,
>>> but she can not gain access to it.
>>>
>>>
>>> What must my friend do to be able to gain access to this almost new
>>> IPad?
>>>
>>>
>>> Thanks for your help and advice.
>>>
>>>
>>> nancy
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
>
>




Re: how to get access to an IPad

Gene
 

I don’t know why it isn’t there and I’ve never seen any setting that an owner can make that affects this. 
 
Also, you can’t be reading mail in plain text to see this link.
 
Others may know more about the subject and have information about how to cause the link to be present.  But technical support is not available to nonpaid lists, though I believe I could ask the question in a user forum.  I may do so if we don’t learn more from members.
 
Gene

-----Original Message-----
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 12:08 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] how to get access to an IPad
 

Several of the lists I am subscribed to in Groups.io, there is a link which is stated as: reply to sender. This works quite nicely in any email client you choose to use. Could this be added to the TechTalk emails?

Marie

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Tuesday, June 15, 2021 11:26 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] how to get access to an IPad

 

I found out that the more simple method I gave originally will work in Thunderbird a lot of the time.  I’m not sure how often it may not work.  So try the more simple method first.  I’ll give it again below with an additional step or two and an additional comment or two.. 

 

If it doesn’t work for the e-mail message you are using, try the more complicated method.

 

Open the message.

Shift tab once.

Tab once.

Open the context menu.

Down arrow to compose message to, then press enter.

A message will open and you will be in the subject line.

Shift tab once.

Left arrow once.

You will hear the address announced.

If you want to hear it again, use read current line.

If it is correct, tab to the subject line, write the subject, then tab to the message body and write and send the message.

 

If you don’t hear the correct address, use the procedure I gave in my second description.  Here is what you do:

You can continue to work with the same message.  If the address is not correct, and you will know it because it will say something that makes no sense such as at groups.io at the end:

Press enter once.

press home. 

Right arrow until you get to the equals sign.  Then right arrow one more time.

Hold shift and press end.  Then press delete.

then right arrow until the end of the proper address.

You will see a second at sign after the end of the proper address.

Stop on it.

Press shift and press end while holding shift.

Press delete.

You now have the correct address and can continue to the subject line to fill it out and then to the message body to write and send the message. 

 

Gene

From: Gene

Sent: Tuesday, June 15, 2021 7:59 PM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] how to get access to an IPad

 

Let us know if you try my method.  If done correctly, it will work. 

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

From: Nancy Hill

Sent: Tuesday, June 15, 2021 7:40 PM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] how to get access to an IPad

 

Ashley, will you reply directly to me.  I just have not been successful.


Many thanks,

nancy

On 6/15/2021 7:26 PM, Nancy Hill wrote:
> Ashley, I hit CTRL R so I hope this goes only to you.
>
>
> Thanks,
>
> nancy
>
> On 6/15/2021 7:04 PM, Ashley Breger via groups.io wrote:
>> Hello, if you want to contact me off list I would be happy to give
>> you instructions on how to gain access to the iPad. Email me back off
>> the list for assistance with this problem
>>
>> Ashley
>>
>>> On Jun 15, 2021, at 5:56 PM, Nancy Hill <girlyscream@...>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>> Group,
>>>
>>>
>>> I have a good friend whose Mom passed away unexpectedly last year. 
>>> In going through her things she found an I Pad that is fairly new,
>>> but she can not gain access to it.
>>>
>>>
>>> What must my friend do to be able to gain access to this almost new
>>> IPad?
>>>
>>>
>>> Thanks for your help and advice.
>>>
>>>
>>> nancy
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
>
>




Re: Recommendations for a new laptop

Gene
 

However, I doubt that upgrading from Windows 8 to Windows 10 produced the same decline in performance.  If a computer runs well in Windows 10, I doubt that upgrading it to Windows 11 will cause a decline in performance that amounts to anything if at all for most users.  If a machine is on the borderline using Windows 10, with barely adequate performance, perhaps upgrading will result in worse performance that matters.  I doubt it will matter either at all or to any extent for most users.
 
If someone is worried and wants to spend a little more money, I’m not going to make an issue of that.  If someone spends one-hundred or two hundred dollars or more because of such concerns, I think that is not a good idea.
 
Of course, I don’t know that what I am saying is the case, but I think it is.  I don’t think Microsoft will release a new version of Windows that impairs performance for a lot of people who are currently using Windows 10 with relatively new or new machines.  If nothing else, that’s really bad business.
 
Gene

-----Original Message-----
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 11:49 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop
 

I upgraded three computers from windows 7 to windows 10, and in all cases the performance was less than steller.

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: June 16, 2021 1:18 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

That isn’t  true as a generalization.  It may have been true when upgrading from certain versions, I don’t know.  But it is not true as a generalization.  What do you mean by new hardware?  Look at all the people who upgraded from Windows 7 and Windows 8 to Windows 10.  The major thrust of the introduction of Windows 10 for the first year was to get people to upgrade their existing computers.  If Microsoft had not been able to offer Windows 10 as an upgrade, they would have suffered an enormous lack of adoption until people bought new computers over time. 

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 11:10 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

You say:
Microsoft doesn’t make the next version of Windows markedly more demanding than the last version. 

Look at history
MS DOS
Windows 2.5
Windows 3.1
Windows 95
Windows 98
Windows ME
Windows XP
Windows Vista
Windows 7
Windows 8
and Windows 10

Seems to me that each step (almost) required all new hardware.

On 6/16/2021 11:04 AM, Gene wrote:

I mean that, as far as I know, Microsoft doesn’t make the next version of Windows markedly more demanding than the last version. 

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 11:00 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

I don’t know how much more you spend for 16GB of RAM but I see no reason to worry about Windows 11.  Microsoft doesn’t go around making new versions markedly more demanding.  And has anyone reliable who writes technical articles said that Windows 11 will require more ram or computing power?  While I don’t follow these things, at the same time, I have seen nothing indicating that people who had machines that ran Windows 8 needed more powerful machines to run Windows 10. 

 

I don’t know how much more you spend for 16GB of RAM when buying a new machine and having the extra RAM added.  If it is a small amount like twenty-five or thirty dollars, it isn’t worth worrying about mmuchif at all for a lot of people. 

 

I’m not particularly concerned with the amouhnt of RAM except in the context of what I consider the very questionable generalization about future proofing a machine.  though I also am commenting because I just don’t think a typical computer user needs more or will benefit significantly more by adding ram. 

 

also, it is my impression that Windows 10 handles memory more efficiently than Windows 8 did.  I’m challenging the idea that you need to spend more money and go beyond specifications that work well today to future pproof a machine.  Many considerations enter into the question.  How do you intend to use the machine?  How much do you care about speed?  What sorts of changes in Windows and programs can accurately be predicted that will make your computer not be able to work with software over many years and Windows as it changes?  And how much more money are we talking about? 

 

And to explain my point further, if you apply the future proof argument or extrapolation to other areas, what are the results?  Do you end up advocating a much more powerful processor than that which works well now with Windows 10?  In the end, adding, with all these upgrades, 100 dollars, or 150 dollars to the price of a machine.  A little here and a little there and you may be talking about enough money to matter to people who want to be careful or reasonably careful about how much they spend.

 

I really doubt that Microsoft is going to create the kind of bad will and anger among its customers by making Windows 11 require enough more computer resources to make a lot of users’ machines obsolete or require them to spend money to upgrade their machines.

 

In short, my main point is that once you start applying the future proof argument, where does it lead and how much money is involved? 

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 10:29 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

Plus with Windows 11coming out, we don’t know the hardware requirements of that OS yet. Nor do we know  if JAWS will have new hard where requirements either.

I agree with Chris completely on this.

I’d go with 16GB to be safe.

My opinion is you don’t buy a laptop minimal specs just to last a year or two. You buy enough that will carry  you thru for a while.

I’d also go with a Core I5 11th gen.

Do you just want a clamshell laptop or w would you like to have it convert over to a tablet?

Is a keyboard with a  NumLock important to you?

John

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of chris judge
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 9:41 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

Hi Kathy.

 

In my experience, as one who uses jaws and the Microsoft office suite all the time, I can state that the two features that will make you happy are a solid state hard drive, and 16 gig of ram. Sure it is true that 8 gig will suffice, but I have 16 ram and solid state hard drives in all of my computers now and they work great. The difference in cost between 8 gig of ram and 16 gig is almost negligible.

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kathy Pingstock
Sent: June 16, 2021 10:23 AM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

I will not be traveling with my laptop. I am doing a ministry through our church so I use the Internet a lot. I also print out braille so I have a Duxberry program and of course I use the latest jaws I just wanted to make sure that I have enough memory in my computer for it to last me for a little bit I also like to keep books on my computer because I download from bard as well

I do not want a slow computer

 

Kathy Sent from my iPhone

 

On Jun 15, 2021, at 9:04 PM, John Holcomb II <jhii926@...> wrote:



What do you do with your laptop? How much is your budget?

Will you be traveling a lot with this and need a good  battery ?

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kathy Pingstock
Sent: Tuesday, June 15, 2021 2:11 PM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

Good afternoon to all

 

I need to purchase a new laptop, I need help with how much memory and everything I need for my laptop I use the latest jaws  and I use office products I’d like to do the Internet as well I’m not good at this part when it comes to purchasing a laptop and everything I should have in it

 

 

Kathy

 


Re: Recommendations for a new laptop

Monte Single
 

John,

 

Tell us what an eMMC drive is  and why it should be avoided.

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Holcomb II
Sent: June 16, 2021 10:15 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

However, she should be sure not to get one with an eMMC drive.

Some but not all laptops let  you upgrade the storage and ram options later.

I’m going to assume you’d rather not open it up at any point

Do you want  us to suggest some actual laptops for you?

A great k keyboard typing experience is a m must I’d presume.

John

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Monte Single
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 11:43 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

Hi Kathy,

 

A solid state drive has no moving parts. So, unlike the standard hard drives,

---there are no moving parts.

---they do not overheat.

---they use less energy and last longer.

 

These days, they are quite affordable.

Also,  most new laptops now come with a solid state  drive by default.

…and they are faster than  the  traditional mechanical drive.

 

Good brand names are Kingston, crucial, Samsung, etc..

 

I would not purchase a new p c or laptop without a solid state drive.

 

You wrote that you will not  be moving/carrying your  laptop from  place to place, so you can get one that may be a little heavier than  a very lightweight one.

Laptops with a numeric keypad are a little bigger than those without.

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kathy Pingstock


Sent: June 16, 2021 8:56 AM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

I am a little dumb in this area what is considered a solid-state drive question do you like a certain brand other than another brand question

Kathy

 

 

On Jun 16, 2021, at 9:41 AM, chris judge <chrisjudge1967@...> wrote:



Hi Kathy.

 

In my experience, as one who uses jaws and the Microsoft office suite all the time, I can state that the two features that will make you happy are a solid state hard drive, and 16 gig of ram. Sure it is true that 8 gig will suffice, but I have 16 ram and solid state hard drives in all of my computers now and they work great. The difference in cost between 8 gig of ram and 16 gig is almost negligible.

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kathy Pingstock
Sent: June 16, 2021 10:23 AM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

I will not be traveling with my laptop. I am doing a ministry through our church so I use the Internet a lot. I also print out braille so I have a Duxberry program and of course I use the latest jaws I just wanted to make sure that I have enough memory in my computer for it to last me for a little bit I also like to keep books on my computer because I download from bard as well

 I do not want a slow computer 

 

Kathy Sent from my iPhone

 

On Jun 15, 2021, at 9:04 PM, John Holcomb II <jhii926@...> wrote:



What do you do with your laptop? How much is your budget?

Will you be traveling a lot with this and need a good  battery ?

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kathy Pingstock
Sent: Tuesday, June 15, 2021 2:11 PM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

Good afternoon to all

 

I need to purchase a new laptop, I need help with how much memory and everything I need for my laptop I use the latest jaws  and I use office products I’d like to do the Internet as well I’m not good at this part when it comes to purchasing a laptop and everything I should have in it

 

 

Kathy 


Re: Recommendations for a new laptop

Gerald Levy
 


That's why it would make sense to find out the details about the new OS Microsoft plans to unveil on June 24, which is rumored to be designated as Windows 11 before making any recommendations about a new laptop. If Windows 11 is substantially different than Windows 10, then buying a Windows 10 laptop now and upgrading it to Windows 11 later might result in less than optimum performance.  


Gerald



On 6/16/2021 12:49 PM, chris judge wrote:

I upgraded three computers from windows 7 to windows 10, and in all cases the performance was less than steller.

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: June 16, 2021 1:18 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

That isn’t  true as a generalization.  It may have been true when upgrading from certain versions, I don’t know.  But it is not true as a generalization.  What do you mean by new hardware?  Look at all the people who upgraded from Windows 7 and Windows 8 to Windows 10.  The major thrust of the introduction of Windows 10 for the first year was to get people to upgrade their existing computers.  If Microsoft had not been able to offer Windows 10 as an upgrade, they would have suffered an enormous lack of adoption until people bought new computers over time. 

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 11:10 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

You say:
Microsoft doesn’t make the next version of Windows markedly more demanding than the last version. 

Look at history
MS DOS
Windows 2.5
Windows 3.1
Windows 95
Windows 98
Windows ME
Windows XP
Windows Vista
Windows 7
Windows 8
and Windows 10

Seems to me that each step (almost) required all new hardware.

On 6/16/2021 11:04 AM, Gene wrote:

I mean that, as far as I know, Microsoft doesn’t make the next version of Windows markedly more demanding than the last version. 

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 11:00 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

I don’t know how much more you spend for 16GB of RAM but I see no reason to worry about Windows 11.  Microsoft doesn’t go around making new versions markedly more demanding.  And has anyone reliable who writes technical articles said that Windows 11 will require more ram or computing power?  While I don’t follow these things, at the same time, I have seen nothing indicating that people who had machines that ran Windows 8 needed more powerful machines to run Windows 10. 

 

I don’t know how much more you spend for 16GB of RAM when buying a new machine and having the extra RAM added.  If it is a small amount like twenty-five or thirty dollars, it isn’t worth worrying about mmuchif at all for a lot of people. 

 

I’m not particularly concerned with the amouhnt of RAM except in the context of what I consider the very questionable generalization about future proofing a machine.  though I also am commenting because I just don’t think a typical computer user needs more or will benefit significantly more by adding ram. 

 

also, it is my impression that Windows 10 handles memory more efficiently than Windows 8 did.  I’m challenging the idea that you need to spend more money and go beyond specifications that work well today to future pproof a machine.  Many considerations enter into the question.  How do you intend to use the machine?  How much do you care about speed?  What sorts of changes in Windows and programs can accurately be predicted that will make your computer not be able to work with software over many years and Windows as it changes?  And how much more money are we talking about? 

 

And to explain my point further, if you apply the future proof argument or extrapolation to other areas, what are the results?  Do you end up advocating a much more powerful processor than that which works well now with Windows 10?  In the end, adding, with all these upgrades, 100 dollars, or 150 dollars to the price of a machine.  A little here and a little there and you may be talking about enough money to matter to people who want to be careful or reasonably careful about how much they spend.

 

I really doubt that Microsoft is going to create the kind of bad will and anger among its customers by making Windows 11 require enough more computer resources to make a lot of users’ machines obsolete or require them to spend money to upgrade their machines.

 

In short, my main point is that once you start applying the future proof argument, where does it lead and how much money is involved? 

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 10:29 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

Plus with Windows 11coming out, we don’t know the hardware requirements of that OS yet. Nor do we know  if JAWS will have new hard where requirements either.

I agree with Chris completely on this.

I’d go with 16GB to be safe.

My opinion is you don’t buy a laptop minimal specs just to last a year or two. You buy enough that will carry  you thru for a while.

I’d also go with a Core I5 11th gen.

Do you just want a clamshell laptop or w would you like to have it convert over to a tablet?

Is a keyboard with a  NumLock important to you?

John

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of chris judge
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 9:41 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

Hi Kathy.

 

In my experience, as one who uses jaws and the Microsoft office suite all the time, I can state that the two features that will make you happy are a solid state hard drive, and 16 gig of ram. Sure it is true that 8 gig will suffice, but I have 16 ram and solid state hard drives in all of my computers now and they work great. The difference in cost between 8 gig of ram and 16 gig is almost negligible.

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kathy Pingstock
Sent: June 16, 2021 10:23 AM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

I will not be traveling with my laptop. I am doing a ministry through our church so I use the Internet a lot. I also print out braille so I have a Duxberry program and of course I use the latest jaws I just wanted to make sure that I have enough memory in my computer for it to last me for a little bit I also like to keep books on my computer because I download from bard as well

I do not want a slow computer

 

Kathy Sent from my iPhone

 

On Jun 15, 2021, at 9:04 PM, John Holcomb II <jhii926@...> wrote:



What do you do with your laptop? How much is your budget?

Will you be traveling a lot with this and need a good  battery ?

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kathy Pingstock
Sent: Tuesday, June 15, 2021 2:11 PM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

Good afternoon to all

 

I need to purchase a new laptop, I need help with how much memory and everything I need for my laptop I use the latest jaws  and I use office products I’d like to do the Internet as well I’m not good at this part when it comes to purchasing a laptop and everything I should have in it

 

 

Kathy

 


Re: how to get access to an IPad

Marie Nelson
 

Several of the lists I am subscribed to in Groups.io, there is a link which is stated as: reply to sender. This works quite nicely in any email client you choose to use. Could this be added to the TechTalk emails?

Marie

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Tuesday, June 15, 2021 11:26 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] how to get access to an IPad

 

I found out that the more simple method I gave originally will work in Thunderbird a lot of the time.  I’m not sure how often it may not work.  So try the more simple method first.  I’ll give it again below with an additional step or two and an additional comment or two.. 

 

If it doesn’t work for the e-mail message you are using, try the more complicated method.

 

Open the message.

Shift tab once.

Tab once.

Open the context menu.

Down arrow to compose message to, then press enter.

A message will open and you will be in the subject line.

Shift tab once.

Left arrow once.

You will hear the address announced.

If you want to hear it again, use read current line.

If it is correct, tab to the subject line, write the subject, then tab to the message body and write and send the message.

 

If you don’t hear the correct address, use the procedure I gave in my second description.  Here is what you do:

You can continue to work with the same message.  If the address is not correct, and you will know it because it will say something that makes no sense such as at groups.io at the end:

Press enter once.

press home. 

Right arrow until you get to the equals sign.  Then right arrow one more time.

Hold shift and press end.  Then press delete.

then right arrow until the end of the proper address.

You will see a second at sign after the end of the proper address.

Stop on it.

Press shift and press end while holding shift.

Press delete.

You now have the correct address and can continue to the subject line to fill it out and then to the message body to write and send the message. 

 

Gene

From: Gene

Sent: Tuesday, June 15, 2021 7:59 PM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] how to get access to an IPad

 

Let us know if you try my method.  If done correctly, it will work. 

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

From: Nancy Hill

Sent: Tuesday, June 15, 2021 7:40 PM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] how to get access to an IPad

 

Ashley, will you reply directly to me.  I just have not been successful.


Many thanks,

nancy

On 6/15/2021 7:26 PM, Nancy Hill wrote:
> Ashley, I hit CTRL R so I hope this goes only to you.
>
>
> Thanks,
>
> nancy
>
> On 6/15/2021 7:04 PM, Ashley Breger via groups.io wrote:
>> Hello, if you want to contact me off list I would be happy to give
>> you instructions on how to gain access to the iPad. Email me back off
>> the list for assistance with this problem
>>
>> Ashley
>>
>>> On Jun 15, 2021, at 5:56 PM, Nancy Hill <girlyscream@...>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>> Group,
>>>
>>>
>>> I have a good friend whose Mom passed away unexpectedly last year. 
>>> In going through her things she found an I Pad that is fairly new,
>>> but she can not gain access to it.
>>>
>>>
>>> What must my friend do to be able to gain access to this almost new
>>> IPad?
>>>
>>>
>>> Thanks for your help and advice.
>>>
>>>
>>> nancy
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
>
>




Re: Recommendations for a new laptop

Gene
 

Word processors and other programs in the Microsoft suite are not users of a lot of computer resources.  I have no reason to believe, based on years of using JAWS before I switched to NVDA, that JAWS has become a computer processess monster in the last ten years.  I have seen no complaints and I’m on three lists of this type from people who have upgraded JAWS for years that newer versions are making their computers sluggish. 
 
Using Microsoft suite programs are one of the things specified.  Browsing, e-mail, and I believe one or two other things such as streaming are specified.  None of these are intensive activities. 
 
And I don’t know the practical results of what you are advocating.  How much are you advocating spending?  If you agree with me that somewhere between five or six hundred dollars as adequate for the uses specified, then we agree.  If you are advocating spending eight, Nine hundred or more, then we are not in agreement. 
 
And I’ll say again that my price range of between five and six hundred dollars is my guess.  I haven’t priced laptops for a long time.  but I very much doubt that over six hundred dollars would need to be spend for very acceptable performance for the activities discussed.
 
I didn’t take a position on SSDs or other things you have mentioned.  but I’m saying that if you get a computer with a SSD eight or even sixteen GB of ram, and a reasonably powerful processor, I doubt that you need to spend more than between five and six hundred dollars as a rough estimate, biven the needs specified.
 
Gene

-----Original Message-----
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 11:43 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop
 

Well Gene, I’m basing my recommendations on experience, not things I read. She stated she will be using windows 10, jaws 2021, and the Microsoft suite. By your own admission you:

  1. Do not use windows 10.
  2. Do not use jaws.

And

C, do not use the Microsoft suite.

 

I have used all these things on many different computers and I can state from experience that there is a difference. Plus, as John stated, as windows 11 is on the horizon it would be prudent to at least consider a little bit of future proofing.

I can’t state exactly how much more 16 gig would cost over 8, but even if it’s around $100, it’s worth the extra cost in my opinion. Regarding a solid state drive over a mechanical one, the differences are not even debatable.

Ultimately it’s her choice.

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: June 16, 2021 1:00 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

I don’t know how much more you spend for 16GB of RAM but I see no reason to worry about Windows 11.  Microsoft doesn’t go around making new versions markedly more demanding.  And has anyone reliable who writes technical articles said that Windows 11 will require more ram or computing power?  While I don’t follow these things, at the same time, I have seen nothing indicating that people who had machines that ran Windows 8 needed more powerful machines to run Windows 10. 

 

I don’t know how much more you spend for 16GB of RAM when buying a new machine and having the extra RAM added.  If it is a small amount like twenty-five or thirty dollars, it isn’t worth worrying about mmuchif at all for a lot of people. 

 

I’m not particularly concerned with the amouhnt of RAM except in the context of what I consider the very questionable generalization about future proofing a machine.  though I also am commenting because I just don’t think a typical computer user needs more or will benefit significantly more by adding ram. 

 

also, it is my impression that Windows 10 handles memory more efficiently than Windows 8 did.  I’m challenging the idea that you need to spend more money and go beyond specifications that work well today to future pproof a machine.  Many considerations enter into the question.  How do you intend to use the machine?  How much do you care about speed?  What sorts of changes in Windows and programs can accurately be predicted that will make your computer not be able to work with software over many years and Windows as it changes?  And how much more money are we talking about? 

 

And to explain my point further, if you apply the future proof argument or extrapolation to other areas, what are the results?  Do you end up advocating a much more powerful processor than that which works well now with Windows 10?  In the end, adding, with all these upgrades, 100 dollars, or 150 dollars to the price of a machine.  A little here and a little there and you may be talking about enough money to matter to people who want to be careful or reasonably careful about how much they spend.

 

I really doubt that Microsoft is going to create the kind of bad will and anger among its customers by making Windows 11 require enough more computer resources to make a lot of users’ machines obsolete or require them to spend money to upgrade their machines.

 

In short, my main point is that once you start applying the future proof argument, where does it lead and how much money is involved? 

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 10:29 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

Plus with Windows 11coming out, we don’t know the hardware requirements of that OS yet. Nor do we know  if JAWS will have new hard where requirements either.

I agree with Chris completely on this.

I’d go with 16GB to be safe.

My opinion is you don’t buy a laptop minimal specs just to last a year or two. You buy enough that will carry  you thru for a while.

I’d also go with a Core I5 11th gen.

Do you just want a clamshell laptop or w would you like to have it convert over to a tablet?

Is a keyboard with a  NumLock important to you?

John

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of chris judge
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 9:41 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

Hi Kathy.

 

In my experience, as one who uses jaws and the Microsoft office suite all the time, I can state that the two features that will make you happy are a solid state hard drive, and 16 gig of ram. Sure it is true that 8 gig will suffice, but I have 16 ram and solid state hard drives in all of my computers now and they work great. The difference in cost between 8 gig of ram and 16 gig is almost negligible.

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kathy Pingstock
Sent: June 16, 2021 10:23 AM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

I will not be traveling with my laptop. I am doing a ministry through our church so I use the Internet a lot. I also print out braille so I have a Duxberry program and of course I use the latest jaws I just wanted to make sure that I have enough memory in my computer for it to last me for a little bit I also like to keep books on my computer because I download from bard as well

I do not want a slow computer

 

Kathy Sent from my iPhone

 

On Jun 15, 2021, at 9:04 PM, John Holcomb II <jhii926@...> wrote:



What do you do with your laptop? How much is your budget?

Will you be traveling a lot with this and need a good  battery ?

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kathy Pingstock
Sent: Tuesday, June 15, 2021 2:11 PM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

Good afternoon to all

 

I need to purchase a new laptop, I need help with how much memory and everything I need for my laptop I use the latest jaws  and I use office products I’d like to do the Internet as well I’m not good at this part when it comes to purchasing a laptop and everything I should have in it

 

 

Kathy


Re: Recommendations for a new laptop

Gene
 

I never advocated buying a bottom of the line computer.  I said that I hadn’t priced computers for a long time but that I thought that five or six hundred dollars for a laptop for the kinds of uses described would purchase a machine that meets such needs well. 
 
I wouldn’t advocate buying a bottom of the line machine.  but I do strongly disagree with someone who says to buy a nine hundred dollar or one-thousand dollar machine to meet such needs and for future proofing when used for such needs.  You are spending more than half as much as your new computer would cost, which you might purchase five or seven years from now and that is at today’s prices.  Computers five or seven years from now will be more powerful for less money.
 
Gene

-----Original Message-----
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 11:30 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop
 

Gene,

I hear your point but do you want to spend $300 now, then spend $300 in two years or less?

Yes I’m using a number, you’re not going to get a laptop with even 8GB of ram for that cheap  a price.

It is very possible to get a cheap laptop that won’t serve  your needs well for even light tasks.

I’ll give you an example. I tried  this.

I got a Core I3 and it was so slow it might as well not be useable for a screen reader.

I’ve delt with 4 GB of RAMN and it pages so much that it bogs down the drive.

I’ve gotten away with 64GB of storage until it was time to upgrade windows and then you didn’t have enough s space to do even that.

For a user who isn’t technical they are not going to wanna have to think about clearing things out, knowing how to do this, etc. etc.

They want something that will work and will last them. They want something that they won’t have to think about.

They  won’t know enough to know if some tech guy that they have to pay in a few years is doing them s a  service or ripping them off. And you know what ? they shouldn’t have to.

And here’s the other thing to think about.

Being able to go into a store and type on the thing you’re going to be using if at all possible would be a good idea.

What if  we suggest all of this stuff, they get it and then they find out the keyboard experience sucks for them/

Does she want to pay for on-site service on top of the computers’ price? This is an option that is offered by  companies.

This is why I ask for a budget so we know how much can be spent.

Considering you won’t be traveling with the laptop, you won’t need to spend more money to go Thin and light.

See, heavier laptops are easier on the wallet.

You could get an I5 with a good amount of ram and storage option  cheaper if thin and light isn’t a concern. John

 


Re: Recommendations for a new laptop

chris judge
 

I upgraded three computers from windows 7 to windows 10, and in all cases the performance was less than steller.

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: June 16, 2021 1:18 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

That isn’t  true as a generalization.  It may have been true when upgrading from certain versions, I don’t know.  But it is not true as a generalization.  What do you mean by new hardware?  Look at all the people who upgraded from Windows 7 and Windows 8 to Windows 10.  The major thrust of the introduction of Windows 10 for the first year was to get people to upgrade their existing computers.  If Microsoft had not been able to offer Windows 10 as an upgrade, they would have suffered an enormous lack of adoption until people bought new computers over time. 

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 11:10 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

You say:
Microsoft doesn’t make the next version of Windows markedly more demanding than the last version. 

Look at history
MS DOS
Windows 2.5
Windows 3.1
Windows 95
Windows 98
Windows ME
Windows XP
Windows Vista
Windows 7
Windows 8
and Windows 10

Seems to me that each step (almost) required all new hardware.

On 6/16/2021 11:04 AM, Gene wrote:

I mean that, as far as I know, Microsoft doesn’t make the next version of Windows markedly more demanding than the last version. 

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 11:00 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

I don’t know how much more you spend for 16GB of RAM but I see no reason to worry about Windows 11.  Microsoft doesn’t go around making new versions markedly more demanding.  And has anyone reliable who writes technical articles said that Windows 11 will require more ram or computing power?  While I don’t follow these things, at the same time, I have seen nothing indicating that people who had machines that ran Windows 8 needed more powerful machines to run Windows 10. 

 

I don’t know how much more you spend for 16GB of RAM when buying a new machine and having the extra RAM added.  If it is a small amount like twenty-five or thirty dollars, it isn’t worth worrying about mmuchif at all for a lot of people. 

 

I’m not particularly concerned with the amouhnt of RAM except in the context of what I consider the very questionable generalization about future proofing a machine.  though I also am commenting because I just don’t think a typical computer user needs more or will benefit significantly more by adding ram. 

 

also, it is my impression that Windows 10 handles memory more efficiently than Windows 8 did.  I’m challenging the idea that you need to spend more money and go beyond specifications that work well today to future pproof a machine.  Many considerations enter into the question.  How do you intend to use the machine?  How much do you care about speed?  What sorts of changes in Windows and programs can accurately be predicted that will make your computer not be able to work with software over many years and Windows as it changes?  And how much more money are we talking about? 

 

And to explain my point further, if you apply the future proof argument or extrapolation to other areas, what are the results?  Do you end up advocating a much more powerful processor than that which works well now with Windows 10?  In the end, adding, with all these upgrades, 100 dollars, or 150 dollars to the price of a machine.  A little here and a little there and you may be talking about enough money to matter to people who want to be careful or reasonably careful about how much they spend.

 

I really doubt that Microsoft is going to create the kind of bad will and anger among its customers by making Windows 11 require enough more computer resources to make a lot of users’ machines obsolete or require them to spend money to upgrade their machines.

 

In short, my main point is that once you start applying the future proof argument, where does it lead and how much money is involved? 

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 10:29 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

Plus with Windows 11coming out, we don’t know the hardware requirements of that OS yet. Nor do we know  if JAWS will have new hard where requirements either.

I agree with Chris completely on this.

I’d go with 16GB to be safe.

My opinion is you don’t buy a laptop minimal specs just to last a year or two. You buy enough that will carry  you thru for a while.

I’d also go with a Core I5 11th gen.

Do you just want a clamshell laptop or w would you like to have it convert over to a tablet?

Is a keyboard with a  NumLock important to you?

John

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of chris judge
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 9:41 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

Hi Kathy.

 

In my experience, as one who uses jaws and the Microsoft office suite all the time, I can state that the two features that will make you happy are a solid state hard drive, and 16 gig of ram. Sure it is true that 8 gig will suffice, but I have 16 ram and solid state hard drives in all of my computers now and they work great. The difference in cost between 8 gig of ram and 16 gig is almost negligible.

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kathy Pingstock
Sent: June 16, 2021 10:23 AM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

I will not be traveling with my laptop. I am doing a ministry through our church so I use the Internet a lot. I also print out braille so I have a Duxberry program and of course I use the latest jaws I just wanted to make sure that I have enough memory in my computer for it to last me for a little bit I also like to keep books on my computer because I download from bard as well

I do not want a slow computer

 

Kathy Sent from my iPhone

 

On Jun 15, 2021, at 9:04 PM, John Holcomb II <jhii926@...> wrote:



What do you do with your laptop? How much is your budget?

Will you be traveling a lot with this and need a good  battery ?

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kathy Pingstock
Sent: Tuesday, June 15, 2021 2:11 PM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Recommendations for a new laptop

 

Good afternoon to all

 

I need to purchase a new laptop, I need help with how much memory and everything I need for my laptop I use the latest jaws  and I use office products I’d like to do the Internet as well I’m not good at this part when it comes to purchasing a laptop and everything I should have in it

 

 

Kathy

 

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