Date   

Re: Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?

Josh Kennedy <joshknnd1982@...>
 

I use nearby explorer by american printing house for the blind for my gps on my android devices.

On 4/26/2017 4:03 PM, Carolyn Arnold wrote:
Is Waze accessible? Or can we just go to Google Maps and
type in, say, Sage Brush Steak House, get in the car, and it
would direct us there?

Bye for now,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Olusegun --
Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 3:12 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Android Accessibility Good Bad, or
In between?

Dave, if an Android tablet is your preference, please take a
good look at the RCA Galileo Pro. It runs Android 6.0,
known in Android land as Marshmallow since we Androideans
like to keep dentists employed by eating too many candies,
<LOL>! When last I checked, about three days back, it sells
for $79.88 at Walmart; I don't know if this is online
purchase only!

Mr. Josh Kennedy is a real guru with respect to this tablet.
I ought to have grabbed one myself, let's just say I am a
tad lazy at doing it! Shame on me!

As I said in my first post on this subject, I use an Android
phone. I charge my phone once every two days. My phone is
NEVER EVER turned off for any reason unless the battery dies
completely. At 15%, it alerts me to plug in for a charge; I
have ignored this many, many times and have been able to eke
out more time out of it before recharging. For example, I
was leaving my store to go home on the bus; I got the 15%
charge your battery warning; I ignored it. Then I found a
radio station in Wellington, New Zealand and using my
bluetooth headset, I began listening to the station I
picked. The radio played until I got home, and my battery
was at this time down to 3%.
This has been my experience with my phone; I have just about
everything you can think of turned on: Data, GPS, Skype,
WhatsApp, various open apps! May be I'm hopelessly lucky.

I don't know how long the RCA Galileo Pro will hold out
before issuing the CHARGE battery warning, but I'd wager
it'll be longer than two hours! Yes, you will be able to
use Microsoft Word, Excel, Powerpoint and Outlook in an
Android device. I have these installed on my phone and I
play ball with them now and then!

You asked:

"Some of you say that you read Books on the Android. Are
these the Amazon E Book format, or are you actually playing
book files from the NLS BARD library?"

yes sir, BARD Mobile is available for the Android platform.
ePub books can be read in Android. I am able to open PDF
formatted books in Android and read to my heart's content.
And there are so many book reading apps to choose from.
Kindle books are read using the Kindle app.

You also asked:

"Do these less expensive Tablets have the ability to run GPS
apps?"

As long as there is enough space to park them in your
Android device, there's no reason why the GPS won't serve
its purpose. Here again there are quite a number of apps to
choose from: Some are free, some cost several shiny
pennies! GetThere is a great GPS for the blind; GoogleMaps
will also provide navigation. Just say: "Ok Google,
navigate to ..." where dot, dot, dot equals restaurant name,
place name, or a given address. Lazarillo is another GPS
app; Near Explorer sells for $99 if you want offline maps,
free if you have sufficient data and can always have access
to the Internet. One great GPS app I can recommend for your
wife is Waze! It is FREE, just go to the Playstore and grab
it. This app is crazy--it will even alert you when you are
approaching a city camera, identify where the police may be
hiding, and much more.

If there are no dexterity issues which could challenge the
learning curve a bit, I am willing to state that you won't
regret giving Android a test run.
By all means, grab the tablet, play with it, and see where
the chips fall.
You at least have 30 days to return it. But, several of us
here will help you fall in love with Android, only don't
take her out for a late night date 'cause then we won't get
a chance to keep dating her too, <LOL>!

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado








Re: Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?

Carolyn Arnold
 

If Best Buy has the RCA Galileo Pro, you ought to be good to
go with it.

Bye for now,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave
Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 2:46 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Android Accessibility Good Bad, or
In between?

Hi again.

Why not just buy a low cost Windows PC?

Well, sorry to say, I don't have $300, otherwise I probably
would do just that.

I was given a Gift Card to Best Buy for Christmas for about
a third of what such a PC would cost.

So with only $100 to spend, funds are short.

And I've been curious about Android for a while now. With
what some of you were saying, I thought it might fill the
need for a good but cheap note taker device.

Otherwise, I would probably go out and buy a smaller lap
top, or Netbook
running Windows and be done with it. Unfortunately, that
isn't an
option right now.
--

Grumpy Dave


Dave <dlh007@centurylink.net>


Re: are kindles accessible now?

Josh Kennedy <joshknnd1982@...>
 

kindle runs a version of android. a windows tablet runs windows10 mostly these days.

On 4/26/2017 3:56 PM, Janet Gross wrote:
Hi Everyone,
I would like to chime in on this if I may please. Can someone tell me the
difference between a kindle and a windows tablet? This all sounds very
interesting to me. I am hopeing to give up my PC in due time.
I do have an iOS, but I just don't want to holy and soly depend just on my
iOS.
I would like something so I can compose and receive emails, browse the
internet, read books, listen to music etc.

Thank you all in advance.
Janet

Tomorrow's Another Day, Another Way, and If Tomorrow Never Comes, Problem
Solved!


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Carolyn Arnold
Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 1:06 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] are kindles accessible now?

Yes, as Carlos accurately said, "a virtual keyboard." I am not savvy enough
to have thought of the correct technical word, but that is what it is - a
virtual keyboard.

Bye for now,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Pamela Dominguez
Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 1:58 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] are kindles accessible now?

Keyboard that comes up under the screen? Huh? Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Carolyn Arnold
Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 1:09 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] are kindles accessible now?

You type on the keyboard that comes up under the screen; letters or numbers
and symbols. It takes getting used to.

Bye for now,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Pamela Dominguez
Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 8:36 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] are kindles accessible now?

And then, how do you type? Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Josh Kennedy
Sent: Tuesday, April 25, 2017 5:11 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] are kindles accessible now?

oh yes the RCA galileo pro is good to take places without the keyboard
sometimes, especially if you just want to write short messages, read books,
and other media such as audio and videos. in other words. take the galileo
off its keyboard dock, when you know you are gunna use it for stuff besides
lots of typing.



On 4/25/2017 10:38 AM, Carolyn Arnold wrote:
I'm glad to hear that you got one with a keyboard. My
husband and I
are both liking the Kindle so much that we decided to get
another one.
After information from the list and checking with Amazon,
we bought an
RCA Galileo with a keyboard. Jim knows a guy at the Senior
Center that
has one, carries the thing everywhere, just loves the
thing.
We think that the keyboard will be good for me. He loves
the Kindle,
keeps it beside him a lot of the time on the couch, plays
games while
watching TV and does research. I look up the weather and
have gone
into other aps. I was advised to go slow - very smart
words. I think
though, like a computer, that it is an ongoing learning
experience and
one I'll enjoy for a long time to come.

I was just starting to fool with the keyboard on the
thing, when we
ordered the other one. I do, however, want to learn to use
the screen
keyboard, because this one can be detached from the
keyboard. It might
be convenient some of the time to take it places without
the keyboard
case.

Bye for now,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Josh Kennedy
Sent: Tuesday, April 25, 2017 8:31 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] are kindles accessible now?

yes why is that surprising to you? I got a tablet for $80
that also
comes with a physical keyboard dock. and i can use it to
browse the
web, check email, and use tons and tons of apps and games.
well the
accessible ones at least. and the tablet works excellent.



On 4/25/2017 8:17 AM, Carlos wrote:


Why is that surprising? You can purchase Android tablets
in that
price range which are capable of performing all the usual
basic tasks
such as checking Email, surfing the web, reading books,
listening to
music, and so on.

----- Original Message -----
From: Shirley and Nitro
<mailto:shirley1980@eircom.net>
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, April 25, 2017 8:14 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] are kindles
accessible now?

50 dollars? what kinda kindle would that be?
just a kindle or does it do more than just be able to have
books on
there?
shirley

----- Original Message -----
From: Josh Kennedy
<mailto:joshknnd1982@gmail.com>
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, April 25, 2017 1:03
PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] are kindles
accessible now?

yes the kindle is 100% accessible
now. you can by one for $50. and turn on voice view screen
reader by
touch and hold two fingers on the screen after the kindle
is turned on
and is on first setup screen. or if its on already and on
home screen,
hold in power button for five seconds and then touch and
hold two
fingers on the screen to turn on voice view screen reader.


On 4/25/2017 4:22 AM, Shirley and
Nitro wrote:


is the kindle accessible now
to blind people? I use the ap on my phone but was just
wondering
whether it would be worth my while buying a kindle fire
from amazon?
are they accessible?
shirley










---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com
















Re: Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?

Carolyn Arnold
 

Is Waze accessible? Or can we just go to Google Maps and
type in, say, Sage Brush Steak House, get in the car, and it
would direct us there?

Bye for now,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Olusegun --
Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 3:12 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Android Accessibility Good Bad, or
In between?

Dave, if an Android tablet is your preference, please take a
good look at the RCA Galileo Pro. It runs Android 6.0,
known in Android land as Marshmallow since we Androideans
like to keep dentists employed by eating too many candies,
<LOL>! When last I checked, about three days back, it sells
for $79.88 at Walmart; I don't know if this is online
purchase only!

Mr. Josh Kennedy is a real guru with respect to this tablet.
I ought to have grabbed one myself, let's just say I am a
tad lazy at doing it! Shame on me!

As I said in my first post on this subject, I use an Android
phone. I charge my phone once every two days. My phone is
NEVER EVER turned off for any reason unless the battery dies
completely. At 15%, it alerts me to plug in for a charge; I
have ignored this many, many times and have been able to eke
out more time out of it before recharging. For example, I
was leaving my store to go home on the bus; I got the 15%
charge your battery warning; I ignored it. Then I found a
radio station in Wellington, New Zealand and using my
bluetooth headset, I began listening to the station I
picked. The radio played until I got home, and my battery
was at this time down to 3%.
This has been my experience with my phone; I have just about
everything you can think of turned on: Data, GPS, Skype,
WhatsApp, various open apps! May be I'm hopelessly lucky.

I don't know how long the RCA Galileo Pro will hold out
before issuing the CHARGE battery warning, but I'd wager
it'll be longer than two hours! Yes, you will be able to
use Microsoft Word, Excel, Powerpoint and Outlook in an
Android device. I have these installed on my phone and I
play ball with them now and then!

You asked:

"Some of you say that you read Books on the Android. Are
these the Amazon E Book format, or are you actually playing
book files from the NLS BARD library?"

yes sir, BARD Mobile is available for the Android platform.
ePub books can be read in Android. I am able to open PDF
formatted books in Android and read to my heart's content.
And there are so many book reading apps to choose from.
Kindle books are read using the Kindle app.

You also asked:

"Do these less expensive Tablets have the ability to run GPS
apps?"

As long as there is enough space to park them in your
Android device, there's no reason why the GPS won't serve
its purpose. Here again there are quite a number of apps to
choose from: Some are free, some cost several shiny
pennies! GetThere is a great GPS for the blind; GoogleMaps
will also provide navigation. Just say: "Ok Google,
navigate to ..." where dot, dot, dot equals restaurant name,
place name, or a given address. Lazarillo is another GPS
app; Near Explorer sells for $99 if you want offline maps,
free if you have sufficient data and can always have access
to the Internet. One great GPS app I can recommend for your
wife is Waze! It is FREE, just go to the Playstore and grab
it. This app is crazy--it will even alert you when you are
approaching a city camera, identify where the police may be
hiding, and much more.

If there are no dexterity issues which could challenge the
learning curve a bit, I am willing to state that you won't
regret giving Android a test run.
By all means, grab the tablet, play with it, and see where
the chips fall.
You at least have 30 days to return it. But, several of us
here will help you fall in love with Android, only don't
take her out for a late night date 'cause then we won't get
a chance to keep dating her too, <LOL>!

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado


RCA cambio windows10 tablet

Josh Kennedy <joshknnd1982@...>
 

oh and also. since RCA cambio runs full windows10, you can put any windows apps on it you wish including jaws.

you may want to make more room first by compacting the windows10 OS install using the command line in administrator mode and using this command:


compact /compactos:always


Re: Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?

Josh Kennedy <joshknnd1982@...>
 

talkback could use some improvement in the office apps area. if you want office apps then maybe go for the RCA cambio windows10 detachable tablet with physical keyboard.


On 4/26/2017 3:44 PM, Gene wrote:
Again, you are speaking so broadly that there is no way to know much about how you use your device.  I infer that you don't do much word processing.  I'm not sure what to say about your comments about apps.  I'll let others comment if they have experience or comments about app accessibility or their results trying to get developers to make apps accessible. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 1:04 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?

Gene, I like skeptics!  And, since you don't use an Android device, I'm not
about to confuse or convince you to get one.  The controls you referenced
are no issues for me on my Shiny Android toy. 

I don't write in this space for purposes of impressing the wind!  I share
information based solely on personal experience whether it's by way of
experimentation, or by some other direct means.  I live and breathe Android!
If it weren't working for me, I won't be working on THROWING WINDOWS
overboard for Android. 

I will state here for the records that I DO NOT currently use any bluetooth
or physical keyboard of any kind with my Shiny Android toys!  I use the
touchscreen exclusively; I am getting work done, and, when I have issues
worth addressing, I write directly to the app developer in question and get
results.  I just sent a note to CoCard Merchant Services, the developer of
the CoCard Restaurant app; in my note, I am seeking to know why the app
changes my screen orientation from Portrait to Landscape.  I also visited
the issue of unlabeled buttons.  perhaps I'll read from this developer
within the next few hours, or, by the end of the week.  What's important for
me is that I can talk to the developer and get results!  And, if no results
are obtainable, I simply abandon the app and its developer and move on to
something else.

Since I began embracing technology and using it to make things a bit better
for me with regards to what I do, I've never had so much luck in reaching
developers until I wrapped my arms around the Android platform.  So, I can,
and I will, defend my platform to the best of my ability because it is
WORKING FOR ME as advertised. 

I don't pretend to be a guru at anything; I typically will hardly ever
recommend a particular platform over the other; but I'll discuss what I do
that's giving me achievable results!  I'll let iOS enthusiasts speak up,
but, as for me, Android rocks my boat and I'm sticking with it!

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado






RCA cambio windows10 tablet

Josh Kennedy <joshknnd1982@...>
 

hi

if any of you get the RCA cambio windows10 tablet let me know how you like it and how fast it is and how good it is and stuff. thanks.


Re: are kindles accessible now?

Janet Gross
 

Hi Everyone,
I would like to chime in on this if I may please. Can someone tell me the
difference between a kindle and a windows tablet? This all sounds very
interesting to me. I am hopeing to give up my PC in due time.
I do have an iOS, but I just don't want to holy and soly depend just on my
iOS.
I would like something so I can compose and receive emails, browse the
internet, read books, listen to music etc.

Thank you all in advance.
Janet

Tomorrow's Another Day, Another Way, and If Tomorrow Never Comes, Problem
Solved!

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Carolyn Arnold
Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 1:06 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] are kindles accessible now?

Yes, as Carlos accurately said, "a virtual keyboard." I am not savvy enough
to have thought of the correct technical word, but that is what it is - a
virtual keyboard.

Bye for now,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Pamela Dominguez
Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 1:58 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] are kindles accessible now?

Keyboard that comes up under the screen? Huh? Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Carolyn Arnold
Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 1:09 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] are kindles accessible now?

You type on the keyboard that comes up under the screen; letters or numbers
and symbols. It takes getting used to.

Bye for now,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Pamela Dominguez
Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 8:36 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] are kindles accessible now?

And then, how do you type? Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Josh Kennedy
Sent: Tuesday, April 25, 2017 5:11 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] are kindles accessible now?

oh yes the RCA galileo pro is good to take places without the keyboard
sometimes, especially if you just want to write short messages, read books,
and other media such as audio and videos. in other words. take the galileo
off its keyboard dock, when you know you are gunna use it for stuff besides
lots of typing.



On 4/25/2017 10:38 AM, Carolyn Arnold wrote:
I'm glad to hear that you got one with a keyboard. My
husband and I
are both liking the Kindle so much that we decided to get
another one.
After information from the list and checking with Amazon,
we bought an
RCA Galileo with a keyboard. Jim knows a guy at the Senior
Center that
has one, carries the thing everywhere, just loves the
thing.

We think that the keyboard will be good for me. He loves
the Kindle,
keeps it beside him a lot of the time on the couch, plays
games while
watching TV and does research. I look up the weather and
have gone
into other aps. I was advised to go slow - very smart
words. I think
though, like a computer, that it is an ongoing learning
experience and
one I'll enjoy for a long time to come.

I was just starting to fool with the keyboard on the
thing, when we
ordered the other one. I do, however, want to learn to use
the screen
keyboard, because this one can be detached from the
keyboard. It might
be convenient some of the time to take it places without
the keyboard
case.

Bye for now,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Josh Kennedy
Sent: Tuesday, April 25, 2017 8:31 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] are kindles accessible now?

yes why is that surprising to you? I got a tablet for $80
that also
comes with a physical keyboard dock. and i can use it to
browse the
web, check email, and use tons and tons of apps and games.
well the
accessible ones at least. and the tablet works excellent.



On 4/25/2017 8:17 AM, Carlos wrote:


Why is that surprising? You can purchase Android tablets
in that
price range which are capable of performing all the usual
basic tasks
such as checking Email, surfing the web, reading books,
listening to
music, and so on.

----- Original Message -----
From: Shirley and Nitro
<mailto:shirley1980@eircom.net>
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, April 25, 2017 8:14 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] are kindles
accessible now?

50 dollars? what kinda kindle would that be?
just a kindle or does it do more than just be able to have
books on
there?
shirley

----- Original Message -----
From: Josh Kennedy
<mailto:joshknnd1982@gmail.com>
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, April 25, 2017 1:03
PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] are kindles
accessible now?

yes the kindle is 100% accessible
now. you can by one for $50. and turn on voice view screen
reader by
touch and hold two fingers on the screen after the kindle
is turned on
and is on first setup screen. or if its on already and on
home screen,
hold in power button for five seconds and then touch and
hold two
fingers on the screen to turn on voice view screen reader.


On 4/25/2017 4:22 AM, Shirley and
Nitro wrote:


is the kindle accessible now
to blind people? I use the ap on my phone but was just
wondering
whether it would be worth my while buying a kindle fire
from amazon?
are they accessible?
shirley











---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com


Re: Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?

Josh Kennedy <joshknnd1982@...>
 

why not get an RCA cambio windows10 tablet for $110 off walmart.com ? it has 32bit windows10, 2gigs ram, 32gigs storeage with micro sd card slot, and USB ports and stuff.

On 4/26/2017 2:45 PM, Dave wrote:
Hi again.

Why not just buy a low cost Windows PC?

Well, sorry to say, I don't have $300, otherwise I probably would do
just that.

I was given a Gift Card to Best Buy for Christmas for about a third of
what such a PC would cost.

So with only $100 to spend, funds are short.

And I've been curious about Android for a while now. With what some of
you were saying, I thought it might fill the need for a good but cheap
note taker device.

Otherwise, I would probably go out and buy a smaller lap top, or Netbook
running Windows and be done with it. Unfortunately, that isn't an
option right now.


Re: are kindles accessible now?

Pamela Dominguez
 

If It's not something I can feel, I won't be doing it. Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Josh Kennedy
Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 3:43 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] are kindles accessible now?

the keyboard comes up on the screen. ok imagine this. imagine you are
reading something in braille on a paper with your hands/fingers. but the
piece of paper is a glass touch screen. now lets say on braille line 25
of your screen/paper is your home and back buttons and recent apps
buttons. now you move up to braille line24 but your focus is on an edit
box. so when you are focused in an edit box say braille lines 24 through
20 have a keyboard. and braille lines 19 through 2 have your app, and
braille line 1 has your notification bar. so you move your fingers
around the bottom half braille lines 24 through 19 or so, so moving your
finger around that areas of the of the screen and you hear stuff like...
a, space, s, d, f, enter, delete, backspace... and you also hear other
letters. and when your finger is on a letter you want to type, you lift
your finger off of the screen. and that letter is repeated once again to
let you know it has been entered into the edit box. then you put your
finger back on the screen, move it around, find the next letter, lift up
your finger, and that letter is typed. and you keep doing this until you
have typed everything you want to type into that edit box. that is how
an on screen keyboard works.


On 4/26/2017 1:57 PM, Pamela Dominguez wrote:
Keyboard that comes up under the screen? Huh? Pam.

-----Original Message----- From: Carolyn Arnold
Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 1:09 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] are kindles accessible now?

You type on the keyboard that comes up under the screen;
letters or numbers and symbols. It takes getting used to.

Bye for now,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Pamela
Dominguez
Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 8:36 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] are kindles accessible now?

And then, how do you type? Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Josh Kennedy
Sent: Tuesday, April 25, 2017 5:11 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] are kindles accessible now?

oh yes the RCA galileo pro is good to take places without
the keyboard sometimes, especially if you just want to write
short messages, read books, and other media such as audio
and videos. in other words. take the galileo off its
keyboard dock, when you know you are gunna use it for stuff
besides lots of typing.



On 4/25/2017 10:38 AM, Carolyn Arnold wrote:
I'm glad to hear that you got one with a keyboard. My
husband and I
are both liking the Kindle so much that we decided to get
another one.
After information from the list and checking with Amazon,
we bought an
RCA Galileo with a keyboard. Jim knows a guy at the Senior
Center that
has one, carries the thing everywhere, just loves the
thing.

We think that the keyboard will be good for me. He loves
the Kindle,
keeps it beside him a lot of the time on the couch, plays
games while
watching TV and does research. I look up the weather and
have gone
into other aps. I was advised to go slow - very smart
words. I think
though, like a computer, that it is an ongoing learning
experience and
one I'll enjoy for a long time to come.

I was just starting to fool with the keyboard on the
thing, when we
ordered the other one. I do, however, want to learn to use
the screen
keyboard, because this one can be detached from the
keyboard. It might
be convenient some of the time to take it places without
the keyboard
case.

Bye for now,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Josh Kennedy
Sent: Tuesday, April 25, 2017 8:31 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] are kindles accessible now?

yes why is that surprising to you? I got a tablet for $80
that also
comes with a physical keyboard dock. and i can use it to
browse the
web, check email, and use tons and tons of apps and games.
well the
accessible ones at least. and the tablet works excellent.



On 4/25/2017 8:17 AM, Carlos wrote:


Why is that surprising? You can purchase Android tablets
in that
price range which are capable of performing all the usual
basic tasks
such as checking Email, surfing the web, reading books,
listening to
music, and so on.

----- Original Message -----
From: Shirley and Nitro
<mailto:shirley1980@eircom.net>
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, April 25, 2017 8:14 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] are kindles
accessible now?

50 dollars? what kinda kindle would that be?
just a kindle or does it do more than just be able to have
books on
there?
shirley

----- Original Message -----
From: Josh Kennedy
<mailto:joshknnd1982@gmail.com>
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, April 25, 2017 1:03
PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] are kindles
accessible now?

yes the kindle is 100% accessible
now. you can by one for $50. and turn on voice view screen
reader by
touch and hold two fingers on the screen after the kindle
is turned on
and is on first setup screen. or if its on already and on
home screen,
hold in power button for five seconds and then touch and
hold two
fingers on the screen to turn on voice view screen reader.


On 4/25/2017 4:22 AM, Shirley and
Nitro wrote:


is the kindle accessible now
to blind people? I use the ap on my phone but was just
wondering
whether it would be worth my while buying a kindle fire
from amazon?
are they accessible?
shirley











---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com











Re: Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?

Josh Kennedy <joshknnd1982@...>
 

hey all yu skunn. if you use audex those buttons will be automatically labeled for you or they should be.

On 4/26/2017 2:04 PM, Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc. wrote:
Gene, I like skeptics! And, since you don't use an Android device, I'm not
about to confuse or convince you to get one. The controls you referenced
are no issues for me on my Shiny Android toy.

I don't write in this space for purposes of impressing the wind! I share
information based solely on personal experience whether it's by way of
experimentation, or by some other direct means. I live and breathe Android!
If it weren't working for me, I won't be working on THROWING WINDOWS
overboard for Android.

I will state here for the records that I DO NOT currently use any bluetooth
or physical keyboard of any kind with my Shiny Android toys! I use the
touchscreen exclusively; I am getting work done, and, when I have issues
worth addressing, I write directly to the app developer in question and get
results. I just sent a note to CoCard Merchant Services, the developer of
the CoCard Restaurant app; in my note, I am seeking to know why the app
changes my screen orientation from Portrait to Landscape. I also visited
the issue of unlabeled buttons. perhaps I'll read from this developer
within the next few hours, or, by the end of the week. What's important for
me is that I can talk to the developer and get results! And, if no results
are obtainable, I simply abandon the app and its developer and move on to
something else.

Since I began embracing technology and using it to make things a bit better
for me with regards to what I do, I've never had so much luck in reaching
developers until I wrapped my arms around the Android platform. So, I can,
and I will, defend my platform to the best of my ability because it is
WORKING FOR ME as advertised.

I don't pretend to be a guru at anything; I typically will hardly ever
recommend a particular platform over the other; but I'll discuss what I do
that's giving me achievable results! I'll let iOS enthusiasts speak up,
but, as for me, Android rocks my boat and I'm sticking with it!

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado




Re: Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?

Carlos
 

I have dealt with just as many Windows developers who are willing to put effort into improving accessibility in their software, and many who are not. I don't write JAWS scripts for every inaccessible application I encounter. So while I am glad your experience with Android developers has been positive, it is certainly not unique. No matter the platform, it just really depends on the specific developer, how you approach them, and their willingness to cooperate.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc." <ukekearuaro@valtdnet.com>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 3:32 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?


Chief Carlos, you do have a point! Android will however free me from having
to find scripters for apps I need to use in Windows and having to pay such
scripters almost $130 per hour and never knowing how long it'll take them to
write and compile the needed scripts. Then of course whatever scripts they
write, I never get full and complete access to the app I need.

With Android, I identify what the problems are, write to the app developer,
and, within a few weeks, I get a response; thenecessary labels are done and
I become yet another happy-go-lucky child with a new shiny toy!

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado






Re: Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?

Josh Kennedy <joshknnd1982@...>
 

linux is just the kernel. the part of an operating system that tells your keyboard and screen and mouse and touch screen what they are and what to do. an interface can be anything from a command line to a graphical desktop to a tablet or phone interface.

On 4/26/2017 2:04 PM, Victor wrote:
Yes, Linux definitely relies heavily on a command line interface for
many applications. Fortunately, Vinux, the accessible version of
Linux that I use is based on Ubuntu and there are several applications
that use a graphical user interface. Unfortunately, the Orca screen
reader isn't quite to my liking. I may try to install Windows 7 on my
laptop using the talking Windows installer. If I do, I'll call
Microsoft's disability line to see if they can help me finish setting
that up.

If you choose to stick with Windows, you should be able to get a
decent Windows 10 laptop for around $300. I know Best Buy sells them
at that price. So much of this is just about personal preference and
what you need.

Victor

On 4/26/17, Aman Singer <aman.singer@gmail.com> wrote:
Hi Dave and all,

I'm a bit confused, if I may say so. If you want only the things you
mention below, why not just buy something like the Kangaroo PC, the HP
stream, or another small, cheap, low-power Windows PC? These are, as I
said,
cheap, run Windows, and most charge via USB, so you can use a standard USB
battery to extend their battery life for quite a long time. You don't want
to do video editing/OCR/processor intensive applications, so the lower
power
should not harm you significantly while you can benefit from the lower
power
in lower battery usage. Indeed, you can extend the battery life for as long
as you want, just as you would with a mobile device.
I have both an Android and iOS device, and am not interested in
either criticising one or the other, they both have their points, but for
your use case, I wouldn't bother.
Also keep in mind, if you insist on a mobile device, that you can
buy used and that most things you can do with the iPhone, besides
connecting
to the cellular network of course, you can do with an iPod. The same may be
said of an android phone, you can spend less on the screen and more on the
internals if you don't need a screen.
HTH,
Aman
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?

Hello Olusegun,

I ask my questions, because I have very limited funds, and want to make as
wise of a purchase as I can.

For about a year now, I have attempted to lug a lap top to class, and while
it works, the Battery life sucks. I get maybe two or three hours from a
charge Granted, my lap top is older and so probably sucks power worse than
some new lap top. I have even gone out and bought a replacement battery
pack, but still get roughly the same usage time.

Can't afford a New lap top, and so when some of you were talking about
these Android Tablets with the Keyboard, it caught my attention. I
have seen Tablets proclaiming battery life up to five or more hours.
Now I do know that Marketing lie their Asses off, and so who knows what it
takes to get that Tablet to last for five full hours.

I need the charge to last about three hours, three strong hours of use.

As I said, my use would be mostly Note Taking while in class. While I know
I can Email and experience some Internet connectivity, I can't say I
Need to send email or get on the Web when I am away from home. Mostly
I will be writing. I write a lot, and so I will need to find an accessible
Word Processor that at least has a good Spell Checker, because since losing
my sight, I have become the world's worst speller.
Go figure!

Another part of my interest in Android is to stretch my self a bit.
maybe move away from Windows to another OS, so I might be a bit more
knowledgeable about another platform many people use.


When it comes to accessibility, what I experience with MS Windows and
Window
Eyes and NVDA are the Standard for which I will have expectations for Talk
Back.

I do know that Talk Back is probably going to be more limited than
something
like Window eyes, or even NVDA. However, I do hope it gives at least, and
hopefully more accessibility than Narrator.

I am not thinking of replacing my home Desk Top with a small Android
Tablet,
but only going to use the Tablet to replace a large lap top that usually
runs out of Juice 30 to 40 minutes before my need for the lap top is over.


Some of you say that you read Books on the Android. Are these the Amazon E
Book format, or are you actually playing book files from the NLS BARD
library?

Do these less expensive Tablets have the ability to run GPS apps?

I may be able to assist my wife when she is driving around. That would be
cool.

I currently use Jarte as my word processor in Windows. It has enough
features for my needs and so I would hope to find some App that gives me
some basic editing capabilities such as Jarte.

<Smile> Unless one of you can give me cause to pause, I intend to go and
purchase my Tablet later today.

Grumpy Dave






--
Dave <dlh007@centurylink.net>









Re: Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?

Gene
 

Again, you are speaking so broadly that there is no way to know much about how you use your device.  I infer that you don't do much word processing.  I'm not sure what to say about your comments about apps.  I'll let others comment if they have experience or comments about app accessibility or their results trying to get developers to make apps accessible. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 1:04 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?

Gene, I like skeptics!  And, since you don't use an Android device, I'm not
about to confuse or convince you to get one.  The controls you referenced
are no issues for me on my Shiny Android toy. 

I don't write in this space for purposes of impressing the wind!  I share
information based solely on personal experience whether it's by way of
experimentation, or by some other direct means.  I live and breathe Android!
If it weren't working for me, I won't be working on THROWING WINDOWS
overboard for Android. 

I will state here for the records that I DO NOT currently use any bluetooth
or physical keyboard of any kind with my Shiny Android toys!  I use the
touchscreen exclusively; I am getting work done, and, when I have issues
worth addressing, I write directly to the app developer in question and get
results.  I just sent a note to CoCard Merchant Services, the developer of
the CoCard Restaurant app; in my note, I am seeking to know why the app
changes my screen orientation from Portrait to Landscape.  I also visited
the issue of unlabeled buttons.  perhaps I'll read from this developer
within the next few hours, or, by the end of the week.  What's important for
me is that I can talk to the developer and get results!  And, if no results
are obtainable, I simply abandon the app and its developer and move on to
something else.

Since I began embracing technology and using it to make things a bit better
for me with regards to what I do, I've never had so much luck in reaching
developers until I wrapped my arms around the Android platform.  So, I can,
and I will, defend my platform to the best of my ability because it is
WORKING FOR ME as advertised. 

I don't pretend to be a guru at anything; I typically will hardly ever
recommend a particular platform over the other; but I'll discuss what I do
that's giving me achievable results!  I'll let iOS enthusiasts speak up,
but, as for me, Android rocks my boat and I'm sticking with it!

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado





Re: are kindles accessible now?

Josh Kennedy <joshknnd1982@...>
 

the keyboard comes up on the screen. ok imagine this. imagine you are reading something in braille on a paper with your hands/fingers. but the piece of paper is a glass touch screen. now lets say on braille line 25 of your screen/paper is your home and back buttons and recent apps buttons. now you move up to braille line24 but your focus is on an edit box. so when you are focused in an edit box say braille lines 24 through 20 have a keyboard. and braille lines 19 through 2 have your app, and braille line 1 has your notification bar. so you move your fingers around the bottom half braille lines 24 through 19 or so, so moving your finger around that areas of the of the screen and you hear stuff like... a, space, s, d, f, enter, delete, backspace... and you also hear other letters. and when your finger is on a letter you want to type, you lift your finger off of the screen. and that letter is repeated once again to let you know it has been entered into the edit box. then you put your finger back on the screen, move it around, find the next letter, lift up your finger, and that letter is typed. and you keep doing this until you have typed everything you want to type into that edit box. that is how an on screen keyboard works.

On 4/26/2017 1:57 PM, Pamela Dominguez wrote:
Keyboard that comes up under the screen? Huh? Pam.

-----Original Message----- From: Carolyn Arnold
Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 1:09 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] are kindles accessible now?

You type on the keyboard that comes up under the screen;
letters or numbers and symbols. It takes getting used to.

Bye for now,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Pamela
Dominguez
Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 8:36 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] are kindles accessible now?

And then, how do you type? Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Josh Kennedy
Sent: Tuesday, April 25, 2017 5:11 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] are kindles accessible now?

oh yes the RCA galileo pro is good to take places without
the keyboard sometimes, especially if you just want to write
short messages, read books, and other media such as audio
and videos. in other words. take the galileo off its
keyboard dock, when you know you are gunna use it for stuff
besides lots of typing.



On 4/25/2017 10:38 AM, Carolyn Arnold wrote:
I'm glad to hear that you got one with a keyboard. My
husband and I
are both liking the Kindle so much that we decided to get
another one.
After information from the list and checking with Amazon,
we bought an
RCA Galileo with a keyboard. Jim knows a guy at the Senior
Center that
has one, carries the thing everywhere, just loves the
thing.

We think that the keyboard will be good for me. He loves
the Kindle,
keeps it beside him a lot of the time on the couch, plays
games while
watching TV and does research. I look up the weather and
have gone
into other aps. I was advised to go slow - very smart
words. I think
though, like a computer, that it is an ongoing learning
experience and
one I'll enjoy for a long time to come.

I was just starting to fool with the keyboard on the
thing, when we
ordered the other one. I do, however, want to learn to use
the screen
keyboard, because this one can be detached from the
keyboard. It might
be convenient some of the time to take it places without
the keyboard
case.

Bye for now,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Josh Kennedy
Sent: Tuesday, April 25, 2017 8:31 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] are kindles accessible now?

yes why is that surprising to you? I got a tablet for $80
that also
comes with a physical keyboard dock. and i can use it to
browse the
web, check email, and use tons and tons of apps and games.
well the
accessible ones at least. and the tablet works excellent.



On 4/25/2017 8:17 AM, Carlos wrote:


Why is that surprising? You can purchase Android tablets
in that
price range which are capable of performing all the usual
basic tasks
such as checking Email, surfing the web, reading books,
listening to
music, and so on.

----- Original Message -----
From: Shirley and Nitro
<mailto:shirley1980@eircom.net>
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, April 25, 2017 8:14 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] are kindles
accessible now?

50 dollars? what kinda kindle would that be?
just a kindle or does it do more than just be able to have
books on
there?
shirley

----- Original Message -----
From: Josh Kennedy
<mailto:joshknnd1982@gmail.com>
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, April 25, 2017 1:03
PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] are kindles
accessible now?

yes the kindle is 100% accessible
now. you can by one for $50. and turn on voice view screen
reader by
touch and hold two fingers on the screen after the kindle
is turned on
and is on first setup screen. or if its on already and on
home screen,
hold in power button for five seconds and then touch and
hold two
fingers on the screen to turn on voice view screen reader.


On 4/25/2017 4:22 AM, Shirley and
Nitro wrote:


is the kindle accessible now
to blind people? I use the ap on my phone but was just
wondering
whether it would be worth my while buying a kindle fire
from amazon?
are they accessible?
shirley











---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com










Re: Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?

Josh Kennedy <joshknnd1982@...>
 

IOS is also based on linux which is based on unix and the bsd operating systems and kernels. so hate to break it to you but if you use IOS and any apple product, you are using a form of linux.

On 4/26/2017 1:38 PM, Marie wrote:
Funny you mentioned liking the IOS better than Linux, because, if I am not mistaken, Android is based on the Linux OS. And having used Android and Talk Back, I tend to agree somewhat with the salesman. It is definitely accessible and greatly improved in the last couple of years but for me, it is complicated.
Marie


-----Original Message----- From: Victor
Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 9:49 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?

Hi all:

I know nothing about the Android operating system as I use IOS. I
asked the salesman at Best Buy about the accessibility of Android. He
said it was accessible, but complicated.

From what I've read, Android accessibility has come a long way.
However, where accessibility seems to be lacking the most is with
Braille displays. If you enjoy using your Braille display as I do,
you are better off with IOS. At least for now.

I currently have Linux on my laptop because a virus killed my Windows
7. Maybe someday I'll be able to get a Windows 10 computer. Until
then, I plan to use iOS as much as possible as I like it better than
Linux and I don't like all the quirks that Windows 7 has. I.e the way
in which some updates interfere with some applications and screen
readers. Unfortunately, it sounds like that problem still exists with
Windows 10.

JMT,

Victor

On 4/26/17, Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
<ukekearuaro@valtdnet.com> wrote:
Grumpy Dave, I will not personally compare smartphone screen readers with
those on Windows. Why so? The Windows screen readers have been there for
ages and, in my mind, the environment in which they operate are not the
same
as those of a smartphone or tablet.

Talkback is the main screen reader on the Android platform; however, it
isn't the only one! ShinePlus is a huge contender; Amazon and Samsung do
have their own screen readers on Android too. Talkback comes preinstalled
on most Android devices, but if it isn't, it's not hard to install directly
from the Playstore.

If you currently have an iPhone and love it, stick and keep running with
it;
if Windows has always ROCKED THE BOAT for you, get a Windows tablet
instead;
at least, the learning curve will not be too steep. If, on the other hand
you enjoy venturing into territories hitherto unexplored, let Android ring
the bells!

If an app DOES NOT produce desired results on an Android device, that, in
my
view, has absolutely nothing to do iwth Talkback! The app may be badly
written by its developer as is the case with some Windows apps. Where a
developer follows Google's guidelines on accessibility and completely
labels
its apps' buttons and such, there's no reason why you can't access the app
using Talkback.

In my mobile universe, Android rules! For this reason, I've begun to
slowly
move all business related tools that I use daily over to the Android
platform. For one thing, I don't have to worry about costly SMA's for
screen reader upgrades, no need to pay a scripter to have a Windows app
scripted for accessibility only to find out that I can only GAIN minimal
accessibility to the scripted app, and, I have better interactions with app
developers in that I can help them understand what needs to be done to make
their apps more accessible to all. Within the next 9 months or less, I am
hoping to CUT my dependency on Windows to about 5% when Android takes over
95% of all that I do on a daily basis.

You asked:

"how accessible are the various features and Apps in an Android system?"

Whilst some Android devices come with baked in apps, you are NEVER
OBLIGATED
to use any of them! You can look around on the Playstore and find apps
that
work better for you, buy them for a small price, or, some of them may even
be free. I have a Samsung phone; I don't use any of the apps that came
preloaded on my phone. I have disabled all of these preloaded apps and, my
phone continues to function as expected with no issues of any kind.

For me, Talkback is not only intuitively responsive, but most certainly
getting better with each new release. What's more, it is actively
developed
and released independently of the operating system. Microsoft Word or
Office can be used on an Android device! There are several notetaking apps
that are accessible, when you are ready for the plunge, several of us in
this space will be extremely glad to share the names of a few. There are
NO
problems with E-mail or web surfing, these can be done in Android and
Talkback is NOT sleepy at the wheels! An Android device connected to your
computer is like another hard drive; so, moving files between the two DOES
NOT require or call for the installation of any additional app.

I am NOT SO CERTAIN I addressed your concerns satisfactorily. However, to
the best of my ability, I shall be willing to answer other questions that
you may have.

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado









Re: Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?

Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
 

Chief Carlos, you do have a point! Android will however free me from having
to find scripters for apps I need to use in Windows and having to pay such
scripters almost $130 per hour and never knowing how long it'll take them to
write and compile the needed scripts. Then of course whatever scripts they
write, I never get full and complete access to the app I need.

With Android, I identify what the problems are, write to the app developer,
and, within a few weeks, I get a response; thenecessary labels are done and
I become yet another happy-go-lucky child with a new shiny toy!

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado


Re: Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?

Aman Singer
 

Hi Dave,

If you're paying $300 for one of the PCs I was speaking of, you're
being horribly overcharged. I would be a bit hesitant even at $200, and that
includes the keyboard and USB battery. A quick look on Amazon gives me, just
for example
http://www.amzn.com/B01CZM679I
I have the one above and like it, but note the lack of a headphone
jack, include $15 or so for an external sound card or $25 for an HDMI to 3.5
MM adapter, as you prefer.
There's also
http://www.amzn.com/B01MYZEPGP
and
http://www.amzn.com/B0188NA4DS
These are just the first few I found by typing Windows tablet into
Amazon. If I wanted to play more seriously and get to under $100 with, of
course, quite a bit of risk, I would try aliexpress.com or buy used.
Personally, though, if this was my first one, I would stick to Amazon, the
chances of someone taking your money and sending you a broken device are
less that way. Obviously, look at the reviews and see what people are
saying. Look particularly at the bad reviews keeping in mind, of course,
that there are certain things we don't care about. For example, the touch
screen being unresponsive isn't as important for us as it would be for other
users. Similarly, I don't much care about graphics performance, colour
depth, looking "washed out", etc. Certain things do matter, though, if
you're using high quality voices, particularly in non-English Languages
(Arabic, Hebrew, and certain east-Asian languages are particularly
notorious), you may have issues with a slower processor because you're stuck
with a voice which requires huge inputs to be reasonable. If, however,
you're using English with Eloquence or eSpeak, the problems are
significantly less. I would also avoid going for anything with under 2 GB of
RAM generally, Windows doesn't like them as much even with all the
optimizations in Windows 10.
Finally, if you're after Android for the learning experience, I
congratulate you, it's great for that. Further, if you're forced to buy from
BestBuy, you may have issues finding the cheaper Windows stuff, they have to
pay for their buildings somehow. I hope you like whatever you get.
Aman

main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave
Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 2:46 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?

Hi again.

Why not just buy a low cost Windows PC?

Well, sorry to say, I don't have $300, otherwise I probably would do just
that.

I was given a Gift Card to Best Buy for Christmas for about a third of what
such a PC would cost.

So with only $100 to spend, funds are short.

And I've been curious about Android for a while now. With what some of you
were saying, I thought it might fill the need for a good but cheap note
taker device.

Otherwise, I would probably go out and buy a smaller lap top, or Netbook
running Windows and be done with it. Unfortunately, that isn't an
option right now.
--

Grumpy Dave


Dave <dlh007@centurylink.net>


Re: Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?

Josh Kennedy <joshknnd1982@...>
 

from walmart.com for $80 you can get the RCA galileo pro with keyboard. and from amazon.com for $250 you can get a brand new windows10 laptop and for $270 you can get a brand new windows10 laptop that also has a touch screen and a keyboard and a tracPad/Mouse built into it.

On 4/26/2017 1:32 PM, Dave wrote:
Hello Olusegun,

I ask my questions, because I have very limited funds, and want to make
as wise of a purchase as I can.

For about a year now, I have attempted to lug a lap top to class, and
while it works, the Battery life sucks. I get maybe two or three hours
from a charge Granted, my lap top is older and so probably sucks power
worse than some new lap top. I have even gone out and bought a
replacement battery pack, but still get roughly the same usage time.

Can't afford a New lap top, and so when some of you were talking about
these Android Tablets with the Keyboard, it caught my attention. I
have seen Tablets proclaiming battery life up to five or more hours.
Now I do know that Marketing lie their Asses off, and so who knows what
it takes to get that Tablet to last for five full hours.

I need the charge to last about three hours, three strong hours of use.

As I said, my use would be mostly Note Taking while in class. While I
know I can Email and experience some Internet connectivity, I can't say I
Need to send email or get on the Web when I am away from home. Mostly
I will be writing. I write a lot, and so I will need to find an
accessible Word Processor that at least has a good Spell Checker,
because since losing my sight, I have become the world's worst speller.
Go figure!

Another part of my interest in Android is to stretch my self a bit.
maybe move away from Windows to another OS, so I might be a bit more
knowledgeable about another platform many people use.


When it comes to accessibility, what I experience with MS Windows and
Window Eyes and NVDA are the Standard for which I will have expectations
for Talk Back.

I do know that Talk Back is probably going to be more limited than
something like Window eyes, or even NVDA. However, I do hope it gives
at least, and hopefully more accessibility than Narrator.

I am not thinking of replacing my home Desk Top with a small Android
Tablet, but only going to use the Tablet to replace a large lap top that
usually runs out of Juice 30 to 40 minutes before my need for the lap
top is over.

Some of you say that you read Books on the Android. Are these the
Amazon E Book format, or are you actually playing book files from the
NLS BARD library?

Do these less expensive Tablets have the ability to run GPS apps?

I may be able to assist my wife when she is driving around. That would
be cool.

I currently use Jarte as my word processor in Windows. It has enough
features for my needs and so I would hope to find some App that gives me
some basic editing capabilities such as Jarte.

<Smile> Unless one of you can give me cause to pause, I intend to go
and purchase my Tablet later today.

Grumpy Dave






Re: Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?

Josh Kennedy <joshknnd1982@...>
 

talkback is excellent. its like jaws for android but its called talkback, not jaws. and the next brailleBack is in beta testing. when its out, it will have contracted braille input and other stuff.

On 4/26/2017 1:22 PM, Carlos wrote:
I wouldn't expect a typical salesman to know much about accessibility, no matter what they might say.

As for quirks in Windows, my personal experience has been that Windows is generally stable. Of course there are always bugs, some of them caused by updates, but this is true of any operating system. I see just as many complaints about iOS updates. If you are waiting for a quirk/bug free operating system, then you will be waiting a long time. Software is written by humans, therefore software will always contain bugs.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Victor" <victorelawrence@gmail.com>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 12:49 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?


Hi all:

I know nothing about the Android operating system as I use iOS. I
asked the salesman at Best Buy about the accessibility of Android. He
said it was accessible, but complicated.

From what I've read, Android accessibility has come a long way.
However, where accessibility seems to be lacking the most is with
Braille displays. If you enjoy using your Braille display as I do,
you are better off with iOS. At least for now.

I currently have Linux on my laptop because a virus killed my Windows
7. Maybe someday I'll be able to get a Windows 10 computer. Until
then, I plan to use iOS as much as possible as I like it better than
Linux and I don't like all the quirks that Windows 7 has. I.e the way
in which some updates interfere with some applications and screen
readers. Unfortunately, it sounds like that problem still exists with
Windows 10.

JMT,

Victor

On 4/26/17, Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
<ukekearuaro@valtdnet.com> wrote:
Grumpy Dave, I will not personally compare smartphone screen readers with
those on Windows. Why so? The Windows screen readers have been there for
ages and, in my mind, the environment in which they operate are not the
same
as those of a smartphone or tablet.

Talkback is the main screen reader on the Android platform; however, it
isn't the only one! ShinePlus is a huge contender; Amazon and Samsung do
have their own screen readers on Android too. Talkback comes preinstalled
on most Android devices, but if it isn't, it's not hard to install directly
from the Playstore.

If you currently have an iPhone and love it, stick and keep running with
it;
if Windows has always ROCKED THE BOAT for you, get a Windows tablet
instead;
at least, the learning curve will not be too steep. If, on the other hand
you enjoy venturing into territories hitherto unexplored, let Android ring
the bells!

If an app DOES NOT produce desired results on an Android device, that, in
my
view, has absolutely nothing to do iwth Talkback! The app may be badly
written by its developer as is the case with some Windows apps. Where a
developer follows Google's guidelines on accessibility and completely
labels
its apps' buttons and such, there's no reason why you can't access the app
using Talkback.

In my mobile universe, Android rules! For this reason, I've begun to
slowly
move all business related tools that I use daily over to the Android
platform. For one thing, I don't have to worry about costly SMA's for
screen reader upgrades, no need to pay a scripter to have a Windows app
scripted for accessibility only to find out that I can only GAIN minimal
accessibility to the scripted app, and, I have better interactions with app
developers in that I can help them understand what needs to be done to make
their apps more accessible to all. Within the next 9 months or less, I am
hoping to CUT my dependency on Windows to about 5% when Android takes over
95% of all that I do on a daily basis.

You asked:

"how accessible are the various features and Apps in an Android system?"

Whilst some Android devices come with baked in apps, you are NEVER
OBLIGATED
to use any of them! You can look around on the Playstore and find apps
that
work better for you, buy them for a small price, or, some of them may even
be free. I have a Samsung phone; I don't use any of the apps that came
preloaded on my phone. I have disabled all of these preloaded apps and, my
phone continues to function as expected with no issues of any kind.

For me, Talkback is not only intuitively responsive, but most certainly
getting better with each new release. What's more, it is actively
developed
and released independently of the operating system. Microsoft Word or
Office can be used on an Android device! There are several notetaking apps
that are accessible, when you are ready for the plunge, several of us in
this space will be extremely glad to share the names of a few. There are
NO
problems with E-mail or web surfing, these can be done in Android and
Talkback is NOT sleepy at the wheels! An Android device connected to your
computer is like another hard drive; so, moving files between the two DOES
NOT require or call for the installation of any additional app.

I am NOT SO CERTAIN I addressed your concerns satisfactorily. However, to
the best of my ability, I shall be willing to answer other questions that
you may have.

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado







61401 - 61420 of 105899