Date   

banning a sender

Jeffrey Schwartz
 

Gene,

Thanks for the help with this issue.  My application  key works as well as shift F ten.

After some more of this list’s kind help, I will feel comfortable with my new software.

Jeff


Windows 10 Mail Revisited

Steve Matzura
 

Sorry for not remembering who told me about this, but whomever it was suggested I uncheck the button in Windows 10 Mail settings called "Show preview text," sorry to report that it did not stop the message text from speaking.


Re: More on Windows 10 Mail

Steve Matzura
 

Oh-ho! That's the one! THANK YOU!


On 1/4/2018 9:54 PM, Mike B. wrote:
Hi Steve,
 
I was reading a Win Mail tutorial, & in Settings / Reding button here's a little bit from that:
Tab again to, Show preview text Button.
If you check this, part of the email message will be read in the email list.
This might be what you're looking to uncheck.
Take care.  Mike.  Sent from my iBarstool.
Arguing with a woman is like reading a software license agreement.  In the end you have to ignore everything, & click I agree.
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, January 04, 2018 2:51 PM
Subject: [TechTalk] More on Windows 10 Mail

Now I've got it working and understand it a bit better than yesterday,
it's an interesting approach to electronic mail. It's not the most
intuitive interface on the planet for sure.

There's one thing I'd like to know how to change: In certain ways, it
behaves like Mac Mail in that as one moves through a message list, one
hears not only the message subject, but a bit of the message text. If
that's possible to be turned off, hearing just the message subject, that
would be quite good.




Re: Sorry, Thunderbird did it again!

Steve Matzura
 

But then why would T-Bird dump them into Drafts, yet they appear to show up on the lists anyway? I just don't think T-Bird is as reliable as it ought to be. If I can wrestle Windows 10 Mail into working just a bit better, I'm going there for a while. I just hate the thought of having to re-write all my email filters yet again! LOL.

On 1/4/2018 9:07 PM, Michael Boyd wrote:
I suppose it could have something to do with your network problem, but maybe not. Chances are that the servers are experiencing a lot of traffic and it is taking some time for the messages to actually be sent.

Michael



-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Steve Matzura
Sent: Thursday, January 04, 2018 7:46 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Sorry, Thunderbird did it again!

For some unknown reason, even after I send a message, a copy of it gets put into Drafts. I see it there, think it hasn't been sent out, don't spend the time and effort to check Sent Messages to verify whether it has or hasn't, edit the Drafts message, and send it again. I just saw it happen three times on three separate messages. Very annoying. I wish I knew why it did this. I used to think it has something to do with sending messages later, but it doesn't always happen in that situation.
Sorry for the inconvenience and clutter.






Re: Meltdown and Spectre, the big PC security flaws!

Jujube
 

This sounds absolutely brutal! Hopefully we'll be okay.

On 1/5/18, janet gross <janet.harvard@outlook.com> wrote:
Hi Everyone,
I copied and pasted some information below in which I thought some might be
interested in reading.


Meltdown and Spectre, the big PC security flaws just revealed, explained
Get ready to update many of your devices, but the problem won't go away with
a few clicks.
By
Tim Ryan Williams
Updated Jan 4, 2018, 10:56pm EST
While everyone else had eyes on the "bomb cyclone" descending on the East
Coast this week, computer security researchers and tech workers were
wincing
over something else: massive security flaws discovered that potentially
affect the vast majority of personal computers and smartphones ever built.
Two security flaws, dubbed Meltdown and Spectre by researchers, allow
processor exploits to steal passwords and other sensitive user data from
almost any
device made in the past 20 years,
according to the New York Times.

Security researchers,
including Jann Horn at Google and academics at Graz University of
Technology, discovered the flaws. They had already disclosed the flaws last
year to the
big tech companies like Microsoft and Apple, and had planned to reveal them
publicly in coming days.
The processor maker Intel was also informed of the potential exploits, and
it may be worth noting that the company's CEO, Brian Krzanich, sold $24
million
in company stock and options in late November,
according to Business Insider.
Now software companies are scrambling to push out updates. Google and
Microsoft said by Wednesday evening that they had updated their systems to
fix the
Meltdown flaw, according to the Times. Some consumer fixes, including for
PCs, have rolled out, but others are still in development.
There is no evidence yet that hackers have taken advantage of the security
flaws. But once flaws are made public, the attention makes your devices
ready
targets, allowing skilled hackers easy access to your passwords, online bank
accounts, and email.
Apple speaks up after a day of deafening silence
and even nations
to build walls around our increasingly connected world of devices.

Meltdown and Spectre are beyond the norm, however, because they allow
exploits at the hardware level, the silicon in your machine. That makes
fixing the
problem much more challenging, as the exploits allow access to the most
basic part of your computer.

How do Meltdown and Spectre work?
Processors are one of the building blocks of digital devices. They allow
your device to "think," by performing a staggering number of tiny
calculations
per second.
Modern devices work in "parallel," allowing processors to perform different
calculations for different applications at the same time. They can also
store
small bits of information. And this processor complexity is exactly what can
be exploited, potentially even by a browser ad or email link.
As
The Verge explained:
The vulnerabilities allow an attacker to compromise the privileged memory of
a processor by exploiting the way processes run in parallel. They also
allow
an attacker to use JavaScript code running in a browser to access memory in
the attacker's process. That memory content could contain key strokes,
passwords,
and other valuable information.

Meltdown seems to affect only Intel processors, but the company has a near
monopoly on processors for personal computers and servers. Spectre,
however,
is a more general flaw and may affect even more devices, though experts say
the flaw is more difficult to exploit.
According to the security researchers who discovered the exploits, the data
at risk "might include your passwords stored in a password manager or
browser,
your personal photos, emails, instant messages and even business-critical
documents."
The increasing connectivity of consumer products - say, a smart fridge or
juicer
- makes these exploits especially dangerous.

According to the Times, hackers could simply rent space on an unpatched
cloud service and easily access customer data:
That is a major threat to the way cloud-computing systems operate. Cloud
services often share machines among many customers - and it is uncommon for,
say,
a single server to be dedicated to a single customer. Though security tools
and protocols are intended to separate customers' data, the recently
discovered
chip flaws would allow bad actors to circumvent these protections.
The biggest cloud service companies, like Google and Amazon, say they've
fixed their systems issues. But cloud services are an increasing part of
many
online and offline businesses, which may not act so quickly.

How do I protect myself?
Fixes are in the works for Meltdown but probably aren't available yet on all
your devices. The Verge
reported Thursday:
Firefox 57 (the latest) includes a fix,
as do the
latest versions of Internet Explorer and Edge
for Windows 10. Google says it will
roll out a fix with Chrome 64
which is due to be released on January 23rd. ...
For Windows itself, this is where things get messy. Microsoft has
issued an emergency security patch
through Windows Update, but if you're running third-party anti-virus
software then it's possible you won't see that patch yet.

Apple said that it
released software updates
to mitigate the Meltdown exploit for iOS, Macs, and the Apple TV in December
and that further updates are forthcoming.
Fixes for Spectre may require hardware changes, which could take years to
roll out as people buy new devices.

https://www.vox.com/business-and-finance/2018/1/4/16850004/meltdown-spectre-intel-security-flaw-update

block quote





Re: Ap quesion

Sugar Lopez
 

Thank you Blaster,
I will put this away under windows 10 tips and use it for future ref.
I appreciate the steps that are given.
It does help me get more familiar with my windows 10
Smile
Sugar

"Heaven is full of answers to prayers for which no one ever bothered to ask. :
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nyLrl0SWe7s

Please support me in my journey to another opportunity of life at:
https://www.gofundme.com/sugars-transplant-journey

Bless you, Sugar Lopez

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Blaster
Sent: Thursday, January 4, 2018 7:25 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Ap quesion

Hi Sugar, If you know which file type you want to open with a specific program, like .doc and Microsoft Word, than you can do one of these two methods.

The first one is the easiest one, but you'll need one of the files that you want to associate with a program on your pc.

Open an explorer window with the windows key + the letter E.

Navigate to the folder where your file is located and select it.

Press the applications key or Shift key + the F10 key to open the context window.

Arrow down to the option titled: Open with Use the right arrow to open the fly out menu.

Skip all of the available options, even if the one you want is listed there and press the enter key on the selection titled: choose another app.

When this window opens up, arrow through the list of available apps and if the one you want is there, stop using the arrow key when it's highlighted and use the tab key to find the checkbox that says: always use this program to open this file type Use the spacebar to check this box and then tab to the ok button and press the enter key.

NOTE: If the program you wanted to use wasn't in the available program list, there was another option titled: choose more apps, and then another one after that titled something like:search for apps on this pc.

The second option for associating a specific file type with a program can be done by doing the following:

Note: I can only get this done with NVDA, everything else just chokes on the file type screen, but that could just be me.

Press the windows key and type: default app Then press the enter key to open the default app settings window.

Tab to the selection titled, choose default apps by file type.
Then press the spacebar.

The file type window will open, but it will take a little while to load up. It's a long, long, list of every conceiveable file type.

Use the tab key to go through the list of file types.
Keep tabbing until you get to the one you want and then press the spacebar.
Tab through the list of available programs and press the spacebar on the one you want to use to open this file type.

That's it!
Blaster


HTH,
Blaster


On 1/4/18, Michael Boyd <mike122061@outlook.com> wrote:

Hi Sugar,

You will need to set the default program in Control Panel. When there, open
Default Programs, and tab down and select Set Default Programs. Find the
program in question and select it as default. If you need mor
direction, I will be glad to provide that for you.

Michael


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On
Behalf Of Sugar Lopez
Sent: Thursday, January 04, 2018 8:46 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Ap quesion

Michael
Everytime it ask me I say yes but it happens everytime So thanks?
sugar

"Heaven is full of answers to prayers for which no one ever bothered
to ask.
:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nyLrl0SWe7s

Please support me in my journey to another opportunity of life at:
https://www.gofundme.com/sugars-transplant-journey

Bless you, Sugar Lopez



-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On
Behalf Of Michael Boyd
Sent: Thursday, January 4, 2018 6:37 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Ap quesion


Here's a tip, if you would set the application that you want to use as
the default program, you would not get asked these questions.

Michael


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On
Behalf Of Ann Parsons
Sent: Thursday, January 04, 2018 7:22 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Ap quesion

Hi all,

Actually there is a very good reason why this question is asked.
There are times when you do not want to open a file with the default program.
Case and point. Adobe Reader isn't worth the paper it's printed on
whereas Docuscan Plus is fantastic. So, when I'm asked whether I want
to open a PDF with Adobe I always say no, and choose the program I really want.

Ann P.

--
Ann K. Parsons
Portal Tutoring
EMAIL: akp@sero.email
Author of The Demmies: http://www.dldbooks.com/annparsons/
Portal Tutoring web site: http://www.portaltutoring.info
Skype: Putertutor

"All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost."













Re: Meltdown and Spectre, the big PC security flaws!

Jujube
 

This sounds absolutely brutal! Hopefully we'll be okay.


Re: Password Storage Program

Mike Thomas
 


Hi Steve,  Back in the xp days,  I was looking for an addressbook to keep everything in.  I found a great little program  called "Handy AddressBook" by Baily software.  It holds unlimited entries, They can be encrypted or not, and it works great for passwords.  You can also keep different address data files, like Business, Family, friends, etc.  Its all up to you.  it keeps phone numbers, addresses, birthdays, etc, etc and even has a field to hold notes.  This program has worked wonderfully all these years and through XP and Win 7.  There is a free trial of it that holds upto 30 entries, and can be opened 60 times before requiring a key.  I believe the price back then was $45, but I have no idea of now.  The entries can be indexed for quick access, and names, passwords, phone numbers can all be accessed on the alphabetical index.  The only part that I found confusing is ordering those items I want on the index, and in what order.  Its pretty quick for someone sighted, but I know it can be done even if blind, because I have done it.  Once the task is done, it never has to be touched again, and I found the rest of the program accessible to me.  I don't use all the aspects of it to keep my data, but the entries and retrieval is absolutely accessible.  As I said before, the data is all encrypted where I keep passwords and private information, so I don't worry much about it.  You might want to check out the free trial as it does so much more than a password keeper in the longrun.
Mike

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, January 05, 2018 9:06 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Password Storage Program

1Password.


On 1/4/2018 12:27 PM, james f hooper wrote:

Okay just got  back on the list what password program do most of you use I am using jaws 2018

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Cristóbal
Sent: Thursday, January 04, 2018 10:09 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Password Storage Program

In my case, I’m using 1Password Version 6.8.492 with the latest JFW 2018 and Windows 10.

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Steve Matzura
Sent: Thursday, January 4, 2018 7:54 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Password Storage Program

Table? Nope, just a few list boxes. Maybe you're on version 6?

On 1/3/2018 9:06 PM, Kliph wrote:

what system are you using?  Because the list should be in a table for you to choose from.

Do you own a braille display and want to help, or are you a new user and need tips to help learn your device?  Than come join the braille display users group and join in with your Q&A’s, subscribe here
braille-display-users+subscribe@groups.io

All hins, tips, and questions are welcome!

On Jan 2, 2018, at 4:35 PM, Steve Matzura <number6@...> wrote:

Sure doesn't do that here. No matter what I do, without clicking with my screenreader's mouse cursor, I'm stuck on logins.

On 1/2/2018 3:37 PM, Cristóbal wrote:

I simply shift tab a bit till I get to that field and then I can arrow up or down to get to my logins, software licenses, banking info, etc.

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Steve Matzura
Sent: Tuesday, January 2, 2018 11:52 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Password Storage Program

About 1Password, how do you switch betwixt and between the various storage types accessibly? I am using version 4, non-cloud-based, and if I want to switch from passwords to accounts or other types of stored secure things, I have to use my screenreader's mouse emulation cursor to find the category in the list and click it. Is version 6 any better at this than version 4?

On 1/2/2018 10:40 AM, Cristóbal wrote:

Been using 1password on Windows 10, iOS and Android devices with the family plan. The Windows 10 and iOS apps are accessible. No real complaints.

I think I paid $60 for the family plan. Everyone’s happy. 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Mike B.
Sent: Tuesday, January 2, 2018 5:47 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Password Storage Program

Hi All,

I'm in need of a password storage program that will save my personal passwords.  I'm currently using Passkeeper, but it has limited space, & I need a program that will hold more than my current Passkeeper program.  It's hard to say what the size linits of Passkeeper are, & I haven't been able to find its limits but it seems to run out of space after around 120 entries.  Any recommendations are most welcome.  Thanks much.

Take care.  Mike.  Sent from my iBarstool.
Arguing with a woman is like reading a software license agreement.  In the end you have to ignore everything, & click I agree.



Meltdown and Spectre, the big PC security flaws!

Janet
 

Hi Everyone,
I copied and pasted some information below in which I thought some might be interested in reading.


Meltdown and Spectre, the big PC security flaws just revealed, explained
Get ready to update many of your devices, but the problem won't go away with a few clicks.
By
Tim Ryan Williams
Updated Jan 4, 2018, 10:56pm EST
While everyone else had eyes on the "bomb cyclone" descending on the East Coast this week, computer security researchers and tech workers were wincing
over something else: massive security flaws discovered that potentially affect the vast majority of personal computers and smartphones ever built.
Two security flaws, dubbed Meltdown and Spectre by researchers, allow processor exploits to steal passwords and other sensitive user data from almost any
device made in the past 20 years,
according to the New York Times.

Security researchers,
including Jann Horn at Google and academics at Graz University of Technology, discovered the flaws. They had already disclosed the flaws last year to the
big tech companies like Microsoft and Apple, and had planned to reveal them publicly in coming days.
The processor maker Intel was also informed of the potential exploits, and it may be worth noting that the company's CEO, Brian Krzanich, sold $24 million
in company stock and options in late November,
according to Business Insider.
Now software companies are scrambling to push out updates. Google and Microsoft said by Wednesday evening that they had updated their systems to fix the
Meltdown flaw, according to the Times. Some consumer fixes, including for PCs, have rolled out, but others are still in development.
There is no evidence yet that hackers have taken advantage of the security flaws. But once flaws are made public, the attention makes your devices ready
targets, allowing skilled hackers easy access to your passwords, online bank accounts, and email.
Apple speaks up after a day of deafening silence
and even nations
to build walls around our increasingly connected world of devices.

Meltdown and Spectre are beyond the norm, however, because they allow exploits at the hardware level, the silicon in your machine. That makes fixing the
problem much more challenging, as the exploits allow access to the most basic part of your computer.

How do Meltdown and Spectre work?
Processors are one of the building blocks of digital devices. They allow your device to "think," by performing a staggering number of tiny calculations
per second.
Modern devices work in "parallel," allowing processors to perform different calculations for different applications at the same time. They can also store
small bits of information. And this processor complexity is exactly what can be exploited, potentially even by a browser ad or email link.
As
The Verge explained:
The vulnerabilities allow an attacker to compromise the privileged memory of a processor by exploiting the way processes run in parallel. They also allow
an attacker to use JavaScript code running in a browser to access memory in the attacker's process. That memory content could contain key strokes, passwords,
and other valuable information.

Meltdown seems to affect only Intel processors, but the company has a near monopoly on processors for personal computers and servers. Spectre, however,
is a more general flaw and may affect even more devices, though experts say the flaw is more difficult to exploit.
According to the security researchers who discovered the exploits, the data at risk "might include your passwords stored in a password manager or browser,
your personal photos, emails, instant messages and even business-critical documents."
The increasing connectivity of consumer products - say, a smart fridge or
juicer
- makes these exploits especially dangerous.

According to the Times, hackers could simply rent space on an unpatched cloud service and easily access customer data:
That is a major threat to the way cloud-computing systems operate. Cloud services often share machines among many customers - and it is uncommon for, say,
a single server to be dedicated to a single customer. Though security tools and protocols are intended to separate customers' data, the recently discovered
chip flaws would allow bad actors to circumvent these protections.
The biggest cloud service companies, like Google and Amazon, say they've fixed their systems issues. But cloud services are an increasing part of many
online and offline businesses, which may not act so quickly.

How do I protect myself?
Fixes are in the works for Meltdown but probably aren't available yet on all your devices. The Verge
reported Thursday:
Firefox 57 (the latest) includes a fix,
as do the
latest versions of Internet Explorer and Edge
for Windows 10. Google says it will
roll out a fix with Chrome 64
which is due to be released on January 23rd. ...
For Windows itself, this is where things get messy. Microsoft has
issued an emergency security patch
through Windows Update, but if you're running third-party anti-virus software then it's possible you won't see that patch yet.

Apple said that it
released software updates
to mitigate the Meltdown exploit for iOS, Macs, and the Apple TV in December and that further updates are forthcoming.
Fixes for Spectre may require hardware changes, which could take years to roll out as people buy new devices.

https://www.vox.com/business-and-finance/2018/1/4/16850004/meltdown-spectre-intel-security-flaw-update

block quote


Re: getting startup and shut down back and can they beconfigured in Win10

Dennis L <dennisl1982@...>
 

Negative as usual   Gerald

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gerald Levy
Sent: Friday, January 5, 2018 9:43 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] getting startup and shut down back and can they beconfigured in Win10

 

 

And what if you inadvertently change the wrong registry key?  You may very well screw up your computer and even render it unusable if you make a mistake.  Any registry tweaks should only be attempted if you are tech savvy and you first back the registry  up and have a means of restoring it.

 

Gerald

 

 

 

Sent: Friday, January 05, 2018 9:20 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] getting startup and shut down back and can they beconfigured in Win10

 

Here's an article you might find useful. https://www.howtogeek.com/274010/how-to-change-the-windows-10-logoff-logon-and-shutdown-sounds-in-windows-10 Don't get scared off by the use of the word "registry". The changes you'll be making won't break anything if you mess them up. You may get an error if you point to a sound file that doesn't exist (or you mistyped its path), but that shouldn't deter you.

 

On 1/4/2018 11:27 AM, Gene wrote:

Even with a shutdown sound, that never told you whether the computer shut down.  it only told you it started to shut down.  But as a notification that the process started, and with Microsoft presenting itself as caring deeply about accessibility, it is a travesty that the sound is no longer available.  I'm not sure how you can tell that a shutdown has completed successfully.

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Thursday, January 04, 2018 8:56 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] getting startup and shut down back and can they beconfigured in Win10

 

 

So here’s a dumb question from a Windows 7 user.  If there is no shutdown sound in Windows 10, how can you tell for sure that your computer has shutdown successfully, especially if you have a laptop with no fan or DVD drawer? At least with a desktop, you can usually tell that the fan has stopped running, and the DVD drawer won’t open when you press the eject button, which confirms that the computer has shutdown.  

 

Gerald

 

 

 

From: Loy

Sent: Thursday, January 04, 2018 8:18 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] getting startup and shut down back and can they beconfigured in Win10

 

If you have fast startup disabled, you can go to sounds and there you can check the windows startup sound, but you can not get the shutdown sound back, even if you do a registry hack to list the sound it still will not work no matter what sound you assign to it.

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Thursday, January 4, 2018 7:44 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] getting startup and shut down back and can they beconfigured in Win10

 

Go to start menu, in the search type control panel. Then go to sounds and to the sound schemes tab and configure the sounds the way you want.

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Dennis L
Sent: Thursday, January 4, 2018 07:04
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] getting startup and shut down back and can they beconfigured in Win10

 

Can you get the startup and shut down sounds back in win10 and can they be configured?  If so how?  Thanks.

 

 


Re: getting startup and shut down back and can they beconfigured in Win10

Gerald Levy
 

 
And what if you inadvertently change the wrong registry key?  You may very well screw up your computer and even render it unusable if you make a mistake.  Any registry tweaks should only be attempted if you are tech savvy and you first back the registry  up and have a means of restoring it.
 
Gerald
 
 
 

Sent: Friday, January 05, 2018 9:20 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] getting startup and shut down back and can they beconfigured in Win10
 

Here's an article you might find useful. https://www.howtogeek.com/274010/how-to-change-the-windows-10-logoff-logon-and-shutdown-sounds-in-windows-10 Don't get scared off by the use of the word "registry". The changes you'll be making won't break anything if you mess them up. You may get an error if you point to a sound file that doesn't exist (or you mistyped its path), but that shouldn't deter you.

 

On 1/4/2018 11:27 AM, Gene wrote:
Even with a shutdown sound, that never told you whether the computer shut down.  it only told you it started to shut down.  But as a notification that the process started, and with Microsoft presenting itself as caring deeply about accessibility, it is a travesty that the sound is no longer available.  I'm not sure how you can tell that a shutdown has completed successfully.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, January 04, 2018 8:56 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] getting startup and shut down back and can they beconfigured in Win10
 
 
So here’s a dumb question from a Windows 7 user.  If there is no shutdown sound in Windows 10, how can you tell for sure that your computer has shutdown successfully, especially if you have a laptop with no fan or DVD drawer? At least with a desktop, you can usually tell that the fan has stopped running, and the DVD drawer won’t open when you press the eject button, which confirms that the computer has shutdown.  
 
Gerald
 
 
 
From: Loy
Sent: Thursday, January 04, 2018 8:18 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] getting startup and shut down back and can they beconfigured in Win10
 
If you have fast startup disabled, you can go to sounds and there you can check the windows startup sound, but you can not get the shutdown sound back, even if you do a registry hack to list the sound it still will not work no matter what sound you assign to it.
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, January 4, 2018 7:44 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] getting startup and shut down back and can they beconfigured in Win10
 

Go to start menu, in the search type control panel. Then go to sounds and to the sound schemes tab and configure the sounds the way you want.

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Dennis L
Sent: Thursday, January 4, 2018 07:04
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] getting startup and shut down back and can they beconfigured in Win10

 

Can you get the startup and shut down sounds back in win10 and can they be configured?  If so how?  Thanks.

 



Re: getting startup and shut down back and can they beconfigured in Win10

Steve Matzura
 

On 1/4/2018 11:55 AM, Reed Poynter wrote:
 

As far as accessibility goes, the whole Windows 10 implementation has been a joke.



Why do you say that? Narrator is better than ever it's been. There are things I can do now with Narrator that I absolutely could not in previous implementations, and there are things I can read with Narrator that I cannot read with either JAWS or NVDA. So then, is the joke on me? what am I missing?


Re: getting startup and shut down back and can theybeconfigured in Win10

Jeremy <icu8it2@...>
 

I'm not quite sure what you're trying to say, but yes, the process for determining whether or not the lid is closed is normally handled by some sort of switch/button/sensor, similar to how a smart phone determines whether or not you've got the phone close to your face so it can turn off the display. The action of closing the lid is therefor controlled by this switch/button/sensor being triggered, which isn't normally supposed to happen unless the lid is actually closed. If for some reason, this device were to malfunction, the lid would never be detected as being in the closed state and the computer would never be given the command to sleep or shut down, depending on how you had it set. The chances of this hardware screwing up are probably much less likely than something screwing up in software to cause the computer not to properly sleep/shut down, but it does happen.
I don't think I ever stated that closing the lid would stop current from getting to any other part of the hardware, except for the display, but please feel free to correct me if I did, as I'd be incorrect.
Take care.

On 1/5/2018 2:51 AM, Gene wrote:
Closing the lid tells the computer to do something like shut down or sleep.  It isn't a switch that does something like stop current to the computer.  It does what you do when you shut down or sleep or whatever you do with whatever command you use.  If it were otherwise, and took an action such as stopping current, it would cause an improper shutdown. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Jeremy
Sent: Thursday, January 04, 2018 10:54 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] getting startup and shut down back and can theybeconfigured in Win10

Things can even be worse than the draining of the batteries. :)
I know for a fact that if circumstances are just right and the laptop doesn't sleep/shutdown properly, things can actually get hot enough to cause damage to the case it's being stored in, like fire. lol
While I've personally never had this happen with my computer, I know someone who has and he didn't catch it until the cloth inside his computer case had started smoking.

I'm of the mind as to not completely trust a software based means of determining if the computer will successfully shut down, so I've always made sure that it was shut down before placing it in its case. I suppose that a physical button/switch type thing that might be used to detect the lid being closed, that being hardware, would be good enough, but I still don't care to take the chance. I never did ask as to how he had it configured, whether it was set to shutdown on closing the lid, sleep on closing it, whatever, but I know that whatever it was supposed to do, it somehow continued running while it was confined in that nice insulated case and it was on to the barbecuing.

Perhaps on a newer type laptop, with a processor that isn't design to run so hot, temperatures would stay below the point where an ignition would take place. If this was one of the fanless versions though, I'd be worried about extra heat that that fan would normally help to dissipate. Even if temperatures didn't reach that high, I'd imagine it not so good for the hardware to reach temps that it might not have been designed for.
Take care.
On 1/4/2018 10:15 PM, Gene wrote:

If you could guarantee me that every time a computer begins a shutdown, it always completes, your statement would be correct.  It wouldn't be a very pleasant occurrence to shut down a laptop running on batteries and have the shutdown not fully complete, thus continuing to drain the battery.  Computers usually shut down but not every time.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, January 04, 2018 8:45 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] getting startup and shut down back and can theybeconfigured in Win10

 

It is not always that easy. If you have a laptop that has no fan and runs on a solid state drive, there are no operational sounds from the computer. One would have to know how to create an error that is accompanied by a sound to have anything come from the speakers. The long and short of it is, if you shutdown the computer in the proper  fashion, and you have the Power Options set to shutdown the laptop when the lid is closed, then there is nothing to worry about.

 

Michael

 

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Josh Kennedy
Sent: Thursday, January 04, 2018 12:43 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] getting startup and shut down back and can theybeconfigured in Win10

 

You just press buttons on it, if nothing happens, it is shut down. It is same with my android tablet. When I hit shut down or power off I give it 10 or so seconds, hit some buttons, if nothing happens it is shut down.

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Gerald Levy
Sent: Thursday, January 4, 2018 09:56
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] getting startup and shut down back and can theybeconfigured in Win10

 

 

So here’s a dumb question from a Windows 7 user.  If there is no shutdown sound in Windows 10, how can you tell for sure that your computer has shutdown successfully, especially if you have a laptop with no fan or DVD drawer? At least with a desktop, you can usually tell that the fan has stopped running, and the DVD drawer won’t open when you press the eject button, which confirms that the computer has shutdown.  

 

Gerald

 

 

 

From: Loy

Sent: Thursday, January 04, 2018 8:18 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] getting startup and shut down back and can they beconfigured in Win10

 

If you have fast startup disabled, you can go to sounds and there you can check the windows startup sound, but you can not get the shutdown sound back, even if you do a registry hack to list the sound it still will not work no matter what sound you assign to it.

----- Original Message -----

From: Josh Kennedy

Sent: Thursday, January 4, 2018 7:44 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] getting startup and shut down back and can they beconfigured in Win10

 

Go to start menu, in the search type control panel. Then go to sounds and to the sound schemes tab and configure the sounds the way you want.

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Dennis L
Sent: Thursday, January 4, 2018 07:04
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] getting startup and shut down back and can they beconfigured in Win10

 

Can you get the startup and shut down sounds back in win10 and can they be configured?  If so how?  Thanks.

 

 




Re: Ap quesion

Blaster
 

I agree with all of Ann's points and would add, I use it to read all
of my paper text like snail mail. It can also scan a graphic like a
magazine cover and grab the text out of it really well.

There's also a subscription service for about $20 a month that
includes DocuScan.

Blaster

On 1/5/18, Ann Parsons <akp@sero.email> wrote:
Hi all,

You asked what advantages DocuScan Plus has over Adobe? Well, there
are several.

First, it is more accurate than Adobe, giving fewer errors, and
formatting material so that it can be read properly.

Second, it is sometimes even better than Kurzie, especially with
colored paper. I got a letter from a doctor once and I first tried to
scan it with Kurzie, and it failed miserably! I tried DocuScan Plus
and it came up singing. When I asked my reader what was unusual about
the letter, she explained that it had been written on pink paper!

Third, your stuff is saved in the cloud unless you specify. This
allows you to retrieve it from any computer.

Fourth, it has some nice features like conversion to audio, conversion
to DAISY, emailing the document, and so on.

Finally, for approx. $350.00, a third of the price of Kurzie, you've
got an OCR program that is excellent, a .pdf reader that is reliable,
and it has several good features which I like. I get weekly
newsletters in .pdf. they come up singing every time.

Those are the reasons why I like DocuScan Plus. Oh, I think it also
works with cameras for scanning, not sure, though, you can check it out.

Ann P.

Original message:
Hi Ann,

What advantages does Docuscan have over Adobe PDF?


On 1/4/2018 8:22 PM, Ann Parsons wrote:
Hi all,
Actually there is a very good reason why this question is asked. There
are times when you do not want to open a file with the default
program. Case and point. Adobe Reader isn't worth the paper it's
printed on whereas Docuscan Plus is fantastic. So, when I'm asked
whether I want to open a PDF with Adobe I always say no, and choose
the program I really want.
Ann P.

--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"

--
Ann K. Parsons
Portal Tutoring
EMAIL: akp@sero.email
Author of The Demmies: http://www.dldbooks.com/annparsons/
Portal Tutoring web site: http://www.portaltutoring.info
Skype: Putertutor

"All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost."




Re: getting startup and shut down back and can theybeconfigured in Win10

Jeremy <icu8it2@...>
 

While it is certainly the case that devices don't always need a fan to stay cool, it's tough to say that a fan would never be required, depending on where the device is being used, how much of the processor is being utilized in certain tasks, does the device have adequate venting to allow cooling air to move throughout the hardware inside the case, etc. There are in fact portable-type computers that don't come with a fan, but I'd certainly much rather have one, if given the choice. In my tinkerings with OpenWRT, the firmware used for some of the cheaper routers, it was often the case that it would be recommended to either modify the device to include a fan for cooling or to place it in such a way as to allow for better air venting around the device. This would typically be recommended for those wishing to over clock their device or set the wireless radios transmission power up higher than what you could by default, but it's still a good practice to keep in mind.

I dunno, I think that there's still quite the difference between what I'd expect from my laptop and something like my phone, my phone obviously not having a fan for cooling and yet, working perfectly, but then I also know that my laptops processor has a higher power requirement and can do quite a bit more at once too. There is an OS that people sometimes use for firewalling called PFSense that can be installed on lots of different types of Intel-based hardware. When you browse through the forums on their pages about hardware suggestions, you'll find that for systems that have higher requirements, they often recommend you use a system that includes that extra cooling that comes with having a fan, as they can run quite a bit hotter.
Neat stuff. :)
Take care.

On 1/5/2018 3:06 AM, Gene wrote:
What are you basing this on?  Are you assuming or can you document this?  There are some computers, such as tablets, I believe, that are specifically designed not to have fans.  I don't know if any lapttops are.  Unless you actually know and aren't assuming or relying on hearsay information, I would not assume your statements are correct. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, January 05, 2018 12:31 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] getting startup and shut down back and can theybeconfigured in Win10

 

Yes, I wouldn’t want a computer that didn’t have a fan, it is integral to keeping the components coolled down. Plus some components, like your processors are not going to have the life span that they normally would on a system that is being cooled in some manner.

 

Michael

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jeremy
Sent: Thursday, January 04, 2018 10:55 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] getting startup and shut down back and can theybeconfigured in Win10

 

Things can even be worse than the draining of the batteries. :)
I know for a fact that if circumstances are just right and the laptop doesn't sleep/shutdown properly, things can actually get hot enough to cause damage to the case it's being stored in, like fire. lol
While I've personally never had this happen with my computer, I know someone who has and he didn't catch it until the cloth inside his computer case had started smoking.

I'm of the mind as to not completely trust a software based means of determining if the computer will successfully shut down, so I've always made sure that it was shut down before placing it in its case. I suppose that a physical button/switch type thing that might be used to detect the lid being closed, that being hardware, would be good enough, but I still don't care to take the chance. I never did ask as to how he had it configured, whether it was set to shutdown on closing the lid, sleep on closing it, whatever, but I know that whatever it was supposed to do, it somehow continued running while it was confined in that nice insulated case and it was on to the barbecuing.

Perhaps on a newer type laptop, with a processor that isn't design to run so hot, temperatures would stay below the point where an ignition would take place. If this was one of the fanless versions though, I'd be worried about extra heat that that fan would normally help to dissipate. Even if temperatures didn't reach that high, I'd imagine it not so good for the hardware to reach temps that it might not have been designed for.
Take care.
On 1/4/2018 10:15 PM, Gene wrote:


If you could guarantee me that every time a computer begins a shutdown, it always completes, your statement would be correct.  It wouldn't be a very pleasant occurrence to shut down a laptop running on batteries and have the shutdown not fully complete, thus continuing to drain the battery.  Computers usually shut down but not every time.

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

From: Michael Boyd

Sent: Thursday, January 04, 2018 8:45 PM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] getting startup and shut down back and can theybeconfigured in Win10

 

 

It is not always that easy. If you have a laptop that has no fan and runs on a solid state drive, there are no operational sounds from the computer. One would have to know how to create an error that is accompanied by a sound to have anything come from the speakers. The long and short of it is, if you shutdown the computer in the proper  fashion, and you have the Power Options set to shutdown the laptop when the lid is closed, then there is nothing to worry about.

 

Michael

 

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Josh Kennedy
Sent: Thursday, January 04, 2018 12:43 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] getting startup and shut down back and can theybeconfigured in Win10

 

You just press buttons on it, if nothing happens, it is shut down. It is same with my android tablet. When I hit shut down or power off I give it 10 or so seconds, hit some buttons, if nothing happens it is shut down.

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Gerald Levy
Sent: Thursday, January 4, 2018 09:56
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] getting startup and shut down back and can theybeconfigured in Win10

 

 

So here’s a dumb question from a Windows 7 user.  If there is no shutdown sound in Windows 10, how can you tell for sure that your computer has shutdown successfully, especially if you have a laptop with no fan or DVD drawer? At least with a desktop, you can usually tell that the fan has stopped running, and the DVD drawer won’t open when you press the eject button, which confirms that the computer has shutdown.  

 

Gerald

 

 

 

From: Loy

Sent: Thursday, January 04, 2018 8:18 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] getting startup and shut down back and can they beconfigured in Win10

 

If you have fast startup disabled, you can go to sounds and there you can check the windows startup sound, but you can not get the shutdown sound back, even if you do a registry hack to list the sound it still will not work no matter what sound you assign to it.

----- Original Message -----

From: Josh Kennedy

Sent: Thursday, January 4, 2018 7:44 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] getting startup and shut down back and can they beconfigured in Win10

 

Go to start menu, in the search type control panel. Then go to sounds and to the sound schemes tab and configure the sounds the way you want.

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Dennis L
Sent: Thursday, January 4, 2018 07:04
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] getting startup and shut down back and can they beconfigured in Win10

 

Can you get the startup and shut down sounds back in win10 and can they be configured?  If so how?  Thanks.

 

 

 



Re: getting startup and shut down back and can they beconfigured in Win10

Steve Matzura
 

Here's an article you might find useful. https://www.howtogeek.com/274010/how-to-change-the-windows-10-logoff-logon-and-shutdown-sounds-in-windows-10 Don't get scared off by the use of the word "registry". The changes you'll be making won't break anything if you mess them up. You may get an error if you point to a sound file that doesn't exist (or you mistyped its path), but that shouldn't deter you.


On 1/4/2018 11:27 AM, Gene wrote:
Even with a shutdown sound, that never told you whether the computer shut down.  it only told you it started to shut down.  But as a notification that the process started, and with Microsoft presenting itself as caring deeply about accessibility, it is a travesty that the sound is no longer available.  I'm not sure how you can tell that a shutdown has completed successfully.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, January 04, 2018 8:56 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] getting startup and shut down back and can they beconfigured in Win10

 
So here’s a dumb question from a Windows 7 user.  If there is no shutdown sound in Windows 10, how can you tell for sure that your computer has shutdown successfully, especially if you have a laptop with no fan or DVD drawer? At least with a desktop, you can usually tell that the fan has stopped running, and the DVD drawer won’t open when you press the eject button, which confirms that the computer has shutdown.  
 
Gerald
 
 
 
From: Loy
Sent: Thursday, January 04, 2018 8:18 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] getting startup and shut down back and can they beconfigured in Win10
 
If you have fast startup disabled, you can go to sounds and there you can check the windows startup sound, but you can not get the shutdown sound back, even if you do a registry hack to list the sound it still will not work no matter what sound you assign to it.
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, January 4, 2018 7:44 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] getting startup and shut down back and can they beconfigured in Win10
 

Go to start menu, in the search type control panel. Then go to sounds and to the sound schemes tab and configure the sounds the way you want.

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Dennis L
Sent: Thursday, January 4, 2018 07:04
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] getting startup and shut down back and can they beconfigured in Win10

 

Can you get the startup and shut down sounds back in win10 and can they be configured?  If so how?  Thanks.

 



Re: Facebook as the cyber mafia

Steve Matzura
 

Right on! I never had anything approaching even reasonable sight, but I miss what I have and crave more, for all the reasons you mentioned. Well, maybe not the driving thing, except if you count boats and planes (LOL). Land vehicles are more interesting to design and repair than to drive, at least for me they are.

On 1/5/2018 7:40 AM, Lenron wrote:
I probably would have been like hell yeah I will drive. Only if it was
someone I trusted and we were in a safe enough area. Thing is for me
no matter how much sight I have I plan on owning at least one car.
Driving is one of those things that is quite fun. I use to drive
ATV's, and have driven a car before. Being able to drive see a
beautiful lady, and read print rank at the top of my list of reasons I
would want to have perfect vision. lol

On 1/2/18, Peter Spitz <peter.a.spitz@gmail.com> wrote:
Lost my sight on May 17, 2004 and I still miss my Ford F-150 Super Crew
pickup!

On 1/2/18, Michael Boyd <mike122061@outlook.com> wrote:
Hi Dave,

I had to give up my dressed out Harley after losing my sight, and my new
Ford pick up too.

Michael


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf
Of
Dave
Sent: Monday, January 01, 2018 6:56 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Facebook as the cyber mafia

Now there are many things I Miss due to loss of my Sight. But one of the
top items on that Long List, is Driving. And in my case, I loved driving
across the country side on a powerful Motorcycle.

The ultimate in Freedom.

and I miss the Eye Talk between a Man and a Woman. Great Stuff that!

Grumpy Dave












Re: More on Windows 10 Mail

Steve Matzura
 

And what happened there?


As one moves through the message list, one hears not only the subject of said messages, but a few lines from the messages themselves. I'd like to turn that off so I only hear the messages' subjects as I roll down the list.

On 1/5/2018 8:42 AM, Steve Matzura wrote:
Now I've got it working and understand it a bit better than yesterday, it's an interesting approach to electronic mail. It's not the most intuitive interface on the planet for sure.

There's one thing I'd like to know how to change: In certain ways, it behaves like Mac Mail in that as one moves through a message


Re: An unusual network problem

Steve Matzura
 

You must not have seen my solution message. None of these suggestions had any bearing on the issue. A minor Windows update caused SMB services to be turned off. Turned it on again in Control Panel -> Programs and Features -> Turn Features On or Off -> SMB 1.0 in the features list. All fixed now. Microsoft says this problem has been reported sporadically and has no clue yet as to what caused it. Something to watch out for if the symptoms happen to you.


On 1/4/2018 9:04 PM, Michael Boyd wrote:

 

Steve,

 

Call your ISP or the manufacturer of your Modem/router.

 

Michael

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Steve Matzura
Sent: Thursday, January 04, 2018 7:42 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] An unusual network problem

 

My call to Microsoft yielded absolutely nothing (say it again!). In fact, I had to call them twice. First I tried the Disability Help Line, and when the nice person went through everything she could think of, including trying to get both machines to leave and rejoin a homegroup (which succeeded after about three tries on her part), still no happiness.

 

Then it was on to the network support line (1-800-642-7676). The guy I spoke with tried to tell me that doing a system restore would cure my problem. Lucky for me, I did full image backups in between calls. Both restores (one on each computer) failed because they don't take into acount that antivirus software is running. On one machine I have only Windows Defender (f.k.a. Microsoft Security Essentials), while on one machine I also have Malwarebytes. (And what about that pesky tray application then?)

 

So I still can't access either machine from the other via the network view on the Desktop. I haven't the first or faintest clue what broke, or why, but until I feel like sitting on one of their helpless help lines for forty-five minutes before getting answered, I'll just have to access them via the Run dialog.

 

On 1/3/2018 8:16 AM, Steve Matzura wrote:

I actually did that but failed to add that to the problem details I originally posted. It was the next thing I did after rebooting everything. Everything shows up on the network that should--tablets, phones (where applicable), NAS, TV set-top boxes, ... just not the two Windows computers. Come to think of it, I don't think my Linux box shows up either, which it used to. All this started after a Windows 10 update last week. That's why I suspect that is what broke things. I'll keep at it, though.


On 1/2/2018 7:15 PM, Michael Boyd wrote:

Steve,

Have you tried resetting your modem and/or router? This will often solve problems that one might experience. The items that you have listed, your TV, cable boxes and such are typically connected to your network these days. If resetting (power reset) does not fix the problem, a call to your internet provider might be in order. This is assuming that your gateway is provided by the ISP. If you own your own equipment, then call the manufacturer.

Michael


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Steve Matzura
Sent: Tuesday, January 02, 2018 1:44 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] An unusual network problem

The other morning, like Thursday last, I awoke to discover neither of my Windows 10 machines, all running  FCU 1709 (build 16299) could not see each other from the Network view, although if I typed the UNC of one machine from the run dialog of the other, I was allowed to access what I am supposed to be allowed to access according to my sharing setups. So where did my machines go on the Network view? All that's there now are silly things, like my Internet gateway and my cable TV boxes, and I don't even understand how they got there in the first place since they're not plugged in to the router/gateway. I can also view the house tablets when they come online, including my iPad and my wife's and my Kindle Fire HD's. Any thoughts?








 



Re: Password Storage Program

Steve Matzura
 

1Password.


On 1/4/2018 12:27 PM, james f hooper wrote:

Okay just got  back on the list what password program do most of you use I am using jaws 2018

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Cristóbal
Sent: Thursday, January 04, 2018 10:09 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Password Storage Program

 

In my case, I’m using 1Password Version 6.8.492 with the latest JFW 2018 and Windows 10.

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Steve Matzura
Sent: Thursday, January 4, 2018 7:54 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Password Storage Program

 

Table? Nope, just a few list boxes. Maybe you're on version 6?

 

 

On 1/3/2018 9:06 PM, Kliph wrote:

what system are you using?  Because the list should be in a table for you to choose from.

 

Do you own a braille display and want to help, or are you a new user and need tips to help learn your device?  Than come join the braille display users group and join in with your Q&A’s, subscribe here
braille-display-users+subscribe@groups.io

All hins, tips, and questions are welcome!

 

On Jan 2, 2018, at 4:35 PM, Steve Matzura <number6@...> wrote:

 

Sure doesn't do that here. No matter what I do, without clicking with my screenreader's mouse cursor, I'm stuck on logins.

 

On 1/2/2018 3:37 PM, Cristóbal wrote:

I simply shift tab a bit till I get to that field and then I can arrow up or down to get to my logins, software licenses, banking info, etc.

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Steve Matzura
Sent: Tuesday, January 2, 2018 11:52 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Password Storage Program

 

About 1Password, how do you switch betwixt and between the various storage types accessibly? I am using version 4, non-cloud-based, and if I want to switch from passwords to accounts or other types of stored secure things, I have to use my screenreader's mouse emulation cursor to find the category in the list and click it. Is version 6 any better at this than version 4?

 

On 1/2/2018 10:40 AM, Cristóbal wrote:

Been using 1password on Windows 10, iOS and Android devices with the family plan. The Windows 10 and iOS apps are accessible. No real complaints.

I think I paid $60 for the family plan. Everyone’s happy. 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Mike B.
Sent: Tuesday, January 2, 2018 5:47 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Password Storage Program

 

Hi All,

 

I'm in need of a password storage program that will save my personal passwords.  I'm currently using Passkeeper, but it has limited space, & I need a program that will hold more than my current Passkeeper program.  It's hard to say what the size linits of Passkeeper are, & I haven't been able to find its limits but it seems to run out of space after around 120 entries.  Any recommendations are most welcome.  Thanks much.

Take care.  Mike.  Sent from my iBarstool.
Arguing with a woman is like reading a software license agreement.  In the end you have to ignore everything, & click I agree.