Date   

Re: simple dumb phone

Pamela Dominguez
 

That's what I thought. I checked to make sure my computer was saying it
correctly, and not mispronouncing "unvaluable" instead. Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 7:10 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] simple dumb phone

Janet, please review the definition of the word invaluable. He was
complimenting us!

"in·val·u·a·ble
/inˈvaly(o͞o)əb(ə)l/Listen
adjective
adjective: invaluable
extremely useful; indispensable.
"an invaluable source of information"
synonyms:
indispensable, crucial, critical, key, vital, necessary,
irreplaceable, all-important; Moreimmeasurable, incalculable,
inestimable, priceless
"an invaluable member of the organization"
antonyms:
dispensable"

On 11/02/2018, janet gross <janet.harvard@...> wrote:
Jeff,
You need to get a grip on your bad hair day, and stop taking your anger
out
on the members. Your being very insulting to the members on this list by
saying you have received invaluable help. I’ve seen many and many of them
here go all out of their way just to help you. They put a great deal of
time and effort in helping you, and I’ve seen this over and over. By
right,
you should apologize to them for what you are now saying. I don’t believe
they deserve this insult just because you are in a bad mood! You think
you
get invaluable help here, but you wouldn’t know half as much as you know
now
if it wasn’t for the members here, or unless you know more about computers
than you are willing to admit.
Janet

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf
Of
Jeffrey Schwartz
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 3:53 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] simple dumb phone

Janet, simply having a bad hair day. I receive some invaluable assistance
on this list. Thanks for your interest and advice.
Jeff

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of janet gross
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 4:32 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] simple dumb phone

Jeff,
I’m not sure what you meant when you said: you wonder if this list was for
you? I thought this list was for all of us who have tech questions or who
has tech information in which would help someone else, or did you mean to
say you wonder if this list was the right list for you? You say this list
goes on forever in which is over your head, Jeff, this is a good way to
learn by listening to what others have to share regarding your tech
question, but if you don’t want to listen, you will never learn! Maybe
these people who say it is simple and wonderful are trying to encourage
you
to learn. You ask for help, but yet, you criticize how you receive it!
You
like those who agree with you, but not the others who try to encourage
you!
Wow, talk about being greatful! It sounds like if you don’t get exactly
what you asked for, well, you don’t like it!
Janet


From: main@TechTalk.groups.io<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jeffrey Schwartz
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 9:30 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] simple dumb phone

Thanks Gerald,
I was wondering if this list is for me. You are becoming a friend on the
lists to which we belong. This list goes on forever with topics which are
over my head, but a good source of info on learning these damned ribbons.
If I ask someone will help me and ten others will say how simple and
wonderful the ribbons are.
Jeff

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gerald Levy
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 10:08 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] simple dumb phone


Jeff, don’t take it personally. I have discovered that a lot of
tech-savvy
blind people look down on the rest of us who may have no interest in using
the latest and greatest whiz-bang gadgets. They have a cavalier and
condescending attitude that if you don’t own a smart phone or a Google
Home
or an Amazon Echo, you are somehow less of a human being. I don’t let it
bother me. Go ahead and laugh, but my cell phone is a ten-year old
refurbished LG 4650 that I picked up from an online seller for only $15.
It
still works,and I keep it just for emergencies. I’m not interested in
texting or using it as an alarm clock or GPS device. And I only pay $40 a
year ($10 every four months) to keep it activated with Page Plus Cellular.
And I don’t own a Victor Reader Trek or Stream because I don’t need
one,since I am perfectly satisfied with my NLS DTB player, which serves my
needs.

Gerald



From: Jeffrey Schwartz<mailto:jeffreyschwartz0238@...>
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 9:35 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: [TechTalk] simple dumb phone

I am seventy and spent sixty years gradually losing my vision to RP. I
have been totally blind for ten years. My wife is virtually an invalid.
We
have no need for a smart phone as we are seldom out. When we go to
medical
appointments we use an agency to give my wife a shower and take her and or
me to the doctors office. We bought the jitterbug quite a few years ago.
At that time she went by cab and used the phone to call one when we were
ready to go home. It has no features other than calling out and receiving
calls. There was one option at the time which we chose not to get, a
section for receiving messages. We had no need for it. This phone just
fine. I grew tired of hearing from others who had more complex needs.
With
the exception of Nancy, who only wanted a phone to make and receive calls,
I
was deluged by people who couldn’t possibly use it and went on to describe
their smart phones. I offered this phone for others on the list who might
have needs or preferences like my own. My post started a deluge of
contrary preferences. After a time I lost interest in the varieties of
smart phones. These posts were not critical, but after a time made me feel
like an outlier.
Jeff


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Re: simple dumb phone

Eleni Vamvakari <elvam2167@...>
 

Janet, please review the definition of the word invaluable. He was
complimenting us!

"in·val·u·a·ble
/inˈvaly(o͞o)əb(ə)l/Listen
adjective
adjective: invaluable
extremely useful; indispensable.
"an invaluable source of information"
synonyms:
indispensable, crucial, critical, key, vital, necessary,
irreplaceable, all-important; Moreimmeasurable, incalculable,
inestimable, priceless
"an invaluable member of the organization"
antonyms:
dispensable"

On 11/02/2018, janet gross <janet.harvard@...> wrote:
Jeff,
You need to get a grip on your bad hair day, and stop taking your anger out
on the members. Your being very insulting to the members on this list by
saying you have received invaluable help. I’ve seen many and many of them
here go all out of their way just to help you. They put a great deal of
time and effort in helping you, and I’ve seen this over and over. By right,
you should apologize to them for what you are now saying. I don’t believe
they deserve this insult just because you are in a bad mood! You think you
get invaluable help here, but you wouldn’t know half as much as you know now
if it wasn’t for the members here, or unless you know more about computers
than you are willing to admit.
Janet

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Jeffrey Schwartz
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 3:53 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] simple dumb phone

Janet, simply having a bad hair day. I receive some invaluable assistance
on this list. Thanks for your interest and advice.
Jeff

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of janet gross
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 4:32 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] simple dumb phone

Jeff,
I’m not sure what you meant when you said: you wonder if this list was for
you? I thought this list was for all of us who have tech questions or who
has tech information in which would help someone else, or did you mean to
say you wonder if this list was the right list for you? You say this list
goes on forever in which is over your head, Jeff, this is a good way to
learn by listening to what others have to share regarding your tech
question, but if you don’t want to listen, you will never learn! Maybe
these people who say it is simple and wonderful are trying to encourage you
to learn. You ask for help, but yet, you criticize how you receive it! You
like those who agree with you, but not the others who try to encourage you!
Wow, talk about being greatful! It sounds like if you don’t get exactly
what you asked for, well, you don’t like it!
Janet


From: main@TechTalk.groups.io<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jeffrey Schwartz
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 9:30 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] simple dumb phone

Thanks Gerald,
I was wondering if this list is for me. You are becoming a friend on the
lists to which we belong. This list goes on forever with topics which are
over my head, but a good source of info on learning these damned ribbons.
If I ask someone will help me and ten others will say how simple and
wonderful the ribbons are.
Jeff

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gerald Levy
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 10:08 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] simple dumb phone


Jeff, don’t take it personally. I have discovered that a lot of tech-savvy
blind people look down on the rest of us who may have no interest in using
the latest and greatest whiz-bang gadgets. They have a cavalier and
condescending attitude that if you don’t own a smart phone or a Google Home
or an Amazon Echo, you are somehow less of a human being. I don’t let it
bother me. Go ahead and laugh, but my cell phone is a ten-year old
refurbished LG 4650 that I picked up from an online seller for only $15. It
still works,and I keep it just for emergencies. I’m not interested in
texting or using it as an alarm clock or GPS device. And I only pay $40 a
year ($10 every four months) to keep it activated with Page Plus Cellular.
And I don’t own a Victor Reader Trek or Stream because I don’t need
one,since I am perfectly satisfied with my NLS DTB player, which serves my
needs.

Gerald



From: Jeffrey Schwartz<mailto:jeffreyschwartz0238@...>
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 9:35 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: [TechTalk] simple dumb phone

I am seventy and spent sixty years gradually losing my vision to RP. I
have been totally blind for ten years. My wife is virtually an invalid. We
have no need for a smart phone as we are seldom out. When we go to medical
appointments we use an agency to give my wife a shower and take her and or
me to the doctors office. We bought the jitterbug quite a few years ago.
At that time she went by cab and used the phone to call one when we were
ready to go home. It has no features other than calling out and receiving
calls. There was one option at the time which we chose not to get, a
section for receiving messages. We had no need for it. This phone just
fine. I grew tired of hearing from others who had more complex needs. With
the exception of Nancy, who only wanted a phone to make and receive calls, I
was deluged by people who couldn’t possibly use it and went on to describe
their smart phones. I offered this phone for others on the list who might
have needs or preferences like my own. My post started a deluge of
contrary preferences. After a time I lost interest in the varieties of
smart phones. These posts were not critical, but after a time made me feel
like an outlier.
Jeff

--
Facebook: elvam2167@...

anyaudio.net: elvam2167

Skype: elvam2167


Re: simple dumb phone

Janet
 

Gene,

Jeff does this because he gets away with it!  Sometimes regardless what the reason might be, sometimes we just need to walk away from our computers.  As humans, we all get angry at times, and we all say things we might not mean, but as humans, we must have and know our limits.  Walk away from the computer, take a deep breath! 

I will be the first to admit as a blind person, wow, it can get extremely frustrating trying to figure out what might be wrong with the computer, and not being able to see on the screen what is going on, but some people take their frustration out on others, but I flat out refuse to take what they throw at me, it’s not going to happen! 

 

Janet

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 4:31 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] simple dumb phone

 

I would advise thinking about whether you really want to write and post something when you are upset.  At times, if I'm annoyed about something, I wait before answering or I may write something and put in in the drafts folder.  There is almost nothing so urgent that it can't be done later.

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 3:52 PM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] simple dumb phone

 

Janet, simply having a bad hair day.  I receive some invaluable assistance on this list.  Thanks for your interest and advice.

Jeff

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of janet gross
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 4:32 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] simple dumb phone

 

Jeff,

I’m not sure what you meant when you said: you wonder if this list was for you? I thought this list was for all of us who have tech questions or who has tech information in which would help someone else, or did you mean to say you wonder if this list was the right list for you? You say this list goes on forever in which is over your head, Jeff, this is a good way to learn by listening to what others have to share  regarding your tech question, but if you don’t want to listen, you will never learn!  Maybe these people who say it is simple and wonderful are trying to encourage you to learn.  You ask for help, but yet, you criticize how you receive it!  You like those who agree with you, but not the others who try to encourage you!  Wow, talk about being greatful!  It sounds like if you don’t get exactly what you asked for, well, you don’t like it!

Janet

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jeffrey Schwartz
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 9:30 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] simple dumb phone

 

Thanks Gerald,

I was wondering if this list is for me.  You are becoming a friend  on the lists to which we belong.  This list goes on forever with topics which are over my head, but a good source of info on learning these damned ribbons.  If I ask someone will help me and ten others will say how simple and wonderful the ribbons are.

Jeff

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gerald Levy
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 10:08 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] simple dumb phone

 

 

Jeff, don’t take it personally.  I have discovered that a lot of tech-savvy blind people look down on the rest of us who may have no interest in using the latest and greatest whiz-bang gadgets.  They have a cavalier and condescending attitude that if you don’t own a smart phone or a Google Home or an Amazon Echo, you are somehow less of a human being.  I don’t let it bother me.  Go ahead and laugh, but my cell phone is a ten-year old refurbished LG 4650 that I picked up from an online seller for only $15.  It still works,and I keep it just for emergencies.  I’m not interested in texting or using it as an alarm clock or GPS device.  And I only pay $40 a year ($10 every four months) to keep it activated with Page Plus Cellular.  And I don’t own a Victor Reader Trek or Stream because I don’t need one,since I am perfectly satisfied with my NLS DTB player, which serves my needs.

 

Gerald

 

 

 

Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 9:35 AM

Subject: [TechTalk] simple dumb phone

 

I am seventy and spent sixty years gradually losing my vision  to RP.  I have been totally blind for ten years.  My wife is virtually an invalid.  We have no need for a smart phone as we are seldom out.  When we go to medical appointments we use an agency to give my wife a shower and take her and or me to the doctors office.  We bought the jitterbug quite a few years ago.  At that time she went by cab and used the phone to call one when we were ready to go home.  It has no features other than calling out and receiving calls.  There was one option at the time which we chose not to get, a section for receiving messages.  We had no need for it.  This phone just fine.  I grew tired of hearing from others who had more complex needs.  With the exception of Nancy, who only wanted a phone to make and receive calls, I was deluged by people who couldn’t possibly use it and went on to describe their smart phones.  I offered this phone for others on the list who might have needs or preferences  like my own.    My post started a deluge of contrary preferences.  After a time I lost interest in the varieties  of smart phones. These posts were not critical, but after a time made me feel like an outlier.

Jeff  


Re: old computers

Eleni Vamvakari <elvam2167@...>
 

I absolutely love that synthesizer! It's the same one used in my old
Language Master and also in the Vert screen reader from Telesensory.
I own two of the Keynote Gold laptops, but I am trying to figure out
why they're not working at the moment. I think it may be the cmos
batteries. They beep when starting up, and then do nothing else. I
tried to bypass autoexec.bat, thinking that perhaps, it's because I
set VocalEyes to use Keynote Voicecard and they're not currently
installed, but that didn't help. I will need to have someone read the
screens to determine the problem. As for the Keynote Companion, I
have wanted one of those, as well as a Keynote Gold SA, since high
school. Sadly, the Commission didn't have either one. I found a
beautiful Companion, with tapes and manuals on Ebay last year, but I
didn't get it because it was a bit expensive and I needed to get a
laptop. I still regret that decision. But I'm sure that it runs a
stripped down version of DOS, as do the laptops, which is a bit
annoying, especially when trying to learn QuickBASIC! I also own an
older product called the Keynote PC. This is another laptop but with
built-in speech. I wish I knew how they did that! It uses a very
different synthesizer from the later ones. Unfortunately, when I got
it, I turned it on, and hit a button, but it then stopped working and
kept asking me to insert the disk. I think that, if I can find the
disk, which I know I have somewhere, I can reinstall the software
successfully. I really want to try this for fun, as it's an antique,
even for me! I think it runs MSDOS 3.3!

On 11/02/2018, Doug Oliver <doliver3183@...> wrote:
who remembers the Keynote gold speech synthesizer working with vocalize and

the old Keynote companion? There was another Keynote gold system that was a

regular laptop sized computer.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Byron Stephens" <bstephens122874@...>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 3:44 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] old computers


I had word perfect on a pentium 166 desktop from 1996, and that thing took

all day to install, incert this disk, swap it out and do another, and the
drive on that thing was very loud.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Pamela Dominguez" <geodom@...>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 1:39 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] old computers


I love wordperfekt 5.1! There is nothing like it! I have never mastered

Word the way I did that program! I also had bought some dos computer
games I used to play. Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Carolyn Arnold
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 3:24 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] old computers

Jim literally loved the Tandy. He is a musician, and did he ever have a
good time with that thing, which was BC - before Carolyn, that is.

I had three 386's on jobs with WordPerfect 5.1. Weren't they fine.

I taught myself WordPerfect with a book called Mastering WordPerfect,
using my Optacon. I never really learned DOS, which is where my husband
has it on me. I try to get him to explain basics to me, and he says I get

it, there are certain tasks to be performed, like copy, paste, cut, save,

set font, just have to learn to do those things on whatever program is
being used. Yet, he knows stuff like our computer guys, can fix problems;

I can't. I can just run one if it works. If it doesn't, I haven't the
slightest idea. I think with DOS I was intimidated, stayed in WordPerfect

whenever I could. On one job we had to get out of wordPerfect and onto a

program called Letterman to upload our work to the client. I don't even
want to go there; thank goodness, that job did not last long for me.

With WordPerfect 5.1, I really liked the macros, have no idea in the
world how to do them with Office 2013, but I don't transcribe now like I

used to do.

I took an afternoon on my job and set up logging macros with my accounts;

there were three or four of them, each with slight differences. With the

programs I made, when dictation started, I could enter the identifying
information in the log, then go right on to chief complaint, preoperative

diagnosis or whatever the beginning of the report would be. The name,
age, date, etc would all be in. I worked on production, so the afternoon

I invested paid off.

On this one, the envelopes never seemed to work right, so I have made
programs for small ones and regular business-sized ones. Incidentally, I

needed to Shift Enter for each line - otherwise, paragraph format,
they're double spaced. I don't like that, but figured how to work around

it, had to do the same thing with my check program.

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf

Of Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Saturday, February 10, 2018 9:26 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] old computers

To those who have previously read my story, I apologise for reposting it.

Please feel free to ignore it.

To put things into perspective, I was born in 1983. The first computer
that I ever used was an Apple IIIE in elementary school. My peers played

games like Number Munchers and the Oregon Trail while I played with Dr.
Pete's Talking Writer and the few games on it, like Space Invaders. I
still have the original, plus a newer one that I received later in life.

One day, at a flee market, Mom bought an Apple IIC. She loved the clicky

keyboard and kept playing with it in the car. She still has it in a
closet, because she knows that it's valuable. Our first family computer

that we really used was an old Tandy 1000 that a friend gave to us. We
played games on it like Sleuth, Wheel of Fortune, Slots, Blackjack,
Monopoly, and Treasure Mountain. But no screen reader was installed on
it. In 1994, a dear friend of the family died, and we inherited her
computer. It was a massive and heavy tower, with a 386 processor, MSDOS
5.0, and Wordperfect 5.1 installed. In 1996 or so, we bought our first
Windows machine, an IBM Abtiva. But I wanted nothing to do with it,
until we started playing games like Silent Steel on it, and I heard it
talk! I was then introduced to JFW 3.7. Eventually, I became interested

in the 386 and fought to learn DOS, though no one would teach it to me,
as it was already obsolete. So I got DOS for Dummies from the New Jersey

Library for the Blind and taught myself. I also learned how to use
VocalEyes, via the manual. This lasted for a while, until one day, the
computer simply stopped working. By the time I was graduated from high
school in 2002, I had collected almost everything that the New Jersey
Commission for the blind had on DOS, from two Keynote Gold laptops (I
think the CMOS battery on each is malfunctioning now), to copies of
VocalEyes, to various speech synthesizers, because no one wanted them.
Knowing that I loved old computers, my high school gave me their Apple
IIGS, along with a printer and paper for it, as a graduation present. I

then bought TextTalker and Proterm from APH (they had only three of one
of the programs left in stock). I still have them, but have never used
them. My parents then bought two desktops (one exclusively for me) from

an Infomercial, and that's how I was introduced to Windows XP, which I
still use to this day. In 2003, I received my first Windows laptop, an HP

Pavilion ZE5385US.
The rest is history. For the record, I still maintain that my Lenovo
X61 is the best computer that I own, other than my new desktop. I'm
still an IBM lover at heart and am not afraid to admit it! *smile*

On 10/02/2018, Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
<ukekearuaro@...> wrote:
Dash, I have no plans to play ball with anything Apple! I like being
able to get into the innards of my toys to see what I can break and or
fix! I don't believe I'll have such luck with anything Apple.
Besides, I have elected to watch my Windows computers DIE NATURALLY;
they won't ever be resuscitated! Android will, over time, become the
only OS with which I shall play ball and I'll be able to use both
touchscreen and keyboards. I also have great rapport with app
developers in Android land.

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado






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Re: simple dumb phone

Janet
 

Jeff,

You need to get a grip on your bad hair day, and stop taking your anger out on the members.  Your being very insulting to the members on this list by saying you have received invaluable help.  I’ve seen many and many of them here go all out of their way just to help you.  They put a great deal of time and effort in helping you, and I’ve seen this over and over.  By right, you should apologize to them for what you are now saying.  I don’t believe they deserve this insult just because you are in a bad mood!  You think you get invaluable help here, but you wouldn’t know half as much as you know now if it wasn’t for the members here, or unless you know more about computers than you are willing to admit. 

Janet

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jeffrey Schwartz
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 3:53 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] simple dumb phone

 

Janet, simply having a bad hair day.  I receive some invaluable assistance on this list.  Thanks for your interest and advice.

Jeff

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of janet gross
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 4:32 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] simple dumb phone

 

Jeff,

I’m not sure what you meant when you said: you wonder if this list was for you? I thought this list was for all of us who have tech questions or who has tech information in which would help someone else, or did you mean to say you wonder if this list was the right list for you? You say this list goes on forever in which is over your head, Jeff, this is a good way to learn by listening to what others have to share  regarding your tech question, but if you don’t want to listen, you will never learn!  Maybe these people who say it is simple and wonderful are trying to encourage you to learn.  You ask for help, but yet, you criticize how you receive it!  You like those who agree with you, but not the others who try to encourage you!  Wow, talk about being greatful!  It sounds like if you don’t get exactly what you asked for, well, you don’t like it!

Janet

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jeffrey Schwartz
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 9:30 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] simple dumb phone

 

Thanks Gerald,

I was wondering if this list is for me.  You are becoming a friend  on the lists to which we belong.  This list goes on forever with topics which are over my head, but a good source of info on learning these damned ribbons.  If I ask someone will help me and ten others will say how simple and wonderful the ribbons are.

Jeff

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gerald Levy
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 10:08 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] simple dumb phone

 

 

Jeff, don’t take it personally.  I have discovered that a lot of tech-savvy blind people look down on the rest of us who may have no interest in using the latest and greatest whiz-bang gadgets.  They have a cavalier and condescending attitude that if you don’t own a smart phone or a Google Home or an Amazon Echo, you are somehow less of a human being.  I don’t let it bother me.  Go ahead and laugh, but my cell phone is a ten-year old refurbished LG 4650 that I picked up from an online seller for only $15.  It still works,and I keep it just for emergencies.  I’m not interested in texting or using it as an alarm clock or GPS device.  And I only pay $40 a year ($10 every four months) to keep it activated with Page Plus Cellular.  And I don’t own a Victor Reader Trek or Stream because I don’t need one,since I am perfectly satisfied with my NLS DTB player, which serves my needs.

 

Gerald

 

 

 

Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 9:35 AM

Subject: [TechTalk] simple dumb phone

 

I am seventy and spent sixty years gradually losing my vision  to RP.  I have been totally blind for ten years.  My wife is virtually an invalid.  We have no need for a smart phone as we are seldom out.  When we go to medical appointments we use an agency to give my wife a shower and take her and or me to the doctors office.  We bought the jitterbug quite a few years ago.  At that time she went by cab and used the phone to call one when we were ready to go home.  It has no features other than calling out and receiving calls.  There was one option at the time which we chose not to get, a section for receiving messages.  We had no need for it.  This phone just fine.  I grew tired of hearing from others who had more complex needs.  With the exception of Nancy, who only wanted a phone to make and receive calls, I was deluged by people who couldn’t possibly use it and went on to describe their smart phones.  I offered this phone for others on the list who might have needs or preferences  like my own.    My post started a deluge of contrary preferences.  After a time I lost interest in the varieties  of smart phones. These posts were not critical, but after a time made me feel like an outlier.

Jeff  


Re: old computers

Doug Oliver
 

who remembers the Keynote gold speech synthesizer working with vocalize and the old Keynote companion? There was another Keynote gold system that was a regular laptop sized computer.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Byron Stephens" <bstephens122874@...>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 3:44 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] old computers


I had word perfect on a pentium 166 desktop from 1996, and that thing took all day to install, incert this disk, swap it out and do another, and the drive on that thing was very loud.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Pamela Dominguez" <geodom@...>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 1:39 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] old computers


I love wordperfekt 5.1! There is nothing like it! I have never mastered Word the way I did that program! I also had bought some dos computer games I used to play. Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Carolyn Arnold
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 3:24 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] old computers

Jim literally loved the Tandy. He is a musician, and did he ever have a good time with that thing, which was BC - before Carolyn, that is.

I had three 386's on jobs with WordPerfect 5.1. Weren't they fine.

I taught myself WordPerfect with a book called Mastering WordPerfect, using my Optacon. I never really learned DOS, which is where my husband has it on me. I try to get him to explain basics to me, and he says I get it, there are certain tasks to be performed, like copy, paste, cut, save, set font, just have to learn to do those things on whatever program is being used. Yet, he knows stuff like our computer guys, can fix problems; I can't. I can just run one if it works. If it doesn't, I haven't the slightest idea. I think with DOS I was intimidated, stayed in WordPerfect whenever I could. On one job we had to get out of wordPerfect and onto a program called Letterman to upload our work to the client. I don't even want to go there; thank goodness, that job did not last long for me.

With WordPerfect 5.1, I really liked the macros, have no idea in the world how to do them with Office 2013, but I don't transcribe now like I used to do.

I took an afternoon on my job and set up logging macros with my accounts; there were three or four of them, each with slight differences. With the programs I made, when dictation started, I could enter the identifying information in the log, then go right on to chief complaint, preoperative diagnosis or whatever the beginning of the report would be. The name, age, date, etc would all be in. I worked on production, so the afternoon I invested paid off.

On this one, the envelopes never seemed to work right, so I have made programs for small ones and regular business-sized ones. Incidentally, I needed to Shift Enter for each line - otherwise, paragraph format, they're double spaced. I don't like that, but figured how to work around it, had to do the same thing with my check program.

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Saturday, February 10, 2018 9:26 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] old computers

To those who have previously read my story, I apologise for reposting it. Please feel free to ignore it.

To put things into perspective, I was born in 1983. The first computer that I ever used was an Apple IIIE in elementary school. My peers played games like Number Munchers and the Oregon Trail while I played with Dr. Pete's Talking Writer and the few games on it, like Space Invaders. I still have the original, plus a newer one that I received later in life. One day, at a flee market, Mom bought an Apple IIC. She loved the clicky keyboard and kept playing with it in the car. She still has it in a closet, because she knows that it's valuable. Our first family computer that we really used was an old Tandy 1000 that a friend gave to us. We played games on it like Sleuth, Wheel of Fortune, Slots, Blackjack, Monopoly, and Treasure Mountain. But no screen reader was installed on it. In 1994, a dear friend of the family died, and we inherited her computer. It was a massive and heavy tower, with a 386 processor, MSDOS 5.0, and Wordperfect 5.1 installed. In 1996 or so, we bought our first Windows machine, an IBM Abtiva. But I wanted nothing to do with it, until we started playing games like Silent Steel on it, and I heard it talk! I was then introduced to JFW 3.7. Eventually, I became interested in the 386 and fought to learn DOS, though no one would teach it to me, as it was already obsolete. So I got DOS for Dummies from the New Jersey Library for the Blind and taught myself. I also learned how to use VocalEyes, via the manual. This lasted for a while, until one day, the computer simply stopped working. By the time I was graduated from high school in 2002, I had collected almost everything that the New Jersey Commission for the blind had on DOS, from two Keynote Gold laptops (I think the CMOS battery on each is malfunctioning now), to copies of VocalEyes, to various speech synthesizers, because no one wanted them. Knowing that I loved old computers, my high school gave me their Apple IIGS, along with a printer and paper for it, as a graduation present. I then bought TextTalker and Proterm from APH (they had only three of one of the programs left in stock). I still have them, but have never used them. My parents then bought two desktops (one exclusively for me) from an Infomercial, and that's how I was introduced to Windows XP, which I still use to this day. In 2003, I received my first Windows laptop, an HP Pavilion ZE5385US.
The rest is history. For the record, I still maintain that my Lenovo
X61 is the best computer that I own, other than my new desktop. I'm still an IBM lover at heart and am not afraid to admit it! *smile*

On 10/02/2018, Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
<ukekearuaro@...> wrote:
Dash, I have no plans to play ball with anything Apple! I like being
able to get into the innards of my toys to see what I can break and or
fix! I don't believe I'll have such luck with anything Apple.
Besides, I have elected to watch my Windows computers DIE NATURALLY;
they won't ever be resuscitated! Android will, over time, become the
only OS with which I shall play ball and I'll be able to use both
touchscreen and keyboards. I also have great rapport with app developers in Android land.

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado






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This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com





Re: guitar tuning apps?

Patrick Ford
 

Thanks, yes that is the name. Sadly it is not for iPads. Bummer. Thank you though.

 

Come Join The Group

ScripturePassage-subscribe@...

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jeremy
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 3:17 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] guitar tuning apps?

 

Hi,
I can't recall what the name of it was off hand, but there was a pretty decent one that I used to use on IOS, something like talking tuner, perhaps. I'd herd that it wasn't the most accurate, but it was good enough to get things sounding pretty decent to my untrained ears. lol
I don't know if it's still in the app store though, but I'd definitely give it a look.
Take care.

On 2/11/2018 10:32 AM, Patrick Ford wrote:

Hi,

Any recommendations on accessible guitar tuning apps? Also, I just learned about an accessible guitar chord page which is terrific. Search for accessible guitar chords which will bring you to standard guitar …great site …easy to use …

Patrick

 

Come Join The Group

ScripturePassage-subscribe@...

 

 


Re: guitar tuning apps?

Patrick Ford
 

Thanks. Sadly, Talking Tuner is not in the app store for iPads. Bummer. I was told about one called Poly Tune, I think this is the name.

Thanks everyone for helping out.

Patrick

 

Come Join The Group

ScripturePassage-subscribe@...

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Rich De Steno
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 3:24 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] guitar tuning apps?

 

I use Talking Tuner almost every day.  It was about a dollar or two when I purchased it about two years ago.  It is accurate in my opinion.

 

On 2/11/2018 3:16 PM, Jeremy wrote:

Hi,
I can't recall what the name of it was off hand, but there was a pretty decent one that I used to use on IOS, something like talking tuner, perhaps. I'd herd that it wasn't the most accurate, but it was good enough to get things sounding pretty decent to my untrained ears. lol
I don't know if it's still in the app store though, but I'd definitely give it a look.
Take care.

On 2/11/2018 10:32 AM, Patrick Ford wrote:

Hi,

Any recommendations on accessible guitar tuning apps? Also, I just learned about an accessible guitar chord page which is terrific. Search for accessible guitar chords which will bring you to standard guitar …great site …easy to use …

Patrick

 

Come Join The Group

ScripturePassage-subscribe@...

 

 



-- 
Rich De Steno


vipre anti-virus question

Dennis L <dennisl1982@...>
 

Hi, can you see what is in quarantine and delete it or move it to safe using Jaws?


Re: Modernising an Old Computer

Eleni Vamvakari <elvam2167@...>
 

I keep thinking about what you said, Steve. I wish that i had been
able to spend more time using that computer. But I brought it home
and never was able to set it up. There may have been something wrong
with it. I don't remember. But now, I am trying to determine if it
was, in fact, a convertable! I never even thought of that! I have
always liked that form factor as well. But I thought that, when a
convertable was upright, it was very large, like a regular tower or
even a mini tower. Basically, it couldn't sit on a desk in that
position. Maybe, when I saw it, though, it was flat, but still higher
than my Abtiva, which is why the image in my mind confuses me. I was
told that they were taller than the cases made today, which is why
they could accomodate both floppy drives. I think the 5.25 floppy was
horizontal and the 3.5 was vertical. But I remember it being
relatively narrow and short. In any case, I know that Dell made a few
very interesting convertables. I was considering buying one before I
purchased this new desktop. The thing that made me decide against it
is that it would be very difficult for someone to work on it, and I
wanted a removable hard drive. It's difficult to fit all sorts of
ports and slots into one of those machines, but the result is great
when it works.

On 11/02/2018, Eleni Vamvakari <elvam2167@...> wrote:
My serial port is for when I wish to use DOS with a synthesizer,
though right now, I am using a virtual machine and NVDA. My parallel
port is for when I wish to use my Braille Blazer embosser or the dot
matrix printer that I intend on buying. So yes, I do need both. I
never use floppies in Windows, but in this virtual machine, having to
create iso files to load them into DOS is driving me crazy! I want a
floppy drive so that I can simply load the files and save them to
directories normally. I like things built into machines. I'm not one
for adding all sorts of external devices, except for thumb drives,
speakers, keyboards, and microphones, the latter two only on desktops.
My idea of a desktop is one where everything is built-in. I recently
bought a new one, with XP and 7 installed, and it does have serial and
parallel, though on psi cards. I'm trying to figure out if that is
why it is not working with my Braille Blazer.

I have absolutely no interest, whatsoever, in using Windows 10. I am
an XP and 7 user, and I own several machines with each. I am now
beginning to use DOS again. This desktop was an experiment. I just
wanted to see if it could be done. The project about which I am truly
serious is my custom umpc on which I most certainly am not asking for
these extra ports, etc. There, I am mostly concerned with size,
speed, and good battery life.

As for my old machine, it runs MSDOS and Windows 3.1. I haven't seen
it in years. It's in the attic. I just wanted to know if I could get
that kind of form factor and connections on a custom machine.

I have a love-hate relationship with Windows 7. I try to use it only
when necessary. My main issues are UAC, permissions (not only for
running programs, but for accessing certain folders), ribbons,
libraries, save dialogue boxes, copy/paste, search (last three all
compared to XP), and the constant "program is not responding" error.
Some of them I can eliminate and others I cannot.

On 11/02/2018, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
I'm not sure what you are referring to by relearn everything. I doubt
there
is that much to relearn unless you want to do more with Windows 10 and
you
can learn more regarding new features. Of course, there are changes you
need to know but when I switched from XP to Windows 7, I didn't have to
learn much to use the Windows 7 machine mostly as though it were XP. I
could do most things in the same way or almost the same way. I learned
more
because I was curious and some features of Windows 7 are very convenient
and
useful. But my point is that I didn't have to. If I still wanted to do
those certain things in the less convenient XP way, I could have. And I
suspect that with Windows 10, the same is generally true. Of course
there
will be more changes but a lot of what was done in XP I still expect can
be
done in the same or similar ways. Ribbons in the Windows interface
represent new learning but I expect that, unless you are going to use
apps,
not just programs, that that would be the major learning for those who
want
to use it and want to use it as they did XP, or at least until they
wanted
to learn more.

When I need to get a Windows 10 machine, I'll see if I'm right. I have
no
need for one now. If I'm wrong, I can count on being corrected. But
when
I've made similar comments in the past, I received one or two comments
agreeing and I don't recall getting any disagreeing comments.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Steve Matzura
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 8:54 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Modernising an Old Computer


On re-reading your message, I have some more thoughts.


Most of what I originally wrote regarding a small form-factor machine
still holds. Such systems do exist, but none that will run anything as
old as you mentioned. If you're willing to totally relearn almost
everything you know because what you know is quite old, then ignore
everything I said in my previous message about sticking with XP.


You can get a very modern small form factor system for very little
money, on the order of a few hundred dollars or so. It won't look or
feel like your old friend, but it *will* run rings around it. Minus the
media, of course. Although even that may be possible by purchasing USB
floppy drives, if you can find them these days. There are even
USB-to-serial/parallel converters out there if you still need that
capability, but under Windows 10, I'm dubious of that support.


Bottom line: I don't think you'll need to custom-build a rig if you're
willing to give up that old case. Remember, it's not about the box, it's
about the rocks. The stuff in the box, that is.

On 2/10/2018 9:39 PM, Eleni Vamvakari wrote:
Many years ago, my former friend gave me a computer that I had loved
since the moment I touched it. Sadly, I don't know the model. Maybe,
someone here can help me. I do know that it says IBM Insight. I am
guessing that it's a 486. It has DOS and Windows 3.1 installed on it,
along with both a 3.5 and a 5.25 floppy, plus a cd rom, and serial
and parallel ports. It has the best form factor that I have ever seen
in a desktop. It isn't a tower, needing to sit on the floor, nor is
it flat. It is vertical but could fit easily on a desk. I know that
IBM sometimes made their own case sizes, so perhaps, this is one of
those.

Please keep in mind that I know absolutely nothing about building
computers, but I have heard of this being done with umpcs. If someone
were to gut the machine, removing it's insides, except for the disk
drives, and keeping the case, could it be modernised with a new hard
drive, motherboard, chips, cpu, memory, usb ports, etc? If not, could
the design of the case be used as the basis for a new machine built
from scratch? Can motherboards be completely custom-made to include
new and old technology? When I say new, I don't mean according to the
standards of 2018. These components must work with Windows XP? Is
there a more modern computer with a similar form factor that could
possibly be updated?

Thanks,
Eleni



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Facebook: elvam2167@...

anyaudio.net: elvam2167

Skype: elvam2167



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Facebook: elvam2167@...

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Skype: elvam2167


Re: simple dumb phone

Gene
 

I would advise thinking about whether you really want to write and post something when you are upset.  At times, if I'm annoyed about something, I wait before answering or I may write something and put in in the drafts folder.  There is almost nothing so urgent that it can't be done later.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 3:52 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] simple dumb phone

Janet, simply having a bad hair day.  I receive some invaluable assistance on this list.  Thanks for your interest and advice.

Jeff

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of janet gross
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 4:32 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] simple dumb phone

 

Jeff,

I’m not sure what you meant when you said: you wonder if this list was for you? I thought this list was for all of us who have tech questions or who has tech information in which would help someone else, or did you mean to say you wonder if this list was the right list for you? You say this list goes on forever in which is over your head, Jeff, this is a good way to learn by listening to what others have to share  regarding your tech question, but if you don’t want to listen, you will never learn!  Maybe these people who say it is simple and wonderful are trying to encourage you to learn.  You ask for help, but yet, you criticize how you receive it!  You like those who agree with you, but not the others who try to encourage you!  Wow, talk about being greatful!  It sounds like if you don’t get exactly what you asked for, well, you don’t like it!

Janet

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jeffrey Schwartz
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 9:30 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] simple dumb phone

 

Thanks Gerald,

I was wondering if this list is for me.  You are becoming a friend  on the lists to which we belong.  This list goes on forever with topics which are over my head, but a good source of info on learning these damned ribbons.  If I ask someone will help me and ten others will say how simple and wonderful the ribbons are.

Jeff

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gerald Levy
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 10:08 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] simple dumb phone

 

 

Jeff, don’t take it personally.  I have discovered that a lot of tech-savvy blind people look down on the rest of us who may have no interest in using the latest and greatest whiz-bang gadgets.  They have a cavalier and condescending attitude that if you don’t own a smart phone or a Google Home or an Amazon Echo, you are somehow less of a human being.  I don’t let it bother me.  Go ahead and laugh, but my cell phone is a ten-year old refurbished LG 4650 that I picked up from an online seller for only $15.  It still works,and I keep it just for emergencies.  I’m not interested in texting or using it as an alarm clock or GPS device.  And I only pay $40 a year ($10 every four months) to keep it activated with Page Plus Cellular.  And I don’t own a Victor Reader Trek or Stream because I don’t need one,since I am perfectly satisfied with my NLS DTB player, which serves my needs.

 

Gerald

 

 

 

Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 9:35 AM

Subject: [TechTalk] simple dumb phone

 

I am seventy and spent sixty years gradually losing my vision  to RP.  I have been totally blind for ten years.  My wife is virtually an invalid.  We have no need for a smart phone as we are seldom out.  When we go to medical appointments we use an agency to give my wife a shower and take her and or me to the doctors office.  We bought the jitterbug quite a few years ago.  At that time she went by cab and used the phone to call one when we were ready to go home.  It has no features other than calling out and receiving calls.  There was one option at the time which we chose not to get, a section for receiving messages.  We had no need for it.  This phone just fine.  I grew tired of hearing from others who had more complex needs.  With the exception of Nancy, who only wanted a phone to make and receive calls, I was deluged by people who couldn’t possibly use it and went on to describe their smart phones.  I offered this phone for others on the list who might have needs or preferences  like my own.    My post started a deluge of contrary preferences.  After a time I lost interest in the varieties  of smart phones. These posts were not critical, but after a time made me feel like an outlier.

Jeff  


Re: simple dumb phone

Eleni Vamvakari <elvam2167@...>
 

I have had similar issues when asking about Symbian (an older
operating system for phones). Everyone kept talking about Android and
IOS, and only a few people actually tried to answer my questions.
They do the same with Windows, mentioning 10 when I ask about XP or 7,
though to far less of a degree. I guess some people are just
passionate about such things. But overall, it's a great list,
composed of very helpful people.

On 11/02/2018, Jeffrey Schwartz <jeffreyschwartz0238@...> wrote:
Janet, simply having a bad hair day. I receive some invaluable assistance
on this list. Thanks for your interest and advice.

Jeff



From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
janet gross
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 4:32 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] simple dumb phone



Jeff,

I’m not sure what you meant when you said: you wonder if this list was for
you? I thought this list was for all of us who have tech questions or who
has tech information in which would help someone else, or did you mean to
say you wonder if this list was the right list for you? You say this list
goes on forever in which is over your head, Jeff, this is a good way to
learn by listening to what others have to share regarding your tech
question, but if you don’t want to listen, you will never learn! Maybe
these people who say it is simple and wonderful are trying to encourage you
to learn. You ask for help, but yet, you criticize how you receive it! You
like those who agree with you, but not the others who try to encourage you!
Wow, talk about being greatful! It sounds like if you don’t get exactly
what you asked for, well, you don’t like it!

Janet





From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jeffrey Schwartz
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 9:30 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] simple dumb phone



Thanks Gerald,

I was wondering if this list is for me. You are becoming a friend on the
lists to which we belong. This list goes on forever with topics which are
over my head, but a good source of info on learning these damned ribbons.
If I ask someone will help me and ten others will say how simple and
wonderful the ribbons are.

Jeff



From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gerald Levy
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 10:08 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] simple dumb phone





Jeff, don’t take it personally. I have discovered that a lot of tech-savvy
blind people look down on the rest of us who may have no interest in using
the latest and greatest whiz-bang gadgets. They have a cavalier and
condescending attitude that if you don’t own a smart phone or a Google Home
or an Amazon Echo, you are somehow less of a human being. I don’t let it
bother me. Go ahead and laugh, but my cell phone is a ten-year old
refurbished LG 4650 that I picked up from an online seller for only $15. It
still works,and I keep it just for emergencies. I’m not interested in
texting or using it as an alarm clock or GPS device. And I only pay $40 a
year ($10 every four months) to keep it activated with Page Plus Cellular.
And I don’t own a Victor Reader Trek or Stream because I don’t need
one,since I am perfectly satisfied with my NLS DTB player, which serves my
needs.



Gerald







From: Jeffrey Schwartz <mailto:jeffreyschwartz0238@...>

Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 9:35 AM

To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>

Subject: [TechTalk] simple dumb phone



I am seventy and spent sixty years gradually losing my vision to RP. I
have been totally blind for ten years. My wife is virtually an invalid. We
have no need for a smart phone as we are seldom out. When we go to medical
appointments we use an agency to give my wife a shower and take her and or
me to the doctors office. We bought the jitterbug quite a few years ago.
At that time she went by cab and used the phone to call one when we were
ready to go home. It has no features other than calling out and receiving
calls. There was one option at the time which we chose not to get, a
section for receiving messages. We had no need for it. This phone just
fine. I grew tired of hearing from others who had more complex needs. With
the exception of Nancy, who only wanted a phone to make and receive calls, I
was deluged by people who couldn’t possibly use it and went on to describe
their smart phones. I offered this phone for others on the list who might
have needs or preferences like my own. My post started a deluge of
contrary preferences. After a time I lost interest in the varieties of
smart phones. These posts were not critical, but after a time made me feel
like an outlier.

Jeff



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Re: DIY Tiny Laptop

Eleni Vamvakari <elvam2167@...>
 

Since there were some responses to my question regarding modernising
an old machine, or at least, case, I have decided to write here again.
The previous post was mostly out of curiosity, but I am serious about
a umpc. Given my specifications at the beginning of this thread, can
it be done, and how much would it cost? I will repost my
specifications here if requested to do so, but I don't wish to clutter
the list, since they are in the same discussion.

Thanks,
Eleni

On 24/01/2018, Eleni Vamvakari <elvam2167@...> wrote:
Oh, it can definitely be done with a desktop. There is no doubt about
that at all, as many people do it. It can also be done with a regular
laptop. Things become more difficult, however, when dealing with a
umpc, because of needing to keep it cool, finding smaller components,
choosing a processor that can work with the above and still be
relatively fast, etc.

On 24/01/2018, Sharon Hooley <shooley42@...> wrote:
My brother-in-law used at least one part from Ebay on a dektop some years
back. Someday we might be able to easily snap together what parts we
want
in a desktop, so maybe down the road it might work for a laptop as you
described.

On Jan 24, 2018, at 7:15 PM, Eleni Vamvakari <elvam2167@...>
wrote:

So would I! This is driving me crazy! I can't find a prebuilt one,
so I may have to go the custom route. But first, I need to find
someone who is willing to do this for me at a reasonable price, and
second, I need to find the necessary hardware. It doesn't have to be
new. Older hardware will keep the price relatively low, unless we
work with cheap components. But I still want something of decent
quality.

On 24/01/2018, Sharon Hooley <shooley42@...> wrote:
Wow, I’d like to hear your followup on this!


On Jan 24, 2018, at 3:26 PM, Eleni Vamvakari <elvam2167@...>
wrote:

I have recently been reading about DIY laptops and portable devices.
These are homemade machines, usually composed of parts from
professional ones that result in something entirely different. For
years, I have wanted a custom handheld computer. Call it a umpc, a
palmtop, or a tiny laptop, but not a mid or a netbook, because while I
like those, I want to get away from the slow Atom processors, and I
want something a bit smaller than the 10.1 inch screen. At any rate,
while I have written about it here several times, I never pursued it
seriously, because I thought it would cost thousands of dollars. Now,
however, I wish to reexamine my options, as some of these homemade
computers are quite cheap. Can anyone tell me, once and for all, how
much a machine with the below specifications might cost, minus the
labour? I don't see why this can't be made, particularly if a
preexisting umpc or pda could be gutted and modern hardware could be
installed.

Specifications

Note. (see Fujitsu Lifebook UH900 for perfect size, keyboard, and
placement of pointing nub. It measures nine inches across (including
bezel) but only four inches from top to bottom when closed.)

Form Factor:
clamshell

Screen Size:
5 in. to 8.9 in.

Screen:
regular, not touchscreen

Weight:
3 lbs or less with battery

Hard Drive:
traditional, unless solid state will last for over five years)

Hard Drive Capacity:
60 to 160GB

Ram:
2GB (minimum) 4GB (preferred)

Processor:
dual core (minimum)

Processor Speed:
1.6ghz (minimum, 2ghz or more preferred)

Battery type:
lithium ion, or anything that lacks memory issues and lasts long

Battery Life:
5 hours (minimum)

Keyboard:
US. must have page up-down, home, end, and delete (either separately
or via function key), two alts, Windows, and Applications keys

Pointing Device
no touchpad, or must be easily disabled

Connectivity:
2 usb 2.0 ports (minimum)
wireless b/g/n (on-off switch included)
1 microphone jack
1 headphone jack

Sound:
built-in speaker (can be mono or stereo)
built-in microphone (high quality if possible)

Webcam:
if included, should either have easy-to-feel/cover lens (Acer Aspire
One D270 good example, UH900 bad) or sliding cover)

Operating System:
Windows XP 32-Bit SP3 with updates (disks with several licenses owned)
Linux as dual boot (either Ubuntu or Vinux) if using hard drive larger
than 160gb

Recovery:
on disks or as separate partition in drive (If on disks, NVDA should
be slipstreamed into the files)

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Re: simple dumb phone

Jeffrey Schwartz
 

Janet, simply having a bad hair day.  I receive some invaluable assistance on this list.  Thanks for your interest and advice.

Jeff

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of janet gross
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 4:32 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] simple dumb phone

 

Jeff,

I’m not sure what you meant when you said: you wonder if this list was for you? I thought this list was for all of us who have tech questions or who has tech information in which would help someone else, or did you mean to say you wonder if this list was the right list for you? You say this list goes on forever in which is over your head, Jeff, this is a good way to learn by listening to what others have to share  regarding your tech question, but if you don’t want to listen, you will never learn!  Maybe these people who say it is simple and wonderful are trying to encourage you to learn.  You ask for help, but yet, you criticize how you receive it!  You like those who agree with you, but not the others who try to encourage you!  Wow, talk about being greatful!  It sounds like if you don’t get exactly what you asked for, well, you don’t like it!

Janet

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jeffrey Schwartz
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 9:30 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] simple dumb phone

 

Thanks Gerald,

I was wondering if this list is for me.  You are becoming a friend  on the lists to which we belong.  This list goes on forever with topics which are over my head, but a good source of info on learning these damned ribbons.  If I ask someone will help me and ten others will say how simple and wonderful the ribbons are.

Jeff

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gerald Levy
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 10:08 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] simple dumb phone

 

 

Jeff, don’t take it personally.  I have discovered that a lot of tech-savvy blind people look down on the rest of us who may have no interest in using the latest and greatest whiz-bang gadgets.  They have a cavalier and condescending attitude that if you don’t own a smart phone or a Google Home or an Amazon Echo, you are somehow less of a human being.  I don’t let it bother me.  Go ahead and laugh, but my cell phone is a ten-year old refurbished LG 4650 that I picked up from an online seller for only $15.  It still works,and I keep it just for emergencies.  I’m not interested in texting or using it as an alarm clock or GPS device.  And I only pay $40 a year ($10 every four months) to keep it activated with Page Plus Cellular.  And I don’t own a Victor Reader Trek or Stream because I don’t need one,since I am perfectly satisfied with my NLS DTB player, which serves my needs.

 

Gerald

 

 

 

Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 9:35 AM

Subject: [TechTalk] simple dumb phone

 

I am seventy and spent sixty years gradually losing my vision  to RP.  I have been totally blind for ten years.  My wife is virtually an invalid.  We have no need for a smart phone as we are seldom out.  When we go to medical appointments we use an agency to give my wife a shower and take her and or me to the doctors office.  We bought the jitterbug quite a few years ago.  At that time she went by cab and used the phone to call one when we were ready to go home.  It has no features other than calling out and receiving calls.  There was one option at the time which we chose not to get, a section for receiving messages.  We had no need for it.  This phone just fine.  I grew tired of hearing from others who had more complex needs.  With the exception of Nancy, who only wanted a phone to make and receive calls, I was deluged by people who couldn’t possibly use it and went on to describe their smart phones.  I offered this phone for others on the list who might have needs or preferences  like my own.    My post started a deluge of contrary preferences.  After a time I lost interest in the varieties  of smart phones. These posts were not critical, but after a time made me feel like an outlier.

Jeff  


Re: Modernising an Old Computer

Eleni Vamvakari <elvam2167@...>
 

My serial port is for when I wish to use DOS with a synthesizer,
though right now, I am using a virtual machine and NVDA. My parallel
port is for when I wish to use my Braille Blazer embosser or the dot
matrix printer that I intend on buying. So yes, I do need both. I
never use floppies in Windows, but in this virtual machine, having to
create iso files to load them into DOS is driving me crazy! I want a
floppy drive so that I can simply load the files and save them to
directories normally. I like things built into machines. I'm not one
for adding all sorts of external devices, except for thumb drives,
speakers, keyboards, and microphones, the latter two only on desktops.
My idea of a desktop is one where everything is built-in. I recently
bought a new one, with XP and 7 installed, and it does have serial and
parallel, though on psi cards. I'm trying to figure out if that is
why it is not working with my Braille Blazer.

I have absolutely no interest, whatsoever, in using Windows 10. I am
an XP and 7 user, and I own several machines with each. I am now
beginning to use DOS again. This desktop was an experiment. I just
wanted to see if it could be done. The project about which I am truly
serious is my custom umpc on which I most certainly am not asking for
these extra ports, etc. There, I am mostly concerned with size,
speed, and good battery life.

As for my old machine, it runs MSDOS and Windows 3.1. I haven't seen
it in years. It's in the attic. I just wanted to know if I could get
that kind of form factor and connections on a custom machine.

I have a love-hate relationship with Windows 7. I try to use it only
when necessary. My main issues are UAC, permissions (not only for
running programs, but for accessing certain folders), ribbons,
libraries, save dialogue boxes, copy/paste, search (last three all
compared to XP), and the constant "program is not responding" error.
Some of them I can eliminate and others I cannot.

On 11/02/2018, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
I'm not sure what you are referring to by relearn everything. I doubt there
is that much to relearn unless you want to do more with Windows 10 and you
can learn more regarding new features. Of course, there are changes you
need to know but when I switched from XP to Windows 7, I didn't have to
learn much to use the Windows 7 machine mostly as though it were XP. I
could do most things in the same way or almost the same way. I learned more
because I was curious and some features of Windows 7 are very convenient and
useful. But my point is that I didn't have to. If I still wanted to do
those certain things in the less convenient XP way, I could have. And I
suspect that with Windows 10, the same is generally true. Of course there
will be more changes but a lot of what was done in XP I still expect can be
done in the same or similar ways. Ribbons in the Windows interface
represent new learning but I expect that, unless you are going to use apps,
not just programs, that that would be the major learning for those who want
to use it and want to use it as they did XP, or at least until they wanted
to learn more.

When I need to get a Windows 10 machine, I'll see if I'm right. I have no
need for one now. If I'm wrong, I can count on being corrected. But when
I've made similar comments in the past, I received one or two comments
agreeing and I don't recall getting any disagreeing comments.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Steve Matzura
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 8:54 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Modernising an Old Computer


On re-reading your message, I have some more thoughts.


Most of what I originally wrote regarding a small form-factor machine
still holds. Such systems do exist, but none that will run anything as
old as you mentioned. If you're willing to totally relearn almost
everything you know because what you know is quite old, then ignore
everything I said in my previous message about sticking with XP.


You can get a very modern small form factor system for very little
money, on the order of a few hundred dollars or so. It won't look or
feel like your old friend, but it *will* run rings around it. Minus the
media, of course. Although even that may be possible by purchasing USB
floppy drives, if you can find them these days. There are even
USB-to-serial/parallel converters out there if you still need that
capability, but under Windows 10, I'm dubious of that support.


Bottom line: I don't think you'll need to custom-build a rig if you're
willing to give up that old case. Remember, it's not about the box, it's
about the rocks. The stuff in the box, that is.

On 2/10/2018 9:39 PM, Eleni Vamvakari wrote:
Many years ago, my former friend gave me a computer that I had loved
since the moment I touched it. Sadly, I don't know the model. Maybe,
someone here can help me. I do know that it says IBM Insight. I am
guessing that it's a 486. It has DOS and Windows 3.1 installed on it,
along with both a 3.5 and a 5.25 floppy, plus a cd rom, and serial
and parallel ports. It has the best form factor that I have ever seen
in a desktop. It isn't a tower, needing to sit on the floor, nor is
it flat. It is vertical but could fit easily on a desk. I know that
IBM sometimes made their own case sizes, so perhaps, this is one of
those.

Please keep in mind that I know absolutely nothing about building
computers, but I have heard of this being done with umpcs. If someone
were to gut the machine, removing it's insides, except for the disk
drives, and keeping the case, could it be modernised with a new hard
drive, motherboard, chips, cpu, memory, usb ports, etc? If not, could
the design of the case be used as the basis for a new machine built
from scratch? Can motherboards be completely custom-made to include
new and old technology? When I say new, I don't mean according to the
standards of 2018. These components must work with Windows XP? Is
there a more modern computer with a similar form factor that could
possibly be updated?

Thanks,
Eleni


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Re: old computers

Byron Stephens
 

I had word perfect on a pentium 166 desktop from 1996, and that thing took all day to install, incert this disk, swap it out and do another, and the drive on that thing was very loud.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Pamela Dominguez" <geodom@...>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 1:39 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] old computers


I love wordperfekt 5.1! There is nothing like it! I have never mastered Word the way I did that program! I also had bought some dos computer games I used to play. Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Carolyn Arnold
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 3:24 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] old computers

Jim literally loved the Tandy. He is a musician, and did he ever have a good time with that thing, which was BC - before Carolyn, that is.

I had three 386's on jobs with WordPerfect 5.1. Weren't they fine.

I taught myself WordPerfect with a book called Mastering WordPerfect, using my Optacon. I never really learned DOS, which is where my husband has it on me. I try to get him to explain basics to me, and he says I get it, there are certain tasks to be performed, like copy, paste, cut, save, set font, just have to learn to do those things on whatever program is being used. Yet, he knows stuff like our computer guys, can fix problems; I can't. I can just run one if it works. If it doesn't, I haven't the slightest idea. I think with DOS I was intimidated, stayed in WordPerfect whenever I could. On one job we had to get out of wordPerfect and onto a program called Letterman to upload our work to the client. I don't even want to go there; thank goodness, that job did not last long for me.

With WordPerfect 5.1, I really liked the macros, have no idea in the world how to do them with Office 2013, but I don't transcribe now like I used to do.

I took an afternoon on my job and set up logging macros with my accounts; there were three or four of them, each with slight differences. With the programs I made, when dictation started, I could enter the identifying information in the log, then go right on to chief complaint, preoperative diagnosis or whatever the beginning of the report would be. The name, age, date, etc would all be in. I worked on production, so the afternoon I invested paid off.

On this one, the envelopes never seemed to work right, so I have made programs for small ones and regular business-sized ones. Incidentally, I needed to Shift Enter for each line - otherwise, paragraph format, they're double spaced. I don't like that, but figured how to work around it, had to do the same thing with my check program.

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Saturday, February 10, 2018 9:26 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] old computers

To those who have previously read my story, I apologise for reposting it. Please feel free to ignore it.

To put things into perspective, I was born in 1983. The first computer that I ever used was an Apple IIIE in elementary school. My peers played games like Number Munchers and the Oregon Trail while I played with Dr. Pete's Talking Writer and the few games on it, like Space Invaders. I still have the original, plus a newer one that I received later in life. One day, at a flee market, Mom bought an Apple IIC. She loved the clicky keyboard and kept playing with it in the car. She still has it in a closet, because she knows that it's valuable. Our first family computer that we really used was an old Tandy 1000 that a friend gave to us. We played games on it like Sleuth, Wheel of Fortune, Slots, Blackjack, Monopoly, and Treasure Mountain. But no screen reader was installed on it. In 1994, a dear friend of the family died, and we inherited her computer. It was a massive and heavy tower, with a 386 processor, MSDOS 5.0, and Wordperfect 5.1 installed. In 1996 or so, we bought our first Windows machine, an IBM Abtiva. But I wanted nothing to do with it, until we started playing games like Silent Steel on it, and I heard it talk! I was then introduced to JFW 3.7. Eventually, I became interested in the 386 and fought to learn DOS, though no one would teach it to me, as it was already obsolete. So I got DOS for Dummies from the New Jersey Library for the Blind and taught myself. I also learned how to use VocalEyes, via the manual. This lasted for a while, until one day, the computer simply stopped working. By the time I was graduated from high school in 2002, I had collected almost everything that the New Jersey Commission for the blind had on DOS, from two Keynote Gold laptops (I think the CMOS battery on each is malfunctioning now), to copies of VocalEyes, to various speech synthesizers, because no one wanted them. Knowing that I loved old computers, my high school gave me their Apple IIGS, along with a printer and paper for it, as a graduation present. I then bought TextTalker and Proterm from APH (they had only three of one of the programs left in stock). I still have them, but have never used them. My parents then bought two desktops (one exclusively for me) from an Infomercial, and that's how I was introduced to Windows XP, which I still use to this day. In 2003, I received my first Windows laptop, an HP Pavilion ZE5385US.
The rest is history. For the record, I still maintain that my Lenovo
X61 is the best computer that I own, other than my new desktop. I'm still an IBM lover at heart and am not afraid to admit it! *smile*

On 10/02/2018, Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
<ukekearuaro@...> wrote:
Dash, I have no plans to play ball with anything Apple! I like being
able to get into the innards of my toys to see what I can break and or
fix! I don't believe I'll have such luck with anything Apple.
Besides, I have elected to watch my Windows computers DIE NATURALLY;
they won't ever be resuscitated! Android will, over time, become the
only OS with which I shall play ball and I'll be able to use both
touchscreen and keyboards. I also have great rapport with app developers in Android land.

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado






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Re: old computers

Pamela Dominguez
 

I love wordperfekt 5.1! There is nothing like it! I have never mastered Word the way I did that program! I also had bought some dos computer games I used to play. Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Carolyn Arnold
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 3:24 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] old computers

Jim literally loved the Tandy. He is a musician, and did he ever have a good time with that thing, which was BC - before Carolyn, that is.

I had three 386's on jobs with WordPerfect 5.1. Weren't they fine.

I taught myself WordPerfect with a book called Mastering WordPerfect, using my Optacon. I never really learned DOS, which is where my husband has it on me. I try to get him to explain basics to me, and he says I get it, there are certain tasks to be performed, like copy, paste, cut, save, set font, just have to learn to do those things on whatever program is being used. Yet, he knows stuff like our computer guys, can fix problems; I can't. I can just run one if it works. If it doesn't, I haven't the slightest idea. I think with DOS I was intimidated, stayed in WordPerfect whenever I could. On one job we had to get out of wordPerfect and onto a program called Letterman to upload our work to the client. I don't even want to go there; thank goodness, that job did not last long for me.

With WordPerfect 5.1, I really liked the macros, have no idea in the world how to do them with Office 2013, but I don't transcribe now like I used to do.

I took an afternoon on my job and set up logging macros with my accounts; there were three or four of them, each with slight differences. With the programs I made, when dictation started, I could enter the identifying information in the log, then go right on to chief complaint, preoperative diagnosis or whatever the beginning of the report would be. The name, age, date, etc would all be in. I worked on production, so the afternoon I invested paid off.

On this one, the envelopes never seemed to work right, so I have made programs for small ones and regular business-sized ones. Incidentally, I needed to Shift Enter for each line - otherwise, paragraph format, they're double spaced. I don't like that, but figured how to work around it, had to do the same thing with my check program.

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Saturday, February 10, 2018 9:26 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] old computers

To those who have previously read my story, I apologise for reposting it. Please feel free to ignore it.

To put things into perspective, I was born in 1983. The first computer that I ever used was an Apple IIIE in elementary school. My peers played games like Number Munchers and the Oregon Trail while I played with Dr. Pete's Talking Writer and the few games on it, like Space Invaders. I still have the original, plus a newer one that I received later in life. One day, at a flee market, Mom bought an Apple IIC. She loved the clicky keyboard and kept playing with it in the car. She still has it in a closet, because she knows that it's valuable. Our first family computer that we really used was an old Tandy 1000 that a friend gave to us. We played games on it like Sleuth, Wheel of Fortune, Slots, Blackjack, Monopoly, and Treasure Mountain. But no screen reader was installed on it. In 1994, a dear friend of the family died, and we inherited her computer. It was a massive and heavy tower, with a 386 processor, MSDOS 5.0, and Wordperfect 5.1 installed. In 1996 or so, we bought our first Windows machine, an IBM Abtiva. But I wanted nothing to do with it, until we started playing games like Silent Steel on it, and I heard it talk! I was then introduced to JFW 3.7. Eventually, I became interested in the 386 and fought to learn DOS, though no one would teach it to me, as it was already obsolete. So I got DOS for Dummies from the New Jersey Library for the Blind and taught myself. I also learned how to use VocalEyes, via the manual. This lasted for a while, until one day, the computer simply stopped working. By the time I was graduated from high school in 2002, I had collected almost everything that the New Jersey Commission for the blind had on DOS, from two Keynote Gold laptops (I think the CMOS battery on each is malfunctioning now), to copies of VocalEyes, to various speech synthesizers, because no one wanted them. Knowing that I loved old computers, my high school gave me their Apple IIGS, along with a printer and paper for it, as a graduation present. I then bought TextTalker and Proterm from APH (they had only three of one of the programs left in stock). I still have them, but have never used them. My parents then bought two desktops (one exclusively for me) from an Infomercial, and that's how I was introduced to Windows XP, which I still use to this day. In 2003, I received my first Windows laptop, an HP Pavilion ZE5385US.
The rest is history. For the record, I still maintain that my Lenovo
X61 is the best computer that I own, other than my new desktop. I'm still an IBM lover at heart and am not afraid to admit it! *smile*

On 10/02/2018, Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
<ukekearuaro@...> wrote:
Dash, I have no plans to play ball with anything Apple! I like being
able to get into the innards of my toys to see what I can break and or
fix! I don't believe I'll have such luck with anything Apple.
Besides, I have elected to watch my Windows computers DIE NATURALLY;
they won't ever be resuscitated! Android will, over time, become the
only OS with which I shall play ball and I'll be able to use both
touchscreen and keyboards. I also have great rapport with app developers in Android land.

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado






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Re: Forced to buy a Smarter Phone

Gene
 

You may be able to save contacts to the sym card.  You can save some information to the card, I don't know what or how much.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 3:33 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Forced to buy a Smarter Phone

Not all phones use sim cards.  When I was on Sprint, there was no sim card
in my phone.  When I got the Nokia and changed to TMobile, I had to buy a
sim card.  So when I had to get another phone, the TMobile place took the
sim card out of the Nokia and put it into the Alcatel I got from them.  As
for contacts, I had to manually put them into the Alcatel.  Carolyn made it
sound like it would put all the contacts into the new phone; it doesn't.
Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Carolyn Arnold
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 3:09 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Forced to buy a Smarter Phone

A sim card is a tiny card with the code for your phone to work with your
specific carrier.

So, say, I decided to bite the bullet, get that shiny Android. Out of the LG
comes the sim card, into the maybe LG Moto G it goes, so that it will work
with my carrier, my number, all of my contacts. I guess yall get it,
contacts are a big deal to me with cell phones.

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Howard Traxler
Sent: Saturday, February 10, 2018 9:09 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Forced to buy a Smarter Phone

Thank you of course, for your suggestion.  It seems that the service
provider is not my question at this point.  The actual phone I am going to
purchase is my real problem.



What is a SIM card and when, how, and why do I want one?

Thank you.
Howard
----- Original Message -----
From: Pamela Dominguez <mailto:geodom@...>
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, February 10, 2018 8:04 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Forced to buy a Smarter Phone


Okay, but I don’t think the person is here.  I think Virgin Mobile was
mentioned.  Pam.

From: andy.tidwell <mailto:andy.tidwell@...>
Sent: Friday, February 09, 2018 8:09 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Forced to buy a Smarter Phone

    Hello I have used consumer cellular for 5 years now and have had no
trouble with them and you can use any kind of phone that will take an at&t
sim card either full size or micro or Nano because there sim cards are 3 in
one so give them a call and check them out.

From: Michael Boyd
Sent: Friday, February 09, 2018 6:21 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Forced to buy a Smarter Phone




You can always switch to another provider, Consumer Cellular has some great
plans. You can purchase a phone from them or use your own. They use the AT&T
towers so the coverage is really good. No contract involved.



Michael





Michael



From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Howard Traxler
Sent: Friday, February 09, 2018 4:25 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Forced to buy a Smarter Phone



Hi all, I hope this question is OK for this list:



My cell phone service provider (Virgin Mobile) has "retired" my phone type
and the "pay as you go" plan we had.  Now we're forced to buy a smarter
phone and a more expensive plan.  All because I missplaced my phone.  It's
gonna be an inexpensive Android; just have to figure out which of the
cheapest I can work.



Can anyone suggest which of the cheaper Androids can best be used by a
total?



Up until now, I've ignored all messages about smart phones; and now I'm
sorry I have.



So I'm dragged, kicking and screaming,  into the modern day.  Thanks to
anyone who can suggest



Howard



Jesus dyed for us, why can't we live for him?

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Re: Forced to buy a Smarter Phone

Pamela Dominguez
 

Not all phones use sim cards. When I was on Sprint, there was no sim card
in my phone. When I got the Nokia and changed to TMobile, I had to buy a
sim card. So when I had to get another phone, the TMobile place took the
sim card out of the Nokia and put it into the Alcatel I got from them. As
for contacts, I had to manually put them into the Alcatel. Carolyn made it
sound like it would put all the contacts into the new phone; it doesn't.
Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Carolyn Arnold
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 3:09 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Forced to buy a Smarter Phone

A sim card is a tiny card with the code for your phone to work with your
specific carrier.

So, say, I decided to bite the bullet, get that shiny Android. Out of the LG
comes the sim card, into the maybe LG Moto G it goes, so that it will work
with my carrier, my number, all of my contacts. I guess yall get it,
contacts are a big deal to me with cell phones.

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Howard Traxler
Sent: Saturday, February 10, 2018 9:09 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Forced to buy a Smarter Phone

Thank you of course, for your suggestion. It seems that the service
provider is not my question at this point. The actual phone I am going to
purchase is my real problem.



What is a SIM card and when, how, and why do I want one?

Thank you.
Howard
----- Original Message -----
From: Pamela Dominguez <mailto:geodom@...>
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, February 10, 2018 8:04 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Forced to buy a Smarter Phone


Okay, but I don’t think the person is here. I think Virgin Mobile was
mentioned. Pam.

From: andy.tidwell <mailto:andy.tidwell@...>
Sent: Friday, February 09, 2018 8:09 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Forced to buy a Smarter Phone

Hello I have used consumer cellular for 5 years now and have had no
trouble with them and you can use any kind of phone that will take an at&t
sim card either full size or micro or Nano because there sim cards are 3 in
one so give them a call and check them out.

From: Michael Boyd
Sent: Friday, February 09, 2018 6:21 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Forced to buy a Smarter Phone




You can always switch to another provider, Consumer Cellular has some great
plans. You can purchase a phone from them or use your own. They use the AT&T
towers so the coverage is really good. No contract involved.



Michael





Michael



From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Howard Traxler
Sent: Friday, February 09, 2018 4:25 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Forced to buy a Smarter Phone



Hi all, I hope this question is OK for this list:



My cell phone service provider (Virgin Mobile) has "retired" my phone type
and the "pay as you go" plan we had. Now we're forced to buy a smarter
phone and a more expensive plan. All because I missplaced my phone. It's
gonna be an inexpensive Android; just have to figure out which of the
cheapest I can work.



Can anyone suggest which of the cheaper Androids can best be used by a
total?



Up until now, I've ignored all messages about smart phones; and now I'm
sorry I have.



So I'm dragged, kicking and screaming, into the modern day. Thanks to
anyone who can suggest



Howard



Jesus dyed for us, why can't we live for him?

<http://www.avg.com/email-signature?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient>
Virus-free. www.avg.com
<http://www.avg.com/email-signature?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient>








---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com


Re: simple dumb phone

Janet
 

Jeff,

I’m not sure what you meant when you said: you wonder if this list was for you? I thought this list was for all of us who have tech questions or who has tech information in which would help someone else, or did you mean to say you wonder if this list was the right list for you? You say this list goes on forever in which is over your head, Jeff, this is a good way to learn by listening to what others have to share  regarding your tech question, but if you don’t want to listen, you will never learn!  Maybe these people who say it is simple and wonderful are trying to encourage you to learn.  You ask for help, but yet, you criticize how you receive it!  You like those who agree with you, but not the others who try to encourage you!  Wow, talk about being greatful!  It sounds like if you don’t get exactly what you asked for, well, you don’t like it!

Janet

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jeffrey Schwartz
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 9:30 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] simple dumb phone

 

Thanks Gerald,

I was wondering if this list is for me.  You are becoming a friend  on the lists to which we belong.  This list goes on forever with topics which are over my head, but a good source of info on learning these damned ribbons.  If I ask someone will help me and ten others will say how simple and wonderful the ribbons are.

Jeff

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gerald Levy
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 10:08 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] simple dumb phone

 

 

Jeff, don’t take it personally.  I have discovered that a lot of tech-savvy blind people look down on the rest of us who may have no interest in using the latest and greatest whiz-bang gadgets.  They have a cavalier and condescending attitude that if you don’t own a smart phone or a Google Home or an Amazon Echo, you are somehow less of a human being.  I don’t let it bother me.  Go ahead and laugh, but my cell phone is a ten-year old refurbished LG 4650 that I picked up from an online seller for only $15.  It still works,and I keep it just for emergencies.  I’m not interested in texting or using it as an alarm clock or GPS device.  And I only pay $40 a year ($10 every four months) to keep it activated with Page Plus Cellular.  And I don’t own a Victor Reader Trek or Stream because I don’t need one,since I am perfectly satisfied with my NLS DTB player, which serves my needs.

 

Gerald

 

 

 

Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2018 9:35 AM

Subject: [TechTalk] simple dumb phone

 

I am seventy and spent sixty years gradually losing my vision  to RP.  I have been totally blind for ten years.  My wife is virtually an invalid.  We have no need for a smart phone as we are seldom out.  When we go to medical appointments we use an agency to give my wife a shower and take her and or me to the doctors office.  We bought the jitterbug quite a few years ago.  At that time she went by cab and used the phone to call one when we were ready to go home.  It has no features other than calling out and receiving calls.  There was one option at the time which we chose not to get, a section for receiving messages.  We had no need for it.  This phone just fine.  I grew tired of hearing from others who had more complex needs.  With the exception of Nancy, who only wanted a phone to make and receive calls, I was deluged by people who couldn’t possibly use it and went on to describe their smart phones.  I offered this phone for others on the list who might have needs or preferences  like my own.    My post started a deluge of contrary preferences.  After a time I lost interest in the varieties  of smart phones. These posts were not critical, but after a time made me feel like an outlier.

Jeff  

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