Date   

Re: best Programming Language for Beginners

Bob J
 

Hello Eleni,

It would help us to know which version of DOS you are going to be using.

Most of the old versions of DOS that preceed Windows included a BASIC interpreter named GWBASIC.EXE.

I suggest that you should start with that one because it uses English language words for most of the simple commands and would enable you to become comfortable, through your own experimentation, with programing structures and program flow of execution before you move on to more complex and powerful programming languages.

If you need any documentation for that interpreter, I could help you with some of that.

hth

Bob



--------------------------------------------------
From: "Eleni Vamvakari" <elvam2167@gmail.com>
Sent: Tuesday, December 05, 2017 8:00 PM
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: [TechTalk] best Programming Language for Beginners

I wrote about this many years ago in other groups. However, at that
time, I lacked the proper resources to continue my studies. Now that
I have a fully functioning MSDOS machine (or at least, a virtual one
for the time being), I intend on learning how to program. I must
stress that I have no intention of doing this for a living. This is
purely a hobby and will mostly be for me, unless someone requests
something or just wants to download my creations. If I ever chose to
write anything for Windows, it would be portable, as I like the idea
of each program being contained in its own folder/directory, and it
would be compatible with XP, though I couldn't guarantee whether or
not it would work with later versions of Windows. For now, though, I
am strictly interested in DOS.

I am trying to determine which language is best for me to learn as a
beginner. I used to think that what I wanted to learn was called
procedural programming, as opposed to object-oriented programming, but
I may be wrong. So I will explain it. Basically, I don't want to
write in a language that involves graphics, buttons, etc. I want my
programs to be purely text-based, whether they're commandline, driven
by hotkeys, such as y/n or selection between options 1, 2, and 3, or
menu-driven, where alt and arrow keys activate various menus. I also
like if/then statements, or at least, things that I can easily
understand, being that I am not one for mathematics or abstract
thinking. From what I recall, text can either be written directly to
the screen or can be drawn. I wish to use only the first option.

Given all that I have said, where should I start? From what I can
tell, the three most popular languages, though I'm not sure if the
first can really be considered one, are batch programming, BASIC (and
its variants), and C (usually C++). How far can I get with these? I
know that the former is generally used to make programs run, or to
have the system perform certain functions. But can they do anything
else? What kinds of programs can I create with QuickBASIC? Can I
incorporate sound in them? Can I make practical as well as fun
programs? What are the differences between 16-bit and 32-bit
programs? I have seen compilers for both, but am not really sure why
one should be preferred over the other, except with regard to audio.

Thanks,
Eleni

--
Facebook: elvam2167@gmail.com

anyaudio.net: elvam2167

Skype: elvam2167


Re: BRF Files

Aman Singer
 

Hi,

If you are using XP and 7, and are using the blazer through the parallel port, you should, and again I emphasize should, be able to install the generic text-only driver through the normal add printer process and then emboss from even notepad. Note that you will get computer braille, not raised print, I seem to recall that there was a program to turn text into raised print for embossing but it has been too long, I no longer remember the name.
I am a bit hesitant as I say these things, and am putting in qualifications, not because there's anything problematic in what you're doing, but simply because I no longer have any of this technology and am going strictly by memory.
The cable you need for the parallel port is a Centronics parallel cable. You can use a db25 straight cable, but only with the serial port. Again, I'm going on memory here but I think you can use the same generic/text only driver and, if you make sure that the port is configured to match the settings in the blazer itself, which you can set from the machine (the documentation is quite thorough on this), you can simply send the file through the serial port and get braille. In my experience, the serial port process was more problematic and required more configuration than using the parallel port.
Keep in mind that you can produce your braille files with any translator you wish, and then print them. You need not emboss from the translator if you don't want to.
Aman

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Monday, December 04, 2017 8:10 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] BRF Files

I am using it through its parallel port, with XP and 7. I may also use it with DOS in the future. As for the translator, in Windows, I am using Braille Blaster. In DOS, I may use Turbo Braille or NFB Trans, but I have never tried either of these. Would the results be different if I used the serial port?

I would be very much interested to learn whether they emboss as jibberish or real print letters that I can feel. I will update the list once I find out. Right now, I need to buy a printer cable because I don't have the right kind here. I thought that both sides were DB25!

Thank you so much for explaining that about the NBP! I thought that, once they switched to UEB, that is all you could order, unless it specifically said otherwise in the description. I'm glad that I was wrong. I will also ask if they have any of their publications regarding MSDOS and compatible programs, as well as some back issues of Our Special magazine. Perhaps, they have digital copies.

On 04/12/2017, Aman Singer <aman.singer@gmail.com> wrote:
Hello,

You ask quite a few questions below, let me answer as much as I can
here to the best of my ability.
You ask:
If I just plug the Blazer into my computer, I doubt that Windows will
recognise it as an embosser. Does a translator usually not have its
own drivers for such devices? If not, then must i install drivers for
this one?

This depends on a few factors. First, are you using the blazer
through the serial port or its parallel port? Secondly, what version
of Windows do you have? Thirdly, what translator are you using, if any?


You ask:
What if I had a file that was in txt or rtf with no graphics?

Assuming you can connect the printer using the generic/text only
driver, you should, with emphasis on the should, be able to emboss
from, for example, Notepad or Wordpad so long as the file is txt/rtf.
How the file will turn out is an open question. I'm afraid I know
nothing about braille graphics.

You ask:
I am not receiving these from a regular bookseller or a transcriber.
This is the National Braille Press. To my knowledge, whatever they
have is what you get.

I'm very familiar with NBP, and my experience with them is that they
will bend over backwards to fulfill customer requests. I would
definitely ask if they can help you get the format you want.
Aman

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On
Behalf Of Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Monday, December 04, 2017 5:49 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] BRF Files

If I just plug the Blazer into my computer, I doubt that Windows will
recognise it as an embosser. Does a translator usually not have its
own drivers for such devices? If not, then must i install drivers for this one?
Do I just tell it to print, as I would with a regular printer?

I don't have a braille display, and right now, I don't have a printer
plugged in to the computer. But I guess that answers my previous question.
I can just use a generic printer driver. Can I print graphics this way?
What if I had a file that was in txt or rtf with no graphics? Could I
make the Blazer emboss a tactile print file?
What about a Tiger Cub? My friend has one of those, and we're trying
to figure out how to make such files.

I am not receiving these from a regular bookseller or a transcriber.
This is the National Braille Press. To my knowledge, whatever they
have is what you get.

Thanks,
Eleni

On 04/12/2017, Aman Singer <aman.singer@gmail.com> wrote:
Hi,

Permit me to answer your questions under each question. You ask:

Do I need something like the Braille Blaster translator, or is there
a way to emboss them directly?

BRF files are already in braille. Generally, though not universally,
they are in contracted braille, but in any case, they are formatted
so that they will appear properly on a braille embosser or note taker
without further translation. Therefore, no translation package should
be needed if you're going to emboss them.

You write:
Note that, for regular rtf and txt documents, I just use Wordpad
or Notepad.

In that case, you can do that with these BRF files. They will not
read properly with your screen reader's voice, but will read fine
with your screen reader's braille display assuming the right settings
are in place and will emboss as if they are text or RTF. I assume
you're using the generic text printer driver.

You ask:
Are these brf files in Grade II or UEB? If they're in the latter,
how can I convert them to the former? Can they be converted to rtf or txt?

You'll need to ask the provider, BRF as a format can be in any
braille code the producer likes. Whether you can back-translate the
files, and to what format depends on what format they are in now and
what software you have. If I may respectfully say so, however, I'm
not sure why you would do that. If you want grade 2, and the files
are in UEB, why not ask the provider to provide you a copy in grade
2? If you're looking to translate them to text or RTF, is the
provider not able to provide you a better format like epub/html/xml/Daisy?
HTH,
Aman


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On
Behalf Of Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Monday, December 04, 2017 3:13 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] BRF Files

I recently saw several books from the National Braille Press that
interested me. Most were available in brf format, which works with
notetakers and embossers. I have a Braille Blazer. How do I emboss
these files? Do I need something like the Braille Blaster
translator, or is there a way to emboss them directly? Note that,
for regular rtf and txt documents, I just use Wordpad or Notepad.
Are these brf files in Grade II or UEB? If they're in the latter,
how can I convert them to the former? Can they be converted to rtf or txt?

Thanks,
Eleni

--
Facebook: elvam2167@gmail.com

anyaudio.net: elvam2167

Skype: elvam2167








--
Facebook: elvam2167@gmail.com

anyaudio.net: elvam2167

Skype: elvam2167








--
Facebook: elvam2167@gmail.com

anyaudio.net: elvam2167

Skype: elvam2167


Re: Modern Keynote Gold Synthesizer

Josh Kennedy
 

If you learn assembly language, keynote gold could be decompiled perhaps.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Tuesday, December 5, 2017 20:16
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Modern Keynote Gold Synthesizer

 

I wonder if it would be possible to create a modern synthesizer with

the voice of the Keynote Gold.  For those who have never used it, this

is the same voice that was used in the Braille Note.  It was also used

in the Vert screen reader, and in the Language Master, so I doubt that

Humanware has rights to it.  Even if they do, we don't need to use

their actual code.  Perhaps, by recording samples from these products,

something new could be created that would be compatible with Windows.

What do you think?  As an interesting side note, I wrote to Humanware

several years ago and asked which chip it uses, but they honestly

didn't know.

 

--

Facebook: elvam2167@...

 

anyaudio.net: elvam2167

 

Skype: elvam2167

 

 

 


Re: Modern Keynote Gold Synthesizer

Josh Kennedy
 

And the brailleNote’s keynote gold is also in dll files. I know because I looked when I had a brailleNote.

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Tuesday, December 5, 2017 20:16
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Modern Keynote Gold Synthesizer

 

I wonder if it would be possible to create a modern synthesizer with

the voice of the Keynote Gold.  For those who have never used it, this

is the same voice that was used in the Braille Note.  It was also used

in the Vert screen reader, and in the Language Master, so I doubt that

Humanware has rights to it.  Even if they do, we don't need to use

their actual code.  Perhaps, by recording samples from these products,

something new could be created that would be compatible with Windows.

What do you think?  As an interesting side note, I wrote to Humanware

several years ago and asked which chip it uses, but they honestly

didn't know.

 

--

Facebook: elvam2167@...

 

anyaudio.net: elvam2167

 

Skype: elvam2167

 

 

 


keynote gold was RE: [TechTalk] best Programming Language for Beginners

Josh Kennedy
 

Hey, if you learn assembly language, you could decompile the old keynote gold and maybe figure out how to make a modern version for windows10. Or I should say for windows7 and 10.

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Steve Matzura
Sent: Tuesday, December 5, 2017 22:17
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] best Programming Language for Beginners

 

Object-oriented programming has little or nothing to do with

object-oriented interfaces. Pascal, about the first object-oriented

programming language I ever learned, was used to create lots of

text-based software in its day, the nineteen-eighties.

 

 

On 12/5/2017 8:00 PM, Eleni Vamvakari wrote:

> I wrote about this many years ago in other groups.  However, at that

> time, I lacked the proper resources to continue my studies.  Now that

> I have a fully functioning MSDOS machine (or at least, a virtual one

> for the time being), I intend on learning how to program.  I must

> stress that I have no intention of doing this for a living.  This is

> purely a hobby and will mostly be for me, unless someone requests

> something or just wants to download my creations.  If I ever chose to

> write anything for Windows, it would be portable, as I like the idea

> of each program being contained in its own folder/directory, and it

> would be compatible with XP, though I couldn't guarantee whether or

> not it would work with later versions of Windows.  For now, though, I

> am strictly interested in DOS.

> I am trying to determine which language is best for me to learn as a

> beginner.    I used to think that what I wanted to learn was called

> procedural programming, as opposed to object-oriented programming, but

> I may be wrong. So I will explain it.  Basically, I don't want to

> write in a language that involves graphics, buttons, etc.  I want my

> programs to be purely text-based, whether they're commandline, driven

> by hotkeys, such as y/n or selection between options 1, 2, and 3, or

> menu-driven, where alt and arrow keys activate various menus.  I also

> like if/then statements, or at least, things that I can easily

> understand, being that I am not one for mathematics or abstract

> thinking.  From what I recall, text can either be written directly to

> the screen or can be drawn.  I wish to use only the first option.

> Given all that I have said, where should I start?  From what I can

> tell, the three most popular languages, though I'm not sure if the

> first can really be considered one, are batch programming, BASIC (and

> its variants), and C (usually C++).  How far can I get with these?  I

> know that the former is generally used to make programs run, or to

> have the system perform certain functions.  But can they do anything

> else?  What kinds of programs can I create with QuickBASIC?  Can I

> incorporate sound in them?  Can I make practical as well as fun

> programs?  What are the differences between 16-bit and 32-bit

> programs?  I have seen compilers for both, but am not really sure why

> one should be preferred over the other, except with regard to audio.

> Thanks,

> Eleni

 

 

 

 


Re: best Programming Language for Beginners

Steve Matzura
 

Object-oriented programming has little or nothing to do with object-oriented interfaces. Pascal, about the first object-oriented programming language I ever learned, was used to create lots of text-based software in its day, the nineteen-eighties.

On 12/5/2017 8:00 PM, Eleni Vamvakari wrote:
I wrote about this many years ago in other groups. However, at that
time, I lacked the proper resources to continue my studies. Now that
I have a fully functioning MSDOS machine (or at least, a virtual one
for the time being), I intend on learning how to program. I must
stress that I have no intention of doing this for a living. This is
purely a hobby and will mostly be for me, unless someone requests
something or just wants to download my creations. If I ever chose to
write anything for Windows, it would be portable, as I like the idea
of each program being contained in its own folder/directory, and it
would be compatible with XP, though I couldn't guarantee whether or
not it would work with later versions of Windows. For now, though, I
am strictly interested in DOS.

I am trying to determine which language is best for me to learn as a
beginner. I used to think that what I wanted to learn was called
procedural programming, as opposed to object-oriented programming, but
I may be wrong. So I will explain it. Basically, I don't want to
write in a language that involves graphics, buttons, etc. I want my
programs to be purely text-based, whether they're commandline, driven
by hotkeys, such as y/n or selection between options 1, 2, and 3, or
menu-driven, where alt and arrow keys activate various menus. I also
like if/then statements, or at least, things that I can easily
understand, being that I am not one for mathematics or abstract
thinking. From what I recall, text can either be written directly to
the screen or can be drawn. I wish to use only the first option.

Given all that I have said, where should I start? From what I can
tell, the three most popular languages, though I'm not sure if the
first can really be considered one, are batch programming, BASIC (and
its variants), and C (usually C++). How far can I get with these? I
know that the former is generally used to make programs run, or to
have the system perform certain functions. But can they do anything
else? What kinds of programs can I create with QuickBASIC? Can I
incorporate sound in them? Can I make practical as well as fun
programs? What are the differences between 16-bit and 32-bit
programs? I have seen compilers for both, but am not really sure why
one should be preferred over the other, except with regard to audio.

Thanks,
Eleni


Re: Modern Keynote Gold Synthesizer

Josh Kennedy
 

Oh finally someone else who wants the same thing I have wanted for years! And years and years! So anyway about keynote gold. I grew up with it. It is my favorite synthesizer. It is the first one I used back in 1992 when I was 10 years old. And did you know that back around 1995, humanware made a software version of keynote gold. And a software version of KeySoft? Both keynote gold Multimedia software and Keysoft worked under windows3.1 and windows95. They also worked in windows98. And I have demos of both keynote gold multimedia and keysoft gold. Keysoft gold was the special keysoft that worked in conjunction with keynote gold multimedia multilingual.  Normal keysoft could use both keynote gold and decTalk for speech output. You can find the keynote gold developer manual at

www.grossgang.com if that will help its under old synthesizers directory. And I also have a talking dosbox all set up with keynote gold inside of windows3.1 and it works in windows10. So I go into talking dosbox, switch to the windows folder and run werun.bat that runs window eyes and then I go use the keynote demo player. And to record the keynote gold’s output I hit control f6 before making keynote gold read something, then control f6 to stop recording out to a wave file. Then I got a perfect capture of keynote gold with whatever pitch and language speed and volume I wish. The issue is, it is a 15 minute demo. When I start windows3.1 keynote gold multimedia says:

keynote gold multimedia speech demo. Speech will run for 15 minutes, from first load. Keynote gold multimedia’s tts is in dll files. I think it was made by Berkeley tts back in 1990 and then lernout and hauspie or l&h took it over. Keynote gold is also in the old franklin language masters. But it is modified.

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Tuesday, December 5, 2017 20:16
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Modern Keynote Gold Synthesizer

 

I wonder if it would be possible to create a modern synthesizer with

the voice of the Keynote Gold.  For those who have never used it, this

is the same voice that was used in the Braille Note.  It was also used

in the Vert screen reader, and in the Language Master, so I doubt that

Humanware has rights to it.  Even if they do, we don't need to use

their actual code.  Perhaps, by recording samples from these products,

something new could be created that would be compatible with Windows.

What do you think?  As an interesting side note, I wrote to Humanware

several years ago and asked which chip it uses, but they honestly

didn't know.

 

--

Facebook: elvam2167@...

 

anyaudio.net: elvam2167

 

Skype: elvam2167

 

 

 


Re: best Programming Language for Beginners

Steve Matzura
 

If you're set on sticking with something that's been out-of-date for over twenty years, then BASIC is your best choice. Matter of fact, it's almost your only choice. Why on earth are you sticking with DOS? And please tell me you're at least on version 6.22.

On 12/5/2017 8:00 PM, Eleni Vamvakari wrote:
I wrote about this many years ago in other groups. However, at that
time, I lacked the proper resources to continue my studies. Now that
I have a fully functioning MSDOS machine (or at least, a virtual one
for the time being), I intend on learning how to program. I must
stress that I have no intention of doing this for a living. This is
purely a hobby and will mostly be for me, unless someone requests
something or just wants to download my creations. If I ever chose to
write anything for Windows, it would be portable, as I like the idea
of each program being contained in its own folder/directory, and it
would be compatible with XP, though I couldn't guarantee whether or
not it would work with later versions of Windows. For now, though, I
am strictly interested in DOS.

I am trying to determine which language is best for me to learn as a
beginner. I used to think that what I wanted to learn was called
procedural programming, as opposed to object-oriented programming, but
I may be wrong. So I will explain it. Basically, I don't want to
write in a language that involves graphics, buttons, etc. I want my
programs to be purely text-based, whether they're commandline, driven
by hotkeys, such as y/n or selection between options 1, 2, and 3, or
menu-driven, where alt and arrow keys activate various menus. I also
like if/then statements, or at least, things that I can easily
understand, being that I am not one for mathematics or abstract
thinking. From what I recall, text can either be written directly to
the screen or can be drawn. I wish to use only the first option.

Given all that I have said, where should I start? From what I can
tell, the three most popular languages, though I'm not sure if the
first can really be considered one, are batch programming, BASIC (and
its variants), and C (usually C++). How far can I get with these? I
know that the former is generally used to make programs run, or to
have the system perform certain functions. But can they do anything
else? What kinds of programs can I create with QuickBASIC? Can I
incorporate sound in them? Can I make practical as well as fun
programs? What are the differences between 16-bit and 32-bit
programs? I have seen compilers for both, but am not really sure why
one should be preferred over the other, except with regard to audio.

Thanks,
Eleni


Re: VERACRYPT?

Jeremy <icu8it2@...>
 

I never did quite understand what happened between the time that work on TC had stopped and the source was went through and audited, or so I think I might recall and it was changed over to Veracrypt. I know though that for a while, people were still suggesting that TC was okay to use and that you could still find pages where you could grab a download of it, but I didn't ever pay close enough attention to everything to know if it was worthwhile. Before that, I'd used TC and noticed that the interface for Veracrypt was pretty much the same, but never really looked into how much more secure these new changes to it might make it. If it were me though, I'd probably say it'd be okay to use it for keeping important information such as banking and passwords and alike secure, that's also what I've done with it, but perhaps those more knowledgeable might know better. :)
Take care.

On 12/5/2017 7:05 PM, Joe Orozco wrote:
Is TrueCript truly a bad option? I'm still using it. It fits my needs,
but as I'm using it to encrypt banking information and other
financials, I would be curious to know if my approach is a dumb one.
:)

Joe

On 12/5/17, Aman Singer <aman.singer@gmail.com> wrote:
Hi Jeremy,

If we chat about anything specific, and there are any particular tools we
discuss, I'll let the list know. Honestly, the tools are more or less
accessible, and if the GUI isn't, the command line usually is. This applies
to Windows at least, and more or less to Linux/Mac.
As for creating the container on the flash drive, I have never done it
except, of course, for when I'm encrypting the flash drive partition itself.
This isn't because I think it a bad idea, but because the only significant
benefit I can see is not having to move the container from the machine to
the flash drive. If, for whatever reason, I don't trust the machine to hold
the container, I shouldn't be trusting it to create the container to begin
with, since I enter the password into the keyboard and since the machine
must access my keyfile if I'm using one. I never do this, but keep in mind
that once you move the container, nothing stops you from clearing free space
with something like eraser.
Aman

-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Jeremy
Sent: Monday, December 04, 2017 10:33 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] VERACRYPT?

A bit late to these responses, but would you mind also shooting me any extra
information privately you've got on other tools and such that are accessible
that you share with

Olusegun? I'm somewhat familiar with using Veracrypt, as I mentioned before,
but I've not really kept up on any other tools that might be around and that
are accessible, etc. Also, what are your thoughts on creating the encrypted
volume directly on the flash drive, compared to creating it elsewhere and
then moving the volume to the drive afterwards. I don't know enough about
how the creation process actually works to be certain, but I do know that I
had issues with one flash drive I used for this, when I was creating the
volume directly onto the drive and always wondered if it might be doing to
many writes to the flash storage, maybe. Since then, I've always created the
volume, normally pretty small volume containers for storing my important
information, so text and such, outside the flash drive I want to store it on
and then move it there after it's created.

Take care.

On 12/2/2017 9:21 AM, Aman Singer wrote:
Hi Olusegun,

The answer to both your questions is yes. Before I go into how, I
should say that the following doesn't apply if you're trying to defeat
a government-level attacker. If you're trying to do that, that is, if
one of the more despotic or forceful governments of the world is going
to be interested in these USB drives or the machines they're on, there
are other solutions which, though they may not work, will stand up to
attack for a good deal longer than the below. If that is the case, we
should really take this off list, as it has nothing to do with
accessibility. The blind and sighted are in the same boat.
Having said that, you can create an encrypted file container with
veracrypt for each main folder. I have pasted the instructions, from
the veracrypt documentation, below my name. This is an accessible
process with Jaws and NVDA except for the mouse movement for
randomness. You can either do this if you have a mouse or touch pad or
have a sighted person do it. You can also, depending on the abilities of
any potential attacker, leave it.
From here, you have two options. First, you can create a new file
container for each of the subfolders and put that encrypted file
container inside the original container. To open the subfolder, you
will have first to decrypt the main container and then to decrypt the
subfolder with a different password. The user without the second
password, that for the subfolder, will know that the subfolder exists
but will not know what is inside it. Note that it is possible for the
user of the main folder not to know even that the subfolder exists, but
this takes more work.
Alternatively, you can put, inside the main container, a subfolder
encrypted by another encryption application You can use any application
you like with the obvious caveats any user of encryption has to take
into consideration (is the application trustworthy, is it open source,
is the encryption implementation unbroken, etc). This is easier.
Again, though, the user of the main folder will know that the
subfolder exists but will not be able to access the contents.
I hope that's of use.
Aman

How to Create and Use a VeraCrypt Container This chapter contains
step-by-step instructions on how to create, mount, and use a VeraCrypt
volume. We strongly recommend that you also read the other sections of
this manual, as they contain important information.
STEP 1:
If you have not done so, download and install VeraCrypt. Then launch
VeraCrypt by doubleclicking the file VeraCrypt.exe or by clicking the
VeraCrypt shortcut in your Windows Start menu.
STEP 2:
The main VeraCrypt window should appear. Click Create Volume (marked
with a red rectangle for clarity).
STEP 3:
The VeraCrypt Volume Creation Wizard window should appear.
In this step you need to choose where you wish the VeraCrypt volume to
be created. A VeraCrypt volume can reside in a file, which is also
called container, in a partition or drive. In this tutorial, we will
choose the first option and create a VeraCrypt volume within a file.
As the option is selected by default, you can just click Next.
Note: In the following steps, the screenshots will show only the
right-hand part of the Wizard window.
STEP 4:
In this step you need to choose whether to create a standard or hidden
VeraCrypt volume. In this tutorial, we will choose the former option
and create a standard VeraCrypt volume.
As the option is selected by default, you can just click Next.
STEP 5:
In this step you have to specify where you wish the VeraCrypt volume
(file
container) to be
created. Note that a VeraCrypt container is just like any normal file.
It can be, for example, moved or deleted as any normal file. It also
needs a filename, which you will choose in the next step.
Click Select File.
The standard Windows file selector should appear (while the window of
the VeraCrypt Volume Creation Wizard remains open in the background).
STEP 6:
In this tutorial, we will create our VeraCrypt volume in the folder
F:\Data\ and the filename of the volume (container) will be My Volume
(as can be seen in the screenshot above). You may, of course, choose
any other filename and location you like (for example, on a USB memory
stick).
Note that the file My Volume does not exist yet - VeraCrypt will create
it.
IMPORTANT: Note that VeraCrypt will not encrypt any existing files
(when creating a VeraCrypt file container). If you select an existing
file in this step, it will be overwritten and replaced by the newly
created volume (so the overwritten file will be lost, not encrypted).
You will be able to encrypt existing files (later on) by moving them
to the VeraCrypt volume that we are creating now. * Select the desired
path (where you wish the container to be created) in the file
selector.
Type the desired container filename in the File name box.
Click Save.
The file selector window should disappear.
In the following steps, we will return to the VeraCrypt Volume
Creation Wizard.
* Note that after you copy existing unencrypted files to a VeraCrypt
volume, you should securely erase (wipe) the original unencrypted
files. There are software tools that can be used for the purpose of
secure erasure (many of them are free).
STEP 7:
In the Volume Creation Wizard window, click Next.
STEP 8:
Here you can choose an encryption algorithm and a hash algorithm for
the volume. If you are not sure what to select here, you can use the
default settings and click Next (for more information, see chapters
Encryption Algorithms and Hash Algorithms).
STEP 9:
Here we specify that we wish the size of our VeraCrypt container to be
250 megabyte. You may, of course, specify a different size. After you
type the desired size in the input field (marked with a red
rectangle), click Next.
STEP 10:
This is one of the most important steps. Here you have to choose a
good volume password.
Read carefully the information displayed in the Wizard window about
what is considered a good password.
After you choose a good password, type it in the first input field.
Then re-type it in the input field below the first one and click Next.
Note: The button Next will be disabled until passwords in both input
fields are the same.
STEP 11:
Move your mouse as randomly as possible within the Volume Creation
Wizard window at least until the randomness indicator becomes green.
The longer you move the mouse, the better (moving the mouse for at
least 30 seconds is recommended). This significantly increases the
cryptographic strength of the encryption keys (which increases security).
Click Format.
Volume creation should begin. VeraCrypt will now create a file called
My Volume in the folder F:\Data\ (as we specified in Step 6). This
file will be a VeraCrypt container (it will contain the encrypted
VeraCrypt volume). Depending on the size of the volume, the volume
creation may take a long time. After it finishes, the following dialog
box will appear:
Click OK to close the dialog box.
STEP 12:
We have just successfully created a VeraCrypt volume (file container).
In the VeraCrypt Volume Creation Wizard window, click Exit.
The Wizard window should disappear.
In the remaining steps, we will mount the volume we just created. We
will return to the main VeraCrypt window (which should still be open,
but if it is not, repeat Step
1 to launch VeraCrypt
and then continue from Step 13.)
STEP 13:
Select a drive letter from the list (marked with a red rectangle).
This will be the drive letter to which the VeraCrypt container will be
mounted.
Note: In this tutorial, we chose the drive letter M, but you may of
course choose any other available drive letter.
STEP 14:
Click Select File.
The standard file selector window should appear.
STEP 15:
In the file selector, browse to the container file (which we created
in Steps 6-11) and select it.
Click Open (in the file selector window).
The file selector window should disappear.
In the following steps, we will return to the main VeraCrypt window.
STEP 16:
In the main VeraCrypt window, click Mount. Password prompt dialog
window should appear.
STEP 17:
Type the password (which you specified in Step 10) in the password
input field (marked with a red rectangle).
STEP 18:
Select the PRF algorithm that was used during the creation of the
volume
(SHA-512 is the default
PRF used by VeraCrypt). If you don't remember which PRF was used, just
leave it set to "autodetection" but the mounting process will take
more time. Click OK after entering the password.
VeraCrypt will now attempt to mount the volume. If the password is
incorrect (for example, if you typed it incorrectly), VeraCrypt will
notify you and you will need to repeat the previous step (type the
password again and click OK). If the password is correct, the volume
will be mounted.
FINAL STEP:
We have just successfully mounted the container as a virtual disk M:
The virtual disk is entirely encrypted (including file names,
allocation tables, free space, etc.) and behaves like a real disk. You
can save (or copy, move, etc.) files to this virtual disk and they
will be encrypted on the fly as they are being written.
If you open a file stored on a VeraCrypt volume, for example, in media
player, the file will be automatically decrypted to RAM (memory) on
the fly while it is being read.
Important: Note that when you open a file stored on a VeraCrypt volume
(or when you write/copy a file to/from the VeraCrypt volume) you will
not be asked to enter the password again. You need to enter the
correct password only when mounting the volume.
You can open the mounted volume, for example, by selecting it on the
list as shown in the screenshot above (blue selection) and then
double-clicking on the selected item.
You can also browse to the mounted volume the way you normally browse
to any other types of volumes. For example, by opening the 'Computer'
(or 'My Computer') list and double clicking the corresponding drive
letter (in this case, it is the letter M).
You can copy files (or folders) to and from the VeraCrypt volume just
as you would copy them to any normal disk (for example, by simple
drag-and-drop operations). Files that are being read or copied from
the encrypted VeraCrypt volume are automatically decrypted on the fly
in RAM (memory). Similarly, files that are being written or copied to
the VeraCrypt volume are automatically encrypted on the fly in RAM
(right before they are written to the disk).
Note that VeraCrypt never saves any decrypted data to a disk - it only
stores them temporarily in RAM (memory). Even when the volume is
mounted, data stored in the volume is still encrypted.
When you restart Windows or turn off your computer, the volume will be
dismounted and all files stored on it will be inaccessible (and
encrypted). Even when power supply is suddenly interrupted (without
proper system shut down), all files stored on the volume will be
inaccessible (and encrypted). To make them accessible again, you have
to mount the volume. To do so, repeat Steps 13-18.
If you want to close the volume and make files stored on it
inaccessible, either restart your operating system or dismount the
volume. To do so, follow these steps:
Select the volume from the list of mounted volumes in the main
VeraCrypt window (marked with a red rectangle in the screenshot above)
and then click Dismount (also marked with a red rectangle in the
screenshot above). To make files stored on the volume accessible
again, you will have to mount the volume. To do so, repeat Steps
13-18.



From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On
Behalf Of Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2017 5:12 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] VERACRYPT?

Hello All:

I need some helpful advice! I have a batch of folders on a USB flash
drive.


Question: Is it possible to use VeraCrypt to encrypt each folder such
that each folder can only be opened with its own unique password? Can
subfolders also be encrypted such that both a parent folder and a
subfolder can have different passwords?

If not, I'd appreciate suggestions on how to accomplish this task.

The need to encrypt each folder on the USB flash drive is an essential
documentation requirement in my line of business. Looking forward to
reading your thoughts!!

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado















Re: BRF Files

Eleni Vamvakari
 

Since my friend has a working Blazer and the cable with which to use
it, I installed the generic driver on his Windows 7 machine via NVDA
Remote. But I can't figure out how to get to it so that I can edit
the properties as described here. Is this necessary with an embosser?

http://www.frogmorecs.com/arts/using-the-generic-driver/

If this doesn't work, I'll either install it in a virtual XP machine,
or we'll try the Tiger, as that software is properly installed. I
wanted to start with the Blazer because I also own one and I wanted to
see what it could do. I'm leaving the Tiger with him in case we do
anything truly advanced.

Thanks,
Eleni

On 05/12/2017, Ann Parsons <akp@sero.email> wrote:
Hi all,

Eleni, if you have a translation program like Duxbury, just import the
file by using ctrl-o and then just emboss it.

Ann P.

--
Ann K. Parsons
Portal Tutoring
EMAIL: akp@sero.email
Author of The Demmies: http://www.dldbooks.com/annparsons/
Portal Tutoring web site: http://www.portaltutoring.info
Skype: Putertutor

"All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost."



--
Facebook: elvam2167@gmail.com

anyaudio.net: elvam2167

Skype: elvam2167


SATA to Floppy Adapter

Eleni Vamvakari
 

Right now, in my modern desktop, I have an empty 3.5 bay for a SATA
drive. Does anyone know if there is such a thing as an adapter or
converter that would permit me to turn it into a bay that is able to
accept a floppy drive? My second bay holds a removable 3.5 sata
drive, but that's where my operating system is stored, so I can't use
it for this purpose.

Thanks,
Eleni


XP-Compatible Com0Com

Eleni Vamvakari
 

Can someone please give me a version of Com0Com that is compatible
with Windows XP? I am trying to add this iso file to my virtual DOS
machine and, as usual, Windows Explorer in 7 is driving me mad! I am
literally about to go on Ebay and buy a floppy drive, just so that I
can avoid the headaches! I can't wait until I get my DOS machine on
the Internet so that I can download files directly!

Thanks,
Eleni

--
Facebook: elvam2167@gmail.com

anyaudio.net: elvam2167

Skype: elvam2167


Modern Keynote Gold Synthesizer

Eleni Vamvakari
 

I wonder if it would be possible to create a modern synthesizer with
the voice of the Keynote Gold. For those who have never used it, this
is the same voice that was used in the Braille Note. It was also used
in the Vert screen reader, and in the Language Master, so I doubt that
Humanware has rights to it. Even if they do, we don't need to use
their actual code. Perhaps, by recording samples from these products,
something new could be created that would be compatible with Windows.
What do you think? As an interesting side note, I wrote to Humanware
several years ago and asked which chip it uses, but they honestly
didn't know.

--
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anyaudio.net: elvam2167

Skype: elvam2167


Re: VERACRYPT?

Joe Orozco
 

Is TrueCript truly a bad option? I'm still using it. It fits my needs,
but as I'm using it to encrypt banking information and other
financials, I would be curious to know if my approach is a dumb one.
:)

Joe

On 12/5/17, Aman Singer <aman.singer@gmail.com> wrote:
Hi Jeremy,

If we chat about anything specific, and there are any particular tools we
discuss, I'll let the list know. Honestly, the tools are more or less
accessible, and if the GUI isn't, the command line usually is. This applies
to Windows at least, and more or less to Linux/Mac.
As for creating the container on the flash drive, I have never done it
except, of course, for when I'm encrypting the flash drive partition itself.
This isn't because I think it a bad idea, but because the only significant
benefit I can see is not having to move the container from the machine to
the flash drive. If, for whatever reason, I don't trust the machine to hold
the container, I shouldn't be trusting it to create the container to begin
with, since I enter the password into the keyboard and since the machine
must access my keyfile if I'm using one. I never do this, but keep in mind
that once you move the container, nothing stops you from clearing free space
with something like eraser.
Aman

-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Jeremy
Sent: Monday, December 04, 2017 10:33 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] VERACRYPT?

A bit late to these responses, but would you mind also shooting me any extra
information privately you've got on other tools and such that are accessible
that you share with

Olusegun? I'm somewhat familiar with using Veracrypt, as I mentioned before,
but I've not really kept up on any other tools that might be around and that
are accessible, etc. Also, what are your thoughts on creating the encrypted
volume directly on the flash drive, compared to creating it elsewhere and
then moving the volume to the drive afterwards. I don't know enough about
how the creation process actually works to be certain, but I do know that I
had issues with one flash drive I used for this, when I was creating the
volume directly onto the drive and always wondered if it might be doing to
many writes to the flash storage, maybe. Since then, I've always created the
volume, normally pretty small volume containers for storing my important
information, so text and such, outside the flash drive I want to store it on
and then move it there after it's created.

Take care.

On 12/2/2017 9:21 AM, Aman Singer wrote:
Hi Olusegun,

The answer to both your questions is yes. Before I go into how, I
should say that the following doesn't apply if you're trying to defeat
a government-level attacker. If you're trying to do that, that is, if
one of the more despotic or forceful governments of the world is going
to be interested in these USB drives or the machines they're on, there
are other solutions which, though they may not work, will stand up to
attack for a good deal longer than the below. If that is the case, we
should really take this off list, as it has nothing to do with
accessibility. The blind and sighted are in the same boat.
Having said that, you can create an encrypted file container with
veracrypt for each main folder. I have pasted the instructions, from
the veracrypt documentation, below my name. This is an accessible
process with Jaws and NVDA except for the mouse movement for
randomness. You can either do this if you have a mouse or touch pad or
have a sighted person do it. You can also, depending on the abilities of
any potential attacker, leave it.
From here, you have two options. First, you can create a new file
container for each of the subfolders and put that encrypted file
container inside the original container. To open the subfolder, you
will have first to decrypt the main container and then to decrypt the
subfolder with a different password. The user without the second
password, that for the subfolder, will know that the subfolder exists
but will not know what is inside it. Note that it is possible for the
user of the main folder not to know even that the subfolder exists, but
this takes more work.
Alternatively, you can put, inside the main container, a subfolder
encrypted by another encryption application You can use any application
you like with the obvious caveats any user of encryption has to take
into consideration (is the application trustworthy, is it open source,
is the encryption implementation unbroken, etc). This is easier.
Again, though, the user of the main folder will know that the
subfolder exists but will not be able to access the contents.
I hope that's of use.
Aman

How to Create and Use a VeraCrypt Container This chapter contains
step-by-step instructions on how to create, mount, and use a VeraCrypt
volume. We strongly recommend that you also read the other sections of
this manual, as they contain important information.
STEP 1:
If you have not done so, download and install VeraCrypt. Then launch
VeraCrypt by doubleclicking the file VeraCrypt.exe or by clicking the
VeraCrypt shortcut in your Windows Start menu.
STEP 2:
The main VeraCrypt window should appear. Click Create Volume (marked
with a red rectangle for clarity).
STEP 3:
The VeraCrypt Volume Creation Wizard window should appear.
In this step you need to choose where you wish the VeraCrypt volume to
be created. A VeraCrypt volume can reside in a file, which is also
called container, in a partition or drive. In this tutorial, we will
choose the first option and create a VeraCrypt volume within a file.
As the option is selected by default, you can just click Next.
Note: In the following steps, the screenshots will show only the
right-hand part of the Wizard window.
STEP 4:
In this step you need to choose whether to create a standard or hidden
VeraCrypt volume. In this tutorial, we will choose the former option
and create a standard VeraCrypt volume.
As the option is selected by default, you can just click Next.
STEP 5:
In this step you have to specify where you wish the VeraCrypt volume
(file
container) to be
created. Note that a VeraCrypt container is just like any normal file.
It can be, for example, moved or deleted as any normal file. It also
needs a filename, which you will choose in the next step.
Click Select File.
The standard Windows file selector should appear (while the window of
the VeraCrypt Volume Creation Wizard remains open in the background).
STEP 6:
In this tutorial, we will create our VeraCrypt volume in the folder
F:\Data\ and the filename of the volume (container) will be My Volume
(as can be seen in the screenshot above). You may, of course, choose
any other filename and location you like (for example, on a USB memory
stick).
Note that the file My Volume does not exist yet - VeraCrypt will create
it.
IMPORTANT: Note that VeraCrypt will not encrypt any existing files
(when creating a VeraCrypt file container). If you select an existing
file in this step, it will be overwritten and replaced by the newly
created volume (so the overwritten file will be lost, not encrypted).
You will be able to encrypt existing files (later on) by moving them
to the VeraCrypt volume that we are creating now. * Select the desired
path (where you wish the container to be created) in the file
selector.
Type the desired container filename in the File name box.
Click Save.
The file selector window should disappear.
In the following steps, we will return to the VeraCrypt Volume
Creation Wizard.
* Note that after you copy existing unencrypted files to a VeraCrypt
volume, you should securely erase (wipe) the original unencrypted
files. There are software tools that can be used for the purpose of
secure erasure (many of them are free).
STEP 7:
In the Volume Creation Wizard window, click Next.
STEP 8:
Here you can choose an encryption algorithm and a hash algorithm for
the volume. If you are not sure what to select here, you can use the
default settings and click Next (for more information, see chapters
Encryption Algorithms and Hash Algorithms).
STEP 9:
Here we specify that we wish the size of our VeraCrypt container to be
250 megabyte. You may, of course, specify a different size. After you
type the desired size in the input field (marked with a red
rectangle), click Next.
STEP 10:
This is one of the most important steps. Here you have to choose a
good volume password.
Read carefully the information displayed in the Wizard window about
what is considered a good password.
After you choose a good password, type it in the first input field.
Then re-type it in the input field below the first one and click Next.
Note: The button Next will be disabled until passwords in both input
fields are the same.
STEP 11:
Move your mouse as randomly as possible within the Volume Creation
Wizard window at least until the randomness indicator becomes green.
The longer you move the mouse, the better (moving the mouse for at
least 30 seconds is recommended). This significantly increases the
cryptographic strength of the encryption keys (which increases security).
Click Format.
Volume creation should begin. VeraCrypt will now create a file called
My Volume in the folder F:\Data\ (as we specified in Step 6). This
file will be a VeraCrypt container (it will contain the encrypted
VeraCrypt volume). Depending on the size of the volume, the volume
creation may take a long time. After it finishes, the following dialog
box will appear:
Click OK to close the dialog box.
STEP 12:
We have just successfully created a VeraCrypt volume (file container).
In the VeraCrypt Volume Creation Wizard window, click Exit.
The Wizard window should disappear.
In the remaining steps, we will mount the volume we just created. We
will return to the main VeraCrypt window (which should still be open,
but if it is not, repeat Step
1 to launch VeraCrypt
and then continue from Step 13.)
STEP 13:
Select a drive letter from the list (marked with a red rectangle).
This will be the drive letter to which the VeraCrypt container will be
mounted.
Note: In this tutorial, we chose the drive letter M, but you may of
course choose any other available drive letter.
STEP 14:
Click Select File.
The standard file selector window should appear.
STEP 15:
In the file selector, browse to the container file (which we created
in Steps 6-11) and select it.
Click Open (in the file selector window).
The file selector window should disappear.
In the following steps, we will return to the main VeraCrypt window.
STEP 16:
In the main VeraCrypt window, click Mount. Password prompt dialog
window should appear.
STEP 17:
Type the password (which you specified in Step 10) in the password
input field (marked with a red rectangle).
STEP 18:
Select the PRF algorithm that was used during the creation of the
volume
(SHA-512 is the default
PRF used by VeraCrypt). If you don't remember which PRF was used, just
leave it set to "autodetection" but the mounting process will take
more time. Click OK after entering the password.
VeraCrypt will now attempt to mount the volume. If the password is
incorrect (for example, if you typed it incorrectly), VeraCrypt will
notify you and you will need to repeat the previous step (type the
password again and click OK). If the password is correct, the volume
will be mounted.
FINAL STEP:
We have just successfully mounted the container as a virtual disk M:
The virtual disk is entirely encrypted (including file names,
allocation tables, free space, etc.) and behaves like a real disk. You
can save (or copy, move, etc.) files to this virtual disk and they
will be encrypted on the fly as they are being written.
If you open a file stored on a VeraCrypt volume, for example, in media
player, the file will be automatically decrypted to RAM (memory) on
the fly while it is being read.
Important: Note that when you open a file stored on a VeraCrypt volume
(or when you write/copy a file to/from the VeraCrypt volume) you will
not be asked to enter the password again. You need to enter the
correct password only when mounting the volume.
You can open the mounted volume, for example, by selecting it on the
list as shown in the screenshot above (blue selection) and then
double-clicking on the selected item.
You can also browse to the mounted volume the way you normally browse
to any other types of volumes. For example, by opening the 'Computer'
(or 'My Computer') list and double clicking the corresponding drive
letter (in this case, it is the letter M).
You can copy files (or folders) to and from the VeraCrypt volume just
as you would copy them to any normal disk (for example, by simple
drag-and-drop operations). Files that are being read or copied from
the encrypted VeraCrypt volume are automatically decrypted on the fly
in RAM (memory). Similarly, files that are being written or copied to
the VeraCrypt volume are automatically encrypted on the fly in RAM
(right before they are written to the disk).
Note that VeraCrypt never saves any decrypted data to a disk - it only
stores them temporarily in RAM (memory). Even when the volume is
mounted, data stored in the volume is still encrypted.
When you restart Windows or turn off your computer, the volume will be
dismounted and all files stored on it will be inaccessible (and
encrypted). Even when power supply is suddenly interrupted (without
proper system shut down), all files stored on the volume will be
inaccessible (and encrypted). To make them accessible again, you have
to mount the volume. To do so, repeat Steps 13-18.
If you want to close the volume and make files stored on it
inaccessible, either restart your operating system or dismount the
volume. To do so, follow these steps:
Select the volume from the list of mounted volumes in the main
VeraCrypt window (marked with a red rectangle in the screenshot above)
and then click Dismount (also marked with a red rectangle in the
screenshot above). To make files stored on the volume accessible
again, you will have to mount the volume. To do so, repeat Steps
13-18.



From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On
Behalf Of Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2017 5:12 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] VERACRYPT?

Hello All:

I need some helpful advice! I have a batch of folders on a USB flash
drive.


Question: Is it possible to use VeraCrypt to encrypt each folder such
that each folder can only be opened with its own unique password? Can
subfolders also be encrypted such that both a parent folder and a
subfolder can have different passwords?

If not, I'd appreciate suggestions on how to accomplish this task.

The need to encrypt each folder on the USB flash drive is an essential
documentation requirement in my line of business. Looking forward to
reading your thoughts!!

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado
















best Programming Language for Beginners

Eleni Vamvakari
 

I wrote about this many years ago in other groups. However, at that
time, I lacked the proper resources to continue my studies. Now that
I have a fully functioning MSDOS machine (or at least, a virtual one
for the time being), I intend on learning how to program. I must
stress that I have no intention of doing this for a living. This is
purely a hobby and will mostly be for me, unless someone requests
something or just wants to download my creations. If I ever chose to
write anything for Windows, it would be portable, as I like the idea
of each program being contained in its own folder/directory, and it
would be compatible with XP, though I couldn't guarantee whether or
not it would work with later versions of Windows. For now, though, I
am strictly interested in DOS.

I am trying to determine which language is best for me to learn as a
beginner. I used to think that what I wanted to learn was called
procedural programming, as opposed to object-oriented programming, but
I may be wrong. So I will explain it. Basically, I don't want to
write in a language that involves graphics, buttons, etc. I want my
programs to be purely text-based, whether they're commandline, driven
by hotkeys, such as y/n or selection between options 1, 2, and 3, or
menu-driven, where alt and arrow keys activate various menus. I also
like if/then statements, or at least, things that I can easily
understand, being that I am not one for mathematics or abstract
thinking. From what I recall, text can either be written directly to
the screen or can be drawn. I wish to use only the first option.

Given all that I have said, where should I start? From what I can
tell, the three most popular languages, though I'm not sure if the
first can really be considered one, are batch programming, BASIC (and
its variants), and C (usually C++). How far can I get with these? I
know that the former is generally used to make programs run, or to
have the system perform certain functions. But can they do anything
else? What kinds of programs can I create with QuickBASIC? Can I
incorporate sound in them? Can I make practical as well as fun
programs? What are the differences between 16-bit and 32-bit
programs? I have seen compilers for both, but am not really sure why
one should be preferred over the other, except with regard to audio.

Thanks,
Eleni

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anyaudio.net: elvam2167

Skype: elvam2167


New J18.0.4352 Update Direct Download Links + What's New

Mike B. <mb69mach1@...>
 

Hi All,
 
Here is the latest update released today for Jaws 18 download links + what's new in this release.
 
32 Bit:
 
 
64 Bit:
 
 
Enhancements in JAWS 18.0.4532 (December 2017)
 
The following is a list of improvements made between the JAWS 18 October 2017 release and the December 2017 update.
 
list of 7 items
• Addressed an issue where JAWS was not announcing auto-complete information when typing email addresses in the Windows 10 Fall Creators' update of Outlook
365.
• When JAWS is configured to start at the login screen and after logon, addressed an issue in the Windows 10 Fall Creators' update where JAWS was not working
as expected if the "Use my sign in info to automatically finish setting up my device after update or restart" option is enabled.
• Resolved an issue where JAWS was blocking the Windows shut down in the Fall Creators' update.
• Added a new Eco Braille display driver provided by ONCE in Spain.
• Resolved an issue where both JAWS and Skype would stop working if the Call Quality Feedback dialog box was displayed after ending a call.
• Updated the Command Search (INSERT+SPACEBAR, J) so Fusion users can search for "panning" to locate the CAPS LOCK+SHIFT+ARROW keys to scroll the magnified
view.
• Addressed an issue with a couple Research It lookup sources in the French version of JAWS not displaying results as expected.
list end
Take care.  Mike.  Sent from my iBarstool.
Arguing with a woman is like reading a software license agreement.  In the end you have to ignore everything, & click I agree.


Re: Making an image of a hard drive

Jeremy <icu8it2@...>
 

Howdy, :)
Here ya go:
http://opopanax.net/download/
Be sure and grab the PE for the version of Windows you are wanting to use.
The ActivAT application can be used to both create and restore images, so shoot a message if you need help with it. Also note that I've used this to make/restore images of both 7 and 10 professional and it works great, but if you want to use it for any other types of filesystems, so Linux or whatever, the process doesn't work as good.
Take care.

On 12/5/2017 3:45 PM, Mr. J. wrote:
Hi everyone
And where can i find carlos tools and tutorials please?
Also is there a tutorial for the image for windows program? I use jaws
Thanks

Sent from my iPhone

On Dec 5, 2017, at 1:25 PM, Jeremy <icu8it2@gmail.com> wrote:

The nice thing about the terabyte stuff too is that it can also be placed into the Talking PE, but yes, the tools that are already included in the PE do work well enough. Thank you, by the way, for posting that podcast thingy you did on adding it to a PE. Carlos explained it several times on list before, but having it in a voice type tutorial thing was a nice touch. :)
Take care.

On 12/5/2017 1:06 PM, Steve Matzura wrote:
Carlos's Windows 7 or 10 Pre-installation Environment has a couple free choices which, in his words, are "pretty accessible" for making images, but I would go a step further and buy the Terabyte product because it does so much more than making images and comes with real backup support tools. http://www.terabyteunlimited.com


On 12/5/2017 11:39 AM, Mr. J. wrote:
Hi everyone
I just got a new pc and would like to make an image of my hard drive.
1 which program would you recommend?
2 also to make a backup of my registry which program?
Thanks

Sent from my iPhone




Re: Replacing the Micro SD Card on a Victor Reader

Laz
 

That's because when you hear 8GB you actually end up with less due to
computer math as opposed to people math. Just like if you purchase a
64GB memory card you end up with about 59GB of usable memory. And some
of the 8GB remaining memory on the Stream is used up by the Victor
Stream system files and such. Just like if you purchase a 64GB memory
card you end up with about 59GB of usable memory.

Laz

On 12/5/17, Carolyn Arnold <4carolyna@windstream.net> wrote:
Oh, thanks.

I wonder why my reader says that it has 595 gb, yet it comes with 8. I have
tried to transfer everything I could to my SD card.

Another thing. How does one know the life of an SD card?

Best from,

Carolyn



-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Laz
Sent: Tuesday, December 5, 2017 12:19 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Replacing the Micro SD Card on a Victor Reader

Carolyn, again they're referring to the internal microSD card, not the
easily changeable SD card that anyone can replace with a different one.

Laz

On 12/5/17, Carolyn Arnold <4carolyna@windstream.net> wrote:
As unsavvy as I am, I had no problem with the 32 SD card for the
Stream - just out with the four, in with the 32, VOILA! It's doing its
job. But, when I bought mine, Roger Behm explained in detail how to do
that.

Best from,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On
Behalf Of Chris Grabowski
Sent: Tuesday, December 5, 2017 2:43 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Replacing the Micro SD Card on a Victor Reader

I did that as well.




Make sure you follow his instructions to the letter as I didn't and
ended up needing to send mine to HW as I shorted out the WIFI chip.

Oops.




When I got the Stream back from Humanware it took me 5 minutes to get
the new 32GB micro sd card inserted once I knew what I was doing.




The Stream wasn't under warranty and is working great.






________________________________

From: andy.tidwell
Sent: Friday, Dec 1, 2017 9:16 PM EST
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: [TechTalk] Replacing the Micro SD Card on a Victor Reader



Hello Joe, I know a man that can replace the micro SD card on your
victor stream and also give you more internal memory.
His name is Konrad and here is is email address.
retroxpsystems@gmail.com <mailto:retroxpsystems@gmail.com>

He can tell you anything you need to know and he is very good at what
he does.
I have two second generation streams and they both work well and I
have
24.4 gigs of memory and you can also do the updates normally
Give him a try and tell him Andy sent you.
-----Original Message----- From: Joe Orozco
Sent: Friday, December 01, 2017 6:03 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: [TechTalk] Replacing the Micro SD Card on a Victor Reader

Hello,

Out of nowhere, my second generation Victor Reader Stream decided to
stop powering on, or rather, it’ll get as far as “Welcome to
Victor...” before shutting down. A factory reset did not work, and
tech support said it would need to be sent in to have its micro SD
card replaced.

Does anyone have any idea how much this will cost? The tech support
guy was vague, only said it would be the least expensive of repairs,
but if the unit arrives and I refuse to pay for the fix, they’ll
charge me $95 as a maintenance fee.

Alternatively, does anyone know if this is something that can be fixed
independently?

The unit is a few months shy of five years old. It’s understandably
old, and while I am willing to pay for repairs, I would rather not pay
near original price. At that point I may as well replace it or get
something else.

And, please, no pointing out how I could just use my iPhone. I very
much prefer using a second device on account of longer battery and
tactile buttons. Yes, I’m a weird millennial.

Thanks for any help! And if you know of anyone selling their VRS,
please let me know this as well!

Joe



Jesus dyed for us, why can't we live for him?












--
Affordably priced Accessible Talking MP3 Players, Accessible phones,
Bluetooth devices, and accessories http://www.talkingmp3players.com/
Email: laz@talkingmp3players.com
Phone: 727-498-0121
Skype: lazmesa
Personal Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/laz.mesa
Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/Talkingmp3players?_rdr







--
Affordably priced Accessible Talking MP3 Players, Accessible phones,
Bluetooth devices, and accessories
http://www.talkingmp3players.com/
Email: laz@talkingmp3players.com
Phone: 727-498-0121
Skype: lazmesa
Personal Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/laz.mesa
Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/Talkingmp3players?_rdr


Re: currency reader

Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
 

Oh, you don't have to be an NLS patron to get the iBill Reader! There's an
844 number one could call, but my foggy brain yanked off its deposit box in
my head.

The advantage of getting one as an NLS patron is that you don't have to
present papers proving blindness or visual impairment. Anyway, do a search
on the web, you'll most certainly find the form to fill out for one as a
non-NLS patron.

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado


Re: currency reader

Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
 

Captain Rob, yikes, scratch my last post! I should have examined the toy
before writing. Now I go to the Guillotine to be taught a lesson or two!

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado

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