Date   

Re: Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?

Marie <magpie.mn@...>
 

I have a Surface 3 and I absolutely love it. I also do not believe that the IPhone or the Android even comes close. I can use the same screen reader and the same programs that I use on the laptop. It is not as fast but is oh so much easier to use and powerful too.
Marie

-----Original Message-----
From: Carlos
Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 11:22 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?

Of course it always comes down to preference, but for me personally, both
iOS and Android have lost what little appeal they ever had now that Windows
tablets have become common and affordable. As much as I dislike Windows 10,
I would still always choose a Windows 10 tablet over an Android tablet or an
iPad. As far as I'm concerned, neither Android or iOS can beat Windows in
terms of flexibility, accessibility, or the sheer amount of available
software.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc." <ukekearuaro@valtdnet.com>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 2:04 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?


Gene, I like skeptics! And, since you don't use an Android device, I'm not
about to confuse or convince you to get one. The controls you referenced
are no issues for me on my Shiny Android toy.

I don't write in this space for purposes of impressing the wind! I share
information based solely on personal experience whether it's by way of
experimentation, or by some other direct means. I live and breathe Android!
If it weren't working for me, I won't be working on THROWING WINDOWS
overboard for Android.

I will state here for the records that I DO NOT currently use any bluetooth
or physical keyboard of any kind with my Shiny Android toys! I use the
touchscreen exclusively; I am getting work done, and, when I have issues
worth addressing, I write directly to the app developer in question and get
results. I just sent a note to CoCard Merchant Services, the developer of
the CoCard Restaurant app; in my note, I am seeking to know why the app
changes my screen orientation from Portrait to Landscape. I also visited
the issue of unlabeled buttons. perhaps I'll read from this developer
within the next few hours, or, by the end of the week. What's important for
me is that I can talk to the developer and get results! And, if no results
are obtainable, I simply abandon the app and its developer and move on to
something else.

Since I began embracing technology and using it to make things a bit better
for me with regards to what I do, I've never had so much luck in reaching
developers until I wrapped my arms around the Android platform. So, I can,
and I will, defend my platform to the best of my ability because it is
WORKING FOR ME as advertised.

I don't pretend to be a guru at anything; I typically will hardly ever
recommend a particular platform over the other; but I'll discuss what I do
that's giving me achievable results! I'll let iOS enthusiasts speak up,
but, as for me, Android rocks my boat and I'm sticking with it!

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado





Re: Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?

Josh Kennedy
 

well then in the latest audex version there is a switch that lets you turn off all of the earcons if you don't want them.


Sent with AquaMail for Android
http://www.aqua-mail.com

On April 26, 2017 18:59:42 "Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc." <ukekearuaro@valtdnet.com> wrote:

I should actually give Audex a spin. I just want the SLS functionality, I
don't care too much about earcons; I find them somewhat distracting after a
fashion.

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado




Re: Thanks for the Android advice and Help

Marie <magpie.mn@...>
 

Dave, for a little more money, the RCA Cambio tablet running windows 10 with a detachable keyboard sounds like it might fit your needs. You can install NVDA, Jaws or Window Eyes and go to town. It would probably run the Jard program you are currently using so there would be very little learning curve and plenty of battery life for what you want to do.
Marie

-----Original Message-----
From: Dave
Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 2:01 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Thanks for the Android advice and Help

Hello again,

Hey, a sincere thank you to all who were generous with their advice,
Comments, and Observations concerning Android and Windows Tablets.

I am most familiar with MS Windows, and know next to nothing about
Android gear.

As I said, I have this Gift Card to Best Buy, so that pretty much limits
me going to Amazon or Walmart. I will be limited to the Tablets Best
Buy has on hand when I walk through their doors.

For $100 I am attempting to be realistic, and I figure the Tablet may be
slow, and not have much in the way of Storage space, or Computing power.
With that in mind, I'll check out the systems in my price range and see
what there may be in the way of choices.

I may come home with nothing, and I'll need to save up another $50 or
$75 to get something faster bigger better etc.

But, it does sound like a Tablet may give me the ability to type class
notes on something that has a longer Battery life.

I had no idea Microsoft had a version of MS Word for the Android!
Surprise! Surprise!

But, I just wanted to say Thank you for the advice and Help many of you
have offered and given.

Grumpy Dave





--
Dave <dlh007@centurylink.net>


Re: Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?

Laz
 

Thanks Aman for explaining how what Josh was saying is possible. I
wasn't aware of that.

Laz

On 4/26/17, Aman Singer <aman.singer@gmail.com> wrote:
Hello Laz,

To electronically locate yourself on earth, you do not need a connection to
anyone else. All you need is, first, a map and, secondly, to receive the
GPS signal sent out by the satellites and know how to process it. To receive
a GPS signal, all you require is a GPS receiver. It's a radio receiver just
like any other. For confirmation see
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Global_Positioning_System
Most android tablets and a good many Windows tablets have GPS receivers
built in. If they don't, you can get a small Bluetooth device which acts as
a GPS receiver. In neither case, though, do you need a connection to the
internet to know where you are in real-time. There are, of course, programs
which use a combination of the GPS chip and an internet connection to locate
you. Having an internet connection allows you to download maps as you need
them, to obtain updated information on a business (the most obvious example
in the blindness specific apps is blindsquare, which uses 4square's data
which it fetches from the internet), to send your location to others, etc.
However, these services are auxiliary to GPS, they are not GPS itself. There
are tons of GPS devices which are simply unable to transmit anything and can
connect to nothing. See, for example, some of the products made by Garmin
for cars and boats. They don't talk to anything except, perhaps, the car's
speakers, but they receive the GPS signal and can tell the user where he is
and how to get to his destination.
I should say that some companies have decided, in their phones and tablets,
to use cheap GPS receivers and use what is called assisted GPS to get a
better location. This uses a rough GPS signal to get started and narrows the
location down by seeing what wireless networks are in the area, what
cellular site the device is connecting to, and so on. As a manufacturer,
this allows you to save a little on your GPS receiver and the customer won't
notice.
As for Google maps, keep in mind that it relies on Google's servers for the
maps in most cases. Therefore, it obviously dies if you have no connection
to the internet, it can't talk to Google. Products like Nearby Explorer,
however, get their maps in one big gulp. They then use the GPS signal to
know where you are on the map and to direct you to wherever you're going or
to show you what's around you.
I hope that's of some use.
Aman

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Laz
Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 5:33 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?

Josh, Perhaps you're not understanding what I'm asking. Fine and dandy that
it downloads the maps but maps whether on a tablet or on a piece of paper,
are completely worthless unless one and/or the device have a way to locate
you in the environment, which is where GPS comes in. GPS has to have some
way of contacting and accessing the global positioning satellites so as to
figure out where you are so the navigation app can further guide you.
Without this outside data there's no way to know where you are and the map
is worthless.

So again, is it just a list of directions that you follow as in step 1, go
to 7th avenue, step 2. take a left to 3rd street, step 3. walk
10 yards and you'll be in front of the pizza joint which you can do by
paying attention to what you're doing and without the GPS updating your
position, or are you claiming that it somehow magically is capable of
updating your location without any connection and giving you the next step
to follow when it's the correct time?

I've had experience with losing the GPS signal and Google Maps falls on its
face until it can reconnect with the satellites, so I'm really interested in
knowing if there's some magical way for it to locate where you are and keep
directing you without the need for any connection at all.

Laz

On 4/26/17, Josh Kennedy <joshknnd1982@gmail.com> wrote:
ok the scoop on nearby explorer for android.

1. it uses offline maps. the maps get downloaded into your device's
main storeage area and the download will take 2 or 3 hours to complete.

2. after the maps are downloaded and installed. you can start using
nearby explorer.

3. you can use nearby explorer with wifi and data turned all the way off.

4. you do not need any data or any wifi at all whatsoever to use
nearby explorer after of course you have downloaded the maps.

5. the map download is a one time thing. you download the maps one
time and then you just forget about them.

6. nearby explorer has a settings menu for different modes such as
driving and many many other things.

7. again, you do not need wifi for nearby explorer. you do not need
data for nearby explorer.

8. there is a version of the app, that is free, called nearby explorer
online. nearby explorer online free version does require data, or wifi.
because nearby explorer online free version does not let you download
any maps into your onboard storeage. therefore you need data at all
times for the nearby explorer online free version.

both apps are found in the play store.

On 4/26/2017 4:25 PM, Laz wrote:
Interesting. So how does it keep track of where you are while driving
in a car? Or does it just provide you with driving instructions as in
a list? I think what you're saying is that you can use an app that
will provide you with directions but the tablet can't use GPS without
some sort of external connection to either a data plan or wifi.

Laz

On 4/26/17, Josh Kennedy <joshknnd1982@gmail.com> wrote:
I do not need a data plan to use gps on my phone and tablet. the
reason is because nearby explorer has all its maps and points of
interest offline stored locally onboard the device, no data plan
needed!


On 4/26/2017 4:07 PM, Laz wrote:
Sorry to rain on the ardent support for Android but both Olusegoon
and Josh claimed that using GPS on the tablet would not be an issue...
That would be true if the tablet could use a data plan which most
Android tablets don't. You could use GPS if you were in range of a
wifi signal but in a car that would also be doubtful. If the tablet
was tethered to a smart phone then it would be possible to do it on
the road, but then why use the tablet since the smart phone could
do the same?

I use Android, iOS, and the Fire OS so you know.

Laz

On 4/26/17, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:
Again, you are speaking so broadly that there is no way to know
much about how you use your device. I infer that you don't do
much word processing.
I'm not sure what to say about your comments about apps. I'll let
others comment if they have experience or comments about app
accessibility or their results trying to get developers to make
apps accessible.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 1:04 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In
between?


Gene, I like skeptics! And, since you don't use an Android
device, I'm not about to confuse or convince you to get one. The
controls you referenced are no issues for me on my Shiny Android
toy.

I don't write in this space for purposes of impressing the wind!
I share information based solely on personal experience whether
it's by way of experimentation, or by some other direct means. I
live and breathe Android!
If it weren't working for me, I won't be working on THROWING
WINDOWS overboard for Android.

I will state here for the records that I DO NOT currently use any
bluetooth or physical keyboard of any kind with my Shiny Android
toys! I use the touchscreen exclusively; I am getting work done,
and, when I have issues worth addressing, I write directly to the
app developer in question and get results. I just sent a note to
CoCard Merchant Services, the developer of the CoCard Restaurant
app; in my note, I am seeking to know why the app changes my
screen orientation from Portrait to Landscape. I also visited the
issue of unlabeled buttons. perhaps I'll read from this developer
within the next few hours, or, by the end of the week. What's
important for me is that I can talk to the developer and get
results! And, if no results are obtainable, I simply abandon the
app and its developer and move on to something else.

Since I began embracing technology and using it to make things a
bit better for me with regards to what I do, I've never had so
much luck in reaching developers until I wrapped my arms around
the Android platform. So, I can, and I will, defend my platform
to the best of my ability because it is WORKING FOR ME as
advertised.

I don't pretend to be a guru at anything; I typically will hardly
ever recommend a particular platform over the other; but I'll
discuss what I do that's giving me achievable results! I'll let
iOS enthusiasts speak up, but, as for me, Android rocks my boat
and I'm sticking with it!

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado










--
Affordably priced Accessible Talking MP3 Players, Accessible phones,
Bluetooth devices, and accessories http://www.talkingmp3players.com/
Email: laz@talkingmp3players.com
Phone: 727-498-0121
Skype: lazmesa
Personal Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/laz.mesa
Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/Talkingmp3players?_rdr







--
Affordably priced Accessible Talking MP3 Players, Accessible phones,
Bluetooth devices, and accessories
http://www.talkingmp3players.com/
Email: laz@talkingmp3players.com
Phone: 727-498-0121
Skype: lazmesa
Personal Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/laz.mesa
Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/Talkingmp3players?_rdr


Re: New RCA Galileo, my thoughts

Marie <magpie.mn@...>
 

have had many similar experiences even on the higher end Android c\devices. So you are not alone.
Marie

-----Original Message-----
From: Jeremy
Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 1:09 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] New RCA Galileo, my thoughts

Hey all,
First let me just say that I do not intend what so ever to start any
arguments as to what platforms might be better, but my experiences so
far with this new tablet haven't been good at all. It was my hopes that
perhaps updating tb might fix some of the issues I'm seeing so far, but
it hasn't done much for being able to navigate around this thing.

Beyond that, I'm hoping that perhaps something is faulty in the
hardware, but either way, here is what I'm having issues with, so
perhaps someone with more experience can help.

As soon as I got the tablet this morning, I followed the instructions
here for starting tb. I'm familiar with using this two-finger gesture,
as I'd used it before on other devices, but I unfortunately wasn't able
to get it to work right away. I ended up locking and unlocking the
screen, as was mentioned here previously, using one finger to flick up
and then using the two-finger gesture again. After a little bit tb came
up talking and took me to the tutorial thing as I'd expected.

It was here that I started having a lot of problems. First, the double
tap gesture seems to be very difficult to register. From what I can tell
so far, the other gestures such as flicking aren't as bad, but no matter
how slow or fast I try to double tap, it always seems to register it as
me just touching the item once. I noticed that it's a little more
reliable if I keep one finger on the item I want to activate and then
use another finger to double tap, but this isn't always consistent either.

Another real gripe was actually making it through the setup process. One
area specifically that I got stuck in was the one where you can select
your wireless AP you wish to connect to. I'm not quite certain if it was
the flick gesture screwing up, an issue with that part of the interface,
or whatever, but I ended up in an area where the name of an AP here
close to me was being repeated over and over and over. As soon as I'd
use the arrow keys on the keyboard or a flick right gesture to try to
jump to the name of my AP, I would get the sound from tb that something
else had been refocused and it would jump back to somewhere else on the
screen. Once I'd made it to the name of my AP, I tried to quickly use
the double tap to activate it, but once again, it failed. I ended up
having to use a mixture of the arrow keys, enter key, touching the
screen to find stuff that I couldn't focus on with the keyboard and the
flick gestures to make it through.

Once I'd made it through setting up the tablet, I was able to go into
the apps icon on the bottom and locate the play store icon. Through
using explore by touch, flicking and the keyboard, I was able to locate
the search button and do a search for talkback. I'd also been somewhat
familiar with this process from older devices, so I already knew what to
expect as to installing/updating it. Once I'd updated it, I noticed that
the navigation sounds had changed, but I'm still having major issues
with actually moving around through the UI. This is where I'm hoping
that maybe something is jacked up with the screen, as to why it's hard
to register a double tap, but if not, I'm not quite sure I'd call this
usable at all. I'll also note that in the little I've been able to play
with higher end devices, such as the s7, I didn't seem to have issues
with gestures like this.

For anyone else who might be thinking of purchasing this, please keep in
mind that it doesn't seem to have dedicated hardware buttons for back
and home. For those familiar with some of the phones that actually have
a home button you can feel, this makes it quite easy to re orientate
yourself back to the home screen if you're stuck or whatever. While the
tablet does have buttons going along the very bottom of the screen,
back, overview, home, volume down and volume up, it appears to be
necessary to use the double tap gesture to activate these, so that means
it's stupidly hard to get them to work.

I then decided to locate the settings app and see if there were any
preferences I might could change to help, which leads me to my final
problem. I checked through everything I could find, accessibility,
checked the TTS, looked at the TTS's speech rate, whent back a bit and
turned down the brightness on the screen, pressed back on the keyboard
to go back into the main settings again and poof, I completely lost
speech. It didn't appear that tb had crashed, as I still had the
navigation sounds that tb used when I used flick or the keyboard to
move, but the speech from the default google TTS that comes loaded was
completely gone. I tried to lock and unlock the screen which didn't
work, so I ended up holding down the power button for like 30 seconds
and everything was shut down. Luckily for me, when the device came back
up, I had speech again. I've thought about purchasing another TTS, as
one reason I tried it was for being able to use eloquence, but I'm
honestly a little worried with what I see so far from what I assume is
crappy hardware.

I'd really hoped that the 80 bucks I put into purchasing this little
beasty would be enough to give me an idea if a higher end device such as
a phone would be something I'd like changing to, but so far as I can
tell, I'm not pleased at all.
It was here that I was hoping that perhaps it's just me, something
screwy with the hardware that could be fixed, or that perhaps someone
else had ideas on stuff I could try.
Hope everyone is well.
Take care.


Re: Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?

Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
 

I should actually give Audex a spin. I just want the SLS functionality, I
don't care too much about earcons; I find them somewhat distracting after a
fashion.

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado


Re: Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?

Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
 

Gene, your inference is wrong! I'll leave it there and let the skepticism
have a jolly ride!

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado


Re: Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?

Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
 

I did play with Waze a while back; it was reasonably accessible at that
time. I am hoping that nothing has been broken in the code.

Waze is now owned by Google and I believe it is still being developed. I'll
grab it again and take it for a spin and report back.

GoogleMaps is not too shabby; my fun-go-lucky group and I were driving into
Wyoming using GoogleMaps; as we exited Colorado, Ms. GPS said: "Welcome to
Wyoming". I found that interesting.

From a blindness perspective though, you probably want something for
walking. GetThere ranks up there!

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado


Re: project voco #article

Josh Kennedy
 

and it may make the creation of new tts voices even easier as well.

On 4/26/2017 6:48 PM, Victor wrote:
Sounds pretty cool for those of us in radio broadcasting.

Victor

On 4/26/17, Josh Kennedy <joshknnd1982@gmail.com> wrote:
hey i just found this. and this project may revolutionise how we edit
audio and voices/vocals. its called project voco for audio example just
look up project voco on youtube and the link for the article is


http://www.theverge.com/2016/11/3/13514088/adobe-photoshop-audio-project-voco







Re: project voco #article

Victor
 

Sounds pretty cool for those of us in radio broadcasting.

Victor

On 4/26/17, Josh Kennedy <joshknnd1982@gmail.com> wrote:
hey i just found this. and this project may revolutionise how we edit
audio and voices/vocals. its called project voco for audio example just
look up project voco on youtube and the link for the article is


http://www.theverge.com/2016/11/3/13514088/adobe-photoshop-audio-project-voco







project voco #article

Josh Kennedy
 

hey i just found this. and this project may revolutionise how we edit audio and voices/vocals. its called project voco for audio example just look up project voco on youtube and the link for the article is


http://www.theverge.com/2016/11/3/13514088/adobe-photoshop-audio-project-voco


Re: Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?

Aman Singer
 

Hello Laz,

To electronically locate yourself on earth, you do not need a connection to anyone else. All you need is, first, a map and, secondly, to receive the GPS signal sent out by the satellites and know how to process it. To receive a GPS signal, all you require is a GPS receiver. It's a radio receiver just like any other. For confirmation see
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Global_Positioning_System
Most android tablets and a good many Windows tablets have GPS receivers built in. If they don't, you can get a small Bluetooth device which acts as a GPS receiver. In neither case, though, do you need a connection to the internet to know where you are in real-time. There are, of course, programs which use a combination of the GPS chip and an internet connection to locate you. Having an internet connection allows you to download maps as you need them, to obtain updated information on a business (the most obvious example in the blindness specific apps is blindsquare, which uses 4square's data which it fetches from the internet), to send your location to others, etc. However, these services are auxiliary to GPS, they are not GPS itself. There are tons of GPS devices which are simply unable to transmit anything and can connect to nothing. See, for example, some of the products made by Garmin for cars and boats. They don't talk to anything except, perhaps, the car's speakers, but they receive the GPS signal and can tell the user where he is and how to get to his destination.
I should say that some companies have decided, in their phones and tablets, to use cheap GPS receivers and use what is called assisted GPS to get a better location. This uses a rough GPS signal to get started and narrows the location down by seeing what wireless networks are in the area, what cellular site the device is connecting to, and so on. As a manufacturer, this allows you to save a little on your GPS receiver and the customer won't notice.
As for Google maps, keep in mind that it relies on Google's servers for the maps in most cases. Therefore, it obviously dies if you have no connection to the internet, it can't talk to Google. Products like Nearby Explorer, however, get their maps in one big gulp. They then use the GPS signal to know where you are on the map and to direct you to wherever you're going or to show you what's around you.
I hope that's of some use.
Aman

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Laz
Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 5:33 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?

Josh, Perhaps you're not understanding what I'm asking. Fine and dandy that it downloads the maps but maps whether on a tablet or on a piece of paper, are completely worthless unless one and/or the device have a way to locate you in the environment, which is where GPS comes in. GPS has to have some way of contacting and accessing the global positioning satellites so as to figure out where you are so the navigation app can further guide you. Without this outside data there's no way to know where you are and the map is worthless.

So again, is it just a list of directions that you follow as in step 1, go to 7th avenue, step 2. take a left to 3rd street, step 3. walk
10 yards and you'll be in front of the pizza joint which you can do by paying attention to what you're doing and without the GPS updating your position, or are you claiming that it somehow magically is capable of updating your location without any connection and giving you the next step to follow when it's the correct time?

I've had experience with losing the GPS signal and Google Maps falls on its face until it can reconnect with the satellites, so I'm really interested in knowing if there's some magical way for it to locate where you are and keep directing you without the need for any connection at all.

Laz

On 4/26/17, Josh Kennedy <joshknnd1982@gmail.com> wrote:
ok the scoop on nearby explorer for android.

1. it uses offline maps. the maps get downloaded into your device's
main storeage area and the download will take 2 or 3 hours to complete.

2. after the maps are downloaded and installed. you can start using
nearby explorer.

3. you can use nearby explorer with wifi and data turned all the way off.

4. you do not need any data or any wifi at all whatsoever to use
nearby explorer after of course you have downloaded the maps.

5. the map download is a one time thing. you download the maps one
time and then you just forget about them.

6. nearby explorer has a settings menu for different modes such as
driving and many many other things.

7. again, you do not need wifi for nearby explorer. you do not need
data for nearby explorer.

8. there is a version of the app, that is free, called nearby explorer
online. nearby explorer online free version does require data, or wifi.
because nearby explorer online free version does not let you download
any maps into your onboard storeage. therefore you need data at all
times for the nearby explorer online free version.

both apps are found in the play store.

On 4/26/2017 4:25 PM, Laz wrote:
Interesting. So how does it keep track of where you are while driving
in a car? Or does it just provide you with driving instructions as in
a list? I think what you're saying is that you can use an app that
will provide you with directions but the tablet can't use GPS without
some sort of external connection to either a data plan or wifi.

Laz

On 4/26/17, Josh Kennedy <joshknnd1982@gmail.com> wrote:
I do not need a data plan to use gps on my phone and tablet. the
reason is because nearby explorer has all its maps and points of
interest offline stored locally onboard the device, no data plan needed!


On 4/26/2017 4:07 PM, Laz wrote:
Sorry to rain on the ardent support for Android but both Olusegoon
and Josh claimed that using GPS on the tablet would not be an issue...
That would be true if the tablet could use a data plan which most
Android tablets don't. You could use GPS if you were in range of a
wifi signal but in a car that would also be doubtful. If the tablet
was tethered to a smart phone then it would be possible to do it on
the road, but then why use the tablet since the smart phone could
do the same?

I use Android, iOS, and the Fire OS so you know.

Laz

On 4/26/17, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:
Again, you are speaking so broadly that there is no way to know
much about how you use your device. I infer that you don't do
much word processing.
I'm not sure what to say about your comments about apps. I'll let
others comment if they have experience or comments about app
accessibility or their results trying to get developers to make
apps accessible.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 1:04 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?


Gene, I like skeptics! And, since you don't use an Android
device, I'm not about to confuse or convince you to get one. The
controls you referenced are no issues for me on my Shiny Android
toy.

I don't write in this space for purposes of impressing the wind!
I share information based solely on personal experience whether
it's by way of experimentation, or by some other direct means. I
live and breathe Android!
If it weren't working for me, I won't be working on THROWING
WINDOWS overboard for Android.

I will state here for the records that I DO NOT currently use any
bluetooth or physical keyboard of any kind with my Shiny Android
toys! I use the touchscreen exclusively; I am getting work done,
and, when I have issues worth addressing, I write directly to the
app developer in question and get results. I just sent a note to
CoCard Merchant Services, the developer of the CoCard Restaurant
app; in my note, I am seeking to know why the app changes my
screen orientation from Portrait to Landscape. I also visited the
issue of unlabeled buttons. perhaps I'll read from this developer
within the next few hours, or, by the end of the week. What's
important for me is that I can talk to the developer and get
results! And, if no results are obtainable, I simply abandon the
app and its developer and move on to something else.

Since I began embracing technology and using it to make things a
bit better for me with regards to what I do, I've never had so
much luck in reaching developers until I wrapped my arms around
the Android platform. So, I can, and I will, defend my platform
to the best of my ability because it is WORKING FOR ME as
advertised.

I don't pretend to be a guru at anything; I typically will hardly
ever recommend a particular platform over the other; but I'll
discuss what I do that's giving me achievable results! I'll let
iOS enthusiasts speak up, but, as for me, Android rocks my boat
and I'm sticking with it!

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado










--
Affordably priced Accessible Talking MP3 Players, Accessible phones, Bluetooth devices, and accessories http://www.talkingmp3players.com/
Email: laz@talkingmp3players.com
Phone: 727-498-0121
Skype: lazmesa
Personal Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/laz.mesa
Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/Talkingmp3players?_rdr


Re: Thanks for the Android advice and Help

Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
 

Chief Dave, I am probably the grumpiest, <LOL>!

Even though you only have a BestBuy gift card, please don't limit yourself
to just checking things out at BestBuy. Is there a Microcenter near you?
Check there as well.

If you love adventure, don't rule out Android! The much talked about RCA
Galileo Pro comes with 32GB internal storage and this can be expanded;
simply insert a 128GB SD card and you'll have plenty for a while. It
supports WI-FI and bluetooth. I'm made to understand that its speakers are
lousy; well, I'm sure an inexpensive bluetooth speaker can be found.

When your searches are over, please consider contacting me privately. All
the very best!!

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado


Re: webvisim

J.G
 

Hi,


yeah, I agree. addon developers will have to use newer technologies because NPAPI (which webvisum probably uses)is not supported in newest firefox.


regards, Jožef


Re: are kindles accessible now?

Josh Kennedy
 

no you cannot get windows7 tablets. they are not available because windows7 is *not* designed for tablets.


Sent with AquaMail for Android
http://www.aqua-mail.com

On April 26, 2017 17:52:41 "Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc." <ukekearuaro@valtdnet.com> wrote:

Janet, I'm certain that others who are better than me at it have already
responded. Nevertheless, let me see if I can chip in an additional cent.
In doing so, you will have to promise to buy me -- buy me what? Hmm, we'll
figure that out later, <LOL>!!

A Windows tablet runs Windows as you know it. So, if you are running
Windows10, the latest toy in town, that's what you'll get if you buy a
Windows tablet. I suppose Windows7 tablets are also available, but please,
please, don't quote me on that one until I wake up!

You can install your preferred Windows screen reader on a Windows tablet.

There's only one thing that makes an Android tablet much the same as a
Windows one: Both have touch screens and both can either come with a
physical keyboard, or you can use a bluetooth keyboard.

Now what's different? An Android tablet uses the TalkBack screen reader
which comes preinstalled, and, if it isn't, you can grab it from the Google
Playstore and install it. TalkBack is free.

If you want to venture into the world of Android, touchscreen is nothing for
you since you are using an iOS device! Notwithstanding, please check out
Android with an open mind. Don't expect it to act like iOS and vice versa.
Just grab the cheapest Android toy you can find, play with it, make it your
friend, then venture as far afield as you so desire. I can assure you that
you will get a lot of help if you get stuck.

And now I can't wait to join you for that barbecue feast when Ms. Android
comes to visit hopefully on a more permanent basis!

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado




Re: Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?

Josh Kennedy
 

my RCA tablet lets me turn on location services. but in all honesty, i would not use a tablet of any kind for gps. i tried it. its too bulky and unweeldy to use for a handheld portable gps. if you want a gps device then get the motorola moto g 4 phone off amazon because its smaller and much more portable and better for gps use.


Sent with AquaMail for Android
http://www.aqua-mail.com

On April 26, 2017 17:49:34 "Laz" <laz@talkingmp3players.com> wrote:

Which requires some sort of data connection whether wifi or data plan.
Tell me, does this Galaxy tablet you have and have been talking about
even have a GPS chip in it? I know smart phones do but I don't think
many tablets have them as they are mainly for use with wifi and most
don't have a SIM card slot for a data plan.

On 4/26/17, Josh Kennedy <joshknnd1982@gmail.com> wrote:
if you want it to direct you, you have to turn location services on under
settings which will activate the gps chip that is inside of your android
device.


Sent with AquaMail for Android
http://www.aqua-mail.com


On April 26, 2017 5:32:54 PM "Laz" <laz@talkingmp3players.com> wrote:

Josh, Perhaps you're not understanding what I'm asking. Fine and dandy
that it downloads the maps but maps whether on a tablet or on a piece
of paper, are completely worthless unless one and/or the device have a
way to locate you in the environment, which is where GPS comes in. GPS
has to have some way of contacting and accessing the global
positioning satellites so as to figure out where you are so the
navigation app can further guide you. Without this outside data
there's no way to know where you are and the map is worthless.

So again, is it just a list of directions that you follow as in step
1, go to 7th avenue, step 2. take a left to 3rd street, step 3. walk
10 yards and you'll be in front of the pizza joint which you can do by
paying attention to what you're doing and without the GPS updating
your position, or are you claiming that it somehow magically is
capable of updating your location without any connection and giving
you the next step to follow when it's the correct time?

I've had experience with losing the GPS signal and Google Maps falls
on its face until it can reconnect with the satellites, so I'm really
interested in knowing if there's some magical way for it to locate
where you are and keep directing you without the need for any
connection at all.

Laz

On 4/26/17, Josh Kennedy <joshknnd1982@gmail.com> wrote:
ok the scoop on nearby explorer for android.

1. it uses offline maps. the maps get downloaded into your device's main
storeage area and the download will take 2 or 3 hours to complete.

2. after the maps are downloaded and installed. you can start using
nearby explorer.

3. you can use nearby explorer with wifi and data turned all the way
off.

4. you do not need any data or any wifi at all whatsoever to use nearby
explorer after of course you have downloaded the maps.

5. the map download is a one time thing. you download the maps one time
and then you just forget about them.

6. nearby explorer has a settings menu for different modes such as
driving and many many other things.

7. again, you do not need wifi for nearby explorer. you do not need data
for nearby explorer.

8. there is a version of the app, that is free, called nearby explorer
online. nearby explorer online free version does require data, or wifi.
because nearby explorer online free version does not let you download
any maps into your onboard storeage. therefore you need data at all
times for the nearby explorer online free version.

both apps are found in the play store.

On 4/26/2017 4:25 PM, Laz wrote:
Interesting. So how does it keep track of where you are while driving
in a car? Or does it just provide you with driving instructions as in
a list? I think what you're saying is that you can use an app that
will provide you with directions but the tablet can't use GPS without
some sort of external connection to either a data plan or wifi.

Laz

On 4/26/17, Josh Kennedy <joshknnd1982@gmail.com> wrote:
I do not need a data plan to use gps on my phone and tablet. the
reason
is because nearby explorer has all its maps and points of interest
offline stored locally onboard the device, no data plan needed!


On 4/26/2017 4:07 PM, Laz wrote:
Sorry to rain on the ardent support for Android but both Olusegoon
and
Josh claimed that using GPS on the tablet would not be an issue...
That would be true if the tablet could use a data plan which most
Android tablets don't. You could use GPS if you were in range of a
wifi signal but in a car that would also be doubtful. If the tablet
was tethered to a smart phone then it would be possible to do it on
the road, but then why use the tablet since the smart phone could do
the same?

I use Android, iOS, and the Fire OS so you know.

Laz

On 4/26/17, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:
Again, you are speaking so broadly that there is no way to know much
about
how you use your device. I infer that you don't do much word
processing.
I'm not sure what to say about your comments about apps. I'll let
others
comment if they have experience or comments about app accessibility
or
their
results trying to get developers to make apps accessible.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 1:04 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In
between?


Gene, I like skeptics! And, since you don't use an Android device,
I'm
not
about to confuse or convince you to get one. The controls you
referenced
are no issues for me on my Shiny Android toy.

I don't write in this space for purposes of impressing the wind! I
share
information based solely on personal experience whether it's by way
of
experimentation, or by some other direct means. I live and breathe
Android!
If it weren't working for me, I won't be working on THROWING WINDOWS
overboard for Android.

I will state here for the records that I DO NOT currently use any
bluetooth
or physical keyboard of any kind with my Shiny Android toys! I use
the
touchscreen exclusively; I am getting work done, and, when I have
issues
worth addressing, I write directly to the app developer in question
and
get
results. I just sent a note to CoCard Merchant Services, the
developer
of
the CoCard Restaurant app; in my note, I am seeking to know why the
app
changes my screen orientation from Portrait to Landscape. I also
visited
the issue of unlabeled buttons. perhaps I'll read from this
developer
within the next few hours, or, by the end of the week. What's
important
for
me is that I can talk to the developer and get results! And, if no
results
are obtainable, I simply abandon the app and its developer and move
on
to
something else.

Since I began embracing technology and using it to make things a bit
better
for me with regards to what I do, I've never had so much luck in
reaching
developers until I wrapped my arms around the Android platform. So,
I
can,
and I will, defend my platform to the best of my ability because it
is
WORKING FOR ME as advertised.

I don't pretend to be a guru at anything; I typically will hardly
ever
recommend a particular platform over the other; but I'll discuss
what
I
do
that's giving me achievable results! I'll let iOS enthusiasts speak
up,
but, as for me, Android rocks my boat and I'm sticking with it!

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado










--
Affordably priced Accessible Talking MP3 Players, Accessible phones,
Bluetooth devices, and accessories
http://www.talkingmp3players.com/
Email: laz@talkingmp3players.com
Phone: 727-498-0121
Skype: lazmesa
Personal Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/laz.mesa
Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/Talkingmp3players?_rdr







--
Affordably priced Accessible Talking MP3 Players, Accessible phones,
Bluetooth devices, and accessories
http://www.talkingmp3players.com/
Email: laz@talkingmp3players.com
Phone: 727-498-0121
Skype: lazmesa
Personal Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/laz.mesa
Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/Talkingmp3players?_rdr


Re: are kindles accessible now?

Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
 

Janet, I'm certain that others who are better than me at it have already
responded. Nevertheless, let me see if I can chip in an additional cent.
In doing so, you will have to promise to buy me -- buy me what? Hmm, we'll
figure that out later, <LOL>!!

A Windows tablet runs Windows as you know it. So, if you are running
Windows10, the latest toy in town, that's what you'll get if you buy a
Windows tablet. I suppose Windows7 tablets are also available, but please,
please, don't quote me on that one until I wake up!

You can install your preferred Windows screen reader on a Windows tablet.

There's only one thing that makes an Android tablet much the same as a
Windows one: Both have touch screens and both can either come with a
physical keyboard, or you can use a bluetooth keyboard.

Now what's different? An Android tablet uses the TalkBack screen reader
which comes preinstalled, and, if it isn't, you can grab it from the Google
Playstore and install it. TalkBack is free.

If you want to venture into the world of Android, touchscreen is nothing for
you since you are using an iOS device! Notwithstanding, please check out
Android with an open mind. Don't expect it to act like iOS and vice versa.
Just grab the cheapest Android toy you can find, play with it, make it your
friend, then venture as far afield as you so desire. I can assure you that
you will get a lot of help if you get stuck.

And now I can't wait to join you for that barbecue feast when Ms. Android
comes to visit hopefully on a more permanent basis!

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado


Re: Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?

Laz
 

Which requires some sort of data connection whether wifi or data plan.
Tell me, does this Galaxy tablet you have and have been talking about
even have a GPS chip in it? I know smart phones do but I don't think
many tablets have them as they are mainly for use with wifi and most
don't have a SIM card slot for a data plan.

On 4/26/17, Josh Kennedy <joshknnd1982@gmail.com> wrote:
if you want it to direct you, you have to turn location services on under
settings which will activate the gps chip that is inside of your android
device.


Sent with AquaMail for Android
http://www.aqua-mail.com


On April 26, 2017 5:32:54 PM "Laz" <laz@talkingmp3players.com> wrote:

Josh, Perhaps you're not understanding what I'm asking. Fine and dandy
that it downloads the maps but maps whether on a tablet or on a piece
of paper, are completely worthless unless one and/or the device have a
way to locate you in the environment, which is where GPS comes in. GPS
has to have some way of contacting and accessing the global
positioning satellites so as to figure out where you are so the
navigation app can further guide you. Without this outside data
there's no way to know where you are and the map is worthless.

So again, is it just a list of directions that you follow as in step
1, go to 7th avenue, step 2. take a left to 3rd street, step 3. walk
10 yards and you'll be in front of the pizza joint which you can do by
paying attention to what you're doing and without the GPS updating
your position, or are you claiming that it somehow magically is
capable of updating your location without any connection and giving
you the next step to follow when it's the correct time?

I've had experience with losing the GPS signal and Google Maps falls
on its face until it can reconnect with the satellites, so I'm really
interested in knowing if there's some magical way for it to locate
where you are and keep directing you without the need for any
connection at all.

Laz

On 4/26/17, Josh Kennedy <joshknnd1982@gmail.com> wrote:
ok the scoop on nearby explorer for android.

1. it uses offline maps. the maps get downloaded into your device's main
storeage area and the download will take 2 or 3 hours to complete.

2. after the maps are downloaded and installed. you can start using
nearby explorer.

3. you can use nearby explorer with wifi and data turned all the way
off.

4. you do not need any data or any wifi at all whatsoever to use nearby
explorer after of course you have downloaded the maps.

5. the map download is a one time thing. you download the maps one time
and then you just forget about them.

6. nearby explorer has a settings menu for different modes such as
driving and many many other things.

7. again, you do not need wifi for nearby explorer. you do not need data
for nearby explorer.

8. there is a version of the app, that is free, called nearby explorer
online. nearby explorer online free version does require data, or wifi.
because nearby explorer online free version does not let you download
any maps into your onboard storeage. therefore you need data at all
times for the nearby explorer online free version.

both apps are found in the play store.

On 4/26/2017 4:25 PM, Laz wrote:
Interesting. So how does it keep track of where you are while driving
in a car? Or does it just provide you with driving instructions as in
a list? I think what you're saying is that you can use an app that
will provide you with directions but the tablet can't use GPS without
some sort of external connection to either a data plan or wifi.

Laz

On 4/26/17, Josh Kennedy <joshknnd1982@gmail.com> wrote:
I do not need a data plan to use gps on my phone and tablet. the
reason
is because nearby explorer has all its maps and points of interest
offline stored locally onboard the device, no data plan needed!


On 4/26/2017 4:07 PM, Laz wrote:
Sorry to rain on the ardent support for Android but both Olusegoon
and
Josh claimed that using GPS on the tablet would not be an issue...
That would be true if the tablet could use a data plan which most
Android tablets don't. You could use GPS if you were in range of a
wifi signal but in a car that would also be doubtful. If the tablet
was tethered to a smart phone then it would be possible to do it on
the road, but then why use the tablet since the smart phone could do
the same?

I use Android, iOS, and the Fire OS so you know.

Laz

On 4/26/17, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:
Again, you are speaking so broadly that there is no way to know much
about
how you use your device. I infer that you don't do much word
processing.
I'm not sure what to say about your comments about apps. I'll let
others
comment if they have experience or comments about app accessibility
or
their
results trying to get developers to make apps accessible.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 1:04 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In
between?


Gene, I like skeptics! And, since you don't use an Android device,
I'm
not
about to confuse or convince you to get one. The controls you
referenced
are no issues for me on my Shiny Android toy.

I don't write in this space for purposes of impressing the wind! I
share
information based solely on personal experience whether it's by way
of
experimentation, or by some other direct means. I live and breathe
Android!
If it weren't working for me, I won't be working on THROWING WINDOWS
overboard for Android.

I will state here for the records that I DO NOT currently use any
bluetooth
or physical keyboard of any kind with my Shiny Android toys! I use
the
touchscreen exclusively; I am getting work done, and, when I have
issues
worth addressing, I write directly to the app developer in question
and
get
results. I just sent a note to CoCard Merchant Services, the
developer
of
the CoCard Restaurant app; in my note, I am seeking to know why the
app
changes my screen orientation from Portrait to Landscape. I also
visited
the issue of unlabeled buttons. perhaps I'll read from this
developer
within the next few hours, or, by the end of the week. What's
important
for
me is that I can talk to the developer and get results! And, if no
results
are obtainable, I simply abandon the app and its developer and move
on
to
something else.

Since I began embracing technology and using it to make things a bit
better
for me with regards to what I do, I've never had so much luck in
reaching
developers until I wrapped my arms around the Android platform. So,
I
can,
and I will, defend my platform to the best of my ability because it
is
WORKING FOR ME as advertised.

I don't pretend to be a guru at anything; I typically will hardly
ever
recommend a particular platform over the other; but I'll discuss
what
I
do
that's giving me achievable results! I'll let iOS enthusiasts speak
up,
but, as for me, Android rocks my boat and I'm sticking with it!

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado










--
Affordably priced Accessible Talking MP3 Players, Accessible phones,
Bluetooth devices, and accessories
http://www.talkingmp3players.com/
Email: laz@talkingmp3players.com
Phone: 727-498-0121
Skype: lazmesa
Personal Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/laz.mesa
Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/Talkingmp3players?_rdr






--
Affordably priced Accessible Talking MP3 Players, Accessible phones,
Bluetooth devices, and accessories
http://www.talkingmp3players.com/
Email: laz@talkingmp3players.com
Phone: 727-498-0121
Skype: lazmesa
Personal Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/laz.mesa
Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/Talkingmp3players?_rdr


Re: New RCA Galileo, my thoughts

Josh Kennedy
 

I detached my tablet and was using it for a bit tonight, and had no issues with the double taps and stuff. just practice with it, you'll get the hang of it.

Sent with AquaMail for Android
http://www.aqua-mail.com

On April 26, 2017 17:45:15 "Gene" <gsasner@...> wrote:

I don't use such devices but I would suggest experimenting with the time between taps.  Changing the interval may affect performance.  You indicated that keeping a finger on the icon improves performance.  This may be, in effect, interfering with how the device gauges the time between taps and may be improving performance for that reason.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 4:25 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New RCA Galileo, my thoughts

two useful commands are control alt r for recent screens, and control alt n
for notification screen. to review the screen press alt plus up down left
or right arrow keys. to activate an item hit alt enter. to long  press, hit
alt shift enter.


Sent with AquaMail for Android
http://www.aqua-mail.com


On April 26, 2017 5:19:30 PM "Carolyn Arnold" <4carolyna@...> wrote:

> Thank you for that information. Could you send me any tablet specific key
> commands to:
>
> 4carolyna@...
>
> Thanks.
>
> Bye for now,
>
> Carolyn
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
> Josh Kennedy
> Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 4:13 PM
> To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New RCA Galileo, my thoughts
>
> if you use the keyboard, the escape key is back, and home is f1 and
> settings is f3.
>
>
> On 4/26/2017 4:09 PM, Jeremy wrote:
>> Hey all,
>> First let me just say that I do not intend what so ever to start any
>> arguments as to what platforms might be better,  but my experiences so
>> far with this new tablet haven't been good at all. It was my hopes
>> that perhaps updating tb might fix some of the issues I'm seeing so
>> far, but it hasn't done much for being able to navigate around this
>> thing.
>>
>> Beyond that, I'm hoping that perhaps something is faulty in the
>> hardware, but either way, here is what I'm having issues with, so
>> perhaps someone with more experience can help.
>>
>> As soon as I got the tablet this morning, I followed the instructions
>> here for starting tb. I'm familiar with using this two-finger gesture,
>> as I'd used it before on other devices, but I unfortunately wasn't
>> able to get it to work right away. I ended up locking and unlocking
>> the screen, as was mentioned here previously, using one finger to
>> flick up and then using the two-finger gesture again. After a little
>> bit tb came up talking and took me to the tutorial thing as I'd expected.
>>
>> It was here that I started having a lot of problems. First, the double
>> tap gesture seems to be very difficult to register. From what I can
>> tell so far, the other gestures such as flicking aren't as bad, but no
>> matter how slow or fast I try to double tap, it always seems to
>> register it as me just touching the item once. I noticed that it's a
>> little more reliable if I keep one finger on the item I want to
>> activate and then use another finger to double tap, but this isn't
>> always consistent either.
>>
>> Another real gripe was actually making it through the setup process.
>> One area specifically that I got stuck in was the one where you can
>> select your wireless AP you wish to connect to. I'm not quite certain
>> if it was the flick gesture screwing up, an issue with that part of
>> the interface, or whatever, but I ended up in an area where the name
>> of an AP here close to me was being repeated over and over and over.
>> As soon as I'd use the arrow keys on the keyboard or a flick right
>> gesture to try to jump to the name of my AP, I would get the sound
>> from tb that something else had been refocused and it would jump back
>> to somewhere else on the screen. Once I'd made it to the name of my
>> AP, I tried to quickly use the double tap to activate it, but once
>> again, it failed. I ended up having to use a mixture of the arrow
>> keys, enter key, touching the screen to find stuff that I couldn't
>> focus on with the keyboard and the flick gestures to make it through.
>>
>> Once I'd made it through setting up the tablet, I was able to go into
>> the apps icon on the bottom and locate the play store icon. Through
>> using explore by touch, flicking and the keyboard, I was able to
>> locate the search button and do a search for talkback. I'd also been
>> somewhat familiar with this process from older devices, so I already
>> knew what to expect as to installing/updating it. Once I'd updated it,
>> I noticed that the navigation sounds had changed, but I'm still having
>> major issues with actually moving around through the UI. This is where
>> I'm hoping that maybe something is jacked up with the screen, as to
>> why it's hard to register a double tap, but if not, I'm not quite sure
>> I'd call this usable at all. I'll also note that in the little I've
>> been able to play with higher end devices, such as the s7, I didn't
>> seem to have issues with gestures like this.
>>
>> For anyone else who might be thinking of purchasing this, please keep
>> in mind that it doesn't seem to have dedicated hardware buttons for
>> back and home. For those familiar with some of the phones that
>> actually have a home button you can feel, this makes it quite easy to
>> re orientate yourself back to the home screen if you're stuck or
>> whatever. While the tablet does have buttons going along the very
>> bottom of the screen, back, overview, home, volume down and volume up,
>> it appears to be necessary to use the double tap gesture to activate
>> these, so that means it's stupidly hard to get them to work.
>>
>> I then decided to locate the settings app and see if there were any
>> preferences I might could change to help, which leads me to my final
>> problem. I checked through everything I could find, accessibility,
>> checked the TTS, looked at the TTS's speech rate, whent back a bit and
>> turned down the brightness on the screen, pressed back on the keyboard
>> to go back into the main settings again and poof, I completely lost
>> speech. It didn't appear that tb had crashed, as I still had the
>> navigation sounds that tb used when I used flick or the keyboard to
>> move, but the speech from the default google TTS that comes loaded was
>> completely gone. I tried to lock and unlock the screen which didn't
>> work, so I ended up holding down the power button for like 30 seconds
>> and everything was shut down. Luckily for me, when the device came
>> back up, I had speech again. I've thought about purchasing another
>> TTS, as one reason I tried it was for being able to use eloquence, but
>> I'm honestly a little worried with what I see so far from what I
>> assume is crappy hardware.
>>
>> I'd really hoped that the 80 bucks I put into purchasing this little
>> beasty would be enough to give me an idea if a higher end device such
>> as a phone would be something I'd like changing to, but so far as I
>> can tell, I'm not pleased at all.
>> It was here that I was hoping that perhaps it's just me, something
>> screwy with the hardware that could be fixed, or that perhaps someone
>> else had ideas on stuff I could try.
>> Hope everyone is well.
>> Take care.
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>





Re: Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?

Carlos
 

Hi Aman,

It may be in part a matter of life style and priorities. I don't tend to use GPS much or the Uber service at all so I haven't noticed the lack. I was thinking more in terms of general software, but for those use cases, I can certainly see your point.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Aman Singer" <aman.singer@gmail.com>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 5:27 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?


Hi Carlos,

I would really love to agree with you. I dislike both iOS
and Android for different reasons. There remain, though, things that are
easier to do with, or only possible on, iOS, just for example, than with a
windows machine. I have yet to see a decent GPS application for Windows
which costs less than $300. There are tons of GPS apps for the iDevices
which are both cheap and very usable. Working with Uber is difficult on
Windows, it is easier on iOS. iMessage and faceTime require either an
iDevice or a Mac, and it's worth keeping in mind that Macs are huge and
expensive. Hackintosh or mac via VM is not really a viable way of using
iMessage and FaceTime. KNFB reader is certainly available for Windows, but I
can't find a handheld camera with tilt sensing capability. If anyone knows
of one, I would love to hear about it. Again, for Americans, Bard is not
available for Windows, and probably will never be. Having said all that, and
despite the fact that Microsoft has turned themselves into spy central, I am
very pleased with the accessibility and capability of Windows recently. I
just wish the maker were better. I say all this in hope of a correction, I
would be absolutely overjoyed with a GPS program for Windows that is more
affordable than PC Maps, a hand-held tilt-sensing camera, etc.
Aman

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Carlos
Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 2:23 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?

Of course it always comes down to preference, but for me personally, both
iOS and Android have lost what little appeal they ever had now that Windows
tablets have become common and affordable. As much as I dislike Windows 10,
I would still always choose a Windows 10 tablet over an Android tablet or an
iPad. As far as I'm concerned, neither Android or iOS can beat Windows in
terms of flexibility, accessibility, or the sheer amount of available
software.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc." <ukekearuaro@valtdnet.com>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 2:04 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Android Accessibility Good Bad, or In between?


Gene, I like skeptics! And, since you don't use an Android device,
I'm not about to confuse or convince you to get one. The controls you
referenced are no issues for me on my Shiny Android toy.

I don't write in this space for purposes of impressing the wind! I
share information based solely on personal experience whether it's by
way of experimentation, or by some other direct means. I live and
breathe Android!
If it weren't working for me, I won't be working on THROWING WINDOWS
overboard for Android.

I will state here for the records that I DO NOT currently use any
bluetooth or physical keyboard of any kind with my Shiny Android toys!
I use the touchscreen exclusively; I am getting work done, and, when I
have issues worth addressing, I write directly to the app developer in
question and get results. I just sent a note to CoCard Merchant
Services, the developer of the CoCard Restaurant app; in my note, I am
seeking to know why the app changes my screen orientation from
Portrait to Landscape. I also visited the issue of unlabeled buttons.
perhaps I'll read from this developer within the next few hours, or,
by the end of the week. What's important for me is that I can talk to
the developer and get results! And, if no results are obtainable, I
simply abandon the app and its developer and move on to something
else.

Since I began embracing technology and using it to make things a bit
better for me with regards to what I do, I've never had so much luck
in reaching developers until I wrapped my arms around the Android
platform. So, I can, and I will, defend my platform to the best of my
ability because it is WORKING FOR ME as advertised.

I don't pretend to be a guru at anything; I typically will hardly ever
recommend a particular platform over the other; but I'll discuss what
I do that's giving me achievable results! I'll let iOS enthusiasts
speak up, but, as for me, Android rocks my boat and I'm sticking with it!

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado









59261 - 59280 of 103830