Date   

Re: Comcast web-based email access

Pamela Dominguez
 

I have always used pop 3, but I don’t know what he set me up as now.  When I had pop 3, I could always see, and get into my folders, so I don’t know what you mean.  I can see both, the windows live mail junk folder, and the gmail spam folder.  It’s just that the supposed spam goes in there instead of the windows live mail one.  That’s always empty.  Also, the deleted items go into the gmail trash folder.  Pam.
 

From: Gene
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 11:26 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Comcast web-based email access
 
Are you using POP3 or IMAP?  I don't use IMAP but my understanding is that if you do, every folder the provider makes available and every folder you create can all be seen.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 10:23 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Comcast web-based email access
 
That’s what is happening to me, now that I have gmail.  I don’t know if there is anything to do about that.  Pam.
 
From: Holly
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 11:19 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Comcast web-based email access
 
Hi David:
 
The WLM junk folder is not receiving the lost emails.  They are going to the Comcast spam folder and not being sent on to WLM,
 
Holly


Re: Comcast web-based email access

Gene
 

Are you using POP3 or IMAP?  I don't use IMAP but my understanding is that if you do, every folder the provider makes available and every folder you create can all be seen.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 10:23 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Comcast web-based email access

That’s what is happening to me, now that I have gmail.  I don’t know if there is anything to do about that.  Pam.
 
From: Holly
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 11:19 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Comcast web-based email access
 
Hi David:
 
The WLM junk folder is not receiving the lost emails.  They are going to the Comcast spam folder and not being sent on to WLM,
 
Holly


Re: How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?

Gene
 

But wherever you have the computer located, there are easy ways to connect a number of devices to one or two joint connection items.  I don't know what you might technically call them.  You can buy items that you connect to a surface and that feel like electrical socket mountings with perhaps four or six sockets.  You could plug the entire item into one power outlet.  You could use heavy duty extension chords that are rated to handle the amount of current the devices are using cumulatively and they would be heavy and sturdy.  Don't put them under carpets, however.  Leave them exposed and don't walk on them.
 
Whatever the case. by unplugging one or two plugs, everything can be disconnected.
 
I'm also curious why the idea of hibernation has received no attention. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 10:16 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?


Power surges or disruptions are more likely in suburban and rural areas where power lines are above ground.  They are much less likely in urban areas where power lines are buried underground. In any case, it's always a good idea to keep your electronic equipment as far away from windows as possible.  


Gerald



On 3/14/2019 11:03 AM, Gene wrote:
If lightning strikes a power line, whether a computer is on or off won't increase the protection as far as being protected from the electric current surge.  Maybe what you should do is get some sort of connection system, maybe two heavy extension chords, and plug everything into those two chords.  Then, you can unplug just two plugs. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 6:39 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?

With printers, scanners, sound systems, and more, Digging around and unplugging every thing for two computer systems quickly is not an option for me.  And, I have often heard that handling cables and wireing is not such a good idea when strong lightning  is in the immediate area.  I’m afraid that a quick shut down seems to be my only choice.
 
I have decided to call MS tech support to find out if they have a rapid shut down option for me.  Surely businesses with hundreds of PC’s are not stuck waiting for updates when strong lightning is in the immediate area.
 
Thanks again,
 
James B
 
 
 
 
 
From: wayne
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 7:01 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?
 
First of all, James, you're very welcome, and now that I have a clear picture of your situation I have a few more solutions for you. Well when it comes to shutting down a computer, and having to wait on windows updates, I don't know how long it would take to update windows and shut down, unless it is a very large windows update. The following may work quite well for you. You can purchase uninterupted power supply that will supply power for an hour or longer. Without more information I can't suggest which one for you to get. Hopefully other honest people in your area can help. This means that with a power supply you can unplug the power supply from the wall, and your computer will continue to operate for an hour or longer. This is important, you must choose an uninterupted power supply big enough to do this. If the other concern is static electricity then you can  do something I've thought about doing over the years, and that is to turn the place your living in, into a faraday cage. If you do you it and do it right you'll have absolutely no problems with static electricity.It's good to hear that you have all your equipment plugged into surge protectors. That is one thing that all the uninterupted power supplys have. In fact the business I'm in depends on safety, security and reliability. One last thing, anybody connected to the internet with an eithernet cable when a thunder storm just starts to brewing, should  have away to unplug the eithernet cable from the internet. Happy and safe computing. If you have any other questions, just ask. you can contact me at
 
 
greenwood33@...
or you could visit us at
Wayne
 
Original Message -----
From: James Bentley
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 1:54 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?
 
Hi Wayne and all,
 
Fortunately, all of my systems here are wireless.  So, my concerns are limited to being able to do a rapid shut down of all computers as fast as possible.
 
I will experiment with your suggestion concerning changing what the power button does.  But, I do kind of have the feeling that Windows is just going to install the updates before shutting down.  There goes my chances for a rapid shut down while massive lightning bolts are hitting power lines, cable/internet lines, etc..
 
It may sound a bit like I am exaggerating but I have lived 83 feet up on a hill for around 24 years.  All of my long time neighbors can attest to multiple lightning strikes and thousands of dollars of fried electronics over the years.  I use $75.00, to $100.00, surge protectors on every thing but the static electricity in the air  is still occasionally quite strong.
 
I am starting to wonder why Microsoft hasn’t considered the possibility that their customers might need to do a rapid shut down of their computers.  I can understand why some are sticking with Win7 while MS slowly irons out more wrinkles in Win10.
 
Wayne, thanks for your advice and offer for further assistance.
 
Regards,
 
James B
 
 
 
From: wayne
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 4:55 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?
 
James, when it comes to shutting down computers in the beginning of a thunder storm, to keep your computers as safe as possible, I feel that these are somethings you should do. Have an uninterupted power supply on each of the computers. There are different uninterupted power supplys. If your computers are wired via eithernet cable then you can buy an uninterupted power supply wi the eithernet ports for extra protection. In addition you can buy an eithernet kill switch to take them offline. Of course the absolute safest thing to do is, if it's convenient or if you could arrange for it to be convenient is to unplug that eithernet cable from the computer. Put it away from the computer in a glass container, however if your computers are wireless connected the eithernet cable cautions won't apply. Lightning is a very powerful thing, and I'm sad to hear that you lost a computer due to the thunder storm. As far as being able to shut down the computer quickly, however I'm not sure what would happen if you adjusted your power  management settings to shut down your computer when you tap the power button. I believe that it will go ahead and shut down properly in about 5 or 10 seconds. The thing I don't know is if you have pending updates if it would bring that up before it shuts down. That would be something to try, during times when there isn't a thunder storm.If it does bring up a dialog wanting you to install updates before you shut down then you definitely need that uninterupted power supply. and also a wireless connection so you can get that done. If you need to contact me,
greenwood33@...
Wayne 
----- Original Message -----
From: James Bentley
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 12:06 AM
Subject: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?
 
Hi all,
 
Several times now, I have run to all of my computers to quickly shut them down because a very strong thunderstorm is hitting my area.
 
Occasionally, Win10 does not give me the option to shutdown.  Sometimes, I only get the option to install updates and then shut down.  That takes a lot of time and we have very strong thunderstorms that hit with little or no warning.
 
I lost a desktop in July because I did not get to it fast enough.
 
I maybe could do a forced shut down.  But, I have heard for years now, that forced shut downs have a small risk of corrupting data.
 
Anyone have any suggestions?
 
Thanks,
 
James B
 
    


Re: Comcast web-based email access

Pamela Dominguez
 

That’s what is happening to me, now that I have gmail.  I don’t know if there is anything to do about that.  Pam.
 

From: Holly
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 11:19 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Comcast web-based email access
 
Hi David:
 
The WLM junk folder is not receiving the lost emails.  They are going to the Comcast spam folder and not being sent on to WLM,
 
Holly


Re: Comcast web-based email access

Holly
 

Hi David:
 
The WLM junk folder is not receiving the lost emails.  They are going to the Comcast spam folder and not being sent on to WLM,
 
Holly


Re: How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?

Gerald Levy
 


Power surges or disruptions are more likely in suburban and rural areas where power lines are above ground.  They are much less likely in urban areas where power lines are buried underground. In any case, it's always a good idea to keep your electronic equipment as far away from windows as possible.  


Gerald



On 3/14/2019 11:03 AM, Gene wrote:
If lightning strikes a power line, whether a computer is on or off won't increase the protection as far as being protected from the electric current surge.  Maybe what you should do is get some sort of connection system, maybe two heavy extension chords, and plug everything into those two chords.  Then, you can unplug just two plugs. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 6:39 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?

With printers, scanners, sound systems, and more, Digging around and unplugging every thing for two computer systems quickly is not an option for me.  And, I have often heard that handling cables and wireing is not such a good idea when strong lightning  is in the immediate area.  I’m afraid that a quick shut down seems to be my only choice.
 
I have decided to call MS tech support to find out if they have a rapid shut down option for me.  Surely businesses with hundreds of PC’s are not stuck waiting for updates when strong lightning is in the immediate area.
 
Thanks again,
 
James B
 
 
 
 
 
From: wayne
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 7:01 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?
 
First of all, James, you're very welcome, and now that I have a clear picture of your situation I have a few more solutions for you. Well when it comes to shutting down a computer, and having to wait on windows updates, I don't know how long it would take to update windows and shut down, unless it is a very large windows update. The following may work quite well for you. You can purchase uninterupted power supply that will supply power for an hour or longer. Without more information I can't suggest which one for you to get. Hopefully other honest people in your area can help. This means that with a power supply you can unplug the power supply from the wall, and your computer will continue to operate for an hour or longer. This is important, you must choose an uninterupted power supply big enough to do this. If the other concern is static electricity then you can  do something I've thought about doing over the years, and that is to turn the place your living in, into a faraday cage. If you do you it and do it right you'll have absolutely no problems with static electricity.It's good to hear that you have all your equipment plugged into surge protectors. That is one thing that all the uninterupted power supplys have. In fact the business I'm in depends on safety, security and reliability. One last thing, anybody connected to the internet with an eithernet cable when a thunder storm just starts to brewing, should  have away to unplug the eithernet cable from the internet. Happy and safe computing. If you have any other questions, just ask. you can contact me at
 
 
greenwood33@...
or you could visit us at
Wayne
 
Original Message -----
From: James Bentley
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 1:54 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?
 
Hi Wayne and all,
 
Fortunately, all of my systems here are wireless.  So, my concerns are limited to being able to do a rapid shut down of all computers as fast as possible.
 
I will experiment with your suggestion concerning changing what the power button does.  But, I do kind of have the feeling that Windows is just going to install the updates before shutting down.  There goes my chances for a rapid shut down while massive lightning bolts are hitting power lines, cable/internet lines, etc..
 
It may sound a bit like I am exaggerating but I have lived 83 feet up on a hill for around 24 years.  All of my long time neighbors can attest to multiple lightning strikes and thousands of dollars of fried electronics over the years.  I use $75.00, to $100.00, surge protectors on every thing but the static electricity in the air  is still occasionally quite strong.
 
I am starting to wonder why Microsoft hasn’t considered the possibility that their customers might need to do a rapid shut down of their computers.  I can understand why some are sticking with Win7 while MS slowly irons out more wrinkles in Win10.
 
Wayne, thanks for your advice and offer for further assistance.
 
Regards,
 
James B
 
 
 
From: wayne
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 4:55 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?
 
James, when it comes to shutting down computers in the beginning of a thunder storm, to keep your computers as safe as possible, I feel that these are somethings you should do. Have an uninterupted power supply on each of the computers. There are different uninterupted power supplys. If your computers are wired via eithernet cable then you can buy an uninterupted power supply wi the eithernet ports for extra protection. In addition you can buy an eithernet kill switch to take them offline. Of course the absolute safest thing to do is, if it's convenient or if you could arrange for it to be convenient is to unplug that eithernet cable from the computer. Put it away from the computer in a glass container, however if your computers are wireless connected the eithernet cable cautions won't apply. Lightning is a very powerful thing, and I'm sad to hear that you lost a computer due to the thunder storm. As far as being able to shut down the computer quickly, however I'm not sure what would happen if you adjusted your power  management settings to shut down your computer when you tap the power button. I believe that it will go ahead and shut down properly in about 5 or 10 seconds. The thing I don't know is if you have pending updates if it would bring that up before it shuts down. That would be something to try, during times when there isn't a thunder storm.If it does bring up a dialog wanting you to install updates before you shut down then you definitely need that uninterupted power supply. and also a wireless connection so you can get that done. If you need to contact me,
greenwood33@...
Wayne 
----- Original Message -----
From: James Bentley
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 12:06 AM
Subject: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?
 
Hi all,
 
Several times now, I have run to all of my computers to quickly shut them down because a very strong thunderstorm is hitting my area.
 
Occasionally, Win10 does not give me the option to shutdown.  Sometimes, I only get the option to install updates and then shut down.  That takes a lot of time and we have very strong thunderstorms that hit with little or no warning.
 
I lost a desktop in July because I did not get to it fast enough.
 
I maybe could do a forced shut down.  But, I have heard for years now, that forced shut downs have a small risk of corrupting data.
 
Anyone have any suggestions?
 
Thanks,
 
James B
 
    


Using Google Talk Back with Bluetooth keyboard

Akshaya Choudhary
 

How do you guys find Google Talk Back while using it with a bluetooth keyboard? Is it good enough to read books and take notes?

Any feedback is wlecome.

Regards


Re: How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?

Gene
 

It is much safer since the NTFS file system started to be used.  There is still a small chance of corruption of some files.  I don't know if the risk is large enough to be of concern.  If it is, having a current image backup would allow you to completely restore from the image.  If you know that thunder storms are on the way, you could create an image even that day.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 7:00 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?


You can always use the tried and trued method of quickly shutting down your computer:  pressing and holding the power button.  While shutting down a computer this way was a problem on older machines, it is much safer nowadays on a Windows 10 system, especially if you close all running applications first.  And placing your system as far away from a window as possible will minimize the potential for damage from a lightning strike.


Gerald



On 3/14/2019 7:39 AM, James Bentley wrote:
With printers, scanners, sound systems, and more, Digging around and unplugging every thing for two computer systems quickly is not an option for me.  And, I have often heard that handling cables and wireing is not such a good idea when strong lightning  is in the immediate area.  I’m afraid that a quick shut down seems to be my only choice.
 
I have decided to call MS tech support to find out if they have a rapid shut down option for me.  Surely businesses with hundreds of PC’s are not stuck waiting for updates when strong lightning is in the immediate area.
 
Thanks again,
 
James B
 
 
 
 
 
From: wayne
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 7:01 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?
 
First of all, James, you're very welcome, and now that I have a clear picture of your situation I have a few more solutions for you. Well when it comes to shutting down a computer, and having to wait on windows updates, I don't know how long it would take to update windows and shut down, unless it is a very large windows update. The following may work quite well for you. You can purchase uninterupted power supply that will supply power for an hour or longer. Without more information I can't suggest which one for you to get. Hopefully other honest people in your area can help. This means that with a power supply you can unplug the power supply from the wall, and your computer will continue to operate for an hour or longer. This is important, you must choose an uninterupted power supply big enough to do this. If the other concern is static electricity then you can  do something I've thought about doing over the years, and that is to turn the place your living in, into a faraday cage. If you do you it and do it right you'll have absolutely no problems with static electricity.It's good to hear that you have all your equipment plugged into surge protectors. That is one thing that all the uninterupted power supplys have. In fact the business I'm in depends on safety, security and reliability. One last thing, anybody connected to the internet with an eithernet cable when a thunder storm just starts to brewing, should  have away to unplug the eithernet cable from the internet. Happy and safe computing. If you have any other questions, just ask. you can contact me at
 
 
greenwood33@...
or you could visit us at
Wayne
 
Original Message -----
From: James Bentley
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 1:54 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?
 
Hi Wayne and all,
 
Fortunately, all of my systems here are wireless.  So, my concerns are limited to being able to do a rapid shut down of all computers as fast as possible.
 
I will experiment with your suggestion concerning changing what the power button does.  But, I do kind of have the feeling that Windows is just going to install the updates before shutting down.  There goes my chances for a rapid shut down while massive lightning bolts are hitting power lines, cable/internet lines, etc..
 
It may sound a bit like I am exaggerating but I have lived 83 feet up on a hill for around 24 years.  All of my long time neighbors can attest to multiple lightning strikes and thousands of dollars of fried electronics over the years.  I use $75.00, to $100.00, surge protectors on every thing but the static electricity in the air  is still occasionally quite strong.
 
I am starting to wonder why Microsoft hasn’t considered the possibility that their customers might need to do a rapid shut down of their computers.  I can understand why some are sticking with Win7 while MS slowly irons out more wrinkles in Win10.
 
Wayne, thanks for your advice and offer for further assistance.
 
Regards,
 
James B
 
 
 
From: wayne
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 4:55 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?
 
James, when it comes to shutting down computers in the beginning of a thunder storm, to keep your computers as safe as possible, I feel that these are somethings you should do. Have an uninterupted power supply on each of the computers. There are different uninterupted power supplys. If your computers are wired via eithernet cable then you can buy an uninterupted power supply wi the eithernet ports for extra protection. In addition you can buy an eithernet kill switch to take them offline. Of course the absolute safest thing to do is, if it's convenient or if you could arrange for it to be convenient is to unplug that eithernet cable from the computer. Put it away from the computer in a glass container, however if your computers are wireless connected the eithernet cable cautions won't apply. Lightning is a very powerful thing, and I'm sad to hear that you lost a computer due to the thunder storm. As far as being able to shut down the computer quickly, however I'm not sure what would happen if you adjusted your power  management settings to shut down your computer when you tap the power button. I believe that it will go ahead and shut down properly in about 5 or 10 seconds. The thing I don't know is if you have pending updates if it would bring that up before it shuts down. That would be something to try, during times when there isn't a thunder storm.If it does bring up a dialog wanting you to install updates before you shut down then you definitely need that uninterupted power supply. and also a wireless connection so you can get that done. If you need to contact me,
greenwood33@...
Wayne 
----- Original Message -----
From: James Bentley
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 12:06 AM
Subject: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?
 
Hi all,
 
Several times now, I have run to all of my computers to quickly shut them down because a very strong thunderstorm is hitting my area.
 
Occasionally, Win10 does not give me the option to shutdown.  Sometimes, I only get the option to install updates and then shut down.  That takes a lot of time and we have very strong thunderstorms that hit with little or no warning.
 
I lost a desktop in July because I did not get to it fast enough.
 
I maybe could do a forced shut down.  But, I have heard for years now, that forced shut downs have a small risk of corrupting data.
 
Anyone have any suggestions?
 
Thanks,
 
James B
 
    


Re: Comcast web-based email access

Gene
 

Not if  a POP3 account is being used, however, and that's what it sounds like.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 6:40 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Comcast web-based email access

Hi, Holly.

Since you're using Windows Live Mail to receive email from your Comcast.net account you should be able to access any of your email folders from within WLM, including your junk folder. In other words, if an email message did get stuck in your junk mail folder then you don't actually need to log into your Comcast.net account in order to access it. From within WLM you should be able to open any email folder, including Junk, to locate the message.



David Goldfield, Assistive Technology Specialist WWW.David-Goldfield.Com
On 3/13/2019 5:21 PM, Holly wrote:
Joseph:

I have been using Newsline publications for several years, without any problem.  Don't know why this happened, but hopefully, it won't happen again.

My computer tech said he would be glad to look at it anytime I think there may be a problem.

I get plenty of junk mail that is sent through, which I wish would go into the spam folder, but never does.  Hahahaha.

Holly




Re: How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?

Gene
 

If lightning strikes a power line, whether a computer is on or off won't increase the protection as far as being protected from the electric current surge.  Maybe what you should do is get some sort of connection system, maybe two heavy extension chords, and plug everything into those two chords.  Then, you can unplug just two plugs. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 6:39 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?

With printers, scanners, sound systems, and more, Digging around and unplugging every thing for two computer systems quickly is not an option for me.  And, I have often heard that handling cables and wireing is not such a good idea when strong lightning  is in the immediate area.  I’m afraid that a quick shut down seems to be my only choice.
 
I have decided to call MS tech support to find out if they have a rapid shut down option for me.  Surely businesses with hundreds of PC’s are not stuck waiting for updates when strong lightning is in the immediate area.
 
Thanks again,
 
James B
 
 
 
 
 
From: wayne
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 7:01 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?
 
First of all, James, you're very welcome, and now that I have a clear picture of your situation I have a few more solutions for you. Well when it comes to shutting down a computer, and having to wait on windows updates, I don't know how long it would take to update windows and shut down, unless it is a very large windows update. The following may work quite well for you. You can purchase uninterupted power supply that will supply power for an hour or longer. Without more information I can't suggest which one for you to get. Hopefully other honest people in your area can help. This means that with a power supply you can unplug the power supply from the wall, and your computer will continue to operate for an hour or longer. This is important, you must choose an uninterupted power supply big enough to do this. If the other concern is static electricity then you can  do something I've thought about doing over the years, and that is to turn the place your living in, into a faraday cage. If you do you it and do it right you'll have absolutely no problems with static electricity.It's good to hear that you have all your equipment plugged into surge protectors. That is one thing that all the uninterupted power supplys have. In fact the business I'm in depends on safety, security and reliability. One last thing, anybody connected to the internet with an eithernet cable when a thunder storm just starts to brewing, should  have away to unplug the eithernet cable from the internet. Happy and safe computing. If you have any other questions, just ask. you can contact me at
 
 
greenwood33@...
or you could visit us at
Wayne
 
Original Message -----
From: James Bentley
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 1:54 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?
 
Hi Wayne and all,
 
Fortunately, all of my systems here are wireless.  So, my concerns are limited to being able to do a rapid shut down of all computers as fast as possible.
 
I will experiment with your suggestion concerning changing what the power button does.  But, I do kind of have the feeling that Windows is just going to install the updates before shutting down.  There goes my chances for a rapid shut down while massive lightning bolts are hitting power lines, cable/internet lines, etc..
 
It may sound a bit like I am exaggerating but I have lived 83 feet up on a hill for around 24 years.  All of my long time neighbors can attest to multiple lightning strikes and thousands of dollars of fried electronics over the years.  I use $75.00, to $100.00, surge protectors on every thing but the static electricity in the air  is still occasionally quite strong.
 
I am starting to wonder why Microsoft hasn’t considered the possibility that their customers might need to do a rapid shut down of their computers.  I can understand why some are sticking with Win7 while MS slowly irons out more wrinkles in Win10.
 
Wayne, thanks for your advice and offer for further assistance.
 
Regards,
 
James B
 
 
 
From: wayne
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 4:55 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?
 
James, when it comes to shutting down computers in the beginning of a thunder storm, to keep your computers as safe as possible, I feel that these are somethings you should do. Have an uninterupted power supply on each of the computers. There are different uninterupted power supplys. If your computers are wired via eithernet cable then you can buy an uninterupted power supply wi the eithernet ports for extra protection. In addition you can buy an eithernet kill switch to take them offline. Of course the absolute safest thing to do is, if it's convenient or if you could arrange for it to be convenient is to unplug that eithernet cable from the computer. Put it away from the computer in a glass container, however if your computers are wireless connected the eithernet cable cautions won't apply. Lightning is a very powerful thing, and I'm sad to hear that you lost a computer due to the thunder storm. As far as being able to shut down the computer quickly, however I'm not sure what would happen if you adjusted your power  management settings to shut down your computer when you tap the power button. I believe that it will go ahead and shut down properly in about 5 or 10 seconds. The thing I don't know is if you have pending updates if it would bring that up before it shuts down. That would be something to try, during times when there isn't a thunder storm.If it does bring up a dialog wanting you to install updates before you shut down then you definitely need that uninterupted power supply. and also a wireless connection so you can get that done. If you need to contact me,
greenwood33@...
Wayne 
----- Original Message -----
From: James Bentley
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 12:06 AM
Subject: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?
 
Hi all,
 
Several times now, I have run to all of my computers to quickly shut them down because a very strong thunderstorm is hitting my area.
 
Occasionally, Win10 does not give me the option to shutdown.  Sometimes, I only get the option to install updates and then shut down.  That takes a lot of time and we have very strong thunderstorms that hit with little or no warning.
 
I lost a desktop in July because I did not get to it fast enough.
 
I maybe could do a forced shut down.  But, I have heard for years now, that forced shut downs have a small risk of corrupting data.
 
Anyone have any suggestions?
 
Thanks,
 
James B
 
    


Re: How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?

James Bentley
 

Hi Gerald and list,
 
Well, Gerald, The MS Disability desk agrees with you concerning holding down the power button for a few seconds to do a hard shut down.  But, I still am not quite convinced.
 
I mean no disrespect to Microsoft or especially to you Gerald, but, I have corrupted Windows on two different Win7 pc’s so bad that Win7 had to be reinstalled.  This happened after holding the power button down for around 7 seconds to force a shut down.
 
 
I do realize that if windows freezes, then, there is no other option but to do the forced shut down.
 
So, I still do not have a definitive answer but, the next time Windows only gives me the option to first update before shutting down, I will hold down the shift key while hitting enter on the update and shutdown button.
 
Thanks for your post.
 
James B
 
 
: Gerald Levy via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 7:00 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?
 

 

You can always use the tried and trued method of quickly shutting down your computer:  pressing and holding the power button.  While shutting down a computer this way was a problem on older machines, it is much safer nowadays on a Windows 10 system, especially if you close all running applications first.  And placing your system as far away from a window as possible will minimize the potential for damage from a lightning strike.

 

Gerald

 

 

On 3/14/2019 7:39 AM, James Bentley wrote:
With printers, scanners, sound systems, and more, Digging around and unplugging every thing for two computer systems quickly is not an option for me.  And, I have often heard that handling cables and wireing is not such a good idea when strong lightning  is in the immediate area.  I’m afraid that a quick shut down seems to be my only choice.
 
I have decided to call MS tech support to find out if they have a rapid shut down option for me.  Surely businesses with hundreds of PC’s are not stuck waiting for updates when strong lightning is in the immediate area.
 
Thanks again,
 
James B
 
 
 
 
 
From: wayne
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 7:01 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?
 
First of all, James, you're very welcome, and now that I have a clear picture of your situation I have a few more solutions for you. Well when it comes to shutting down a computer, and having to wait on windows updates, I don't know how long it would take to update windows and shut down, unless it is a very large windows update. The following may work quite well for you. You can purchase uninterupted power supply that will supply power for an hour or longer. Without more information I can't suggest which one for you to get. Hopefully other honest people in your area can help. This means that with a power supply you can unplug the power supply from the wall, and your computer will continue to operate for an hour or longer. This is important, you must choose an uninterupted power supply big enough to do this. If the other concern is static electricity then you can  do something I've thought about doing over the years, and that is to turn the place your living in, into a faraday cage. If you do you it and do it right you'll have absolutely no problems with static electricity.It's good to hear that you have all your equipment plugged into surge protectors. That is one thing that all the uninterupted power supplys have. In fact the business I'm in depends on safety, security and reliability. One last thing, anybody connected to the internet with an eithernet cable when a thunder storm just starts to brewing, should  have away to unplug the eithernet cable from the internet. Happy and safe computing. If you have any other questions, just ask. you can contact me at
 
 
greenwood33@...
or you could visit us at
Wayne
 
Original Message -----
From: James Bentley
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 1:54 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?
 
Hi Wayne and all,
 
Fortunately, all of my systems here are wireless.  So, my concerns are limited to being able to do a rapid shut down of all computers as fast as possible.
 
I will experiment with your suggestion concerning changing what the power button does.  But, I do kind of have the feeling that Windows is just going to install the updates before shutting down.  There goes my chances for a rapid shut down while massive lightning bolts are hitting power lines, cable/internet lines, etc..
 
It may sound a bit like I am exaggerating but I have lived 83 feet up on a hill for around 24 years.  All of my long time neighbors can attest to multiple lightning strikes and thousands of dollars of fried electronics over the years.  I use $75.00, to $100.00, surge protectors on every thing but the static electricity in the air  is still occasionally quite strong.
 
I am starting to wonder why Microsoft hasn’t considered the possibility that their customers might need to do a rapid shut down of their computers.  I can understand why some are sticking with Win7 while MS slowly irons out more wrinkles in Win10.
 
Wayne, thanks for your advice and offer for further assistance.
 
Regards,
 
James B
 
 
 
From: wayne
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 4:55 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?
 
James, when it comes to shutting down computers in the beginning of a thunder storm, to keep your computers as safe as possible, I feel that these are somethings you should do. Have an uninterupted power supply on each of the computers. There are different uninterupted power supplys. If your computers are wired via eithernet cable then you can buy an uninterupted power supply wi the eithernet ports for extra protection. In addition you can buy an eithernet kill switch to take them offline. Of course the absolute safest thing to do is, if it's convenient or if you could arrange for it to be convenient is to unplug that eithernet cable from the computer. Put it away from the computer in a glass container, however if your computers are wireless connected the eithernet cable cautions won't apply. Lightning is a very powerful thing, and I'm sad to hear that you lost a computer due to the thunder storm. As far as being able to shut down the computer quickly, however I'm not sure what would happen if you adjusted your power  management settings to shut down your computer when you tap the power button. I believe that it will go ahead and shut down properly in about 5 or 10 seconds. The thing I don't know is if you have pending updates if it would bring that up before it shuts down. That would be something to try, during times when there isn't a thunder storm.If it does bring up a dialog wanting you to install updates before you shut down then you definitely need that uninterupted power supply. and also a wireless connection so you can get that done. If you need to contact me,
greenwood33@...
Wayne 
----- Original Message -----
From: James Bentley
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 12:06 AM
Subject: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?
 
Hi all,
 
Several times now, I have run to all of my computers to quickly shut them down because a very strong thunderstorm is hitting my area.
 
Occasionally, Win10 does not give me the option to shutdown.  Sometimes, I only get the option to install updates and then shut down.  That takes a lot of time and we have very strong thunderstorms that hit with little or no warning.
 
I lost a desktop in July because I did not get to it fast enough.
 
I maybe could do a forced shut down.  But, I have heard for years now, that forced shut downs have a small risk of corrupting data.
 
Anyone have any suggestions?
 
Thanks,
 
James B
 
    


Re: Hi Jack ing phone numbers

Pamela Dominguez
 

Yes, there sure have always been phone scams probably as long as there were phones, and people to use them. But what you described is what I meant when I said the words "dial it up", and that if you can count, you can do it. That's the way they did it, back then. Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: brian
Sent: Wednesday, March 13, 2019 9:58 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Hi Jack ing phone numbers

About 20 years ago or so I tried a work at home job for a window
company. I was told to spend 2 hours per day making calls telling
callers that I was with this company and ask them if they are instered
in setting up an apoinment to have somone out to their hometo try to
sell them windows for their home. The thing that I was told to do was
just call every phone number in order in my exchange. Of course if you
do that you will come acrost unlisted phone numbers. My town had an old
style phone system at that time and all of the phone numbers started
with 5258 so I started with 8001 8002 8003 and so on. I did notfinish
the whole exchange. If I had I would have to go up to 8999. I think
that is what audo dialers do although I think thatthey look for working
numbers. Because I was dialing every number manually I did come acrost
lots of non working numbers. I would then just move on to the next
number in sequence. I don't even know ifthe window company was real or
a scam or not. I never got paid and I only gave the man who hired me 2
contacts and I never heard from if the people ever bought any windows
for their home or not. What I am trying to say is that phone scams are
nothing new they were just not as many as they are today. The only
thing that an unlisted number does is that your number is not publihed
and you can't get it by calling information. There have always been ways
to phone scam you it's just much worse now.

Brian Sackrider

On 3/13/2019 11:01 AM, Pamela Dominguez wrote:
They did that a long time ago. Back in the sixties or seventies, my mother was told by somebody she challenged for calling her unlisted number, that they are given an exchange, and told to just dial it up. If you can count, you can do it. If you happen to hit an unlisted number, that's the breaks, so to speak. That was the old-fashioned version of today's random-number generating computer programs. But it still came out to the same thing. You could get called, even if your number was unlisted. But it was still a good idea to have an unlisted number, because a person couldn't just look it up and call you, even if you didn't want to hear from that person. Pam.

-----Original Message----- From: Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
Sent: Tuesday, March 12, 2019 6:27 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Hi Jack ing phone numbers

I do get these types of calls now and then at work, and, in recent times, on
my cell phone as well. I basically ignore them and move on; I don't recall
the first or last time I attempted or tried to call myself. So, in my view,
if I'm not doing it, I don't care what source it comes from, I just won't
answer the call. Fortunately, I do have caller-id's at both ends!

There's so much talk about privacy, and it's all good. I knew a guy who had
an unpublished number back in the day. Still, he got subscription calls
from Denver Post and the now defunct Rocky Mountain News. He was always
shocked as to how either newspaper got his number. I used to tell him that
he was wasting scarce rsources paying an extra dime to the phone company for
an unpublished number. Since computer software can be manipulated to pick
any set of numbers at random from a particular exchange, it's a matter of
time before my number gets a hit.

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado







Re: How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?

Gerald Levy
 


You can always use the tried and trued method of quickly shutting down your computer:  pressing and holding the power button.  While shutting down a computer this way was a problem on older machines, it is much safer nowadays on a Windows 10 system, especially if you close all running applications first.  And placing your system as far away from a window as possible will minimize the potential for damage from a lightning strike.


Gerald



On 3/14/2019 7:39 AM, James Bentley wrote:
With printers, scanners, sound systems, and more, Digging around and unplugging every thing for two computer systems quickly is not an option for me.  And, I have often heard that handling cables and wireing is not such a good idea when strong lightning  is in the immediate area.  I’m afraid that a quick shut down seems to be my only choice.
 
I have decided to call MS tech support to find out if they have a rapid shut down option for me.  Surely businesses with hundreds of PC’s are not stuck waiting for updates when strong lightning is in the immediate area.
 
Thanks again,
 
James B
 
 
 
 
 
From: wayne
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 7:01 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?
 
First of all, James, you're very welcome, and now that I have a clear picture of your situation I have a few more solutions for you. Well when it comes to shutting down a computer, and having to wait on windows updates, I don't know how long it would take to update windows and shut down, unless it is a very large windows update. The following may work quite well for you. You can purchase uninterupted power supply that will supply power for an hour or longer. Without more information I can't suggest which one for you to get. Hopefully other honest people in your area can help. This means that with a power supply you can unplug the power supply from the wall, and your computer will continue to operate for an hour or longer. This is important, you must choose an uninterupted power supply big enough to do this. If the other concern is static electricity then you can  do something I've thought about doing over the years, and that is to turn the place your living in, into a faraday cage. If you do you it and do it right you'll have absolutely no problems with static electricity.It's good to hear that you have all your equipment plugged into surge protectors. That is one thing that all the uninterupted power supplys have. In fact the business I'm in depends on safety, security and reliability. One last thing, anybody connected to the internet with an eithernet cable when a thunder storm just starts to brewing, should  have away to unplug the eithernet cable from the internet. Happy and safe computing. If you have any other questions, just ask. you can contact me at
 
 
greenwood33@...
or you could visit us at
Wayne
 
Original Message -----
From: James Bentley
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 1:54 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?
 
Hi Wayne and all,
 
Fortunately, all of my systems here are wireless.  So, my concerns are limited to being able to do a rapid shut down of all computers as fast as possible.
 
I will experiment with your suggestion concerning changing what the power button does.  But, I do kind of have the feeling that Windows is just going to install the updates before shutting down.  There goes my chances for a rapid shut down while massive lightning bolts are hitting power lines, cable/internet lines, etc..
 
It may sound a bit like I am exaggerating but I have lived 83 feet up on a hill for around 24 years.  All of my long time neighbors can attest to multiple lightning strikes and thousands of dollars of fried electronics over the years.  I use $75.00, to $100.00, surge protectors on every thing but the static electricity in the air  is still occasionally quite strong.
 
I am starting to wonder why Microsoft hasn’t considered the possibility that their customers might need to do a rapid shut down of their computers.  I can understand why some are sticking with Win7 while MS slowly irons out more wrinkles in Win10.
 
Wayne, thanks for your advice and offer for further assistance.
 
Regards,
 
James B
 
 
 
From: wayne
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 4:55 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?
 
James, when it comes to shutting down computers in the beginning of a thunder storm, to keep your computers as safe as possible, I feel that these are somethings you should do. Have an uninterupted power supply on each of the computers. There are different uninterupted power supplys. If your computers are wired via eithernet cable then you can buy an uninterupted power supply wi the eithernet ports for extra protection. In addition you can buy an eithernet kill switch to take them offline. Of course the absolute safest thing to do is, if it's convenient or if you could arrange for it to be convenient is to unplug that eithernet cable from the computer. Put it away from the computer in a glass container, however if your computers are wireless connected the eithernet cable cautions won't apply. Lightning is a very powerful thing, and I'm sad to hear that you lost a computer due to the thunder storm. As far as being able to shut down the computer quickly, however I'm not sure what would happen if you adjusted your power  management settings to shut down your computer when you tap the power button. I believe that it will go ahead and shut down properly in about 5 or 10 seconds. The thing I don't know is if you have pending updates if it would bring that up before it shuts down. That would be something to try, during times when there isn't a thunder storm.If it does bring up a dialog wanting you to install updates before you shut down then you definitely need that uninterupted power supply. and also a wireless connection so you can get that done. If you need to contact me,
greenwood33@...
Wayne 
----- Original Message -----
From: James Bentley
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 12:06 AM
Subject: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?
 
Hi all,
 
Several times now, I have run to all of my computers to quickly shut them down because a very strong thunderstorm is hitting my area.
 
Occasionally, Win10 does not give me the option to shutdown.  Sometimes, I only get the option to install updates and then shut down.  That takes a lot of time and we have very strong thunderstorms that hit with little or no warning.
 
I lost a desktop in July because I did not get to it fast enough.
 
I maybe could do a forced shut down.  But, I have heard for years now, that forced shut downs have a small risk of corrupting data.
 
Anyone have any suggestions?
 
Thanks,
 
James B
 
    


Re: Comcast web-based email access

David Goldfield <david.goldfield@...>
 

Hi, Holly.

Since you're using Windows Live Mail to receive email from your Comcast.net account you should be able to access any of your email folders from within WLM, including your junk folder. In other words, if an email message did get stuck in your junk mail folder then you don't actually need to log into your Comcast.net account in order to access it. From within WLM you should be able to open any email folder, including Junk, to locate the message.



David Goldfield, Assistive Technology Specialist WWW.David-Goldfield.Com

On 3/13/2019 5:21 PM, Holly wrote:
Joseph:

I have been using Newsline publications for several years, without any problem.  Don't know why this happened, but hopefully, it won't happen again.

My computer tech said he would be glad to look at it anytime I think there may be a problem.

I get plenty of junk mail that is sent through, which I wish would go into the spam folder, but never does.  Hahahaha.

Holly




Re: How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?

James Bentley
 

With printers, scanners, sound systems, and more, Digging around and unplugging every thing for two computer systems quickly is not an option for me.  And, I have often heard that handling cables and wireing is not such a good idea when strong lightning  is in the immediate area.  I’m afraid that a quick shut down seems to be my only choice.
 
I have decided to call MS tech support to find out if they have a rapid shut down option for me.  Surely businesses with hundreds of PC’s are not stuck waiting for updates when strong lightning is in the immediate area.
 
Thanks again,
 
James B
 
 
 
 
 

From: wayne
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 7:01 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?
 
First of all, James, you're very welcome, and now that I have a clear picture of your situation I have a few more solutions for you. Well when it comes to shutting down a computer, and having to wait on windows updates, I don't know how long it would take to update windows and shut down, unless it is a very large windows update. The following may work quite well for you. You can purchase uninterupted power supply that will supply power for an hour or longer. Without more information I can't suggest which one for you to get. Hopefully other honest people in your area can help. This means that with a power supply you can unplug the power supply from the wall, and your computer will continue to operate for an hour or longer. This is important, you must choose an uninterupted power supply big enough to do this. If the other concern is static electricity then you can  do something I've thought about doing over the years, and that is to turn the place your living in, into a faraday cage. If you do you it and do it right you'll have absolutely no problems with static electricity.It's good to hear that you have all your equipment plugged into surge protectors. That is one thing that all the uninterupted power supplys have. In fact the business I'm in depends on safety, security and reliability. One last thing, anybody connected to the internet with an eithernet cable when a thunder storm just starts to brewing, should  have away to unplug the eithernet cable from the internet. Happy and safe computing. If you have any other questions, just ask. you can contact me at
 
 
greenwood33@...
or you could visit us at
Wayne
 
Original Message -----
From: James Bentley
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 1:54 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?
 
Hi Wayne and all,
 
Fortunately, all of my systems here are wireless.  So, my concerns are limited to being able to do a rapid shut down of all computers as fast as possible.
 
I will experiment with your suggestion concerning changing what the power button does.  But, I do kind of have the feeling that Windows is just going to install the updates before shutting down.  There goes my chances for a rapid shut down while massive lightning bolts are hitting power lines, cable/internet lines, etc..
 
It may sound a bit like I am exaggerating but I have lived 83 feet up on a hill for around 24 years.  All of my long time neighbors can attest to multiple lightning strikes and thousands of dollars of fried electronics over the years.  I use $75.00, to $100.00, surge protectors on every thing but the static electricity in the air  is still occasionally quite strong.
 
I am starting to wonder why Microsoft hasn’t considered the possibility that their customers might need to do a rapid shut down of their computers.  I can understand why some are sticking with Win7 while MS slowly irons out more wrinkles in Win10.
 
Wayne, thanks for your advice and offer for further assistance.
 
Regards,
 
James B
 
 
 
From: wayne
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 4:55 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?
 
James, when it comes to shutting down computers in the beginning of a thunder storm, to keep your computers as safe as possible, I feel that these are somethings you should do. Have an uninterupted power supply on each of the computers. There are different uninterupted power supplys. If your computers are wired via eithernet cable then you can buy an uninterupted power supply wi the eithernet ports for extra protection. In addition you can buy an eithernet kill switch to take them offline. Of course the absolute safest thing to do is, if it's convenient or if you could arrange for it to be convenient is to unplug that eithernet cable from the computer. Put it away from the computer in a glass container, however if your computers are wireless connected the eithernet cable cautions won't apply. Lightning is a very powerful thing, and I'm sad to hear that you lost a computer due to the thunder storm. As far as being able to shut down the computer quickly, however I'm not sure what would happen if you adjusted your power  management settings to shut down your computer when you tap the power button. I believe that it will go ahead and shut down properly in about 5 or 10 seconds. The thing I don't know is if you have pending updates if it would bring that up before it shuts down. That would be something to try, during times when there isn't a thunder storm.If it does bring up a dialog wanting you to install updates before you shut down then you definitely need that uninterupted power supply. and also a wireless connection so you can get that done. If you need to contact me,
greenwood33@...
Wayne 
----- Original Message -----
From: James Bentley
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 12:06 AM
Subject: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?
 
Hi all,
 
Several times now, I have run to all of my computers to quickly shut them down because a very strong thunderstorm is hitting my area.
 
Occasionally, Win10 does not give me the option to shutdown.  Sometimes, I only get the option to install updates and then shut down.  That takes a lot of time and we have very strong thunderstorms that hit with little or no warning.
 
I lost a desktop in July because I did not get to it fast enough.
 
I maybe could do a forced shut down.  But, I have heard for years now, that forced shut downs have a small risk of corrupting data.
 
Anyone have any suggestions?
 
Thanks,
 
James B
 
    


Re: Best Email Client for Windows?

David Goldfield <david.goldfield@...>
 

Hi. My experiences with both Thunderbird and Outlook 365 likely are the exact opposite of what some people might be reporting. Bear in mind that my Windows PC is slower than many newer PCs and I admit this is definitely a factor in what I am experiencing.

I actually find Thunderbird's performance incredibly snappy, even when opening the first message after starting the program. Its speed reminds me of older programs, such as when I used to use Outlook Express. By contrast, opening messages using Outlook 365 is very sluggish for me. I actually would prefer to use Outlook since JAWS offers such incredible support for it but I am unwilling to deal with what I consider to be unacceptable performance.

David Goldfield, Assistive Technology Specialist WWW.David-Goldfield.Com

On 3/13/2019 6:45 PM, Abbie Taylor wrote:
I've been using Thunderbird, but I agree that it's a bit sluggish, especially when first opening. Because I was having some issues with Word 2013, I decided to try Office 365, which contains Outlook. I've discovered that I like Outlook better than Thunderbird. Once it opens, I don't have to press F6 umpteen million times in order to get to my in box. It's a pain in the anatomy to set up with a gmail account, but it works pretty well otherwise. The ribbons aren't as confusing once you figure out how to navigate them, and the spell checker is much easier to use than that of Thunderbird. NVDA doesn't speak auto-complete results in message fields, but I've found a way to work around this. The only thing I don't like about it is that there seems to be no way to view an alphabetical list of your contacts, but that outweighs the benefits. 

I'm also enjoying the latest version of Word, so the $99.00 yearly subscription fee, in my opinion, is a worthwhile investment. However, if you don't need Word, you might be able to get just Outlook, for a price of course. Whatever you do, though, don't mess with the Windows Mail app. It's for the birds.


Re: How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?

Gene
 

Also, and those with more technical knowledge may be able to address this, it appears to me that when you hibernate in Windows 10 and in earlier versions of Windows, if updates have been downloaded and are ready to install, when you resume from hibernation, they may be installed and the computer not resume from hibernation, but boot as a new bootup.  See this forum discussion:
 
However, it appears to me that you can hibernate if updates aren't currently being installed and not have updates installed before hibernation occurs, so the purpose is served of having a quick way to stop the machine and then disconnect it from whatever you want. 
 
If this is correct, that a new boot is initiated, that would mean that you should save any work before hibernating unless you definitely know there are no updates that have been downloaded and are waiting to be installed.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
From: Gene
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 5:16 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?

Here is a solution that will probably work.  I don't have Windows 10, for which let us give thanks, so I can't test it.
 
The easiest solution is probably to hibernate, not shut down.  Windows 10 may call it something else, I'm not sure what shutdown options are available.  There are two or three ways to turn off your computer without shutting down Windows.  Windows 10 users may wish to comment.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: wayne
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 7:01 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?

First of all, James, you're very welcome, and now that I have a clear picture of your situation I have a few more solutions for you. Well when it comes to shutting down a computer, and having to wait on windows updates, I don't know how long it would take to update windows and shut down, unless it is a very large windows update. The following may work quite well for you. You can purchase uninterupted power supply that will supply power for an hour or longer. Without more information I can't suggest which one for you to get. Hopefully other honest people in your area can help. This means that with a power supply you can unplug the power supply from the wall, and your computer will continue to operate for an hour or longer. This is important, you must choose an uninterupted power supply big enough to do this. If the other concern is static electricity then you can  do something I've thought about doing over the years, and that is to turn the place your living in, into a faraday cage. If you do you it and do it right you'll have absolutely no problems with static electricity.It's good to hear that you have all your equipment plugged into surge protectors. That is one thing that all the uninterupted power supplys have. In fact the business I'm in depends on safety, security and reliability. One last thing, anybody connected to the internet with an eithernet cable when a thunder storm just starts to brewing, should  have away to unplug the eithernet cable from the internet. Happy and safe computing. If you have any other questions, just ask. you can contact me at
 
 
or you could visit us at
Wayne
 
 Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 1:54 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?

Hi Wayne and all,
 
Fortunately, all of my systems here are wireless.  So, my concerns are limited to being able to do a rapid shut down of all computers as fast as possible.
 
I will experiment with your suggestion concerning changing what the power button does.  But, I do kind of have the feeling that Windows is just going to install the updates before shutting down.  There goes my chances for a rapid shut down while massive lightning bolts are hitting power lines, cable/internet lines, etc..
 
It may sound a bit like I am exaggerating but I have lived 83 feet up on a hill for around 24 years.  All of my long time neighbors can attest to multiple lightning strikes and thousands of dollars of fried electronics over the years.  I use $75.00, to $100.00, surge protectors on every thing but the static electricity in the air  is still occasionally quite strong.
 
I am starting to wonder why Microsoft hasn’t considered the possibility that their customers might need to do a rapid shut down of their computers.  I can understand why some are sticking with Win7 while MS slowly irons out more wrinkles in Win10.
 
Wayne, thanks for your advice and offer for further assistance.
 
Regards,
 
James B
 
 
 
From: wayne
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 4:55 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?
 
James, when it comes to shutting down computers in the beginning of a thunder storm, to keep your computers as safe as possible, I feel that these are somethings you should do. Have an uninterupted power supply on each of the computers. There are different uninterupted power supplys. If your computers are wired via eithernet cable then you can buy an uninterupted power supply wi the eithernet ports for extra protection. In addition you can buy an eithernet kill switch to take them offline. Of course the absolute safest thing to do is, if it's convenient or if you could arrange for it to be convenient is to unplug that eithernet cable from the computer. Put it away from the computer in a glass container, however if your computers are wireless connected the eithernet cable cautions won't apply. Lightning is a very powerful thing, and I'm sad to hear that you lost a computer due to the thunder storm. As far as being able to shut down the computer quickly, however I'm not sure what would happen if you adjusted your power  management settings to shut down your computer when you tap the power button. I believe that it will go ahead and shut down properly in about 5 or 10 seconds. The thing I don't know is if you have pending updates if it would bring that up before it shuts down. That would be something to try, during times when there isn't a thunder storm.If it does bring up a dialog wanting you to install updates before you shut down then you definitely need that uninterupted power supply. and also a wireless connection so you can get that done. If you need to contact me,
greenwood33@...
Wayne 
----- Original Message -----
From: James Bentley
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 12:06 AM
Subject: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?
 
Hi all,
 
Several times now, I have run to all of my computers to quickly shut them down because a very strong thunderstorm is hitting my area.
 
Occasionally, Win10 does not give me the option to shutdown.  Sometimes, I only get the option to install updates and then shut down.  That takes a lot of time and we have very strong thunderstorms that hit with little or no warning.
 
I lost a desktop in July because I did not get to it fast enough.
 
I maybe could do a forced shut down.  But, I have heard for years now, that forced shut downs have a small risk of corrupting data.
 
Anyone have any suggestions?
 
Thanks,
 
James B
 
    


Re: A friend is a first time hearing aid buyer

john s
 

Brian, my aids use 675 batteries and they are more easily handled.


At 04:42 AM 3/14/2019, Brian K. Lingard, wrote:
Dear Gene & List:
 
I have Widex hearing aids. They seem to work well, however if your friend has any fine motor control issues or neuropathy in her hands, be warned the batteries are not much larger than the eraser on the end of a pencil in diameter and a little thicker than a shirt button. There is an IPhone App to control the aids, raise/lower volume, change program etc. They work as Bluetooth earpieces with an iPhone. The battery doors are fragile and will break unless handled with care.  Rechargeable batteries run the hearing aids for about 11-13 hours. Good enough for a workday however not if you want to use them in the evening after work.
Dry cells run the aids for about 7 days including well into the evening.
 
I use rechargeable batteries to avoid having to handle the tiny dry cells. Has a four-year manufacturers warranty, which is standard in the hearing aid biz.
 
As with all hearing aids they come in basic, able to extract someones conversation from a crowd and enhanced conversation extraction from background noise as in a large meeting or restaurant. Your friend probably wants the enhanced conversation extraction from background noise if they attend meetings or frequent restaurants etc.
 
Hearing aids may be partly covered by medical insurance, but most plans are downright stingy. The cost not covered by health insurance is an eligible medical expense in Canada, probably allowable medical expense in USA. Hearing aids are expensive so the co-pay in USA is minimal.
 
Hope this helps. Not sure if anyone makes hearing aids with larger, easier to handle, batteries. Dealer usually provides one-year worth of dry cells with hearing aids.
 
 
Brian K. Lingard VE3YI, Ab2JI, B. A., C. T. M.
 
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [ mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: March 5, 2019 11:51 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] a friend is a first time hearing aid buyer
 
A friend, (sighted, though I do not think that affects the recommendations people will give,) is a first time hearing aid buyer.  I know that some people really like certain hearing aids on this list and I would like to know what they recommend. 
 
Thanks for information.
 
Gene

                 John


Re: How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?

Gene
 

Here is a solution that will probably work.  I don't have Windows 10, for which let us give thanks, so I can't test it.
 
The easiest solution is probably to hibernate, not shut down.  Windows 10 may call it something else, I'm not sure what shutdown options are available.  There are two or three ways to turn off your computer without shutting down Windows.  Windows 10 users may wish to comment.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
From: wayne
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 7:01 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?

First of all, James, you're very welcome, and now that I have a clear picture of your situation I have a few more solutions for you. Well when it comes to shutting down a computer, and having to wait on windows updates, I don't know how long it would take to update windows and shut down, unless it is a very large windows update. The following may work quite well for you. You can purchase uninterupted power supply that will supply power for an hour or longer. Without more information I can't suggest which one for you to get. Hopefully other honest people in your area can help. This means that with a power supply you can unplug the power supply from the wall, and your computer will continue to operate for an hour or longer. This is important, you must choose an uninterupted power supply big enough to do this. If the other concern is static electricity then you can  do something I've thought about doing over the years, and that is to turn the place your living in, into a faraday cage. If you do you it and do it right you'll have absolutely no problems with static electricity.It's good to hear that you have all your equipment plugged into surge protectors. That is one thing that all the uninterupted power supplys have. In fact the business I'm in depends on safety, security and reliability. One last thing, anybody connected to the internet with an eithernet cable when a thunder storm just starts to brewing, should  have away to unplug the eithernet cable from the internet. Happy and safe computing. If you have any other questions, just ask. you can contact me at
 
 
or you could visit us at
Wayne
 
 Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 1:54 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?

Hi Wayne and all,
 
Fortunately, all of my systems here are wireless.  So, my concerns are limited to being able to do a rapid shut down of all computers as fast as possible.
 
I will experiment with your suggestion concerning changing what the power button does.  But, I do kind of have the feeling that Windows is just going to install the updates before shutting down.  There goes my chances for a rapid shut down while massive lightning bolts are hitting power lines, cable/internet lines, etc..
 
It may sound a bit like I am exaggerating but I have lived 83 feet up on a hill for around 24 years.  All of my long time neighbors can attest to multiple lightning strikes and thousands of dollars of fried electronics over the years.  I use $75.00, to $100.00, surge protectors on every thing but the static electricity in the air  is still occasionally quite strong.
 
I am starting to wonder why Microsoft hasn’t considered the possibility that their customers might need to do a rapid shut down of their computers.  I can understand why some are sticking with Win7 while MS slowly irons out more wrinkles in Win10.
 
Wayne, thanks for your advice and offer for further assistance.
 
Regards,
 
James B
 
 
 
From: wayne
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 4:55 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?
 
James, when it comes to shutting down computers in the beginning of a thunder storm, to keep your computers as safe as possible, I feel that these are somethings you should do. Have an uninterupted power supply on each of the computers. There are different uninterupted power supplys. If your computers are wired via eithernet cable then you can buy an uninterupted power supply wi the eithernet ports for extra protection. In addition you can buy an eithernet kill switch to take them offline. Of course the absolute safest thing to do is, if it's convenient or if you could arrange for it to be convenient is to unplug that eithernet cable from the computer. Put it away from the computer in a glass container, however if your computers are wireless connected the eithernet cable cautions won't apply. Lightning is a very powerful thing, and I'm sad to hear that you lost a computer due to the thunder storm. As far as being able to shut down the computer quickly, however I'm not sure what would happen if you adjusted your power  management settings to shut down your computer when you tap the power button. I believe that it will go ahead and shut down properly in about 5 or 10 seconds. The thing I don't know is if you have pending updates if it would bring that up before it shuts down. That would be something to try, during times when there isn't a thunder storm.If it does bring up a dialog wanting you to install updates before you shut down then you definitely need that uninterupted power supply. and also a wireless connection so you can get that done. If you need to contact me,
greenwood33@...
Wayne 
----- Original Message -----
From: James Bentley
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 12:06 AM
Subject: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?
 
Hi all,
 
Several times now, I have run to all of my computers to quickly shut them down because a very strong thunderstorm is hitting my area.
 
Occasionally, Win10 does not give me the option to shutdown.  Sometimes, I only get the option to install updates and then shut down.  That takes a lot of time and we have very strong thunderstorms that hit with little or no warning.
 
I lost a desktop in July because I did not get to it fast enough.
 
I maybe could do a forced shut down.  But, I have heard for years now, that forced shut downs have a small risk of corrupting data.
 
Anyone have any suggestions?
 
Thanks,
 
James B
 
    


Re: How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?

wayne <greenwood33@...>
 


First of all, James, you're very welcome, and now that I have a clear picture of your situation I have a few more solutions for you. Well when it comes to shutting down a computer, and having to wait on windows updates, I don't know how long it would take to update windows and shut down, unless it is a very large windows update. The following may work quite well for you. You can purchase uninterupted power supply that will supply power for an hour or longer. Without more information I can't suggest which one for you to get. Hopefully other honest people in your area can help. This means that with a power supply you can unplug the power supply from the wall, and your computer will continue to operate for an hour or longer. This is important, you must choose an uninterupted power supply big enough to do this. If the other concern is static electricity then you can  do something I've thought about doing over the years, and that is to turn the place your living in, into a faraday cage. If you do you it and do it right you'll have absolutely no problems with static electricity.It's good to hear that you have all your equipment plugged into surge protectors. That is one thing that all the uninterupted power supplys have. In fact the business I'm in depends on safety, security and reliability. One last thing, anybody connected to the internet with an eithernet cable when a thunder storm just starts to brewing, should  have away to unplug the eithernet cable from the internet. Happy and safe computing. If you have any other questions, just ask. you can contact me at
 
 
or you could visit us at
Wayne
 
 Original Message -----

Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 1:54 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?

Hi Wayne and all,
 
Fortunately, all of my systems here are wireless.  So, my concerns are limited to being able to do a rapid shut down of all computers as fast as possible.
 
I will experiment with your suggestion concerning changing what the power button does.  But, I do kind of have the feeling that Windows is just going to install the updates before shutting down.  There goes my chances for a rapid shut down while massive lightning bolts are hitting power lines, cable/internet lines, etc..
 
It may sound a bit like I am exaggerating but I have lived 83 feet up on a hill for around 24 years.  All of my long time neighbors can attest to multiple lightning strikes and thousands of dollars of fried electronics over the years.  I use $75.00, to $100.00, surge protectors on every thing but the static electricity in the air  is still occasionally quite strong.
 
I am starting to wonder why Microsoft hasn’t considered the possibility that their customers might need to do a rapid shut down of their computers.  I can understand why some are sticking with Win7 while MS slowly irons out more wrinkles in Win10.
 
Wayne, thanks for your advice and offer for further assistance.
 
Regards,
 
James B
 
 
 
From: wayne
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 4:55 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?
 
James, when it comes to shutting down computers in the beginning of a thunder storm, to keep your computers as safe as possible, I feel that these are somethings you should do. Have an uninterupted power supply on each of the computers. There are different uninterupted power supplys. If your computers are wired via eithernet cable then you can buy an uninterupted power supply wi the eithernet ports for extra protection. In addition you can buy an eithernet kill switch to take them offline. Of course the absolute safest thing to do is, if it's convenient or if you could arrange for it to be convenient is to unplug that eithernet cable from the computer. Put it away from the computer in a glass container, however if your computers are wireless connected the eithernet cable cautions won't apply. Lightning is a very powerful thing, and I'm sad to hear that you lost a computer due to the thunder storm. As far as being able to shut down the computer quickly, however I'm not sure what would happen if you adjusted your power  management settings to shut down your computer when you tap the power button. I believe that it will go ahead and shut down properly in about 5 or 10 seconds. The thing I don't know is if you have pending updates if it would bring that up before it shuts down. That would be something to try, during times when there isn't a thunder storm.If it does bring up a dialog wanting you to install updates before you shut down then you definitely need that uninterupted power supply. and also a wireless connection so you can get that done. If you need to contact me,
greenwood33@...
Wayne 
----- Original Message -----
From: James Bentley
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 12:06 AM
Subject: [TechTalk] How do I do an emergency shut down with windows 10?
 
Hi all,
 
Several times now, I have run to all of my computers to quickly shut them down because a very strong thunderstorm is hitting my area.
 
Occasionally, Win10 does not give me the option to shutdown.  Sometimes, I only get the option to install updates and then shut down.  That takes a lot of time and we have very strong thunderstorms that hit with little or no warning.
 
I lost a desktop in July because I did not get to it fast enough.
 
I maybe could do a forced shut down.  But, I have heard for years now, that forced shut downs have a small risk of corrupting data.
 
Anyone have any suggestions?
 
Thanks,
 
James B
 
    

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