Date   

virtual recorder question

William Vandervest
 

Can somebody please tell me what the “record time on start stop” checkbox is for?

It wasn’t mentioned in the readme file

Thanks

 

 

 

William Vandervest

Timelord09@...

 

There are none so blind as those who will not se “anon”e

 


nfb newsline is bius

heather albright
 

Hello, I was thinking today about the nfb newsline and how it is available for alexa but, not for google home. Why one and not both? Heather

 

Heather Albright
Blindness is a characteristic, not a handicap!" Dr. Kenneth Jernigan
ham call sign:
kd5cbl
e-mail:
kd5cbl@...

 


Re: web search question

 

I think you are thinking of operators? Just do a search for search
engine operators for the site you want to use. I think they work
across all of them though.


Re: Braillenote Apex And iPhone

Jujube
 

Go to main menu and press t for terminal mode. You can now connect your iPhone. I can give you further instructions later.

----- Original Message -----
From: "George Zaynoun" <humorlessgeza@samobile.net
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Date sent: Sat, 27 Jan 2018 13:34:58 -0500
Subject: [TechTalk] Braillenote Apex And iPhone

Hi. How to put this device in terminal mode and can it be used with
iPhone? How to exit terminal mode as well? Thanks.

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Tel: +46 (500) 48 29 29 +46 (500) 43 55 11

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chrome is going to have it's own ad blocker

mcLeod stinnett
 

--
From Mack Google is going to start blocking certain ads in Chrome, the company announced earlier this year. But now we know exactly when: February 15, 2018 (via VentureBeat) is the go-live date provided by the company for introduction of its built-in enforcement of the standards established by the Coalition for Better Ads, of which it is a member.
This won’t block all ads on all websites – instead, it’ll stop those that are deemed overly annoying or intrusive. But it will be blocking all ads from sites where even one ad displayed on the site doesn’t meet those standards, even if the rest are technically in compliance.
Google has been working with publishers to make sure they’re in compliance with the new standards, in advance of the feature going live. It’s done a lot to make sure that this wasn’t sprung on anyone without warning.


web search question

Keith S
 

When using google, yahoo, or any other search engine, is there a way to include  words in the search but exclude others.  I think they used to be called bulons?
 
example,
 
vest + hunting - canvas
vest plus hunting minus canvas
 
thanks
 
Keith


Braillenote Apex And iPhone

George Zaynoun
 

Hi. How to put this device in terminal mode and can it be used with iPhone? How to exit terminal mode as well? Thanks.

--
Georges Zeinoun
Timmerv. 6A ITR LGH1102, 54163 SKÖVDE SWEDEN
Tel: +46 (500) 48 29 29 +46 (500) 43 55 11


Re: ID Mate: Quest Versus Summit

Pamela Dominguez
 

Why couldn't you format it, then download the updates? Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
Sent: Saturday, January 27, 2018 12:02 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] ID Mate: Quest Versus Summit

Ileni wrote:

"What do you mean you can't format it? FAT is a regular format. Could you
not simply connect the card to a computer and format it as you would the
compact flash card for the Omni?"

I've never played with the Omni; but, if you want access to the
database/updates from EnVision America, doing your own SD card formatting
won't cut it, EnVision America MUST DO IT for you! For me, it's a silly
HANDHOLDING NONSENSE that keeps me farther and farther behind and makes it
nearly impossible to STAY ON THE CUTTING EDGE of technology alongside
sighted counterparts who just pick up stuff in the mainstream and go to work
with it unperturbed.

I had purchased the Galaxy iDMate believing that I could deploy it in my
business as a barcode scanner for gathering and exporting a .CSV data to a
POS app and possibly using it when ringing up a customer at my store.
Yikes, sis, I'm out of luck and stuck with yet another adapted equipment
that holds less value for my desired uses compared to what obtains in the
mainstream.

I've found lots of handheld devices in the mainstream that will do what I
want; the only problem is that I can't install a screen reader in any of
them. So, right now, I am trying to research what Android can offer me in
this regard. Until I find something in Android land, I'll hold on to the
inferior toy and watch it gather some more dust on my shelf of antiquities!


Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado






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Re: When did 'ribbons' start to appear

Pamela Dominguez
 

They are in more than that. Windows live mail, and Internet explorer and I don't remember what else off hand. Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Thursday, January 25, 2018 5:52 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear

I use Windows 7, and the only places where I have ever seen ribbons
are in Wordpad and Notepad. I actually replaced Wordpad with an older
version, in order to eliminate the ribbons. Here are the instructions
for doing so.

http://computer-science-and-software-tricks.blogspot.com/2011/06/how-to-get-good-old-wordpad-without.html

Admittedly, some things are different in the control panel from how
they were in XP, but if these are ribbons, I honestly didn't know.

On 25/01/2018, janet gross <janet.harvard@outlook.com> wrote:
Carolyn,
I think ribbons came out in Microsoft office 2007 in the year 2007, and I
think ribbons for Windows started with Windows 7.
Janet

Janet

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Carolyn Arnold
Sent: Thursday, January 25, 2018 3:45 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear

I agree - think they started with Windows 7. They simply are a learning
experience. We don't have any control that the old menus were changed, and
whether or not we like it or don't, the situation is the same, totally
unaltered by what I think.

Cordially,

Carolyn



-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
janet gross
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 8:07 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear

Nancy,
As far as I know, I think ribbons started with Microsoft in 2007. Someone
else might have more detailed information though. Ribbons aren't a bad
thing either. Some people just don't like them, or they might have a
difficult time learning how to use them. Some people just don't like change
either. Some people just don't want or they don't have to be bothered with
learning ribbons.
Janet

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Nancy Hill
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 5:45 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear

All this 'ribbon' talk got me to wondering about when 'ribbons' started.


Would some kind person give a bit of history about ribbons such as when they
were started and what programs have them?


I have no clue and would love the education.


Thanks!


Nancy















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Re: bios and keyboard help for a toshiba satellite pro laptop

David Mehler
 

Hello Marvin,

You gave me an interesting one so I tried to look it up. For Vista and
7 try this, though if you have the Toshiba hw program referenced on 10
this first one might work:

http://www.steel-net.com/support/toshibafunctionkeys.html

For 8.1 and presumably 10 go here:

http://www.mytoshiba.com.au/support/item/695

Good luck.

Now I have a question for you or anyone can chime in. With a UEFI
system such as 8.1 or in this case 10, any system that you can press
f12 to temporarily boot from another device such as a thumb drive,
first does anyone know if all the f12 options are the same, such as
hard drive first then thumb drive then network etc? And if so, any
ideas how to get via the f12 boot menu a thumb drive to boot?

Thanks.
Dave.

On 1/27/18, Marvin Hunkin via Groups.Io <neilmarvin=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi. Was having issues, and so did a windows reset, and so, had to get
sighted help to install the audio driver. Now, my parent had a look at my
bios. For some stupid reason, the keyboard function keys, got set to
special
keys, not f 1 to f 12. So will paste my model, the function key has been
removed by Toshiba. So, any way, my mom could not see the options, and only
had setup, recovery, is change value f 5 / f 6, the keyboard option to
change. Or do you know of any software, that can help me change my keyboard
layout. And when I go to a site, jaws list links, does nothing, insert f 11
for time and f 12 for system tray, and also got this wireless display, and
alt f 4 does not work, and also my wireless communications, goes off, have
to keep turning off wifi all the time. So asking, any help, and also, any
software, or do I need to update the bios, a new one, can do this in
windows. And the wireless lanb driver as well, got the latest Toshiba
system
settings, for windows 10 64 bit pro. Or is there a way for a sighted
person,
to remote into my machine and use a bios utility, and get into my bios. Is
that feesable. This is frustrating.

Marvin.

Ps: pasting the machine model, part and serial number below.

Any help.

Model Name Satellite Pro C50-A

Part Number PSCGKA-00H004

Serial Number 3E183366S utility






A POSSIBLE NEW E-MAIL APP FOR WINDOWS?

Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
 

Hello All:

Here's yet another E-Mail app hoping to hit Windows 7-10 some time soon. We
can all help make this app more accessible from a blindness perspective by
participating in the beta-testing process. To sign up, please go to:

https://bluemail.me/desktop/windows/

This app is currently available in Android land and possibly in the iOS
world too. Let's see if its developers will be willing to have a
chat/conversation with our community!

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado


bios and keyboard help for a toshiba satellite pro laptop

Marvin Hunkin <neilmarvin@...>
 

Hi. Was having issues, and so did a windows reset, and so, had to get sighted help to install the audio driver. Now, my parent had a look at my bios. For some stupid reason, the keyboard function keys, got set to special keys, not f 1 to f 12. So will paste my model, the function key  has been removed by Toshiba. So, any way, my mom could not see the options, and only had setup, recovery, is change value f 5 / f 6, the keyboard option to change. Or do you know of any software, that can help me change my keyboard layout. And when I go to a site, jaws list links, does nothing, insert f 11 for time and f 12 for system tray, and also got this wireless display, and alt f 4 does not work, and also my wireless communications, goes off, have to keep turning off wifi all the time. So asking, any help, and also, any software, or do I need to update the bios, a new one, can do this in windows. And the wireless lanb driver as well, got the latest Toshiba system settings, for windows 10 64 bit pro. Or is there a way for a sighted person, to remote into my machine and use a bios utility, and get into my bios. Is that feesable. This is frustrating.

Marvin.

Ps: pasting the machine model, part and serial number below.

Any help.

Model Name     Satellite Pro C50-A

 Part Number    PSCGKA-00H004

 Serial Number  3E183366S utility

 




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Viewing Pages on Facebook

Eleni Vamvakari
 

Is there a way, on the mobile version of Facebook (not the app on a
phone, but the site), for me to view the pages that I have liked? I
can view groups, notes, friends, etc. but not pages. Whenever I go
there, it just shows me new ones which may interest me.

Thanks,
Eleni

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Re: New Linux Questions

Eleni Vamvakari
 

Thank you for that extremely detailed answer! I have saved it and
will keep these things in mind. But for now, I just want to get
started with something that is either configured for the blind or that
is standard and works out of the box. I just need to learn the basic
keystrokes, how to use the types of programs that I would normally use
in Windows, and so on.

On 26/01/2018, Jeremy <icu8it2@gmail.com> wrote:
Hi,
First of all, it's worth keeping in mind that there aren't a whole lot
of differences between Ubuntu and Vinux, outside of a few changes in
configurations and some slight differences in package installations for
Vinux, but it's still pretty much Ubuntu. I've always gotten the idea
that those people who get used to using Linux tend to move from Using
Vinux back to Ubuntu, simply because it has a lot more support from a
much larger community, which is pretty important especially with
security. Ubuntu has always been pretty good about making sure that
software such as Orca can be started inside their live environments and
their installs stay pretty accessible, but the same can be said for
Debian also. What makes these systems easier for us blind folks to use
is the fact that most of the applications that either come as a default
on the live environment or are installed as part of larger package
selections, so mate, have mostly everything they need to work well with
Orca included. These extra packages might include applications that are
responsible for managing files, an application that lets you create and
manage the panels that are on the top and bottom of your desktop, an
application that lets you control connections to wireless networks that
you can access from one of the panels, etc. Other parts of the system
though that are also pretty important might be the log-on manager, so
you'd hopefully want to find one that works well with Orca, else you'll
have no speech or crappy accessibility in those areas such as entering
your username and password to log on to your desktop. The console or
terminal is also a pretty big deal in Linux, so you'd want to make sure
that Orca works with the application that provides a terminal inside
mate/gnome, it's gnome-terminal in an install of gnome. If you decide
that you wish to use the system outside a desktop, which is basically
the same type of interface that you get in the terminal interface in
gnome, that's where you'd want speakup to be properly configured to work
along side Orca, which means getting things to play nice with
alsa/Pulse, some of the sound systems used in Linux.

Outside of these basic ideas that you'd want to keep in mind for any
distribution are differences in how package updates are handled and how
often they are released. This is probably what's most important for
those of us relying on Orca and its accessibility framework, is having
our accessibility packages updated more often means that we have better
accessibility. It also means though that there might be things that
aren't tested as much, so you can run into some pretty strange errors
that can really suck if you don't know how to recover from them. This is
one of the pretty big differences between arch-based systems, so an
environment that uses a rolling-release type cycle compared to Debian
based ones like Ubuntu, which only make huge changes to major packages
perhaps every 6 months, every year, I forget what it is now. Basically
what this comes down to for those using a Debian-based environment
especially is that packages can sometimes be pretty far behind, so you
want to figure out how to only update the accessibility stuff, which
isn't necessarily an easy thing. The version of Orca that is most up to
date and has all the really neat changes that Jony fixes are in the
master version, and you normally don't get that through your package
manager. Even in Arch, I don't think there's a package to install Orca
master from within the package manager, pacman, I think you have to
download it from gitt and do it that way. I think there's an add on type
thing for pacman though that lets you install packages from the AUR, a
different list of packages that are kinda outside the arch community
that might have an install for it, but I can't remember now.

Anyways, sonar, which is an arch-based system is basically the same type
of idea as vinux is for Ubuntu, it's a few blind people who've tinkered
around with packages enough to know which ones work pretty well with
Orca and have pre-installed and configured them. While it used to
actually be pretty decent, when the main dev left the project and they
started talking about moving the Sonar project from an arch-based system
to a Fedora one, it became an absolute pile. I never quite understood
everything that went on between the Sonar and Vinux projects, I just
know that before Luke left, Luke was the main dev that worked on Vinux
and who also worked for Ubuntu, I seem to recall, Luke was doing a lot
of research into what was going to work the best for accessibility when
Sonar and Vinux were merged. I don't know what happened to the other
main dev that had been working on Sonar before, but I know that since
he's been gone, the project has basically been dead and that people are
constantly having issues in either getting it to boot, install, update,
basically not usable as a daily OS.

Anyways, I've sorta forgotten what I first wanted to really say in my
message, but if you are really serious about Linux questions and
learning more, what systems people like, all that good stuff, I'd
probably ask them on the Orca list. Some decent questions to probably
start out with are:
Which version might I find works well for me being a beginner with
Linux. I'd probably suggest Debian honestly, as it's close enough to
Ubuntu that you can take some of the useful commands for stuff like apt
and use them there and there's a really helpful guy there who works on
accessibility development for Debian. They might also suggest you try
out one of the versions of Ubuntu mate, so ask them what it will take
for you to install Orca master or if you don't feel like going that far,
what issues are there with Orca's reading of stuff on the desktop, does
it read all the panels, are there workarounds that you need to use to
read things like your wireless networks thing in the panel, whatever.
Fedoras also not a bad suggestion, but I've recently seen posts there
that suggest that there's changes in a part of the system that might
cause us some headaches with Orca, it's called wayland, forgive me
probably misspelling it. lol
Ask about using the latest Fedora with Orca and see what all they say
about what changes you might need to make to go back to the software
that works better for now. There's also the talking arch project which
can be pretty neat, but it takes a lot of knowledge on how to set up
software, configurations, a lot of the underlying stuff in Linux to get
it up and going. You'd also need to know enough about how to keep your
software up to date in its rolling-type release cycle, something that's
probably not the easiest thing to do, which is why I've never really
used arch long-term.
Hope this is at least a good start. :)
Take care.

On 1/25/2018 8:00 PM, Eleni Vamvakari wrote:
I realise that I have previously asked questions regarding Linux. I
am reviewing them, so that I don't repeat anything, but if I do, I
apologise. For the record, the most experience I have had with it is
using Vinux for a short time under Mate and Gnome. Basically, I
logged in and explored the system, but I didn't do anything serious
with it. The same is true of an older version of Sonar (I couldn't
get the newer ones to work). I am not sure if I was able to use
regular Ubuntu or not. So I am really new to all of this.

I once wrote a list of programs that I use with Windows, and I was
given Linux equivalents for almost everything, so that doesn't concern
me. But I have difficulty with some basic issues and concepts
relating to the operating system itself. I use that term loosely,
since I heard that it's not one system, but many. This brings me to
my first question. Aside from specialised systems, such as those
designed to run on very slow machines, or those with special software
for the disabled, what distinguishes one version of Linux from
another, particularly if they use the same desktop? For example, how
would Debbian Mate differ from Ubuntu Mate? How do the most
accessible versions of Linux and desktops differ from each other, I am
especially interested in 32-bit ones. from the perspective of a
screen reader user? I noticed that Red Hat was mentioned several
times. What is this version like?

Are all Linux distributions the same with regard to the commandline?
Can this be accessed with Orca, or does it require Speakup? How easy
would it be for an MS-DOS user to switch to Linux? I found several
comparisons of DOS and Linux commands, but I am not sure if they all
apply. ? My biggest challenge right now is understanding how to work
in a system that doesn't have drive letters. It makes slightly more
sense under a gui.

What about switching from the perspective of a user of Windows XP or
7? I was told that, due to my issues with Windows 7, I wouldn't like
Linux. As briefly as possible, these are UAC, permissions (not only
for running programs, but for
accessing certain folders), ribbons, libraries, save dialogue boxes,
copy/paste, search (last three all compared to XP), and the constant
"program is not responding" error. Does Linux contain most or all of
these? I heard that downloading files and updates is very different
between Windows and Linux. From the tiny bit that I know, it seems
that, under Linux, you don't just go to a site, find a program and
download it. You have to find specific packages or parts of programs.
Apparently, there is also no general update feature for the system
itself. Is any of this correct? In a recent thread, I mentioned
Debbian, and someone said that I would need to know about servers,
clients, and ssh. The only time I have ever used a server is when
connecting (automatically) to the NVDA server using NVDA Remote, and
when accessing a site with various files on it that a regular browser
couldn't read, or for which I needed a password. I forget the
specifics, because it was a very long time ago. But I remembr there
was a letter combination to describe that kind of site, and it wasn't
bbs.

If anyone can think of anything else that he would like to add,
please do so. I really want to try using Linux. If it's best for me
to just play with Vinux for now, I will do that, but I would still
appreciate whatever tips people can give me, so that I can make the
best of my experience.

Thanks,
Eleni



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Re: ID Mate: Quest Versus Summit

Eleni Vamvakari
 

Why on Earth would you need so much memory? It's a bar code scanner,
not a computer. Yes, it can play mp3s and memos that you record, but
it's not a digital recorder either. In any case, I think the Quest
can take up to a 64gb card.

On 27/01/2018, Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
<ukekearuaro@valtdnet.com> wrote:
Well, Ileni, I'm going by what EnVision America itself told me. Whereas I
could experiment, the high price of the adapted equipment that's supposed
to
make me more proficient is a reason why I haven't strayed too far afield.
Another silly thing with the Galaxy device: It only comes with a dismal
8GB
SD card! How silly and stupid can that be? In the mainstream, devices now
take up to 2GB SD card and they don't bug one down with format nonsense!
2TB SD cards are NOT HERE yet, but a new 512GB one will begin selling in
February. Currently, the max is a 400GB Class 10.

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado






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Re: ID Mate: Quest Versus Summit

Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
 

Well, Ileni, I'm going by what EnVision America itself told me. Whereas I
could experiment, the high price of the adapted equipment that's supposed to
make me more proficient is a reason why I haven't strayed too far afield.
Another silly thing with the Galaxy device: It only comes with a dismal 8GB
SD card! How silly and stupid can that be? In the mainstream, devices now
take up to 2GB SD card and they don't bug one down with format nonsense!
2TB SD cards are NOT HERE yet, but a new 512GB one will begin selling in
February. Currently, the max is a 400GB Class 10.

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado


Re: new windows 10 and jaws user favors

Marie <magpie.mn@...>
 

I am sure if you ask specific questions you will get answers unless no one knows how to help with a particular problem.
If I understand correctly, you are having trouble getting your installation of Jaws authorized. When in the authorization dialogs, first choose to activate via wifi and go to the next screen.
tab around until you find the text field to enter your authorization number, then go on to send the code to FS. If it is correct it should then activate the installation. It is really the same process as on all other versions of Windows.
Marie
 
 

From: Keith S
Sent: Friday, January 26, 2018 11:34 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] new windows 10 and jaws user favors
 

Greetings, I recently received a windows 10 laptop and for Christmas and have upgraded to JAWS from window eyes (version 2018 or 18 or whatever).

I have a couple of issues and do not want to sound like a newb, a clueless computer user, or a loser, but I need some serious help in learning how to use windows 10 in conjunction with jaws.

Are there any tutorials on the web, from companies, and/or from blind assistive foundations (if I need to purchase them I gladly will) to learn this stuff.

I started as a sighted computer user and worked my way through the windows 95, 98 SE, and Xp releases and as a blind person with windows xp and window eyes.

I have asked some questions on this list, and some have been answered (with my heartfelt thanks) and some have gone unanswered (probably because they are too simple for members to deal with).

My windows xp netbook has IE 6 on it (I think) and only a few websites are being displayed on that browser and when I install firefox it crashes every time I try to use it, so I will have to get actual websites to go to for tutorials if any exist, to pass on to my cousin so he can look them up on his computer and I can order them on his computer.

I have been able to install jaws on the windows 10 laptop, but I cannot access where I need to enter my wifi password to activate the jaws program with my owner's code as a first step.

Many thanks

Keith

The guy having to relearn everything over again.


Re: ID Mate: Quest Versus Summit

Eleni Vamvakari
 

I'm still slightly confused. I've always been able to upgrade my Omni
without any help from anyone. Has this ability changed? I should try
using another card that I format, just to see if it works. But I
don't see why it wouldn't. It may not work your par particular job,
but I do know that it has an inventory feature.

On 27/01/2018, Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
<ukekearuaro@valtdnet.com> wrote:
Ileni wrote:

"What do you mean you can't format it? FAT is a regular format. Could you
not simply connect the card to a computer and format it as you would the
compact flash card for the Omni?"

I've never played with the Omni; but, if you want access to the
database/updates from EnVision America, doing your own SD card formatting
won't cut it, EnVision America MUST DO IT for you! For me, it's a silly
HANDHOLDING NONSENSE that keeps me farther and farther behind and makes it
nearly impossible to STAY ON THE CUTTING EDGE of technology alongside
sighted counterparts who just pick up stuff in the mainstream and go to
work
with it unperturbed.

I had purchased the Galaxy iDMate believing that I could deploy it in my
business as a barcode scanner for gathering and exporting a .CSV data to a
POS app and possibly using it when ringing up a customer at my store.
Yikes, sis, I'm out of luck and stuck with yet another adapted equipment
that holds less value for my desired uses compared to what obtains in the
mainstream.

I've found lots of handheld devices in the mainstream that will do what I
want; the only problem is that I can't install a screen reader in any of
them. So, right now, I am trying to research what Android can offer me in
this regard. Until I find something in Android land, I'll hold on to the
inferior toy and watch it gather some more dust on my shelf of antiquities!


Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado






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Re: ID Mate: Quest Versus Summit

Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
 

Ileni wrote:

"What do you mean you can't format it? FAT is a regular format. Could you
not simply connect the card to a computer and format it as you would the
compact flash card for the Omni?"

I've never played with the Omni; but, if you want access to the
database/updates from EnVision America, doing your own SD card formatting
won't cut it, EnVision America MUST DO IT for you! For me, it's a silly
HANDHOLDING NONSENSE that keeps me farther and farther behind and makes it
nearly impossible to STAY ON THE CUTTING EDGE of technology alongside
sighted counterparts who just pick up stuff in the mainstream and go to work
with it unperturbed.

I had purchased the Galaxy iDMate believing that I could deploy it in my
business as a barcode scanner for gathering and exporting a .CSV data to a
POS app and possibly using it when ringing up a customer at my store.
Yikes, sis, I'm out of luck and stuck with yet another adapted equipment
that holds less value for my desired uses compared to what obtains in the
mainstream.

I've found lots of handheld devices in the mainstream that will do what I
want; the only problem is that I can't install a screen reader in any of
them. So, right now, I am trying to research what Android can offer me in
this regard. Until I find something in Android land, I'll hold on to the
inferior toy and watch it gather some more dust on my shelf of antiquities!


Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado


Re: New Linux Questions

Jeremy <icu8it2@...>
 

Hi,
First of all, it's worth keeping in mind that there aren't a whole lot of differences between Ubuntu and Vinux, outside of a few changes in configurations and some slight differences in package installations for Vinux, but it's still pretty much Ubuntu. I've always gotten the idea that those people who get used to using Linux tend to move from Using Vinux back to Ubuntu, simply because it has a lot more support from a much larger community, which is pretty important especially with security. Ubuntu has always been pretty good about making sure that software such as Orca can be started inside their live environments and their installs stay pretty accessible, but the same can be said for Debian also. What makes these systems easier for us blind folks to use is the fact that most of the applications that either come as a default on the live environment or are installed as part of larger package selections, so mate, have mostly everything they need to work well with Orca included. These extra packages might include applications that are responsible for managing files, an application that lets you create and manage the panels that are on the top and bottom of your desktop, an application that lets you control connections to wireless networks that you can access from one of the panels, etc. Other parts of the system though that are also pretty important might be the log-on manager, so you'd hopefully want to find one that works well with Orca, else you'll have no speech or crappy accessibility in those areas such as entering your username and password to log on to your desktop. The console or terminal is also a pretty big deal in Linux, so you'd want to make sure that Orca works with the application that provides a terminal inside mate/gnome, it's gnome-terminal in an install of gnome. If you decide that you wish to use the system outside a desktop, which is basically the same type of interface that you get in the terminal interface in gnome, that's where you'd want speakup to be properly configured to work along side Orca, which means getting things to play nice with alsa/Pulse, some of the sound systems used in Linux.

Outside of these basic ideas that you'd want to keep in mind for any distribution are differences in how package updates are handled and how often they are released. This is probably what's most important for those of us relying on Orca and its accessibility framework, is having our accessibility packages updated more often means that we have better accessibility. It also means though that there might be things that aren't tested as much, so you can run into some pretty strange errors that can really suck if you don't know how to recover from them. This is one of the pretty big differences between arch-based systems, so an environment that uses a rolling-release type cycle compared to Debian based ones like Ubuntu, which only make huge changes to major packages perhaps every 6 months, every year, I forget what it is now. Basically what this comes down to for those using a Debian-based environment especially is that packages can sometimes be pretty far behind, so you want to figure out how to only update the accessibility stuff, which isn't necessarily an easy thing. The version of Orca that is most up to date and has all the really neat changes that Jony fixes are in the master version, and you normally don't get that through your package manager. Even in Arch, I don't think there's a package to install Orca master from within the package manager, pacman, I think you have to download it from gitt and do it that way. I think there's an add on type thing for pacman though that lets you install packages from the AUR, a different list of packages that are kinda outside the arch community that might have an install for it, but I can't remember now.

Anyways, sonar, which is an arch-based system is basically the same type of idea as vinux is for Ubuntu, it's a few blind people who've tinkered around with packages enough to know which ones work pretty well with Orca and have pre-installed and configured them. While it used to actually be pretty decent, when the main dev left the project and they started talking about moving the Sonar project from an arch-based system to a Fedora one, it became an absolute pile. I never quite understood everything that went on between the Sonar and Vinux projects, I just know that before Luke left, Luke was the main dev that worked on Vinux and who also worked for Ubuntu, I seem to recall, Luke was doing a lot of research into what was going to work the best for accessibility when Sonar and Vinux were merged. I don't know what happened to the other main dev that had been working on Sonar before, but I know that since he's been gone, the project has basically been dead and that people are constantly having issues in either getting it to boot, install, update, basically not usable as a daily OS.

Anyways, I've sorta forgotten what I first wanted to really say in my message, but if you are really serious about Linux questions and learning more, what systems people like, all that good stuff, I'd probably ask them on the Orca list. Some decent questions to probably start out with are:
Which version might I find works well for me being a beginner with Linux. I'd probably suggest Debian honestly, as it's close enough to Ubuntu that you can take some of the useful commands for stuff like apt and use them there and there's a really helpful guy there who works on accessibility development for Debian. They might also suggest you try out one of the versions of Ubuntu mate, so ask them what it will take for you to install Orca master or if you don't feel like going that far, what issues are there with Orca's reading of stuff on the desktop, does it read all the panels, are there workarounds that you need to use to read things like your wireless networks thing in the panel, whatever. Fedoras also not a bad suggestion, but I've recently seen posts there that suggest that there's changes in a part of the system that might cause us some headaches with Orca, it's called wayland, forgive me probably misspelling it. lol
Ask about using the latest Fedora with Orca and see what all they say about what changes you might need to make to go back to the software that works better for now. There's also the talking arch project which can be pretty neat, but it takes a lot of knowledge on how to set up software, configurations, a lot of the underlying stuff in Linux to get it up and going. You'd also need to know enough about how to keep your software up to date in its rolling-type release cycle, something that's probably not the easiest thing to do, which is why I've never really used arch long-term.
Hope this is at least a good start. :)
Take care.

On 1/25/2018 8:00 PM, Eleni Vamvakari wrote:
I realise that I have previously asked questions regarding Linux. I
am reviewing them, so that I don't repeat anything, but if I do, I
apologise. For the record, the most experience I have had with it is
using Vinux for a short time under Mate and Gnome. Basically, I
logged in and explored the system, but I didn't do anything serious
with it. The same is true of an older version of Sonar (I couldn't
get the newer ones to work). I am not sure if I was able to use
regular Ubuntu or not. So I am really new to all of this.

I once wrote a list of programs that I use with Windows, and I was
given Linux equivalents for almost everything, so that doesn't concern
me. But I have difficulty with some basic issues and concepts
relating to the operating system itself. I use that term loosely,
since I heard that it's not one system, but many. This brings me to
my first question. Aside from specialised systems, such as those
designed to run on very slow machines, or those with special software
for the disabled, what distinguishes one version of Linux from
another, particularly if they use the same desktop? For example, how
would Debbian Mate differ from Ubuntu Mate? How do the most
accessible versions of Linux and desktops differ from each other, I am
especially interested in 32-bit ones. from the perspective of a
screen reader user? I noticed that Red Hat was mentioned several
times. What is this version like?

Are all Linux distributions the same with regard to the commandline?
Can this be accessed with Orca, or does it require Speakup? How easy
would it be for an MS-DOS user to switch to Linux? I found several
comparisons of DOS and Linux commands, but I am not sure if they all
apply. ? My biggest challenge right now is understanding how to work
in a system that doesn't have drive letters. It makes slightly more
sense under a gui.

What about switching from the perspective of a user of Windows XP or
7? I was told that, due to my issues with Windows 7, I wouldn't like
Linux. As briefly as possible, these are UAC, permissions (not only
for running programs, but for
accessing certain folders), ribbons, libraries, save dialogue boxes,
copy/paste, search (last three all compared to XP), and the constant
"program is not responding" error. Does Linux contain most or all of
these? I heard that downloading files and updates is very different
between Windows and Linux. From the tiny bit that I know, it seems
that, under Linux, you don't just go to a site, find a program and
download it. You have to find specific packages or parts of programs.
Apparently, there is also no general update feature for the system
itself. Is any of this correct? In a recent thread, I mentioned
Debbian, and someone said that I would need to know about servers,
clients, and ssh. The only time I have ever used a server is when
connecting (automatically) to the NVDA server using NVDA Remote, and
when accessing a site with various files on it that a regular browser
couldn't read, or for which I needed a password. I forget the
specifics, because it was a very long time ago. But I remembr there
was a letter combination to describe that kind of site, and it wasn't
bbs.

If anyone can think of anything else that he would like to add,
please do so. I really want to try using Linux. If it's best for me
to just play with Vinux for now, I will do that, but I would still
appreciate whatever tips people can give me, so that I can make the
best of my experience.

Thanks,
Eleni

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