Date   

Re: Computer Specifications

Marie <magpie.mn@...>
 

I have a Toshiba Portege 13 inch laptop that is a real jewel. I have had it about 4 years and it originally came with Win 7 and is now running the Creator Edition. It has an Intel I5 processor, 8 GB of ram, a 1 TB hard drive and weighs less than three pounds. It has no num pad but a very nice keyboard with the context key which is one thing I can not get by without. LOL!
In addition I usually get about 6 hours or better with the battery depending on what I am doing.

-----Original Message-----
From: Rajmund
Sent: Saturday, June 17, 2017 2:47 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications

that's exactly why I'm on the hunt for a 11 or smaller inch notebook.
for traveling purposes, and since I hate the numpad, it won't bother me,
either ways.

On 17/06/17 10:40 PM, Eleni Vamvakari wrote:
Ah okay. A 15-inch laptop is far too big for my portable needs,
though I may consider such a size if I needed to choose a desktop
replacement. but then, I would expect it to come with most of the
things under my list of desktop specifications. I don't mind noisy
keyboards. I own an IBM Model M, which is also known as a clicky
keyboard, precisely due to its loud sound cause by the springs in it.

Yes. Usually, when I see "program not responding", it eventually
starts working again.

On 17/06/2017, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:
At times, Windows 7 says that a program is not responding when it is
actually doing something but can't be controled by the user. If you wait,
the not responding message will disappear and the program can be used. If
you have some sort of problem such as a driver incompatibility or something
else, you may see various problems with Windows 7. But there is nothing
inherent in Windows 7 that makes it not work well or that causes crashes or
that would cause a lot of program not responding messages in a lot of
programs.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Saturday, June 17, 2017 2:36 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications


I experience the "program not responding" error so frequently in 7
that I've come to associate it with this version of windows. Very
rarely has it happened in XP, and Iuse the same programs there. But
returning to the topic of this thread, what are the names of the form
factors of the desktops that I am seeking? I imagine that such
machines exist with the specifications listed. I'm not sure, though,
about the smaller computers. Must I get something in te 12.1-inch
size, or can I go to 10.1 and below and find something that is
powerful enough for daily computing tasks and that has decent battery
life? I haven't really had any issues with netbooks, so if I must use
one of those, that's fine, though I would at least like the lates Atom
processor that works with XP. As I said, regarding my UH900, the size
is absolutely perfect, but the battery life is terrible.

On 14/06/2017, Carlos <carlos1106@nyc.rr.com> wrote:
I'm not sure that it's fair to judge 7 based on programs not responding.
No software is completely bug free so applications will occasionally
freeze
up. This is simply the nature of software and has little to do with the
version of Windows. You will experience such problems with any operating
system. I personally don't experience this problem in 7 often unless the
application itself is buggy or unstable which is not the fault of
Windows.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Eleni Vamvakari" <elvam2167@gmail.com>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, June 14, 2017 1:52 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications


I'm 33, and I've been using computers for at least 21 years and
regularly for about 14, on several operating systems, my favourite
being MSDOS and Windows XP. By the time ribbons were invented, it was
well after my initial learning stage with a teacher. One of my mottos
in life is if it's not broken, don't fix it. Don't complicate simple
things is a new one that just came to mind. I never saw a need for
them and they only made things more confusing. So I avoid using them.

I can find almost anything on Ebay, including technology. I like
older dot matrix printers anyway. As for scanners, I have a flatbed
that works well, though I actually don't mind if those are modern.

Even though I have service Pack 4 installed, I agree with you about
banking, etc. I always use 7 for that. Even in 7, though, webpages
are becoming more needlessly complicated and ridiculous. I have my
own issues with Firefox, but those are unrelated to the opperating
system. But I still use it because i haven't found anything better.
I wish that Cometbird would be continued, as it is fast, light, and
simple. I often use it when I need to do things without frustration,
though again, not with anything financial. I stopped seriously using
Internet Explorer after version 6. Thank you for your explanation of
ribbons and for your offer of the tutorial. The good thing is that I
don't need to deal with them in 7 either.

If worse comes to worst, I will switch over to Linux. My issue there
is learning a new operating system (though I'm sure that I can do
that, as I did with Leopard and Snow Leopard before giving up on Macs)
and the fact that the version of Eespeak used in Orca has not been
updated to read polytonic Greek, which I use daily. But any computer
with the specifications that I chose should work well with most
versions of Linux. I would be very interested in hearing about that
system, though we should write about it in separate thread.

I have been using Windows 7 for many years now, so it's not exactly as
if I'm transitioning. I have always hated these annoyances. I also
forgot one. "Program not responding"! I have seen XP do it, but only
three or four times in my life. The good thing about 7, though, is
that it usually recovers the program instead of simply crashing it.

Eleni

On 14/06/2017, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:
You could have used Firefox. Vista is no longer supported and over
time,
it
will become as archaic and insecure as XP but back then, you could have
used
another browser.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Pamela Dominguez
Sent: Wednesday, June 14, 2017 12:03 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications


You are definitely right about internet explorer eight working on less
and
less. In fact, about two years ago, I had to stop using my vista laptop
because internet explorer wouldn’t update, and wouldn’t work on even my
optimum homepage, never mind other sites I tried it on. It worked on a
few,
but not many. Pam.

From: Gene
Sent: Wednesday, June 14, 2017 2:02 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications

Problems such as you describe with ribbons are very likely because you
weren't taught them correctly. It's up to you what you want to do but
XP
is
archaic and as soon as your printer or scanner breaks, you're in for
real
trouble finding something compatible. I would never do anything such as
banking with XP. It's alright to use for just browsing but not for
doing
anything where you provide personal information. And as time goes on,
browsers will do less and less in XP. Internet Explorer8 works on fewer
and
fewer sites. Firefox is no longer being updated except for security
updates
for XP users. Chrome hasn't been updated for months for XP users and it
won't be in future. Support has completely ended for XP users.
meantime,
the Internet continues to evolve. You can't live in the technological
past
forever. Most people who have problems with ribbons have such problems
because they weren't properly taught. The main difference between a
ribbon
and a menu is that you tab and shift tab to move forward and backward in
a
ribbon instead of up and down arrowing. There are other things to know
but
in essence, ribbons are menus but organized differently. They are
systematic and logical just as menus are. I'll send you the tutorial I
did
on ribbons if you like. It's short and you may find ribbons much easier
to
use than you think now when they are properly presented.

Meantime, I want to make clear that I'm not pressuring you to do
anything,
but you are on a rapidly decaying dead end road. You will be spending
money
on a system that will be increasingly unuseable.
Gene

From: Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Tuesday, June 13, 2017 8:20 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications

If a program is not 100% accessible, I refuse to use it. I don't
touch the registry unless I absolutely have to do so, as I don't
understand that sort of thing enough to feel comfortable with it. I
don't save Windows itself, except my virtual copy. But I do save all
of my files and folders by copying and pasting them on my various
media.

On 13/06/2017, Carlos <carlos1106@nyc.rr.com> wrote:
Classic Shell's settings are not very accessible, but after configuring
them

I just export the registry key where they are saved so for future
installations importing my preferences becomes much easier. I have to
make

several similar tweaks as well on a fresh installation such as taking
ownership of system files and disabling UAC, but I don't perform clean
installations very often. That's what images are for. As for the save
and

copy dialogs, I have no comment since they don't particularly bother
me.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Eleni Vamvakari" <elvam2167@gmail.com>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, June 13, 2017 8:54 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications


Classic Shell was almost impossible to configure, and I couldn't get
back into the settings once I exited them. To answer your main
question, every time I get a Windows 7 machine, I have to replace
Wordpad with the one found in Vista (I don't have that system but
found the file online) because I hate ribbons. I then must take
ownership of the entire drive so that I can access certain folders
without getting a "permission denied" error. I then need to turn off
the UAC, because I don't need to be asked every time I do something if
I'm sure that I want to do it. But the thing that I absolutely
despise is the save dialogues in every program! In XP they are save
in, tool bar up one level button, toolbar recent documents button,
folder view list, file name, save as type, save button, and cancel
button. In 7, however, they are address, search box, command module
toolbar, name space control tree view, items view, name split button,
file name, save as type, toolbar hide folders button, save button, and
cancel button. What is all of that nonsense and why is it necessary?
Not to mention the fact that if I hit the wrong thing, it sends me to
af, qz, etc, and 99% of the time, NVDA gets stuck and I have to
restart it when saving files! The same holds if I'm in a folder and
start tabbing. And there, the differences are even more pronounced.
In XP, there are two options, address, and folder list view. In 7,
there are address, search box, command module toolbar, name space
control tree view, items view list, and name split button. Again,
why! And why are libraries necessary? Why must I have two folders
that say "my documents" and two programs folders (one for X86 and one
for other programs)? Oh, and I almost forgot! I don't like the copy
system either, particularly when it comes to replacing files!

The only good things about 7 that I can think of are security, the
listen to microphone option, and some extra power settings. But I
tried 8.0 and 8.1 and I no longer even have that computer, so you can
guess what I thought of it!

On 13/06/2017, Carlos <carlos1106@nyc.rr.com> wrote:
What exactly is it about Windows 7 that drives you quote unquote
"crazy"?
Support for newer hardware found in later versions aside, Windows 7
is
Microsoft's best release in my humble opinion. You can even install
Classic

Shell
http://www.classicshell.net/
if you miss the old XP style
"Start"
menu.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Eleni Vamvakari" <elvam2167@gmail.com>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, June 13, 2017 8:07 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications


Today, I decided to look for computers on amazon, since Ebay has
become much too confusing and annoying in their refinements. I
thought that I found the perfect desktop. It had everything that I
wanted, except the ps/2 ports, and the 3.5 floppy/Superdisk drive
(though it has the slot for it), both of which I can live without.
It
also had a 2tb hard drive, which is entirely too large for my needs,
but I was willing to accept that. But then, I checked the size!
It's
huge!

https://www.cnet.com/products/dell-optiplex-760-core-2-duo-e8400-3-ghz-series/specs/

For those interested, here is the Amazon listing itself, which
doesn't
list the dimentions.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00XWCCU8S?m=A11C7SC2IL2NMJ

This is the same size as my current desktop, and is not what I meant
when I said mini tower! I want something that can fit on my desk,
that either is flat or stands upright. But Amazon only offered
all-in-ones, towers, or minis as their options. What are the names
of
the form factors that I am seeking? Is there a better site that I
can
use for this? If nothing else, I may use a laptop as a full desktop
replacement. That is, it would stay on the desk. But I can't find
one to match the above specifications, particularly with regard to
the
processor speed and ports.

I also need to decide what to do about a small, light laptop with
good
battery life. The reason why I think XP can't be installed on my
Aspire One D270 is that it uses an Atom N2600 processor. I heard
something about it not working with XP due to the GMA graphics. But
at lest one person found the required drivers (never listed at Acer,
and none of their netbook drivers are there now), so it must be
possible. But for now, I want a cheap and quick fix, because
Windows
7 drives me crazy!

On 12/06/2017, Josh Kennedy <joshknnd1982@gmail.com> wrote:
for some reason although this 11 year old laptop has a 64bit
processor,
the 32bit windows 10 home runs best on it even faster and better
and
lighter than the windows 10 professional 64bit did when i had that
installed.



On 6/11/2017 9:07 PM, Joseph Lee wrote:
Hi,
For those recommending parts: please do NOT include SSD's, as XP
will
not
support it properly. A 32-bit Windows will not generally recognize
RAM
that's beyond approximately 3.5 GB, so 3 GB should be the
recommended
choice.
Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On
Behalf
Of Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Sunday, June 11, 2017 9:00 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications

In another mesage, I mentioned that I was considering buying a
computer.
A few months ago, I wrote specifications for both a desktop and a
laptop,
because I wanted to know how much it would cost to have each
custom-made.
While I am still curious, I now wonder if similar machines already
exist.
If so, and if anyone here has one, I am willing to discuss a
price,
provided that it's reasonable. This post will be long, so please
feel
free to cut it in your response. I will include some general
notes
at
the
end for clarity. In the meantime, does anyone know if Windows XP
or
Linux
can successfully be installed on a Fujitsu Lifebook UH900 or an
Acer
Aspire One D270? What would be the average cost to just switch
the
Japanese keyboard in the Lifebook with a U.S. one that I already
own?

Thank you,
Eleni

======

Desktop Specifications

Form Factor:
mini tower (preferred) or slim line

Case Material:
metal

Hard Drive:
traditional or solid state (depending on cost )may be fixed or
swappable

Hard drive Capacity:
60GB to 160GB

Ram:
4GB

Processor:
dual core Duo (minimum)

Processor Speed:
2-ghz (minimum, higher preferred)

Media:
1 LS240 3.5 in. IBM Superdisk
1 5.25 in. high density floppy
1 cd/dvrw
1 PCMCIA
slot (able to read compact flash cards)

Connectivity:
1 RS-232 9-pin male serial port
1 bidirectional female parallel port (2 if possible)
1 ps/2 port (for keyboard)
1 ps/2 port for mouse
1 VGA port for monitor
1 modem jack with internal 56k modem
1 Ethernet jack
wireless a/b/g/n
1 line-in jack
1 3.5mm microphone jack
1 3.5mm headphone/speaker jack
2 usb 2.0 (or 3.0 if backwards-compatible) ports (preferably 4)

Keyboard:
IBM Model M (already owned) or more modern Windows keyboard
(already
owned)

Monitor:
regular (not flat or excessively large)

Sound:
internal PC speaker
external speakers (already owned)

Operating System:
Windows XP 32-Bit SP3 with updates (main drive) Linux (possibly,
main
drive) DOS (possibly, separate drive) Windows 7 (possibly,
separate
drive,
perhaps on same as 7)

Recovery:
on disks or as separate partition in drive

======

Laptop Specifications

Form Factor:
clamshell

Screen Size:
5 in. to 8.9 in. (10.1 if necessary, but no larger, see Lifebook
UH900
for
UMPC form factor)

Screen:
regular, not touchscreen

Weight:
3.5 lbs. maximum (with battery, lighter preferred)

Hard Drive:
traditional or solid state (depending on cost)

Hard Drive Capacity:
60 to 160GB

Ram:
2GB (minimum) 4GB (preferred)

Processor:
dual core (minimum)

Processor Speed:
1.6ghz minimum (2ghz or higher if possible)

Temperature
as cool as possible, without sacrificing important features

Battery type:
lithium ion, or anything that lacks memory issues and lasts long

Battery Life:
5+ hours (minimum)

Keyboard:
US. must have page up-down, home, end, and delete (either
separately
or
via function key), two alts, Windows, and Applications keys

Media:
1 pcmcia or compact flash card slot
1 SD card reader

Connectivity:
2 usb 2.0 (or 3.0 if backwards-compatible) ports (minimum)
wireless
b/g/n,
and (on-off switch
1 microphone jack
1 headphone jack

Sound:
built-in speaker (can be mono or stereo) built-in microphone (high
quality)

Webcam:
if included, should either have easy-to-feel/cover lens (Aspire
One
D270 good example, UH900 bad) or sliding cover,)

Operating System:
Windows XP 32-Bit SP3 with updates
Linux (possibly)

Recovery:
on disks or as separate partition in drive

======

General Notes

If you are selling me your computer and not building one, feel
free
to
ignore the sections about partitioning drives, installing an
operating
system, and XP compatibility unrelated to drivers. While I don't
mind
a
hard drive with more than 160GB, I really don't need it, and 120GB
should
be sufficient for my needs. Likewise, I don't need more than 4GB
of
ram.

I
also don't technically require the 5.25 Superdisk drive, the 56K
modem,
the line-in jack, or Wireless A (B/G/N are all
required) in the desktop, but I included everything for the sake
of
completeness. When referring to a swappable hard drive, I mean
one
with a handle that can easily be removed and replaced by the user,
and
whose bay can be used for another drive or device. While I
already
own

a
keyboard and speakers, I will accept them if they come with the
unit.
As
far as the laptop/umpc, my goal is to get something as small and
light
as
possible, with good battery life. In the UMPC size, the media
section
can
be ignored, and I am aware that certain processors cannot be used.
I
am
including them for a slightly larger model.
Regardless of the computer I choose, I will be using Windows XP as
the
main operating system, so please ensure that the motherboard,
processor,
peripherals, and drivers are compatible. If a main drive under
160GB
cannot be found, I would be interested in partitioning the drive
and
installing Linux (Vinux, Sonar Mate, or Ubuntu Mate). I have had
very
little experience with this operating system, but know that Orca
(the
built-in screen reader) will not start automatically in Ubuntu
Mate
32-Bit. I have not tried it on 64-Bit. On at least one computer,
the
volume of speech on Sonar was extremely quiet. Vinux starts
without
difficulties in Gnome, Mate, and Unity. ====== If using a
swappable
drive, I may install MSDOS or Enhanced DR-DOS on a separate one to
try
them out, and while I don't love Windows 7, I may install it as
well,
in
case I really need it. In all cases, regardless of the machine,
please
set the boot sequence in the bios as
follows: usb, SD (wear applicable), cd (unless external cd rom
drives
count as usb), , hard drive.





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Re: Computer Specifications

Eleni Vamvakari
 

Carolyn, this is excellent news! Perhaps, she can help me choose a
computer! If she is willing to do so, please send her my first post
in this thread, but note my confusing over the form factor and what I
am seeking (see a recent post here where I discuss USFF).

I have made a bit of progress on my own as well. I found the page
with all of the Optiplex models listed. It seems that several come in
different form factors, which means that the 760 is still an option.
I may be able to get an even later one, depending on the drivers and
ports that are included and/or supported.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dell_OptiPlex

I am also going to research computers from HP, and possibly Gateway,
IBM, Acer, and Fujitsu, though I don't know if the last two make
desktops. I am strictly interested in busines computers, as those
usually contain legacy ports and drivers. I know that Dell and HP do
this, and it is true on Fujitsu Lifebook laptops. I will begin my
laptop search tomorrow, but need to divide that between desktop
replacements (business models), and portables (netbooks, UMPCS, and
ultraportables under 12.1 inches).

On 17/06/2017, Carolyn Arnold <4carolyna@windstream.net> wrote:
My sister is a solutions architect consultant with Dell Computers. She
worked there 20 years, retired, but they contracted her back. So, she was
here Thanksgiving, worked a lot on her Laptop computer. I asked her which
Windows system she used, and without hesitation, she said, "Windows 7." I
would think Dell Computers is up do tate, so that tells me that there is a
lot of life left in Windows 7.

Best from,

Carolyn



-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Gene
Sent: Saturday, June 17, 2017 5:23 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications

At times, Windows 7 says that a program is not responding when it is
actually doing something but can't be controled by the user. If you wait,
the not responding message will disappear and the program can be used. If
you have some sort of problem such as a driver incompatibility or something
else, you may see various problems with Windows 7. But there is nothing
inherent in Windows 7 that makes it not work well or that causes crashes or
that would cause a lot of program not responding messages in a lot of
programs.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Eleni Vamvakari <mailto:elvam2167@gmail.com>
Sent: Saturday, June 17, 2017 2:36 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications

I experience the "program not responding" error so frequently in 7 that I've
come to associate it with this version of windows. Very rarely has it
happened in XP, and Iuse the same programs there. But returning to the
topic of this thread, what are the names of the form factors of the desktops
that I am seeking? I imagine that such machines exist with the
specifications listed. I'm not sure, though, about the smaller computers.
Must I get something in te 12.1-inch size, or can I go to 10.1 and below and
find something that is powerful enough for daily computing tasks and that
has decent battery life? I haven't really had any issues with netbooks, so
if I must use one of those, that's fine, though I would at least like the
lates Atom processor that works with XP. As I said, regarding my UH900, the
size is absolutely perfect, but the battery life is terrible.

On 14/06/2017, Carlos <carlos1106@nyc.rr.com <mailto:carlos1106@nyc.rr.com>
wrote:
I'm not sure that it's fair to judge 7 based on programs not responding.
No software is completely bug free so applications will occasionally
freeze up. This is simply the nature of software and has little to do
with the version of Windows. You will experience such problems with
any operating system. I personally don't experience this problem in 7
often unless the application itself is buggy or unstable which is not the
fault of Windows.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Eleni Vamvakari" <elvam2167@gmail.com
<mailto:elvam2167@gmail.com> >
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io> >
Sent: Wednesday, June 14, 2017 1:52 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications


I'm 33, and I've been using computers for at least 21 years and
regularly for about 14, on several operating systems, my favourite
being MSDOS and Windows XP. By the time ribbons were invented, it was
well after my initial learning stage with a teacher. One of my mottos
in life is if it's not broken, don't fix it. Don't complicate simple
things is a new one that just came to mind. I never saw a need for
them and they only made things more confusing. So I avoid using them.

I can find almost anything on Ebay, including technology. I like
older dot matrix printers anyway. As for scanners, I have a flatbed
that works well, though I actually don't mind if those are modern.

Even though I have service Pack 4 installed, I agree with you about
banking, etc. I always use 7 for that. Even in 7, though, webpages
are becoming more needlessly complicated and ridiculous. I have my
own issues with Firefox, but those are unrelated to the opperating
system. But I still use it because i haven't found anything better.
I wish that Cometbird would be continued, as it is fast, light, and
simple. I often use it when I need to do things without frustration,
though again, not with anything financial. I stopped seriously using
Internet Explorer after version 6. Thank you for your explanation of
ribbons and for your offer of the tutorial. The good thing is that I
don't need to deal with them in 7 either.

If worse comes to worst, I will switch over to Linux. My issue there
is learning a new operating system (though I'm sure that I can do
that, as I did with Leopard and Snow Leopard before giving up on Macs)
and the fact that the version of Eespeak used in Orca has not been
updated to read polytonic Greek, which I use daily. But any computer
with the specifications that I chose should work well with most
versions of Linux. I would be very interested in hearing about that
system, though we should write about it in separate thread.

I have been using Windows 7 for many years now, so it's not exactly as
if I'm transitioning. I have always hated these annoyances. I also
forgot one. "Program not responding"! I have seen XP do it, but only
three or four times in my life. The good thing about 7, though, is
that it usually recovers the program instead of simply crashing it.

Eleni

On 14/06/2017, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com <mailto:gsasner@ripco.com> >
wrote:
You could have used Firefox. Vista is no longer supported and over
time, it will become as archaic and insecure as XP but back then, you
could have used another browser.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Pamela Dominguez
Sent: Wednesday, June 14, 2017 12:03 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications


You are definitely right about internet explorer eight working on
less and less. In fact, about two years ago, I had to stop using my
vista laptop because internet explorer wouldn’t update, and wouldn’t
work on even my optimum homepage, never mind other sites I tried it
on. It worked on a few, but not many. Pam.

From: Gene
Sent: Wednesday, June 14, 2017 2:02 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications

Problems such as you describe with ribbons are very likely because
you weren't taught them correctly. It's up to you what you want to
do but XP is archaic and as soon as your printer or scanner breaks,
you're in for real trouble finding something compatible. I would
never do anything such as banking with XP. It's alright to use for
just browsing but not for doing anything where you provide personal
information. And as time goes on, browsers will do less and less in
XP. Internet Explorer8 works on fewer and fewer sites. Firefox is
no longer being updated except for security updates for XP users.
Chrome hasn't been updated for months for XP users and it won't be in
future. Support has completely ended for XP users.
meantime,
the Internet continues to evolve. You can't live in the
technological past forever. Most people who have problems with
ribbons have such problems because they weren't properly taught. The
main difference between a ribbon and a menu is that you tab and shift
tab to move forward and backward in a ribbon instead of up and down
arrowing. There are other things to know but in essence, ribbons are
menus but organized differently. They are systematic and logical
just as menus are. I'll send you the tutorial I did on ribbons if
you like. It's short and you may find ribbons much easier to use
than you think now when they are properly presented.

Meantime, I want to make clear that I'm not pressuring you to do
anything, but you are on a rapidly decaying dead end road. You will
be spending money on a system that will be increasingly unuseable.
Gene

From: Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Tuesday, June 13, 2017 8:20 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications

If a program is not 100% accessible, I refuse to use it. I don't
touch the registry unless I absolutely have to do so, as I don't
understand that sort of thing enough to feel comfortable with it. I
don't save Windows itself, except my virtual copy. But I do save all
of my files and folders by copying and pasting them on my various
media.

On 13/06/2017, Carlos <carlos1106@nyc.rr.com
<mailto:carlos1106@nyc.rr.com> > wrote:
Classic Shell's settings are not very accessible, but after
configuring them

I just export the registry key where they are saved so for future
installations importing my preferences becomes much easier. I have
to make

several similar tweaks as well on a fresh installation such as
taking ownership of system files and disabling UAC, but I don't
perform clean installations very often. That's what images are for.
As for the save and

copy dialogs, I have no comment since they don't particularly bother
me.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Eleni Vamvakari" <elvam2167@gmail.com
<mailto:elvam2167@gmail.com> >
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io> >
Sent: Tuesday, June 13, 2017 8:54 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications


Classic Shell was almost impossible to configure, and I couldn't
get back into the settings once I exited them. To answer your main
question, every time I get a Windows 7 machine, I have to replace
Wordpad with the one found in Vista (I don't have that system but
found the file online) because I hate ribbons. I then must take
ownership of the entire drive so that I can access certain folders
without getting a "permission denied" error. I then need to turn
off the UAC, because I don't need to be asked every time I do
something if I'm sure that I want to do it. But the thing that I
absolutely despise is the save dialogues in every program! In XP
they are save in, tool bar up one level button, toolbar recent
documents button, folder view list, file name, save as type, save
button, and cancel button. In 7, however, they are address, search
box, command module toolbar, name space control tree view, items
view, name split button, file name, save as type, toolbar hide
folders button, save button, and cancel button. What is all of that
nonsense and why is it necessary?
Not to mention the fact that if I hit the wrong thing, it sends me
to af, qz, etc, and 99% of the time, NVDA gets stuck and I have to
restart it when saving files! The same holds if I'm in a folder
and start tabbing. And there, the differences are even more
pronounced.
In XP, there are two options, address, and folder list view. In 7,
there are address, search box, command module toolbar, name space
control tree view, items view list, and name split button. Again,
why! And why are libraries necessary? Why must I have two folders
that say "my documents" and two programs folders (one for X86 and
one for other programs)? Oh, and I almost forgot! I don't like
the copy system either, particularly when it comes to replacing files!

The only good things about 7 that I can think of are security, the
listen to microphone option, and some extra power settings. But I
tried 8.0 and 8.1 and I no longer even have that computer, so you
can guess what I thought of it!

On 13/06/2017, Carlos <carlos1106@nyc.rr.com
<mailto:carlos1106@nyc.rr.com> > wrote:
What exactly is it about Windows 7 that drives you quote unquote
"crazy"?
Support for newer hardware found in later versions aside, Windows
7 is Microsoft's best release in my humble opinion. You can even
install Classic

Shell
http://www.classicshell.net/
if you miss the old XP style
"Start"
menu.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Eleni Vamvakari" <elvam2167@gmail.com
<mailto:elvam2167@gmail.com> >
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io> >
Sent: Tuesday, June 13, 2017 8:07 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications


Today, I decided to look for computers on amazon, since Ebay has
become much too confusing and annoying in their refinements. I
thought that I found the perfect desktop. It had everything that
I wanted, except the ps/2 ports, and the 3.5 floppy/Superdisk
drive (though it has the slot for it), both of which I can live
without.
It
also had a 2tb hard drive, which is entirely too large for my
needs, but I was willing to accept that. But then, I checked the
size!
It's
huge!

https://www.cnet.com/products/dell-optiplex-760-core-2-duo-e8400-
3-ghz-series/specs/

For those interested, here is the Amazon listing itself, which
doesn't list the dimentions.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00XWCCU8S?m=A11C7SC2IL2NMJ

This is the same size as my current desktop, and is not what I
meant when I said mini tower! I want something that can fit on
my desk, that either is flat or stands upright. But Amazon only
offered all-in-ones, towers, or minis as their options. What are
the names of the form factors that I am seeking? Is there a
better site that I can use for this? If nothing else, I may use
a laptop as a full desktop replacement. That is, it would stay
on the desk. But I can't find one to match the above
specifications, particularly with regard to the processor speed
and ports.

I also need to decide what to do about a small, light laptop with
good battery life. The reason why I think XP can't be installed
on my Aspire One D270 is that it uses an Atom N2600 processor. I
heard something about it not working with XP due to the GMA
graphics. But at lest one person found the required drivers
(never listed at Acer, and none of their netbook drivers are
there now), so it must be possible. But for now, I want a cheap
and quick fix, because Windows
7 drives me crazy!

On 12/06/2017, Josh Kennedy <joshknnd1982@gmail.com
<mailto:joshknnd1982@gmail.com> > wrote:
for some reason although this 11 year old laptop has a 64bit
processor, the 32bit windows 10 home runs best on it even faster
and better and lighter than the windows 10 professional 64bit
did when i had that installed.



On 6/11/2017 9:07 PM, Joseph Lee wrote:
Hi,
For those recommending parts: please do NOT include SSD's, as
XP will not support it properly. A 32-bit Windows will not
generally recognize RAM that's beyond approximately 3.5 GB, so
3 GB should be the recommended choice.
Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Sunday, June 11, 2017 9:00 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications

In another mesage, I mentioned that I was considering buying a
computer.
A few months ago, I wrote specifications for both a desktop and
a laptop, because I wanted to know how much it would cost to
have each custom-made.
While I am still curious, I now wonder if similar machines
already exist.
If so, and if anyone here has one, I am willing to discuss a
price, provided that it's reasonable. This post will be long,
so please feel free to cut it in your response. I will include
some general notes at the end for clarity. In the meantime,
does anyone know if Windows XP or Linux can successfully be
installed on a Fujitsu Lifebook UH900 or an Acer Aspire One
D270? What would be the average cost to just switch the
Japanese keyboard in the Lifebook with a U.S. one that I
already own?

Thank you,
Eleni

======

Desktop Specifications

Form Factor:
mini tower (preferred) or slim line

Case Material:
metal

Hard Drive:
traditional or solid state (depending on cost )may be fixed or
swappable

Hard drive Capacity:
60GB to 160GB

Ram:
4GB

Processor:
dual core Duo (minimum)

Processor Speed:
2-ghz (minimum, higher preferred)

Media:
1 LS240 3.5 in. IBM Superdisk
1 5.25 in. high density floppy
1 cd/dvrw
1 PCMCIA
slot (able to read compact flash cards)

Connectivity:
1 RS-232 9-pin male serial port
1 bidirectional female parallel port (2 if possible)
1 ps/2 port (for keyboard)
1 ps/2 port for mouse
1 VGA port for monitor
1 modem jack with internal 56k modem
1 Ethernet jack
wireless a/b/g/n
1 line-in jack
1 3.5mm microphone jack
1 3.5mm headphone/speaker jack
2 usb 2.0 (or 3.0 if backwards-compatible) ports (preferably 4)

Keyboard:
IBM Model M (already owned) or more modern Windows keyboard
(already
owned)

Monitor:
regular (not flat or excessively large)

Sound:
internal PC speaker
external speakers (already owned)

Operating System:
Windows XP 32-Bit SP3 with updates (main drive) Linux
(possibly, main
drive) DOS (possibly, separate drive) Windows 7 (possibly,
separate drive, perhaps on same as 7)

Recovery:
on disks or as separate partition in drive

======

Laptop Specifications

Form Factor:
clamshell

Screen Size:
5 in. to 8.9 in. (10.1 if necessary, but no larger, see
Lifebook
UH900
for
UMPC form factor)

Screen:
regular, not touchscreen

Weight:
3.5 lbs. maximum (with battery, lighter preferred)

Hard Drive:
traditional or solid state (depending on cost)

Hard Drive Capacity:
60 to 160GB

Ram:
2GB (minimum) 4GB (preferred)

Processor:
dual core (minimum)

Processor Speed:
1.6ghz minimum (2ghz or higher if possible)

Temperature
as cool as possible, without sacrificing important features

Battery type:
lithium ion, or anything that lacks memory issues and lasts
long

Battery Life:
5+ hours (minimum)

Keyboard:
US. must have page up-down, home, end, and delete (either
separately or via function key), two alts, Windows, and
Applications keys

Media:
1 pcmcia or compact flash card slot
1 SD card reader

Connectivity:
2 usb 2.0 (or 3.0 if backwards-compatible) ports (minimum)
wireless b/g/n, and (on-off switch
1 microphone jack
1 headphone jack

Sound:
built-in speaker (can be mono or stereo) built-in microphone
(high
quality)

Webcam:
if included, should either have easy-to-feel/cover lens (Aspire
One
D270 good example, UH900 bad) or sliding cover,)

Operating System:
Windows XP 32-Bit SP3 with updates Linux (possibly)

Recovery:
on disks or as separate partition in drive

======

General Notes

If you are selling me your computer and not building one, feel
free to ignore the sections about partitioning drives,
installing an operating system, and XP compatibility unrelated
to drivers. While I don't mind a hard drive with more than
160GB, I really don't need it, and 120GB should be sufficient
for my needs. Likewise, I don't need more than 4GB of ram.

I
also don't technically require the 5.25 Superdisk drive, the
56K modem, the line-in jack, or Wireless A (B/G/N are all
required) in the desktop, but I included everything for the sake
of
completeness. When referring to a swappable hard drive, I mean
one
with a handle that can easily be removed and replaced by the
user, and whose bay can be used for another drive or device.
While I already own

a
keyboard and speakers, I will accept them if they come with the
unit.
As
far as the laptop/umpc, my goal is to get something as small
and light as possible, with good battery life. In the UMPC
size, the media section can be ignored, and I am aware that
certain processors cannot be used.
I
am
including them for a slightly larger model.
Regardless of the computer I choose, I will be using Windows XP
as the main operating system, so please ensure that the
motherboard, processor, peripherals, and drivers are
compatible. If a main drive under 160GB cannot be found, I
would be interested in partitioning the drive and installing
Linux (Vinux, Sonar Mate, or Ubuntu Mate). I have had very
little experience with this operating system, but know that
Orca (the built-in screen reader) will not start automatically
in Ubuntu Mate 32-Bit. I have not tried it on 64-Bit. On at
least one computer, the volume of speech on Sonar was extremely
quiet. Vinux starts without difficulties in Gnome, Mate, and
Unity. ====== If using a swappable drive, I may install MSDOS
or Enhanced DR-DOS on a separate one to try them out, and while
I don't love Windows 7, I may install it as well, in case I
really need it. In all cases, regardless of the machine,
please set the boot sequence in the bios as
follows: usb, SD (wear applicable), cd (unless external cd rom
drives count as usb), , hard drive.





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Re: keyboards VS touch screens and technological change

Marie <magpie.mn@...>
 

I can not understand why a serious keyboard user would ever want the touchpad on.

-----Original Message-----
From: Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Saturday, June 17, 2017 3:05 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] keyboards VS touch screens and technological change

I usually find a way to accidentally touch them and annoy myself. So
I toggle them off as well, whenever possible.

On 17/06/2017, Rajmund <brajmund2000@gmail.com> wrote:
and if it's a big one like mine is, you can easily touch it unintended.
I'll be forever greatful for the FN toggle.

On 17/06/17 10:52 PM, Josh Kennedy wrote:
I JUST LET THE TOUCH PAD ON, BECAUSE THE MOUSE IS USEFUL IN SOME
APPLICATIONS.



On 6/16/2017 6:30 PM, Marie wrote:
d not be so sure about windows not turning Cortana. At least every
other update turns the touchpad on with both of my laptops and I have
to disable them if possible or uninstall the driver on one. It is
extremely annoying.
Marie


-----Original Message----- From: Josh Kennedy
Sent: Friday, June 16, 2017 1:03 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] keyboards VS touch screens and technological
change

no new updates will not try to turn cortana on if you don't want them
to. if you get a new big major update which has you go through the setup
screen you just make sure those checkboxes are all unchecked and you
make a local offline account and you're good to go. windows10 is the
future, embrace it or fall behind. if you still like dos and old
windows3.1 stuff like I do, you can do what I do and run talking dosbox
or run stuff in vmware player. its what I have to do to run some older
stuff I still enjoy using such as the old infovox230 tts.



On 6/16/2017 3:49 PM, Rob wrote:
Carlos <carlos1106@nyc.rr.com> wrote:
Oh yes, not to mention that new poor excuse for a
"Start"
menu is a piece of junk.
And the fact you can't completely remove cortana. I did find a way to
turn it off in group policy editor, but it's still there, lurking in
the background, and I bet some other update will probably try to turn
it on.





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Skype: elvam2167


Re: Blackberry Priv Phone.

Carolyn Arnold
 

Oh yes - the RCA Galileo Pro. Check to see if your loca Wal-Mart has it. Otherwise you can get it from Wal-Mart or Amazon online. It would be nice if you could see it. The way it is designed, the keyboard and tablet can fold together making a nice, protective case, which will go into my Texas-sized big black purse. You can get it for about $80.

I like the Kindle screen better, and the Kindle has longer battery life. It also has stereo speakers, where the RCA does not.

However, the keyboard is so nice the way it comes right with the tablet. If you want to take it without the keyboard, simply power off and then remove the keyboard. When you put it back on, power off, if the tablet is on, since the power should be off to attach or remove the keyboard.

When I first got mine, I had some problems, because below the spacebar is a covered area where the mouse lives. Also I would rare back in my recliner chair, but once I sat it on the dining room table and remembered not to let the backs of my hands rest on the area below the spacebar, I was good to go!

Best from,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Saturday, June 17, 2017 5:44 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Blackberry Priv Phone.

I know that these phones existed in the past. I don't care if it's modern or not. I just want a phone with internet connectivity, a built-in keyboard, and a screen reader.

What is thiS RCA tablet and how big is it? Can the touchscreen be deactivated? I didn't realise that they make tablets with build-in keyboards.

On 17/06/2017, Jeremy <icu8it2@gmail.com> wrote:
No, I think you're right. While the ability to move around through the
interface exists in Android, just as it does in IOS, it's more so
something that goes along with the screenreader. The two are actually
pretty similar, but that's speaking from using an external bluetooth
keyboard, so not sure about a device with one built in.

If I were to expect navigation on the Priv or any other device with a
keyboard, I'd look for the keys that I'd use on an external one for
navigating. Just as with IOS, it requires that you use a key, along
with the arrows to move around, I think it's the alt key, so if it had
it, I'd not see why it wouldn't work. The RCA tablet is a good example
of this. As it has a full-sized laptop keyboard with an alt key, the
talkback commands for moving around in the interface work just fine.
there may also be differences in using a modifier key such as alt in
conjunction with the arrows on a keyboard like that, compared to that
on the Priv which might make it not work, but I can't say.

On 6/17/2017 4:07 PM, Gene wrote:
Are there any? Perhaps, but I'm not optomistic. Phone designers
probably assume that the keyboard is desired for typing in contexts
of texting, writing e-mails, that sort of thing. but it is probably
assumed that in actually operating the phone, that the user will use
a touch screen. I believe Apple phones do let you control the phone
with a Blue Tooth keyboard and Android don't. But I'm telling you
what I recall from conversations I've seen on lists awhile ago. If
I'm wrong, I hope to be corrected. But since phones are designed for
sighted users, I doubt that phone designers in general would go
through the extra time and trouble to make the phone fully
functionable with a keyboard.
Gene
----- Original Message -----
*From:* Eleni Vamvakari <mailto:elvam2167@gmail.com>
*Sent:* Saturday, June 17, 2017 12:20 PM
*To:* main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
*Subject:* Re: [TechTalk] Blackberry Priv Phone.

Thank you for posting this. It seems that this is not the phone for
me. I don't want a keyboard with sliding, swiping, etc. I just want
a normal keyboard, with real keys, that you press to operate the
phone.<div id="DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2"><br /> <table
style="border-top: 1px solid #D3D4DE;"> <tr>
<td style="width: 55px; padding-top: 13px;"><a
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target="_blank"><img
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alt="" width="46" height="29" style="width: 46px; height: 29px;"
/></a></td>
<td style="width: 470px; padding-top: 12px; color: #41424e;
font-size: 13px; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;
line-height: 18px;">Virus-free. <a
href="https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=link"
target="_blank" style="color: #4453ea;">www.avast.com</a> </td> </tr>
</table><a href="#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2" width="1"
height="1"></a></div>

On 17/06/2017, Iaen Cordell <ianc@optusnet.com.au
<mailto:ianc@optusnet.com.au>> wrote:
I agree, it can be hit and miss.


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Carlos
Sent: Sunday, June 18, 2017 1:37 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Blackberry Priv Phone.

I knew that the keyboard was touch sensitive, but that's not quite
the same
as using the keys themselves for navigation.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Carolyn Arnold" <4carolyna@windstream.net
<mailto:4carolyna@windstream.net>>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>>
Sent: Saturday, June 17, 2017 11:32 AM
Subject: [TechTalk] Blackberry Priv Phone.


There has been discussion about keyboard screen navigation.
Here is a post from Eyes-Free, a Google list:

Hi.




You can scroll up and down lists on it, slide up or down with one
finger on the keyboard.




When you type a word, if you slide up on the keyboard with one
finger repeatedly it'll supposedly cycle among possible choices
for the word you typed, though last time I tried it, it kept
typing the word immediately when I did that and putting a space
after it, and swiping up again was just adding another suggested
word that it thought might make sense paired with the previous
word, and thus I could keep swiping up to add lots of random
words, lol. This might be because Iuse GBoard as my software
keyboard, if it was Blackberry keyboard I'm assuming this would work properly.




You can slide left to delete by a word every time you do it.
You can slide right to select the word you chose with swiping up
and insert a space, when it works properly that is.




Cheers:
Aaron Spears, A.K.A. valiant8086. General Partner - Valiant Galaxy
Associates "We make Very Good Audiogames for the blind community -
http://valiantGalaxy.com"


Best from,

Carolyn












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help with outlook please

Adrien Collins <adriencollins22160@...>
 

Hi

 

I am trying to set up my new pc, it is a Lenovo a9 series desktop. For some reason I am unable to get my outlook.com accounts to work or set-up in outlook 365, I keep getting a message Microsoft prudential not responding, I have never had this before. I am using windows 10 pro as before. I have tried to do this even with uac disabled. How can I fix it please? I have tried doing it from within outlook and also by using the app in windows for mail 32, this is my preferred method, I am having the same result.

 

Regards

Adrien


Re: Blackberry Priv Phone.

Carolyn Arnold
 

Sounds right. The RCA keyboard works well, especially since Josh Kennedy was kind enough to send me the keyboard commands for it.

Best from,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jeremy
Sent: Saturday, June 17, 2017 10:35 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Blackberry Priv Phone.

No, I think you're right. While the ability to move around through the interface exists in Android, just as it does in IOS, it's more so something that goes along with the screenreader. The two are actually pretty similar, but that's speaking from using an external bluetooth keyboard, so not sure about a device with one built in.

If I were to expect navigation on the Priv or any other device with a keyboard, I'd look for the keys that I'd use on an external one for navigating. Just as with IOS, it requires that you use a key, along with the arrows to move around, I think it's the alt key, so if it had it, I'd not see why it wouldn't work. The RCA tablet is a good example of this. As it has a full-sized laptop keyboard with an alt key, the talkback commands for moving around in the interface work just fine. there may also be differences in using a modifier key such as alt in conjunction with the arrows on a keyboard like that, compared to that on the Priv which might make it not work, but I can't say.


On 6/17/2017 4:07 PM, Gene wrote:


Are there any? Perhaps, but I'm not optomistic. Phone designers probably assume that the keyboard is desired for typing in contexts of texting, writing e-mails, that sort of thing. but it is probably assumed that in actually operating the phone, that the user will use a touch screen. I believe Apple phones do let you control the phone with a Blue Tooth keyboard and Android don't. But I'm telling you what I recall from conversations I've seen on lists awhile ago. If I'm wrong, I hope to be corrected. But since phones are designed for sighted users, I doubt that phone designers in general would go through the extra time and trouble to make the phone fully functionable with a keyboard.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Eleni Vamvakari <mailto:elvam2167@gmail.com>
Sent: Saturday, June 17, 2017 12:20 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Blackberry Priv Phone.

Thank you for posting this. It seems that this is not the phone for
me. I don't want a keyboard with sliding, swiping, etc. I just want
a normal keyboard, with real keys, that you press to operate the
phone.<div id="DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2"><br />
<table style="border-top: 1px solid #D3D4DE;">
<tr>
<td style="width: 55px; padding-top: 13px;"><a
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On 17/06/2017, Iaen Cordell <ianc@optusnet.com.au <mailto:ianc@optusnet.com.au> > wrote:
> I agree, it can be hit and miss.
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io> [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
> Carlos
> Sent: Sunday, June 18, 2017 1:37 AM
> To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
> Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Blackberry Priv Phone.
>
> I knew that the keyboard was touch sensitive, but that's not quite the same
> as using the keys themselves for navigation.
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Carolyn Arnold" <4carolyna@windstream.net <mailto:4carolyna@windstream.net> >
> To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io> >
> Sent: Saturday, June 17, 2017 11:32 AM
> Subject: [TechTalk] Blackberry Priv Phone.
>
>
>> There has been discussion about keyboard screen navigation.
>> Here is a post from Eyes-Free, a Google list:
>>
>> Hi.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> You can scroll up and down lists on it, slide up or down with one
>> finger on the keyboard.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> When you type a word, if you slide up on the keyboard with one finger
>> repeatedly it'll supposedly cycle among possible choices for the word
>> you typed, though last time I tried it, it kept typing the word
>> immediately when I did that and putting a space after it, and swiping
>> up again was just adding another suggested word that it thought might
>> make sense paired with the previous word, and thus I could keep
>> swiping up to add lots of random words, lol. This might be because
>> Iuse GBoard as my software keyboard, if it was Blackberry keyboard I'm
>> assuming this would work properly.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> You can slide left to delete by a word every time you do it.
>> You can slide right to select the word you chose with swiping up and
>> insert a space, when it works properly that is.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Cheers:
>> Aaron Spears, A.K.A. valiant8086. General Partner - Valiant Galaxy
>> Associates "We make Very Good Audiogames for the blind community -
>> http://valiantGalaxy.com"
>>
>>
>> Best from,
>>
>> Carolyn
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>


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Re: Linux Questions

Josh Kennedy
 

THERE IS VOXIN ELOQUENCE FOR $5.

On 6/16/2017 11:03 PM, Jeremy wrote:
Yeah, I know what you mean. If I had absolutely no other choice I could probably use espeak daily, but I've never been able to get used to it for long periods of time either.
Take care.

On 6/16/2017 4:39 PM, Rob wrote:
Jeremy <icu8it2@gmail.com> wrote:
I would also be interested in if you ever figured out a different TTS to
use there, as I recall that you didn't particularly care for ESpeak,
yeah? If I could actually get a system, even if it were just console
where eloq was nice and stable, I'd be in heaven, at least with Linux
anyways.
Yes, I fiddled around with the
voxin-install.sh
script, so that I could figure out where everything was supposed to go. Everything in that package is prebuilt, so it's just a matter of copying to the right locations. Add the speakup connector for voxin and I was good to go.
I'm afraid that voxin won't work much longer; it's based on libraries that are fifteen or more years out of date and how much longer is that going to continue to be allowed to work. When that happens, I might be forcibly stuck with espeak. And if that happens I'll probably just be a completely braile or ssh user of linux. I just can't get used to it.



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Re: Computer Specifications

Carolyn Arnold
 

My sister is a solutions architect consultant with Dell Computers. She worked there 20 years, retired, but they contracted her back. So, she was here Thanksgiving, worked a lot on her Laptop computer. I asked her which Windows system she used, and without hesitation, she said, "Windows 7." I would think Dell Computers is up do tate, so that tells me that there is a lot of life left in Windows 7.

Best from,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Saturday, June 17, 2017 5:23 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications

At times, Windows 7 says that a program is not responding when it is actually doing something but can't be controled by the user. If you wait, the not responding message will disappear and the program can be used. If you have some sort of problem such as a driver incompatibility or something else, you may see various problems with Windows 7. But there is nothing inherent in Windows 7 that makes it not work well or that causes crashes or that would cause a lot of program not responding messages in a lot of programs.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Eleni Vamvakari <mailto:elvam2167@gmail.com>
Sent: Saturday, June 17, 2017 2:36 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications

I experience the "program not responding" error so frequently in 7 that I've come to associate it with this version of windows. Very rarely has it happened in XP, and Iuse the same programs there. But returning to the topic of this thread, what are the names of the form factors of the desktops that I am seeking? I imagine that such machines exist with the specifications listed. I'm not sure, though, about the smaller computers. Must I get something in te 12.1-inch size, or can I go to 10.1 and below and find something that is powerful enough for daily computing tasks and that has decent battery life? I haven't really had any issues with netbooks, so if I must use one of those, that's fine, though I would at least like the lates Atom processor that works with XP. As I said, regarding my UH900, the size is absolutely perfect, but the battery life is terrible.

On 14/06/2017, Carlos <carlos1106@nyc.rr.com <mailto:carlos1106@nyc.rr.com> > wrote:
I'm not sure that it's fair to judge 7 based on programs not responding.
No software is completely bug free so applications will occasionally
freeze up. This is simply the nature of software and has little to do
with the version of Windows. You will experience such problems with
any operating system. I personally don't experience this problem in 7
often unless the application itself is buggy or unstable which is not the fault of Windows.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Eleni Vamvakari" <elvam2167@gmail.com
<mailto:elvam2167@gmail.com> >
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io> >
Sent: Wednesday, June 14, 2017 1:52 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications


I'm 33, and I've been using computers for at least 21 years and
regularly for about 14, on several operating systems, my favourite
being MSDOS and Windows XP. By the time ribbons were invented, it was
well after my initial learning stage with a teacher. One of my mottos
in life is if it's not broken, don't fix it. Don't complicate simple
things is a new one that just came to mind. I never saw a need for
them and they only made things more confusing. So I avoid using them.

I can find almost anything on Ebay, including technology. I like
older dot matrix printers anyway. As for scanners, I have a flatbed
that works well, though I actually don't mind if those are modern.

Even though I have service Pack 4 installed, I agree with you about
banking, etc. I always use 7 for that. Even in 7, though, webpages
are becoming more needlessly complicated and ridiculous. I have my
own issues with Firefox, but those are unrelated to the opperating
system. But I still use it because i haven't found anything better.
I wish that Cometbird would be continued, as it is fast, light, and
simple. I often use it when I need to do things without frustration,
though again, not with anything financial. I stopped seriously using
Internet Explorer after version 6. Thank you for your explanation of
ribbons and for your offer of the tutorial. The good thing is that I
don't need to deal with them in 7 either.

If worse comes to worst, I will switch over to Linux. My issue there
is learning a new operating system (though I'm sure that I can do
that, as I did with Leopard and Snow Leopard before giving up on Macs)
and the fact that the version of Eespeak used in Orca has not been
updated to read polytonic Greek, which I use daily. But any computer
with the specifications that I chose should work well with most
versions of Linux. I would be very interested in hearing about that
system, though we should write about it in separate thread.

I have been using Windows 7 for many years now, so it's not exactly as
if I'm transitioning. I have always hated these annoyances. I also
forgot one. "Program not responding"! I have seen XP do it, but only
three or four times in my life. The good thing about 7, though, is
that it usually recovers the program instead of simply crashing it.

Eleni

On 14/06/2017, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com <mailto:gsasner@ripco.com> > wrote:
You could have used Firefox. Vista is no longer supported and over
time, it will become as archaic and insecure as XP but back then, you
could have used another browser.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Pamela Dominguez
Sent: Wednesday, June 14, 2017 12:03 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications


You are definitely right about internet explorer eight working on
less and less. In fact, about two years ago, I had to stop using my
vista laptop because internet explorer wouldn’t update, and wouldn’t
work on even my optimum homepage, never mind other sites I tried it
on. It worked on a few, but not many. Pam.

From: Gene
Sent: Wednesday, June 14, 2017 2:02 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications

Problems such as you describe with ribbons are very likely because
you weren't taught them correctly. It's up to you what you want to
do but XP is archaic and as soon as your printer or scanner breaks,
you're in for real trouble finding something compatible. I would
never do anything such as banking with XP. It's alright to use for
just browsing but not for doing anything where you provide personal
information. And as time goes on, browsers will do less and less in
XP. Internet Explorer8 works on fewer and fewer sites. Firefox is
no longer being updated except for security updates for XP users.
Chrome hasn't been updated for months for XP users and it won't be in
future. Support has completely ended for XP users.
meantime,
the Internet continues to evolve. You can't live in the
technological past forever. Most people who have problems with
ribbons have such problems because they weren't properly taught. The
main difference between a ribbon and a menu is that you tab and shift
tab to move forward and backward in a ribbon instead of up and down
arrowing. There are other things to know but in essence, ribbons are
menus but organized differently. They are systematic and logical
just as menus are. I'll send you the tutorial I did on ribbons if
you like. It's short and you may find ribbons much easier to use
than you think now when they are properly presented.

Meantime, I want to make clear that I'm not pressuring you to do
anything, but you are on a rapidly decaying dead end road. You will
be spending money on a system that will be increasingly unuseable.
Gene

From: Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Tuesday, June 13, 2017 8:20 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications

If a program is not 100% accessible, I refuse to use it. I don't
touch the registry unless I absolutely have to do so, as I don't
understand that sort of thing enough to feel comfortable with it. I
don't save Windows itself, except my virtual copy. But I do save all
of my files and folders by copying and pasting them on my various
media.

On 13/06/2017, Carlos <carlos1106@nyc.rr.com <mailto:carlos1106@nyc.rr.com> > wrote:
Classic Shell's settings are not very accessible, but after
configuring them

I just export the registry key where they are saved so for future
installations importing my preferences becomes much easier. I have
to make

several similar tweaks as well on a fresh installation such as
taking ownership of system files and disabling UAC, but I don't
perform clean installations very often. That's what images are for.
As for the save and

copy dialogs, I have no comment since they don't particularly bother me.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Eleni Vamvakari" <elvam2167@gmail.com
<mailto:elvam2167@gmail.com> >
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io> >
Sent: Tuesday, June 13, 2017 8:54 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications


Classic Shell was almost impossible to configure, and I couldn't
get back into the settings once I exited them. To answer your main
question, every time I get a Windows 7 machine, I have to replace
Wordpad with the one found in Vista (I don't have that system but
found the file online) because I hate ribbons. I then must take
ownership of the entire drive so that I can access certain folders
without getting a "permission denied" error. I then need to turn
off the UAC, because I don't need to be asked every time I do
something if I'm sure that I want to do it. But the thing that I
absolutely despise is the save dialogues in every program! In XP
they are save in, tool bar up one level button, toolbar recent
documents button, folder view list, file name, save as type, save
button, and cancel button. In 7, however, they are address, search
box, command module toolbar, name space control tree view, items
view, name split button, file name, save as type, toolbar hide
folders button, save button, and cancel button. What is all of that nonsense and why is it necessary?
Not to mention the fact that if I hit the wrong thing, it sends me
to af, qz, etc, and 99% of the time, NVDA gets stuck and I have to
restart it when saving files! The same holds if I'm in a folder
and start tabbing. And there, the differences are even more pronounced.
In XP, there are two options, address, and folder list view. In 7,
there are address, search box, command module toolbar, name space
control tree view, items view list, and name split button. Again,
why! And why are libraries necessary? Why must I have two folders
that say "my documents" and two programs folders (one for X86 and
one for other programs)? Oh, and I almost forgot! I don't like
the copy system either, particularly when it comes to replacing files!

The only good things about 7 that I can think of are security, the
listen to microphone option, and some extra power settings. But I
tried 8.0 and 8.1 and I no longer even have that computer, so you
can guess what I thought of it!

On 13/06/2017, Carlos <carlos1106@nyc.rr.com <mailto:carlos1106@nyc.rr.com> > wrote:
What exactly is it about Windows 7 that drives you quote unquote
"crazy"?
Support for newer hardware found in later versions aside, Windows
7 is Microsoft's best release in my humble opinion. You can even
install Classic

Shell
http://www.classicshell.net/
if you miss the old XP style
"Start"
menu.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Eleni Vamvakari" <elvam2167@gmail.com
<mailto:elvam2167@gmail.com> >
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io> >
Sent: Tuesday, June 13, 2017 8:07 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications


Today, I decided to look for computers on amazon, since Ebay has
become much too confusing and annoying in their refinements. I
thought that I found the perfect desktop. It had everything that
I wanted, except the ps/2 ports, and the 3.5 floppy/Superdisk
drive (though it has the slot for it), both of which I can live without.
It
also had a 2tb hard drive, which is entirely too large for my
needs, but I was willing to accept that. But then, I checked the size!
It's
huge!

https://www.cnet.com/products/dell-optiplex-760-core-2-duo-e8400-
3-ghz-series/specs/

For those interested, here is the Amazon listing itself, which
doesn't list the dimentions.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00XWCCU8S?m=A11C7SC2IL2NMJ

This is the same size as my current desktop, and is not what I
meant when I said mini tower! I want something that can fit on
my desk, that either is flat or stands upright. But Amazon only
offered all-in-ones, towers, or minis as their options. What are
the names of the form factors that I am seeking? Is there a
better site that I can use for this? If nothing else, I may use
a laptop as a full desktop replacement. That is, it would stay
on the desk. But I can't find one to match the above
specifications, particularly with regard to the processor speed
and ports.

I also need to decide what to do about a small, light laptop with
good battery life. The reason why I think XP can't be installed
on my Aspire One D270 is that it uses an Atom N2600 processor. I
heard something about it not working with XP due to the GMA
graphics. But at lest one person found the required drivers
(never listed at Acer, and none of their netbook drivers are
there now), so it must be possible. But for now, I want a cheap
and quick fix, because Windows
7 drives me crazy!

On 12/06/2017, Josh Kennedy <joshknnd1982@gmail.com <mailto:joshknnd1982@gmail.com> > wrote:
for some reason although this 11 year old laptop has a 64bit
processor, the 32bit windows 10 home runs best on it even faster
and better and lighter than the windows 10 professional 64bit
did when i had that installed.



On 6/11/2017 9:07 PM, Joseph Lee wrote:
Hi,
For those recommending parts: please do NOT include SSD's, as
XP will not support it properly. A 32-bit Windows will not
generally recognize RAM that's beyond approximately 3.5 GB, so
3 GB should be the recommended choice.
Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Sunday, June 11, 2017 9:00 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications

In another mesage, I mentioned that I was considering buying a
computer.
A few months ago, I wrote specifications for both a desktop and
a laptop, because I wanted to know how much it would cost to
have each custom-made.
While I am still curious, I now wonder if similar machines
already exist.
If so, and if anyone here has one, I am willing to discuss a
price, provided that it's reasonable. This post will be long,
so please feel free to cut it in your response. I will include
some general notes at the end for clarity. In the meantime,
does anyone know if Windows XP or Linux can successfully be
installed on a Fujitsu Lifebook UH900 or an Acer Aspire One
D270? What would be the average cost to just switch the
Japanese keyboard in the Lifebook with a U.S. one that I
already own?

Thank you,
Eleni

======

Desktop Specifications

Form Factor:
mini tower (preferred) or slim line

Case Material:
metal

Hard Drive:
traditional or solid state (depending on cost )may be fixed or
swappable

Hard drive Capacity:
60GB to 160GB

Ram:
4GB

Processor:
dual core Duo (minimum)

Processor Speed:
2-ghz (minimum, higher preferred)

Media:
1 LS240 3.5 in. IBM Superdisk
1 5.25 in. high density floppy
1 cd/dvrw
1 PCMCIA
slot (able to read compact flash cards)

Connectivity:
1 RS-232 9-pin male serial port
1 bidirectional female parallel port (2 if possible)
1 ps/2 port (for keyboard)
1 ps/2 port for mouse
1 VGA port for monitor
1 modem jack with internal 56k modem
1 Ethernet jack
wireless a/b/g/n
1 line-in jack
1 3.5mm microphone jack
1 3.5mm headphone/speaker jack
2 usb 2.0 (or 3.0 if backwards-compatible) ports (preferably 4)

Keyboard:
IBM Model M (already owned) or more modern Windows keyboard
(already
owned)

Monitor:
regular (not flat or excessively large)

Sound:
internal PC speaker
external speakers (already owned)

Operating System:
Windows XP 32-Bit SP3 with updates (main drive) Linux
(possibly, main
drive) DOS (possibly, separate drive) Windows 7 (possibly,
separate drive, perhaps on same as 7)

Recovery:
on disks or as separate partition in drive

======

Laptop Specifications

Form Factor:
clamshell

Screen Size:
5 in. to 8.9 in. (10.1 if necessary, but no larger, see
Lifebook
UH900
for
UMPC form factor)

Screen:
regular, not touchscreen

Weight:
3.5 lbs. maximum (with battery, lighter preferred)

Hard Drive:
traditional or solid state (depending on cost)

Hard Drive Capacity:
60 to 160GB

Ram:
2GB (minimum) 4GB (preferred)

Processor:
dual core (minimum)

Processor Speed:
1.6ghz minimum (2ghz or higher if possible)

Temperature
as cool as possible, without sacrificing important features

Battery type:
lithium ion, or anything that lacks memory issues and lasts
long

Battery Life:
5+ hours (minimum)

Keyboard:
US. must have page up-down, home, end, and delete (either
separately or via function key), two alts, Windows, and
Applications keys

Media:
1 pcmcia or compact flash card slot
1 SD card reader

Connectivity:
2 usb 2.0 (or 3.0 if backwards-compatible) ports (minimum)
wireless b/g/n, and (on-off switch
1 microphone jack
1 headphone jack

Sound:
built-in speaker (can be mono or stereo) built-in microphone
(high
quality)

Webcam:
if included, should either have easy-to-feel/cover lens (Aspire
One
D270 good example, UH900 bad) or sliding cover,)

Operating System:
Windows XP 32-Bit SP3 with updates Linux (possibly)

Recovery:
on disks or as separate partition in drive

======

General Notes

If you are selling me your computer and not building one, feel
free to ignore the sections about partitioning drives,
installing an operating system, and XP compatibility unrelated
to drivers. While I don't mind a hard drive with more than
160GB, I really don't need it, and 120GB should be sufficient
for my needs. Likewise, I don't need more than 4GB of ram.

I
also don't technically require the 5.25 Superdisk drive, the
56K modem, the line-in jack, or Wireless A (B/G/N are all
required) in the desktop, but I included everything for the sake of
completeness. When referring to a swappable hard drive, I mean
one
with a handle that can easily be removed and replaced by the
user, and whose bay can be used for another drive or device.
While I already own

a
keyboard and speakers, I will accept them if they come with the
unit.
As
far as the laptop/umpc, my goal is to get something as small
and light as possible, with good battery life. In the UMPC
size, the media section can be ignored, and I am aware that
certain processors cannot be used.
I
am
including them for a slightly larger model.
Regardless of the computer I choose, I will be using Windows XP
as the main operating system, so please ensure that the
motherboard, processor, peripherals, and drivers are
compatible. If a main drive under 160GB cannot be found, I
would be interested in partitioning the drive and installing
Linux (Vinux, Sonar Mate, or Ubuntu Mate). I have had very
little experience with this operating system, but know that
Orca (the built-in screen reader) will not start automatically
in Ubuntu Mate 32-Bit. I have not tried it on 64-Bit. On at
least one computer, the volume of speech on Sonar was extremely
quiet. Vinux starts without difficulties in Gnome, Mate, and
Unity. ====== If using a swappable drive, I may install MSDOS
or Enhanced DR-DOS on a separate one to try them out, and while
I don't love Windows 7, I may install it as well, in case I
really need it. In all cases, regardless of the machine,
please set the boot sequence in the bios as
follows: usb, SD (wear applicable), cd (unless external cd rom
drives count as usb), , hard drive.





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Virus-free. www.avg.com <http://www.avg.com>


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Re: keyboards VS touch screens and technological change

Eleni Vamvakari
 

I usually find a way to accidentally touch them and annoy myself. So
I toggle them off as well, whenever possible.

On 17/06/2017, Rajmund <brajmund2000@gmail.com> wrote:
and if it's a big one like mine is, you can easily touch it unintended.
I'll be forever greatful for the FN toggle.

On 17/06/17 10:52 PM, Josh Kennedy wrote:
I JUST LET THE TOUCH PAD ON, BECAUSE THE MOUSE IS USEFUL IN SOME
APPLICATIONS.



On 6/16/2017 6:30 PM, Marie wrote:
d not be so sure about windows not turning Cortana. At least every
other update turns the touchpad on with both of my laptops and I have
to disable them if possible or uninstall the driver on one. It is
extremely annoying.
Marie


-----Original Message----- From: Josh Kennedy
Sent: Friday, June 16, 2017 1:03 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] keyboards VS touch screens and technological
change

no new updates will not try to turn cortana on if you don't want them
to. if you get a new big major update which has you go through the setup
screen you just make sure those checkboxes are all unchecked and you
make a local offline account and you're good to go. windows10 is the
future, embrace it or fall behind. if you still like dos and old
windows3.1 stuff like I do, you can do what I do and run talking dosbox
or run stuff in vmware player. its what I have to do to run some older
stuff I still enjoy using such as the old infovox230 tts.



On 6/16/2017 3:49 PM, Rob wrote:
Carlos <carlos1106@nyc.rr.com> wrote:
Oh yes, not to mention that new poor excuse for a
"Start"
menu is a piece of junk.
And the fact you can't completely remove cortana. I did find a way to
turn it off in group policy editor, but it's still there, lurking in
the background, and I bet some other update will probably try to turn
it on.




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Re: keyboards VS touch screens and technological change

Rajmund <brajmund2000@...>
 

and if it's a big one like mine is, you can easily touch it unintended. I'll be forever greatful for the FN toggle.

On 17/06/17 10:52 PM, Josh Kennedy wrote:
I JUST LET THE TOUCH PAD ON, BECAUSE THE MOUSE IS USEFUL IN SOME APPLICATIONS.
On 6/16/2017 6:30 PM, Marie wrote:
d not be so sure about windows not turning Cortana. At least every other update turns the touchpad on with both of my laptops and I have to disable them if possible or uninstall the driver on one. It is extremely annoying.
Marie


-----Original Message----- From: Josh Kennedy
Sent: Friday, June 16, 2017 1:03 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] keyboards VS touch screens and technological change

no new updates will not try to turn cortana on if you don't want them
to. if you get a new big major update which has you go through the setup
screen you just make sure those checkboxes are all unchecked and you
make a local offline account and you're good to go. windows10 is the
future, embrace it or fall behind. if you still like dos and old
windows3.1 stuff like I do, you can do what I do and run talking dosbox
or run stuff in vmware player. its what I have to do to run some older
stuff I still enjoy using such as the old infovox230 tts.



On 6/16/2017 3:49 PM, Rob wrote:
Carlos <carlos1106@nyc.rr.com> wrote:
Oh yes, not to mention that new poor excuse for a
"Start"
menu is a piece of junk.
And the fact you can't completely remove cortana. I did find a way to turn it off in group policy editor, but it's still there, lurking in the background, and I bet some other update will probably try to turn it on.



Re: keyboards VS touch screens and technological change

Josh Kennedy
 

I JUST LET THE TOUCH PAD ON, BECAUSE THE MOUSE IS USEFUL IN SOME APPLICATIONS.

On 6/16/2017 6:30 PM, Marie wrote:
d not be so sure about windows not turning Cortana. At least every other update turns the touchpad on with both of my laptops and I have to disable them if possible or uninstall the driver on one. It is extremely annoying.
Marie


-----Original Message----- From: Josh Kennedy
Sent: Friday, June 16, 2017 1:03 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] keyboards VS touch screens and technological change

no new updates will not try to turn cortana on if you don't want them
to. if you get a new big major update which has you go through the setup
screen you just make sure those checkboxes are all unchecked and you
make a local offline account and you're good to go. windows10 is the
future, embrace it or fall behind. if you still like dos and old
windows3.1 stuff like I do, you can do what I do and run talking dosbox
or run stuff in vmware player. its what I have to do to run some older
stuff I still enjoy using such as the old infovox230 tts.



On 6/16/2017 3:49 PM, Rob wrote:
Carlos <carlos1106@nyc.rr.com> wrote:
Oh yes, not to mention that new poor excuse for a
"Start"
menu is a piece of junk.
And the fact you can't completely remove cortana. I did find a way to turn it off in group policy editor, but it's still there, lurking in the background, and I bet some other update will probably try to turn it on.


--
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Re: Computer Specifications

Rajmund <brajmund2000@...>
 

that's exactly why I'm on the hunt for a 11 or smaller inch notebook. for traveling purposes, and since I hate the numpad, it won't bother me, either ways.

On 17/06/17 10:40 PM, Eleni Vamvakari wrote:
Ah okay. A 15-inch laptop is far too big for my portable needs,
though I may consider such a size if I needed to choose a desktop
replacement. but then, I would expect it to come with most of the
things under my list of desktop specifications. I don't mind noisy
keyboards. I own an IBM Model M, which is also known as a clicky
keyboard, precisely due to its loud sound cause by the springs in it.
Yes. Usually, when I see "program not responding", it eventually
starts working again.
On 17/06/2017, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:
At times, Windows 7 says that a program is not responding when it is
actually doing something but can't be controled by the user. If you wait,
the not responding message will disappear and the program can be used. If
you have some sort of problem such as a driver incompatibility or something
else, you may see various problems with Windows 7. But there is nothing
inherent in Windows 7 that makes it not work well or that causes crashes or
that would cause a lot of program not responding messages in a lot of
programs.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Saturday, June 17, 2017 2:36 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications


I experience the "program not responding" error so frequently in 7
that I've come to associate it with this version of windows. Very
rarely has it happened in XP, and Iuse the same programs there. But
returning to the topic of this thread, what are the names of the form
factors of the desktops that I am seeking? I imagine that such
machines exist with the specifications listed. I'm not sure, though,
about the smaller computers. Must I get something in te 12.1-inch
size, or can I go to 10.1 and below and find something that is
powerful enough for daily computing tasks and that has decent battery
life? I haven't really had any issues with netbooks, so if I must use
one of those, that's fine, though I would at least like the lates Atom
processor that works with XP. As I said, regarding my UH900, the size
is absolutely perfect, but the battery life is terrible.

On 14/06/2017, Carlos <carlos1106@nyc.rr.com> wrote:
I'm not sure that it's fair to judge 7 based on programs not responding.
No software is completely bug free so applications will occasionally
freeze
up. This is simply the nature of software and has little to do with the
version of Windows. You will experience such problems with any operating
system. I personally don't experience this problem in 7 often unless the
application itself is buggy or unstable which is not the fault of
Windows.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Eleni Vamvakari" <elvam2167@gmail.com>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, June 14, 2017 1:52 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications


I'm 33, and I've been using computers for at least 21 years and
regularly for about 14, on several operating systems, my favourite
being MSDOS and Windows XP. By the time ribbons were invented, it was
well after my initial learning stage with a teacher. One of my mottos
in life is if it's not broken, don't fix it. Don't complicate simple
things is a new one that just came to mind. I never saw a need for
them and they only made things more confusing. So I avoid using them.

I can find almost anything on Ebay, including technology. I like
older dot matrix printers anyway. As for scanners, I have a flatbed
that works well, though I actually don't mind if those are modern.

Even though I have service Pack 4 installed, I agree with you about
banking, etc. I always use 7 for that. Even in 7, though, webpages
are becoming more needlessly complicated and ridiculous. I have my
own issues with Firefox, but those are unrelated to the opperating
system. But I still use it because i haven't found anything better.
I wish that Cometbird would be continued, as it is fast, light, and
simple. I often use it when I need to do things without frustration,
though again, not with anything financial. I stopped seriously using
Internet Explorer after version 6. Thank you for your explanation of
ribbons and for your offer of the tutorial. The good thing is that I
don't need to deal with them in 7 either.

If worse comes to worst, I will switch over to Linux. My issue there
is learning a new operating system (though I'm sure that I can do
that, as I did with Leopard and Snow Leopard before giving up on Macs)
and the fact that the version of Eespeak used in Orca has not been
updated to read polytonic Greek, which I use daily. But any computer
with the specifications that I chose should work well with most
versions of Linux. I would be very interested in hearing about that
system, though we should write about it in separate thread.

I have been using Windows 7 for many years now, so it's not exactly as
if I'm transitioning. I have always hated these annoyances. I also
forgot one. "Program not responding"! I have seen XP do it, but only
three or four times in my life. The good thing about 7, though, is
that it usually recovers the program instead of simply crashing it.

Eleni

On 14/06/2017, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:
You could have used Firefox. Vista is no longer supported and over
time,
it
will become as archaic and insecure as XP but back then, you could have
used
another browser.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Pamela Dominguez
Sent: Wednesday, June 14, 2017 12:03 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications


You are definitely right about internet explorer eight working on less
and
less. In fact, about two years ago, I had to stop using my vista laptop
because internet explorer wouldn’t update, and wouldn’t work on even my
optimum homepage, never mind other sites I tried it on. It worked on a
few,
but not many. Pam.

From: Gene
Sent: Wednesday, June 14, 2017 2:02 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications

Problems such as you describe with ribbons are very likely because you
weren't taught them correctly. It's up to you what you want to do but
XP
is
archaic and as soon as your printer or scanner breaks, you're in for
real
trouble finding something compatible. I would never do anything such as
banking with XP. It's alright to use for just browsing but not for
doing
anything where you provide personal information. And as time goes on,
browsers will do less and less in XP. Internet Explorer8 works on fewer
and
fewer sites. Firefox is no longer being updated except for security
updates
for XP users. Chrome hasn't been updated for months for XP users and it
won't be in future. Support has completely ended for XP users.
meantime,
the Internet continues to evolve. You can't live in the technological
past
forever. Most people who have problems with ribbons have such problems
because they weren't properly taught. The main difference between a
ribbon
and a menu is that you tab and shift tab to move forward and backward in
a
ribbon instead of up and down arrowing. There are other things to know
but
in essence, ribbons are menus but organized differently. They are
systematic and logical just as menus are. I'll send you the tutorial I
did
on ribbons if you like. It's short and you may find ribbons much easier
to
use than you think now when they are properly presented.

Meantime, I want to make clear that I'm not pressuring you to do
anything,
but you are on a rapidly decaying dead end road. You will be spending
money
on a system that will be increasingly unuseable.
Gene

From: Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Tuesday, June 13, 2017 8:20 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications

If a program is not 100% accessible, I refuse to use it. I don't
touch the registry unless I absolutely have to do so, as I don't
understand that sort of thing enough to feel comfortable with it. I
don't save Windows itself, except my virtual copy. But I do save all
of my files and folders by copying and pasting them on my various
media.

On 13/06/2017, Carlos <carlos1106@nyc.rr.com> wrote:
Classic Shell's settings are not very accessible, but after configuring
them

I just export the registry key where they are saved so for future
installations importing my preferences becomes much easier. I have to
make

several similar tweaks as well on a fresh installation such as taking
ownership of system files and disabling UAC, but I don't perform clean
installations very often. That's what images are for. As for the save
and

copy dialogs, I have no comment since they don't particularly bother
me.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Eleni Vamvakari" <elvam2167@gmail.com>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, June 13, 2017 8:54 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications


Classic Shell was almost impossible to configure, and I couldn't get
back into the settings once I exited them. To answer your main
question, every time I get a Windows 7 machine, I have to replace
Wordpad with the one found in Vista (I don't have that system but
found the file online) because I hate ribbons. I then must take
ownership of the entire drive so that I can access certain folders
without getting a "permission denied" error. I then need to turn off
the UAC, because I don't need to be asked every time I do something if
I'm sure that I want to do it. But the thing that I absolutely
despise is the save dialogues in every program! In XP they are save
in, tool bar up one level button, toolbar recent documents button,
folder view list, file name, save as type, save button, and cancel
button. In 7, however, they are address, search box, command module
toolbar, name space control tree view, items view, name split button,
file name, save as type, toolbar hide folders button, save button, and
cancel button. What is all of that nonsense and why is it necessary?
Not to mention the fact that if I hit the wrong thing, it sends me to
af, qz, etc, and 99% of the time, NVDA gets stuck and I have to
restart it when saving files! The same holds if I'm in a folder and
start tabbing. And there, the differences are even more pronounced.
In XP, there are two options, address, and folder list view. In 7,
there are address, search box, command module toolbar, name space
control tree view, items view list, and name split button. Again,
why! And why are libraries necessary? Why must I have two folders
that say "my documents" and two programs folders (one for X86 and one
for other programs)? Oh, and I almost forgot! I don't like the copy
system either, particularly when it comes to replacing files!

The only good things about 7 that I can think of are security, the
listen to microphone option, and some extra power settings. But I
tried 8.0 and 8.1 and I no longer even have that computer, so you can
guess what I thought of it!

On 13/06/2017, Carlos <carlos1106@nyc.rr.com> wrote:
What exactly is it about Windows 7 that drives you quote unquote
"crazy"?
Support for newer hardware found in later versions aside, Windows 7
is
Microsoft's best release in my humble opinion. You can even install
Classic

Shell
http://www.classicshell.net/
if you miss the old XP style
"Start"
menu.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Eleni Vamvakari" <elvam2167@gmail.com>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, June 13, 2017 8:07 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications


Today, I decided to look for computers on amazon, since Ebay has
become much too confusing and annoying in their refinements. I
thought that I found the perfect desktop. It had everything that I
wanted, except the ps/2 ports, and the 3.5 floppy/Superdisk drive
(though it has the slot for it), both of which I can live without.
It
also had a 2tb hard drive, which is entirely too large for my needs,
but I was willing to accept that. But then, I checked the size!
It's
huge!

https://www.cnet.com/products/dell-optiplex-760-core-2-duo-e8400-3-ghz-series/specs/

For those interested, here is the Amazon listing itself, which
doesn't
list the dimentions.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00XWCCU8S?m=A11C7SC2IL2NMJ

This is the same size as my current desktop, and is not what I meant
when I said mini tower! I want something that can fit on my desk,
that either is flat or stands upright. But Amazon only offered
all-in-ones, towers, or minis as their options. What are the names
of
the form factors that I am seeking? Is there a better site that I
can
use for this? If nothing else, I may use a laptop as a full desktop
replacement. That is, it would stay on the desk. But I can't find
one to match the above specifications, particularly with regard to
the
processor speed and ports.

I also need to decide what to do about a small, light laptop with
good
battery life. The reason why I think XP can't be installed on my
Aspire One D270 is that it uses an Atom N2600 processor. I heard
something about it not working with XP due to the GMA graphics. But
at lest one person found the required drivers (never listed at Acer,
and none of their netbook drivers are there now), so it must be
possible. But for now, I want a cheap and quick fix, because
Windows
7 drives me crazy!

On 12/06/2017, Josh Kennedy <joshknnd1982@gmail.com> wrote:
for some reason although this 11 year old laptop has a 64bit
processor,
the 32bit windows 10 home runs best on it even faster and better
and
lighter than the windows 10 professional 64bit did when i had that
installed.



On 6/11/2017 9:07 PM, Joseph Lee wrote:
Hi,
For those recommending parts: please do NOT include SSD's, as XP
will
not
support it properly. A 32-bit Windows will not generally recognize
RAM
that's beyond approximately 3.5 GB, so 3 GB should be the
recommended
choice.
Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On
Behalf
Of Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Sunday, June 11, 2017 9:00 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications

In another mesage, I mentioned that I was considering buying a
computer.
A few months ago, I wrote specifications for both a desktop and a
laptop,
because I wanted to know how much it would cost to have each
custom-made.
While I am still curious, I now wonder if similar machines already
exist.
If so, and if anyone here has one, I am willing to discuss a
price,
provided that it's reasonable. This post will be long, so please
feel
free to cut it in your response. I will include some general
notes
at
the
end for clarity. In the meantime, does anyone know if Windows XP
or
Linux
can successfully be installed on a Fujitsu Lifebook UH900 or an
Acer
Aspire One D270? What would be the average cost to just switch
the
Japanese keyboard in the Lifebook with a U.S. one that I already
own?

Thank you,
Eleni

======

Desktop Specifications

Form Factor:
mini tower (preferred) or slim line

Case Material:
metal

Hard Drive:
traditional or solid state (depending on cost )may be fixed or
swappable

Hard drive Capacity:
60GB to 160GB

Ram:
4GB

Processor:
dual core Duo (minimum)

Processor Speed:
2-ghz (minimum, higher preferred)

Media:
1 LS240 3.5 in. IBM Superdisk
1 5.25 in. high density floppy
1 cd/dvrw
1 PCMCIA
slot (able to read compact flash cards)

Connectivity:
1 RS-232 9-pin male serial port
1 bidirectional female parallel port (2 if possible)
1 ps/2 port (for keyboard)
1 ps/2 port for mouse
1 VGA port for monitor
1 modem jack with internal 56k modem
1 Ethernet jack
wireless a/b/g/n
1 line-in jack
1 3.5mm microphone jack
1 3.5mm headphone/speaker jack
2 usb 2.0 (or 3.0 if backwards-compatible) ports (preferably 4)

Keyboard:
IBM Model M (already owned) or more modern Windows keyboard
(already
owned)

Monitor:
regular (not flat or excessively large)

Sound:
internal PC speaker
external speakers (already owned)

Operating System:
Windows XP 32-Bit SP3 with updates (main drive) Linux (possibly,
main
drive) DOS (possibly, separate drive) Windows 7 (possibly,
separate
drive,
perhaps on same as 7)

Recovery:
on disks or as separate partition in drive

======

Laptop Specifications

Form Factor:
clamshell

Screen Size:
5 in. to 8.9 in. (10.1 if necessary, but no larger, see Lifebook
UH900
for
UMPC form factor)

Screen:
regular, not touchscreen

Weight:
3.5 lbs. maximum (with battery, lighter preferred)

Hard Drive:
traditional or solid state (depending on cost)

Hard Drive Capacity:
60 to 160GB

Ram:
2GB (minimum) 4GB (preferred)

Processor:
dual core (minimum)

Processor Speed:
1.6ghz minimum (2ghz or higher if possible)

Temperature
as cool as possible, without sacrificing important features

Battery type:
lithium ion, or anything that lacks memory issues and lasts long

Battery Life:
5+ hours (minimum)

Keyboard:
US. must have page up-down, home, end, and delete (either
separately
or
via function key), two alts, Windows, and Applications keys

Media:
1 pcmcia or compact flash card slot
1 SD card reader

Connectivity:
2 usb 2.0 (or 3.0 if backwards-compatible) ports (minimum)
wireless
b/g/n,
and (on-off switch
1 microphone jack
1 headphone jack

Sound:
built-in speaker (can be mono or stereo) built-in microphone (high
quality)

Webcam:
if included, should either have easy-to-feel/cover lens (Aspire
One
D270 good example, UH900 bad) or sliding cover,)

Operating System:
Windows XP 32-Bit SP3 with updates
Linux (possibly)

Recovery:
on disks or as separate partition in drive

======

General Notes

If you are selling me your computer and not building one, feel
free
to
ignore the sections about partitioning drives, installing an
operating
system, and XP compatibility unrelated to drivers. While I don't
mind
a
hard drive with more than 160GB, I really don't need it, and 120GB
should
be sufficient for my needs. Likewise, I don't need more than 4GB
of
ram.

I
also don't technically require the 5.25 Superdisk drive, the 56K
modem,
the line-in jack, or Wireless A (B/G/N are all
required) in the desktop, but I included everything for the sake
of
completeness. When referring to a swappable hard drive, I mean
one
with a handle that can easily be removed and replaced by the user,
and
whose bay can be used for another drive or device. While I
already
own

a
keyboard and speakers, I will accept them if they come with the
unit.
As
far as the laptop/umpc, my goal is to get something as small and
light
as
possible, with good battery life. In the UMPC size, the media
section
can
be ignored, and I am aware that certain processors cannot be used.
I
am
including them for a slightly larger model.
Regardless of the computer I choose, I will be using Windows XP as
the
main operating system, so please ensure that the motherboard,
processor,
peripherals, and drivers are compatible. If a main drive under
160GB
cannot be found, I would be interested in partitioning the drive
and
installing Linux (Vinux, Sonar Mate, or Ubuntu Mate). I have had
very
little experience with this operating system, but know that Orca
(the
built-in screen reader) will not start automatically in Ubuntu
Mate
32-Bit. I have not tried it on 64-Bit. On at least one computer,
the
volume of speech on Sonar was extremely quiet. Vinux starts
without
difficulties in Gnome, Mate, and Unity. ====== If using a
swappable
drive, I may install MSDOS or Enhanced DR-DOS on a separate one to
try
them out, and while I don't love Windows 7, I may install it as
well,
in
case I really need it. In all cases, regardless of the machine,
please
set the boot sequence in the bios as
follows: usb, SD (wear applicable), cd (unless external cd rom
drives
count as usb), , hard drive.





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Re: Blackberry Priv Phone.

Eleni Vamvakari
 

I know that these phones existed in the past. I don't care if it's
modern or not. I just want a phone with internet connectivity, a
built-in keyboard, and a screen reader.

What is thiS RCA tablet and how big is it? Can the touchscreen be
deactivated? I didn't realise that they make tablets with build-in
keyboards.

On 17/06/2017, Jeremy <icu8it2@gmail.com> wrote:
No, I think you're right. While the ability to move around through the
interface exists in Android, just as it does in IOS, it's more so
something that goes along with the screenreader. The two are actually
pretty similar, but that's speaking from using an external bluetooth
keyboard, so not sure about a device with one built in.

If I were to expect navigation on the Priv or any other device with a
keyboard, I'd look for the keys that I'd use on an external one for
navigating. Just as with IOS, it requires that you use a key, along with
the arrows to move around, I think it's the alt key, so if it had it,
I'd not see why it wouldn't work. The RCA tablet is a good example of
this. As it has a full-sized laptop keyboard with an alt key, the
talkback commands for moving around in the interface work just fine.
there may also be differences in using a modifier key such as alt in
conjunction with the arrows on a keyboard like that, compared to that on
the Priv which might make it not work, but I can't say.

On 6/17/2017 4:07 PM, Gene wrote:
Are there any? Perhaps, but I'm not optomistic. Phone designers
probably assume that the keyboard is desired for typing in contexts of
texting, writing e-mails, that sort of thing. but it is probably
assumed that in actually operating the phone, that the user will use a
touch screen. I believe Apple phones do let you control the phone
with a Blue Tooth keyboard and Android don't. But I'm telling you
what I recall from conversations I've seen on lists awhile ago. If
I'm wrong, I hope to be corrected. But since phones are designed for
sighted users, I doubt that phone designers in general would go
through the extra time and trouble to make the phone fully
functionable with a keyboard.
Gene
----- Original Message -----
*From:* Eleni Vamvakari <mailto:elvam2167@gmail.com>
*Sent:* Saturday, June 17, 2017 12:20 PM
*To:* main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
*Subject:* Re: [TechTalk] Blackberry Priv Phone.

Thank you for posting this. It seems that this is not the phone for
me. I don't want a keyboard with sliding, swiping, etc. I just want
a normal keyboard, with real keys, that you press to operate the
phone.<div id="DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2"><br />
<table style="border-top: 1px solid #D3D4DE;">
<tr>
<td style="width: 55px; padding-top: 13px;"><a
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/></a></td>
<td style="width: 470px; padding-top: 12px; color: #41424e;
font-size: 13px; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;
line-height: 18px;">Virus-free. <a
href="https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=link"
target="_blank" style="color: #4453ea;">www.avast.com</a>
</td>
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</table><a href="#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2" width="1"
height="1"></a></div>

On 17/06/2017, Iaen Cordell <ianc@optusnet.com.au
<mailto:ianc@optusnet.com.au>> wrote:
I agree, it can be hit and miss.


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Carlos
Sent: Sunday, June 18, 2017 1:37 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Blackberry Priv Phone.

I knew that the keyboard was touch sensitive, but that's not quite
the same
as using the keys themselves for navigation.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Carolyn Arnold" <4carolyna@windstream.net
<mailto:4carolyna@windstream.net>>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>>
Sent: Saturday, June 17, 2017 11:32 AM
Subject: [TechTalk] Blackberry Priv Phone.


There has been discussion about keyboard screen navigation.
Here is a post from Eyes-Free, a Google list:

Hi.




You can scroll up and down lists on it, slide up or down with one
finger on the keyboard.




When you type a word, if you slide up on the keyboard with one finger
repeatedly it'll supposedly cycle among possible choices for the word
you typed, though last time I tried it, it kept typing the word
immediately when I did that and putting a space after it, and swiping
up again was just adding another suggested word that it thought might
make sense paired with the previous word, and thus I could keep
swiping up to add lots of random words, lol. This might be because
Iuse GBoard as my software keyboard, if it was Blackberry keyboard I'm
assuming this would work properly.




You can slide left to delete by a word every time you do it.
You can slide right to select the word you chose with swiping up and
insert a space, when it works properly that is.




Cheers:
Aaron Spears, A.K.A. valiant8086. General Partner - Valiant Galaxy
Associates "We make Very Good Audiogames for the blind community -
http://valiantGalaxy.com"


Best from,

Carolyn












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Re: Computer Specifications

Eleni Vamvakari
 

Ah okay. A 15-inch laptop is far too big for my portable needs,
though I may consider such a size if I needed to choose a desktop
replacement. but then, I would expect it to come with most of the
things under my list of desktop specifications. I don't mind noisy
keyboards. I own an IBM Model M, which is also known as a clicky
keyboard, precisely due to its loud sound cause by the springs in it.

Yes. Usually, when I see "program not responding", it eventually
starts working again.

On 17/06/2017, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:
At times, Windows 7 says that a program is not responding when it is
actually doing something but can't be controled by the user. If you wait,
the not responding message will disappear and the program can be used. If
you have some sort of problem such as a driver incompatibility or something
else, you may see various problems with Windows 7. But there is nothing
inherent in Windows 7 that makes it not work well or that causes crashes or
that would cause a lot of program not responding messages in a lot of
programs.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Saturday, June 17, 2017 2:36 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications


I experience the "program not responding" error so frequently in 7
that I've come to associate it with this version of windows. Very
rarely has it happened in XP, and Iuse the same programs there. But
returning to the topic of this thread, what are the names of the form
factors of the desktops that I am seeking? I imagine that such
machines exist with the specifications listed. I'm not sure, though,
about the smaller computers. Must I get something in te 12.1-inch
size, or can I go to 10.1 and below and find something that is
powerful enough for daily computing tasks and that has decent battery
life? I haven't really had any issues with netbooks, so if I must use
one of those, that's fine, though I would at least like the lates Atom
processor that works with XP. As I said, regarding my UH900, the size
is absolutely perfect, but the battery life is terrible.

On 14/06/2017, Carlos <carlos1106@nyc.rr.com> wrote:
I'm not sure that it's fair to judge 7 based on programs not responding.
No software is completely bug free so applications will occasionally
freeze
up. This is simply the nature of software and has little to do with the
version of Windows. You will experience such problems with any operating
system. I personally don't experience this problem in 7 often unless the
application itself is buggy or unstable which is not the fault of
Windows.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Eleni Vamvakari" <elvam2167@gmail.com>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, June 14, 2017 1:52 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications


I'm 33, and I've been using computers for at least 21 years and
regularly for about 14, on several operating systems, my favourite
being MSDOS and Windows XP. By the time ribbons were invented, it was
well after my initial learning stage with a teacher. One of my mottos
in life is if it's not broken, don't fix it. Don't complicate simple
things is a new one that just came to mind. I never saw a need for
them and they only made things more confusing. So I avoid using them.

I can find almost anything on Ebay, including technology. I like
older dot matrix printers anyway. As for scanners, I have a flatbed
that works well, though I actually don't mind if those are modern.

Even though I have service Pack 4 installed, I agree with you about
banking, etc. I always use 7 for that. Even in 7, though, webpages
are becoming more needlessly complicated and ridiculous. I have my
own issues with Firefox, but those are unrelated to the opperating
system. But I still use it because i haven't found anything better.
I wish that Cometbird would be continued, as it is fast, light, and
simple. I often use it when I need to do things without frustration,
though again, not with anything financial. I stopped seriously using
Internet Explorer after version 6. Thank you for your explanation of
ribbons and for your offer of the tutorial. The good thing is that I
don't need to deal with them in 7 either.

If worse comes to worst, I will switch over to Linux. My issue there
is learning a new operating system (though I'm sure that I can do
that, as I did with Leopard and Snow Leopard before giving up on Macs)
and the fact that the version of Eespeak used in Orca has not been
updated to read polytonic Greek, which I use daily. But any computer
with the specifications that I chose should work well with most
versions of Linux. I would be very interested in hearing about that
system, though we should write about it in separate thread.

I have been using Windows 7 for many years now, so it's not exactly as
if I'm transitioning. I have always hated these annoyances. I also
forgot one. "Program not responding"! I have seen XP do it, but only
three or four times in my life. The good thing about 7, though, is
that it usually recovers the program instead of simply crashing it.

Eleni

On 14/06/2017, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:
You could have used Firefox. Vista is no longer supported and over
time,
it
will become as archaic and insecure as XP but back then, you could have
used
another browser.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Pamela Dominguez
Sent: Wednesday, June 14, 2017 12:03 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications


You are definitely right about internet explorer eight working on less
and
less. In fact, about two years ago, I had to stop using my vista laptop
because internet explorer wouldn’t update, and wouldn’t work on even my
optimum homepage, never mind other sites I tried it on. It worked on a
few,
but not many. Pam.

From: Gene
Sent: Wednesday, June 14, 2017 2:02 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications

Problems such as you describe with ribbons are very likely because you
weren't taught them correctly. It's up to you what you want to do but
XP
is
archaic and as soon as your printer or scanner breaks, you're in for
real
trouble finding something compatible. I would never do anything such as
banking with XP. It's alright to use for just browsing but not for
doing
anything where you provide personal information. And as time goes on,
browsers will do less and less in XP. Internet Explorer8 works on fewer
and
fewer sites. Firefox is no longer being updated except for security
updates
for XP users. Chrome hasn't been updated for months for XP users and it
won't be in future. Support has completely ended for XP users.
meantime,
the Internet continues to evolve. You can't live in the technological
past
forever. Most people who have problems with ribbons have such problems
because they weren't properly taught. The main difference between a
ribbon
and a menu is that you tab and shift tab to move forward and backward in
a
ribbon instead of up and down arrowing. There are other things to know
but
in essence, ribbons are menus but organized differently. They are
systematic and logical just as menus are. I'll send you the tutorial I
did
on ribbons if you like. It's short and you may find ribbons much easier
to
use than you think now when they are properly presented.

Meantime, I want to make clear that I'm not pressuring you to do
anything,
but you are on a rapidly decaying dead end road. You will be spending
money
on a system that will be increasingly unuseable.
Gene

From: Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Tuesday, June 13, 2017 8:20 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications

If a program is not 100% accessible, I refuse to use it. I don't
touch the registry unless I absolutely have to do so, as I don't
understand that sort of thing enough to feel comfortable with it. I
don't save Windows itself, except my virtual copy. But I do save all
of my files and folders by copying and pasting them on my various
media.

On 13/06/2017, Carlos <carlos1106@nyc.rr.com> wrote:
Classic Shell's settings are not very accessible, but after configuring
them

I just export the registry key where they are saved so for future
installations importing my preferences becomes much easier. I have to
make

several similar tweaks as well on a fresh installation such as taking
ownership of system files and disabling UAC, but I don't perform clean
installations very often. That's what images are for. As for the save
and

copy dialogs, I have no comment since they don't particularly bother
me.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Eleni Vamvakari" <elvam2167@gmail.com>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, June 13, 2017 8:54 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications


Classic Shell was almost impossible to configure, and I couldn't get
back into the settings once I exited them. To answer your main
question, every time I get a Windows 7 machine, I have to replace
Wordpad with the one found in Vista (I don't have that system but
found the file online) because I hate ribbons. I then must take
ownership of the entire drive so that I can access certain folders
without getting a "permission denied" error. I then need to turn off
the UAC, because I don't need to be asked every time I do something if
I'm sure that I want to do it. But the thing that I absolutely
despise is the save dialogues in every program! In XP they are save
in, tool bar up one level button, toolbar recent documents button,
folder view list, file name, save as type, save button, and cancel
button. In 7, however, they are address, search box, command module
toolbar, name space control tree view, items view, name split button,
file name, save as type, toolbar hide folders button, save button, and
cancel button. What is all of that nonsense and why is it necessary?
Not to mention the fact that if I hit the wrong thing, it sends me to
af, qz, etc, and 99% of the time, NVDA gets stuck and I have to
restart it when saving files! The same holds if I'm in a folder and
start tabbing. And there, the differences are even more pronounced.
In XP, there are two options, address, and folder list view. In 7,
there are address, search box, command module toolbar, name space
control tree view, items view list, and name split button. Again,
why! And why are libraries necessary? Why must I have two folders
that say "my documents" and two programs folders (one for X86 and one
for other programs)? Oh, and I almost forgot! I don't like the copy
system either, particularly when it comes to replacing files!

The only good things about 7 that I can think of are security, the
listen to microphone option, and some extra power settings. But I
tried 8.0 and 8.1 and I no longer even have that computer, so you can
guess what I thought of it!

On 13/06/2017, Carlos <carlos1106@nyc.rr.com> wrote:
What exactly is it about Windows 7 that drives you quote unquote
"crazy"?
Support for newer hardware found in later versions aside, Windows 7
is
Microsoft's best release in my humble opinion. You can even install
Classic

Shell
http://www.classicshell.net/
if you miss the old XP style
"Start"
menu.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Eleni Vamvakari" <elvam2167@gmail.com>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, June 13, 2017 8:07 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications


Today, I decided to look for computers on amazon, since Ebay has
become much too confusing and annoying in their refinements. I
thought that I found the perfect desktop. It had everything that I
wanted, except the ps/2 ports, and the 3.5 floppy/Superdisk drive
(though it has the slot for it), both of which I can live without.
It
also had a 2tb hard drive, which is entirely too large for my needs,
but I was willing to accept that. But then, I checked the size!
It's
huge!

https://www.cnet.com/products/dell-optiplex-760-core-2-duo-e8400-3-ghz-series/specs/

For those interested, here is the Amazon listing itself, which
doesn't
list the dimentions.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00XWCCU8S?m=A11C7SC2IL2NMJ

This is the same size as my current desktop, and is not what I meant
when I said mini tower! I want something that can fit on my desk,
that either is flat or stands upright. But Amazon only offered
all-in-ones, towers, or minis as their options. What are the names
of
the form factors that I am seeking? Is there a better site that I
can
use for this? If nothing else, I may use a laptop as a full desktop
replacement. That is, it would stay on the desk. But I can't find
one to match the above specifications, particularly with regard to
the
processor speed and ports.

I also need to decide what to do about a small, light laptop with
good
battery life. The reason why I think XP can't be installed on my
Aspire One D270 is that it uses an Atom N2600 processor. I heard
something about it not working with XP due to the GMA graphics. But
at lest one person found the required drivers (never listed at Acer,
and none of their netbook drivers are there now), so it must be
possible. But for now, I want a cheap and quick fix, because
Windows
7 drives me crazy!

On 12/06/2017, Josh Kennedy <joshknnd1982@gmail.com> wrote:
for some reason although this 11 year old laptop has a 64bit
processor,
the 32bit windows 10 home runs best on it even faster and better
and
lighter than the windows 10 professional 64bit did when i had that
installed.



On 6/11/2017 9:07 PM, Joseph Lee wrote:
Hi,
For those recommending parts: please do NOT include SSD's, as XP
will
not
support it properly. A 32-bit Windows will not generally recognize
RAM
that's beyond approximately 3.5 GB, so 3 GB should be the
recommended
choice.
Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On
Behalf
Of Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Sunday, June 11, 2017 9:00 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Computer Specifications

In another mesage, I mentioned that I was considering buying a
computer.
A few months ago, I wrote specifications for both a desktop and a
laptop,
because I wanted to know how much it would cost to have each
custom-made.
While I am still curious, I now wonder if similar machines already
exist.
If so, and if anyone here has one, I am willing to discuss a
price,
provided that it's reasonable. This post will be long, so please
feel
free to cut it in your response. I will include some general
notes
at
the
end for clarity. In the meantime, does anyone know if Windows XP
or
Linux
can successfully be installed on a Fujitsu Lifebook UH900 or an
Acer
Aspire One D270? What would be the average cost to just switch
the
Japanese keyboard in the Lifebook with a U.S. one that I already
own?

Thank you,
Eleni

======

Desktop Specifications

Form Factor:
mini tower (preferred) or slim line

Case Material:
metal

Hard Drive:
traditional or solid state (depending on cost )may be fixed or
swappable

Hard drive Capacity:
60GB to 160GB

Ram:
4GB

Processor:
dual core Duo (minimum)

Processor Speed:
2-ghz (minimum, higher preferred)

Media:
1 LS240 3.5 in. IBM Superdisk
1 5.25 in. high density floppy
1 cd/dvrw
1 PCMCIA
slot (able to read compact flash cards)

Connectivity:
1 RS-232 9-pin male serial port
1 bidirectional female parallel port (2 if possible)
1 ps/2 port (for keyboard)
1 ps/2 port for mouse
1 VGA port for monitor
1 modem jack with internal 56k modem
1 Ethernet jack
wireless a/b/g/n
1 line-in jack
1 3.5mm microphone jack
1 3.5mm headphone/speaker jack
2 usb 2.0 (or 3.0 if backwards-compatible) ports (preferably 4)

Keyboard:
IBM Model M (already owned) or more modern Windows keyboard
(already
owned)

Monitor:
regular (not flat or excessively large)

Sound:
internal PC speaker
external speakers (already owned)

Operating System:
Windows XP 32-Bit SP3 with updates (main drive) Linux (possibly,
main
drive) DOS (possibly, separate drive) Windows 7 (possibly,
separate
drive,
perhaps on same as 7)

Recovery:
on disks or as separate partition in drive

======

Laptop Specifications

Form Factor:
clamshell

Screen Size:
5 in. to 8.9 in. (10.1 if necessary, but no larger, see Lifebook
UH900
for
UMPC form factor)

Screen:
regular, not touchscreen

Weight:
3.5 lbs. maximum (with battery, lighter preferred)

Hard Drive:
traditional or solid state (depending on cost)

Hard Drive Capacity:
60 to 160GB

Ram:
2GB (minimum) 4GB (preferred)

Processor:
dual core (minimum)

Processor Speed:
1.6ghz minimum (2ghz or higher if possible)

Temperature
as cool as possible, without sacrificing important features

Battery type:
lithium ion, or anything that lacks memory issues and lasts long

Battery Life:
5+ hours (minimum)

Keyboard:
US. must have page up-down, home, end, and delete (either
separately
or
via function key), two alts, Windows, and Applications keys

Media:
1 pcmcia or compact flash card slot
1 SD card reader

Connectivity:
2 usb 2.0 (or 3.0 if backwards-compatible) ports (minimum)
wireless
b/g/n,
and (on-off switch
1 microphone jack
1 headphone jack

Sound:
built-in speaker (can be mono or stereo) built-in microphone (high
quality)

Webcam:
if included, should either have easy-to-feel/cover lens (Aspire
One
D270 good example, UH900 bad) or sliding cover,)

Operating System:
Windows XP 32-Bit SP3 with updates
Linux (possibly)

Recovery:
on disks or as separate partition in drive

======

General Notes

If you are selling me your computer and not building one, feel
free
to
ignore the sections about partitioning drives, installing an
operating
system, and XP compatibility unrelated to drivers. While I don't
mind
a
hard drive with more than 160GB, I really don't need it, and 120GB
should
be sufficient for my needs. Likewise, I don't need more than 4GB
of
ram.

I
also don't technically require the 5.25 Superdisk drive, the 56K
modem,
the line-in jack, or Wireless A (B/G/N are all
required) in the desktop, but I included everything for the sake
of
completeness. When referring to a swappable hard drive, I mean
one
with a handle that can easily be removed and replaced by the user,
and
whose bay can be used for another drive or device. While I
already
own

a
keyboard and speakers, I will accept them if they come with the
unit.
As
far as the laptop/umpc, my goal is to get something as small and
light
as
possible, with good battery life. In the UMPC size, the media
section
can
be ignored, and I am aware that certain processors cannot be used.
I
am
including them for a slightly larger model.
Regardless of the computer I choose, I will be using Windows XP as
the
main operating system, so please ensure that the motherboard,
processor,
peripherals, and drivers are compatible. If a main drive under
160GB
cannot be found, I would be interested in partitioning the drive
and
installing Linux (Vinux, Sonar Mate, or Ubuntu Mate). I have had
very
little experience with this operating system, but know that Orca
(the
built-in screen reader) will not start automatically in Ubuntu
Mate
32-Bit. I have not tried it on 64-Bit. On at least one computer,
the
volume of speech on Sonar was extremely quiet. Vinux starts
without
difficulties in Gnome, Mate, and Unity. ====== If using a
swappable
drive, I may install MSDOS or Enhanced DR-DOS on a separate one to
try
them out, and while I don't love Windows 7, I may install it as
well,
in
case I really need it. In all cases, regardless of the machine,
please
set the boot sequence in the bios as
follows: usb, SD (wear applicable), cd (unless external cd rom
drives
count as usb), , hard drive.





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Re: Blackberry Priv Phone.

Jeremy <icu8it2@...>
 

No, I think you're right. While the ability to move around through the interface exists in Android, just as it does in IOS, it's more so something that goes along with the screenreader. The two are actually pretty similar, but that's speaking from using an external bluetooth keyboard, so not sure about a device with one built in.

If I were to expect navigation on the Priv or any other device with a keyboard, I'd look for the keys that I'd use on an external one for navigating. Just as with IOS, it requires that you use a key, along with the arrows to move around, I think it's the alt key, so if it had it, I'd not see why it wouldn't work. The RCA tablet is a good example of this. As it has a full-sized laptop keyboard with an alt key, the talkback commands for moving around in the interface work just fine. there may also be differences in using a modifier key such as alt in conjunction with the arrows on a keyboard like that, compared to that on the Priv which might make it not work, but I can't say.

On 6/17/2017 4:07 PM, Gene wrote:
Are there any?  Perhaps, but I'm not optomistic.  Phone designers probably assume that the keyboard is desired for typing in contexts of texting, writing e-mails, that sort of thing.  but it is probably assumed that in actually operating the phone, that the user will use a touch screen.  I believe Apple phones do let you control the phone with a Blue Tooth keyboard and Android don't.  But I'm telling you what I recall from conversations I've seen on lists awhile ago.  If I'm wrong, I hope to be corrected.  But since phones are designed for sighted users, I doubt that phone designers in general would go through the extra time and trouble to make the phone fully functionable with a keyboard.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, June 17, 2017 12:20 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Blackberry Priv Phone.

Thank you for posting this.  It seems that this is not the phone for
me.  I don't want a keyboard with sliding, swiping, etc.  I just want
a normal keyboard, with real keys, that you press to operate the
phone.<div id="DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2"><br />
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font-size: 13px; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;
line-height: 18px;">Virus-free. <a
href="https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=link"
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height="1"></a></div>

On 17/06/2017, Iaen Cordell <ianc@...> wrote:
> I agree, it can be hit and miss.
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
> Carlos
> Sent: Sunday, June 18, 2017 1:37 AM
> To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Blackberry Priv Phone.
>
> I knew that the keyboard was touch sensitive, but that's not quite the same
> as using the keys themselves for navigation.
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Carolyn Arnold" <4carolyna@...>
> To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
> Sent: Saturday, June 17, 2017 11:32 AM
> Subject: [TechTalk] Blackberry Priv Phone.
>
>
>> There has been discussion about keyboard screen navigation.
>> Here is a post from Eyes-Free, a Google list:
>>
>> Hi.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> You can scroll up and down lists on it, slide up or down with one
>> finger on the keyboard.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> When you type a word, if you slide up on the keyboard with one finger
>> repeatedly it'll supposedly cycle among possible choices for the word
>> you typed, though last time I tried it, it kept typing the word
>> immediately when I did that and putting a space after it, and swiping
>> up again was just adding another suggested word that it thought might
>> make sense paired with the previous word, and thus I could keep
>> swiping up to add lots of random words, lol. This might be because
>> Iuse GBoard as my software keyboard, if it was Blackberry keyboard I'm
>> assuming this would work properly.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> You can slide left to delete by a word every time you do it.
>> You can slide right to select the word you chose with swiping up and
>> insert a space, when it works properly that is.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Cheers:
>> Aaron Spears, A.K.A. valiant8086. General Partner - Valiant Galaxy
>> Associates "We make Very Good Audiogames for the blind community -
>> http://valiantGalaxy.com"
>>
>>
>> Best from,
>>
>> Carolyn
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>


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Facebook: elvam2167@...

Skype: elvam2167




Re: Linux Questions

Eleni Vamvakari
 

If I had to use the generic version, I would, like so many others,
become annoyed after a while. The intonation is flat, and I agree
about the tin can quality of the default voice. But the deelopers of
NVDA have gone a long way toward changing that. The Michel voice (not
to be confused with Michael, which is different) is male and is just a
standard voice that comes with NVDA's espeak. As for Greek, any
espeak voice can read it. You just change the language settings.
*smile* When I do siwtch, I like the more human-sounding voices, like
Microsoft Speech Platform, Realspeak Solo, and L&H 3000. But if I had
to synthetic, my favourite is definitely KeyNote, as found in the
VoiceCard, the older BrailleNotes, and the older Language Masters.
Unfortunately, no one ever made a driver of it that works with Windows
XP or 7.

On 17/06/2017, Jeremy <icu8it2@gmail.com> wrote:
Because eloquence is often easier on the ears, especially for long
periods of time. Espeak is ok if it's all you've got, but after a while
of using it, it becomes headache inducing. There are a number of people
that don't mind espeak though, but there's also a great deal who find it
difficult to get used to.

On 6/17/2017 3:34 PM, Eleni Vamvakari wrote:
I don't know why everyone loves Eloquence. It's okay, but not great.
I actually prefer espeak, though I use the Michel voice in NVDA and
think that their version has much better intonation than the standard
one. Add to that the fact that it can read Greek, and I really have
no need to switch synthesizers. But sometimes I do, just for a
temporary change.

On 17/06/2017, Rob <captinlogic@gmail.com> wrote:
Josh Kennedy <joshknnd1982@gmail.com> wrote:
you can buy voxin for $5 for linux and it works good. voxin is
eloquence
for linux.
I know that. Read more carefully.
Because I built a custom linux (Linux from scratch) I could not use the
voxin-install.sh
script. I had to dissect it, figure out what it did, and then match its
functions to my own system.
The installer script places the binaries and libraries in predefined
locations based on distribution. Since mine is custom, it couldn't do
that,
so I had to do it all myself.






--
Facebook: elvam2167@gmail.com

Skype: elvam2167


Re: got my new computer

Gene
 

Frankly, it's foolish to remove the recovery partition.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, June 17, 2017 3:16 PM
Subject: [TechTalk] got my new computer

hey just to let you all know, I got my new computer all set up. here are
the specs directly from dx-diag application.

System Information
Current Date/Time:Saturday, June 17, 2017, 4:11:59 PM
Computer Name:LAPTOP-NH3EJ7L3
Operating System:Windows 10 Home 64-bit (10.0, Build 15063)
Language:English (Regional Setting: English)
System Manufacturer:HP
System Model:HP Notebook
BIOS:F.22
Processor:AMD A6-7310 APU with AMD Radeon R4 Graphics     (4 CPUs), ~2.0GHz
Memory:4096MB RAM
Page file:1766MB used, 3129MB available
DirectX Version:DirectX 12


Its very fast and responsive. it comes with a recovery partition but you
can use the diskpart command line to remove it. its partitions 4 and 5.
and you have to first type


gpt attributes=0x8000000000000000


and then you can remove the factory recovery partitions. when you first
start it windows upgrade assistant prompts you to update. i did, then i
did a refresh pc to get rid of all bloatware so i got a fresh windows
pc. then i installed my apps. its using about 20gb of hard drive after
disk cleanup and installing my documents apps and stuff. and its nice
and fast. you can get one the hp backlit laptop from amazon just type in

laptop with AMD

into amazon you'll find it for $250 or so. even has dvdrw and
everything. oh and you guys will like this it has a full 101 key
keyboard with a full number pad. its quite nice for $250 or so I think.




On 6/16/2017 4:15 PM, Carlos wrote:
> LOL everyone uses the future argument until they introduce some
> feature or make some change you personally don't like.  Then it's a
> whole different story.  This has nothing to do with embracing the
> future.  I don't have problems adapting to any new technology. 
> Recognize the difference between people who can't adapt and those who
> just don't like Windows 10.  You may be head over heels over the new
> changes, but not everyone is going to agree with you.
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Josh Kennedy"
> <joshknnd1982@...>
> To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
> Sent: Friday, June 16, 2017 4:03 PM
> Subject: Re: [TechTalk] keyboards VS touch screens and technological
> change
>
>
>> no new updates will not try to turn cortana on if you don't want them
>> to. if you get a new big major update which has you go through the
>> setup screen you just make sure those checkboxes are all unchecked
>> and you make a local offline account and you're good to go. windows10
>> is the future, embrace it or fall behind. if you still like dos and
>> old windows3.1 stuff like I do, you can do what I do and run talking
>> dosbox or run stuff in vmware player. its what I have to do to run
>> some older stuff I still enjoy using such as the old infovox230 tts.
>>
>>
>>
>> On 6/16/2017 3:49 PM, Rob wrote:
>>> Carlos <carlos1106@...> wrote:
>>>> Oh yes, not to mention that new poor excuse for a
>>>> "Start"
>>>> menu is a piece of junk.
>>>
>>> And the fact you can't completely remove cortana. I did find a way
>>> to turn it off in group policy editor, but it's still there, lurking
>>> in the background, and I bet some other update will probably try to
>>> turn it on.
>>>
>>>
>>
>> --
>> sent with mozilla thunderbird email application
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
>

--
sent with mozilla thunderbird email client




Re: Thinking of Outlook with JAWS

Gene
 

If you want to switch you can, of course.  But you can go back to a version of Thunderbird that works well and use it indefinitely.  Tell the program not to update immediately after you go back to the old version. 
 
In addition, since I don't know if any security patches affecting the program's e-mail function have been added recently, if you read mail in plain text, you will have no security problems with e-mails.

Gene
----- Original Messae -----
Sent: Saturday, June 17, 2017 2:42 PM
Subject: [TechTalk] Thinking of Outlook with JAWS

Hi, All:

I'm thinking of switching from Thunderbird to Outlook since the update to
the new infamous version created several problems with Thunderbird and Word
2010 here. I also have some unresolved annoyances with Thunderbird.   I'm
now running JAWS 18 and have JAWS 16 to 18 on a 64 bit Windows 7 Home
Premium machine.  I have Outlook 2010 that is part of the Home and Student
2010? Version.  What would be the best version of Outlook to use with JAWS
on a Windows 7 computer?  It looks like Outlook 16 is the last version that
will work.  Just to complicate things, I'm thinking of getting Windows 10.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Margaret







Re: keyboards VS touch screens and technological change

Eleni Vamvakari
 

I'm glad that it exists. But from what you've described, and I
realise that you haven't really researched this, it seems that you can
only search for one thing at a time. Even if that's not the case,
this is a classic example of taking something that works well and
needlessly complicating it. Instead of having everything displayed at
once, I have to go through extra steps to do something that was once
incredibly simple.

On 17/06/2017, Carolyn Arnold <4carolyna@windstream.net> wrote:
We don't use Classic Shell either. My husband and I each
have Windows-10.

Best from,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Josh Kennedy
Sent: Saturday, June 17, 2017 4:27 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] keyboards VS touch screens and
technological change

I did use classic shell, then i found i like the new start
menu in creators update so got rid of classic shell and do
not use it at all anymore.



On 6/16/2017 5:42 PM, Rajmund wrote:
LOL that looks worse and worse update after update. it's
literally
sickening, despite how you can install classic shell. I
shouldn't have
to do that just to make it tolerable.

On 16/06/17 8:47 PM, Carlos wrote:
Oh yes, not to mention that new poor excuse for a "Start"
menu is a piece of junk.

----- Original Message -----
*From:* Carlos <mailto:carlos1106@nyc.rr.com>
*To:* main@TechTalk.groups.io
<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
*Sent:* Friday, June 16, 2017 3:39 PM
*Subject:* Re: [TechTalk] keyboards VS touch screens
and
technological change

I appreciate the sentiment Josh, but I know how to
give feedback and
anyone can join the insider program. Unfortunately,
these issues
have already been discussed to death and I doubt
Microsoft is going
to do anything about forced updates and the potential
privacy
issues.

----- Original Message -----
*From:* Josh Kennedy
<mailto:joshknnd1982@gmail.com>
*To:* main@TechTalk.groups.io
<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
*Sent:* Friday, June 16, 2017 3:33 PM
*Subject:* Re: [TechTalk] keyboards VS touch
screens and
technological change

so far windows10 is working very good for me. And
with each new
major windows10 release it seems to be just
getting better and
better. I also use feedback hub and give them
feedback. carlos,
can you tell me the specific direction windows10
is going that
you do not like? if you tell me I will write them
feedback in
the feedback hub so perhaps they can change it or
add some
feature that will push it in the direction you
like while
keeping it how it is for other folks.



On 6/16/2017 1:36 PM, Carlos wrote:
This is why I always say that Windows is
Windows. At least in
terms of operation. A newer version of Windows
may
have differences in it's interface and Microsoft
has a bad
habit of making unnecessary changes, but there
are
usually enough similarities that it only takes
me a few days
to adapt. It is possible that as an advanced
user I may be
trivializing the affect such changes have on
others, but I
think often people become frustrated by the
differences
and give up too soon. The problem is that
eventually you have
to move on if you want to keep up with new
technology. Someone will always point out the
exceptions they
know who are still running DOS or Windows 95,
but that simply
isn't realistic for most users. It may be
possible to
continue using outdated versions such as XP for
now, but what
about in 10 or 15 years? When Microsoft has
completely given
up on XP altogether, security becomes more
effort than it's
worth to maintain, and it just won't work with
modern hardware
or peripherals. Some may even consider
switching over to a
completely different operating system, but
learning a new
operating system is generally more difficult for
most
users than adapting to a new version of one you
may have been
already using for years. That is not to say it
can't be done,
but if you have the technical fortitude to learn
Linux for
example, then learning a new version of Windows
should be
trivial. You may take the time to learn a new
operating
system only to discover that it has it's own
annoying quirks
and idiosyncrasies. Of course, there might be
other reasons
for switching over to a new operating system. I
have
considered doing so myself after support ends
for Windows 7
since I don't like Windows 10 and the direction
it's going.
The problem with Linux is that it is not an
operating system
for the technically faint of heart.
Accessibility has
improved significantly in the last several years
and sometimes
everything works as expected, but it's when
something goes
wrong that many users may have difficulties.
Even with modern
desktop based distributions, quite often
changing settings
requires manual editing of configuration files.
Even getting
help and finding answers in the Linux community
can be
daunting at times.

----- Original Message -----
*From:* Gene <mailto:gsasner@ripco.com>
*To:* main@TechTalk.groups.io
<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
*Sent:* Friday, June 16, 2017 12:24 PM
*Subject:* Re: [TechTalk] keyboards VS touch
screens and
technological change

Yes, learning the underlying structure is
important and
learning shortcut commands is also important
for
efficiency. But in Windows 7, I don't think
whether
people learn keystrokes, or underlying
concepts with
shortcuts, or both matters in terms of ease
of using
Windows 7 if you know XP. In my example of
the shut down
dialog, to see almost the identical dialog,
all you have
to do is move to the desktop, then use alt
f4 to open the
shut down dialog. that's how I work with
the shut down
dialog in Windows 7. As far as other things
are
concerned, another example that might
confuse people is
what you see if you open something like the
c drive and
start tabbing. You will see lots of fields
that aren't
present in XP. But you can ignore them all
and simply not
tab around. If you do that, the list view
of files and
folders is the same as in XP. And the
examples could go
on and on. I'll give one more. If you like
to use the
run dialog, in Windows 7 you have to be sure
you press and
hold the Windows key and type r while doing
so. In XP,
you could press and release the Windows key
and then type
r. this is a trivial difference but one
that could cause
lots of frustration if you don't know it.
And a lot of
operations are identical to XP. I've just
chosen this
example to illustrate how trivial the
changes are where
they exist in most cases. I use Windows 7.
At times, I
prefer using the start dialog search to open
a program or
to find where I would change settings for
something. but
almost all I do in Windows 7 is either
identical or almost
identical to XP. Once I realized I could
use Windows 7 in
this way, after I got a Windows 7 computer
and started
looking around and experimenting, I was able
to do almost
everything I did before.
Gene
----- Original Message -----
*From:* Ann Parsons <mailto:akp@sero.email>
*Sent:* Friday, June 16, 2017 6:43 AM
*To:* main@TechTalk.groups.io
<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
*Subject:* [TechTalk] keyboards VS touch
screens and
technological change

Morning all,

Gene, I like your rebuttal here. I would
just like to add
that the
switch between XP and win7 could be
difficult for some
because they are
afraid. Part of the fear is that they will
not remember
or understand
keystrokes.

I agree that much of the fear can be
lessened if the user
is able to do
two things: first, get away from dependence
on keystroke
learning; and
second, have the ribbons explained in a way
they
understand.

I have found that those who are trained by
teachers who
base their
training curricula on keystrokes are much
more afraid than
those who
have learned their computer with a concept
centered
approach. Cathy
Ann Murtha promoted this type of training
and still
does. It is
effective because it allows a user to be
able to sit down
at any
computer running any screen reader and
operate it
competently.

I can tell you that the method does work. I
went to visit
a friend
some years back, and she was running Windows
with a Baum
braille
display and their screen reader whose name
escapes me this
morning.
Hmmm, Hal comes to mind, but not sure. I
was able to
retrieve my email
and read it and send it. the commands for
the screen
reader were
different, but when I asked my friend how to
do X or Y,
she gave me the
commands and I did fine.

As for keyboards VS touch screens, I have to
weigh in on
the keyboard
side of things. I tried an iPhone for two
years. I did
very little
with it. It frustrated me because I couldn't
get things
done fast
enough. Now I have a flip phone that I love
and my apps
are on my
BrailleNote Touch. I'm a happy camper. It
may not work
for others,
but it's working for me.

Ann P.

Original message:
> I'll make this message as short as I can.
It is somewhat
long, however.
> You may not want to continue the
discussion and that's
fine. I may be
> trying too hard to convince you of
something I think may
benefit you.
> But first, regarding number pad texting:
> I wasn't concerned with what you literally
said. it was
the context and
> what someone might have been reasonably
expected to
infer. Your second
> message made much more clear what you were
saying and
why. I think your
> first message implied, not stated, what
appeared to be
skepticism. I'm
> not saying you intended to do so. I'm
saying that I
think it did,
> intended or not. You and others may
disagree.
> I also wrote what I did because of what
may be your
strong resistance
> to change. I say may be because there may
be other
explanations and you
> may not actually be resistant to change.
I'll point out
another
> possible explanation later.
> I strongly believe that the main reason
most people have
problems
> switching from XP to Windows 7 is because
Windows 7
isn't explained
> properly to them or they don't see what
I'm pointing out
when they look
> at it. Windows 7 allows you to do things
in the same way
as XP
> generally. There may be this or that small
exception but
if you know
> XP, if the similarities are pointed out,
it can be
demonstrated that
> almost anything can be done identically or
almost
identically with the
> two systems.
> If it ain't broke don't fix it is fine but
most of the
changes in
> Windows 7 actually make it more convenient
to work with
by giving
> people more options and you don't have to
work with them
if you don't
> want to. To take one example, a new way of
shutting down
the computer
> is available in Windows 7. But you can use
a shut down
dialog that is
> almost identical in Windows 7 to that in
XP. You don't
have to use the
> new way. I won't give more examples
here--the message is
already long enough.
> If Windows 7 wasn't presented to you in
that way or it
wasn't clear to
> you from looking at it yourself, that
might account for
your hostility.
> It may have nothing to do with resistance
to change.
> I'm not assuming you will find learning or
adapting to
the changes
> easy. I don't assume how people will
learn. I say that
in general, if
> well taught, the changes can be shown and
understood to
be able to be
> mostly avoided if desired and many people
would find
them in general to
> be minor. if people do want to try them,
many people
prefer to use some
> of the changes.
> So, if what I wrote seems pushy, that
isn't the intent.
At first, I
> thought you might be better served using
Windows 7. Now,
that isn't my
> concern. I'm not saying that you should
use Windows 7.
I'm not saying
> that you shouldn't use XP and I'm not
saying that you
should not use
> Linux. given some peoples' objections to
Windows 10
because of privacy
> concerns and forced updates and since
Windows 7 won't be
supported in
> about two and a half years, some people
might wish to
switch to Linux
> for such reasons instead of upgrading to
Windows 7. I
don't know enough
> about Linux to know if the same quality of
programs such
as reading
> programs are available or if accessibility
is as good in
Linux. I
> gather that Linux is more of a techie
operating system
where users may
> have to go through more procedures and
problems setting
up things like
> peripherals.
> but I'm not trying to convince you to use
any particular
operating
> system or version of Windows including
whether you use
XP or not. As
> I've said, I don't know if you have a lot
of resistance
to change or if
> Windows 7 just seems to you to be very
different, which
is a different
> reason. That's why I'm going into all
this. If you do
have resistance
> to change, looking at my material may
convince you that
I am right
> about Windows 7. If the reason is that for
whatever
reason, Windows 7
> seems to you to be significantly different
from XP,
seeing my material
> may cause you to be less quick to reach
conclusions and
to seek out
> more information in future before reaching
a conclusion.
If either of
> these results occurs, you will benefit. If
neither does,
you'll have
> lost nothing but perhaps an hour of
looking through and
trying
> procedures I use as examples.
> Gene
> ----- Original Message -----
>> Gene, while your knowledge of technology
is obviously
> vast, you seem
>> to like to tell people what to do and how
to think and
> express their
>> ideas. I never said that other people
couldn't text
using
> the
>> numberpad. Clearly, several here have
explained that
they
> use them
>> successfully. I said that I couldn't. I
tried to enter a
> simple word
>> and became extremely frustrated. It's not
for me, and
I'm
> not the
>> only one who experiences such
difficulties.

>> On 15/06/2017, Rajmund
<brajmund2000@gmail.com
<mailto:brajmund2000@gmail.com>
>> <mailto:brajmund2000@gmail.com>> wrote:
>>> agree with keypad phones. they have to
be more tedious
> than a touch
>>> screen, or so I'd imagine.

>>> On 14/06/17 7:04 PM, Eleni Vamvakari
wrote:
>>>> I don't ever text, but even if I were
to do so, I
can't
> see how
>>>> anyone can write quickly with numbers.
I actually
> researched the
>>>> letter/number combinations, out of
curiosity, but I
> couldn't imagine
>>>> trying to navigate the Internet, etc.
like that. My
> Kyocera Rally
>>>> has a regular telephone keyboard on it
and no way to
> connect an
>>>> external qwerty. This is why, though it
has a browser,
> I have never
>>>> used that feature.

>>>> On 14/06/2017, Pamela Dominguez
<geodom@optonline.net
<mailto:geodom@optonline.net>
>>>> <mailto:geodom@optonline.net>>
> wrote:
>>>>> I don't know that it does. I just
thought that it had
> a number pad
>>>>> of buttons that you could feel. But if
I'm wrong, I'm
> sure I will
>>>>> be corrected. Pam.

>>>>> -----Original Message-----
>>>>> From: Ann Parsons
>>>>> Sent: Wednesday, June 14, 2017 6:36 AM
>>>>> To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
>>>>> Subject: Re: [TechTalk] QWERTY Phone

>>>>> Hi all,

>>>>> I believe the Samsung Gusto has a
QWERTY keyboard.

>>>>> Ann P.

>>>>> --
>>>>> Ann K. Parsons
>>>>> Portal Tutoring
>>>>> ** New EMAIL: akp@sero.email
<mailto:akp@sero.email>
<mailto:akp@sero.email>
>>>>> web site:
http://www.portaltutoring.info
<http://www.portaltutoring.info>
>>>>> Skype: Putertutor

>>>>> "All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who
> wander are
>>>>> lost."




>>>>> ---
>>>>> This email has been checked for
viruses by AVG.
>>>>> http://www.avg.com
<http://www.avg.com>













>> --
>> Facebook: elvam2167@gmail.com
<mailto:elvam2167@gmail.com>
<mailto:elvam2167@gmail.com>

>> Skype: elvam2167



> --
> Ann K. Parsons
> Portal Tutoring
> ** New EMAIL: akp@sero.email
<mailto:akp@sero.email>
<mailto:akp@sero.email>
> web site: http://www.portaltutoring.info
<http://www.portaltutoring.info>
> Skype: Putertutor

> "All that is gold does not glitter,
> Not all those who wander are lost."







>

-- Ann K. Parsons
Portal Tutoring
** New EMAIL: akp@sero.email
<mailto:akp@sero.email>
web site: http://www.portaltutoring.info
Skype: Putertutor

"All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost."

-- sent with mozilla thunderbird email
application


--
sent with mozilla thunderbird email client








--
Facebook: elvam2167@gmail.com

Skype: elvam2167


Re: Linux Questions

Jeremy <icu8it2@...>
 

Because eloquence is often easier on the ears, especially for long periods of time. Espeak is ok if it's all you've got, but after a while of using it, it becomes headache inducing. There are a number of people that don't mind espeak though, but there's also a great deal who find it difficult to get used to.

On 6/17/2017 3:34 PM, Eleni Vamvakari wrote:
I don't know why everyone loves Eloquence. It's okay, but not great.
I actually prefer espeak, though I use the Michel voice in NVDA and
think that their version has much better intonation than the standard
one. Add to that the fact that it can read Greek, and I really have
no need to switch synthesizers. But sometimes I do, just for a
temporary change.

On 17/06/2017, Rob <captinlogic@gmail.com> wrote:
Josh Kennedy <joshknnd1982@gmail.com> wrote:
you can buy voxin for $5 for linux and it works good. voxin is eloquence
for linux.
I know that. Read more carefully.
Because I built a custom linux (Linux from scratch) I could not use the
voxin-install.sh
script. I had to dissect it, figure out what it did, and then match its
functions to my own system.
The installer script places the binaries and libraries in predefined
locations based on distribution. Since mine is custom, it couldn't do that,
so I had to do it all myself.



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