Date   

Re: blood pressure moniter

Pamela Dominguez
 

It's like a scale. You don't always get the same weight from a scale, either. Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
Sent: Monday, October 14, 2019 3:46 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter

Yes, indeed, the arm blood pressure monitors are far more accurate. That
said, blood pressure monitors never truly give the same readings no matter
how many times you run a test. For example, someone could have the blood
pressure checked and it could be in the high hell; for such folks, just wait
a few seconds or about a minute and check again, a different reading will be
obtained. People who have what is typically labelled White Collar Syndrome
will usually have their readings skying through the roofs at initial read.

My company has always wanted to carry for sale talking blood pressure
monitors; I personally had the honor and pleasure of testing two such
devices when the company was approached by its makers. In fact, company
still has these two demo units on its shelf and I still play ball with them
now and then.

I didn't make a decision as to whether or not my company will agree to be a
reseller of the monitors I tested. Why? Despite reading the instructions a
thousand times over, I didn't figure out an easy way of getting them set up.
I suggested to the two makers to consider a different implementation of the
speech readout; no, they weren't open to that idea. I also told them that I
didn't want the selling price to go past $50 minus shipping should that be
necessary. No, my view did not count! They would sell the product to my
company at $58.75; hmm, not enough room for a mark-up that will not break
too many banks!

Ok, I let out too many secrets; so back to my hiding tent I go! But just
before I run, I agree with Gene's comments that a reading comparison of some
kind be done at a doctor's office in order to help determine whether or not
the readings will be reasonably reliable. Anyhow, I keep talking to blood
pressure makers with the hope that my company and I will stumble on one that
we can put through the torture test before announcing its availability to
the general public. Indeed, got to make a penny and a farthing over there
to stay employed, but, no, conscience won't let me sell something that does
not satisfy the torture test in my covert chambers.

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado





--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


Re: blood pressure moniter

Gerald Levy
 

I think the condition you are referring to is called white coat syndrome, not white collar syndrome.  It refers to the artificially high blood pressure readings some patients experience in a doctor's office because they are anxious or nervous. BTW, I apologize for giving the wrong web page for the Lot Fancy talking wrist blood pressure monitor.  The correct page is:


https://www.amazon.com/Pressure-LotFancy-Sphygmomanometer-Function-Approved/dp/B00Q681A68


Gerald

On 10/14/2019 3:46 PM, Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc. wrote:
Yes, indeed, the arm blood pressure monitors are far more accurate. That
said, blood pressure monitors never truly give the same readings no matter
how many times you run a test. For example, someone could have the blood
pressure checked and it could be in the high hell; for such folks, just wait
a few seconds or about a minute and check again, a different reading will be
obtained. People who have what is typically labelled White Collar Syndrome
will usually have their readings skying through the roofs at initial read.

My company has always wanted to carry for sale talking blood pressure
monitors; I personally had the honor and pleasure of testing two such
devices when the company was approached by its makers. In fact, company
still has these two demo units on its shelf and I still play ball with them
now and then.

I didn't make a decision as to whether or not my company will agree to be a
reseller of the monitors I tested. Why? Despite reading the instructions a
thousand times over, I didn't figure out an easy way of getting them set up.
I suggested to the two makers to consider a different implementation of the
speech readout; no, they weren't open to that idea. I also told them that I
didn't want the selling price to go past $50 minus shipping should that be
necessary. No, my view did not count! They would sell the product to my
company at $58.75; hmm, not enough room for a mark-up that will not break
too many banks!

Ok, I let out too many secrets; so back to my hiding tent I go! But just
before I run, I agree with Gene's comments that a reading comparison of some
kind be done at a doctor's office in order to help determine whether or not
the readings will be reasonably reliable. Anyhow, I keep talking to blood
pressure makers with the hope that my company and I will stumble on one that
we can put through the torture test before announcing its availability to
the general public. Indeed, got to make a penny and a farthing over there
to stay employed, but, no, conscience won't let me sell something that does
not satisfy the torture test in my covert chambers.

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado




Re: blood pressure moniter

Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
 

Yes, indeed, the arm blood pressure monitors are far more accurate. That
said, blood pressure monitors never truly give the same readings no matter
how many times you run a test. For example, someone could have the blood
pressure checked and it could be in the high hell; for such folks, just wait
a few seconds or about a minute and check again, a different reading will be
obtained. People who have what is typically labelled White Collar Syndrome
will usually have their readings skying through the roofs at initial read.

My company has always wanted to carry for sale talking blood pressure
monitors; I personally had the honor and pleasure of testing two such
devices when the company was approached by its makers. In fact, company
still has these two demo units on its shelf and I still play ball with them
now and then.

I didn't make a decision as to whether or not my company will agree to be a
reseller of the monitors I tested. Why? Despite reading the instructions a
thousand times over, I didn't figure out an easy way of getting them set up.
I suggested to the two makers to consider a different implementation of the
speech readout; no, they weren't open to that idea. I also told them that I
didn't want the selling price to go past $50 minus shipping should that be
necessary. No, my view did not count! They would sell the product to my
company at $58.75; hmm, not enough room for a mark-up that will not break
too many banks!

Ok, I let out too many secrets; so back to my hiding tent I go! But just
before I run, I agree with Gene's comments that a reading comparison of some
kind be done at a doctor's office in order to help determine whether or not
the readings will be reasonably reliable. Anyhow, I keep talking to blood
pressure makers with the hope that my company and I will stumble on one that
we can put through the torture test before announcing its availability to
the general public. Indeed, got to make a penny and a farthing over there
to stay employed, but, no, conscience won't let me sell something that does
not satisfy the torture test in my covert chambers.

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado


recommendations on a good indoor outdoor thermometer

lance allison
 

does anyone have a good recommendation on an accessible indoor outdoor thermometer that's accurate and has a decent menu maybe anyway thanks


Re: blood pressure moniter

Pamela Dominguez
 

I have an upper arm one, and what we did was to wrap it, velcro it, and then just slide it down when finished, so it can be slid up next time it needs to be used. Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Gerald Levy via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, October 14, 2019 12:08 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter


Another advantage of a wrist monitor over an upper-arm monitor is that
it is usually easier to wrap the cuff around your wrist yourself with
only your free hand. By contrast, an upper-arm monitor usually
requires two hands to wrap the cuff properly around your upper-arm,
which means that you may need somebody on hand to help you. So if you
livealone or do not always have another person on hand to help you, you
are probably better off with a wrist monitor, even if it is less
accurate as an upper-arm model.


Gerald



On 10/14/2019 11:48 AM, Hope Williamson wrote:
I somehow doubt in-home monitoring requires that accuracy as well. If I want it to be that accurate I suppose I can go to the doctor's office.







--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


Editing mp3 tags using windows explorer in windows10 and NVDA or jaws

Josh Kennedy
 

Hi,

I figured out an easy way to edit the tags of mp3 files in windows 10. Once you turn on the details view of windows explorer, and you are on an mp3 file, you just press tab and there are edit fields, edit the tags you want, tab to save and hit enter. And go on to the next one and do the same. An mp3 tag editor is not needed unless you want to do more advanced batch editing and stuff.

Josh


Sent from my iPod

Sent from my iPod


Re: blood pressure moniter

jan howells <gale7978@...>
 

When I got the blood pressure unit from Maxiaides, it got so tight on my arm, that it was painful. It never gets like that in a doctor's office.

Jan


Re: blood pressure moniter

Peter Spitz
 

The link is not to a talking BP monitor, it specifically says "NO
Talking Function".



On 10/14/19, Gerald Levy via Groups.Io
<bwaylimited=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Check out the Lot Fancy talking wrist blood pressure monitor which is
currently selling on Amazon for about $18. I have one myself and find
it to be reasonably, if not absolutely accurate. More importantly, the
speech quality is pretty good and it is convenient to use because you
can wrap the inflation cuff around your wrist yourself without needing
another person to help you:

https://www.amazon.com/LotFancy-Pressure-Monitor-Sphygmomanometer-Approved/dp/B00Q681A1I


Gerald



On 10/14/2019 11:56 AM, jan howells via Groups.Io wrote:
Where do they sell the wrist blood pressure units with speech?







Re: blood pressure moniter

Gerald Levy
 

Check out the Lot Fancy talking wrist blood pressure monitor which is currently selling on Amazon for about $18.  I have one myself and find it to be reasonably, if not absolutely accurate. More importantly, the speech quality is pretty good and it is convenient to use because you can wrap the inflation cuff around your wrist yourself without needing another person to help you:

https://www.amazon.com/LotFancy-Pressure-Monitor-Sphygmomanometer-Approved/dp/B00Q681A1I


Gerald

On 10/14/2019 11:56 AM, jan howells via Groups.Io wrote:
Where do they sell the wrist blood pressure units with speech?



Re: blood pressure moniter

Gerald Levy
 

Another advantage of a wrist monitor over an upper-arm monitor is that it is usually easier to wrap the cuff around your wrist yourself with only your free hand.  By contrast,  an upper-arm monitor usually requires two hands to wrap the cuff properly around your upper-arm, which means that you may need somebody on hand to help you.  So if you livealone or do not always have another person on hand to help you, you are probably better off with a wrist monitor, even if it is less accurate as an upper-arm model.


Gerald

On 10/14/2019 11:48 AM, Hope Williamson wrote:
I somehow doubt in-home monitoring requires that accuracy as well. If I want it to be that accurate I suppose I can go to the doctor's office.



Re: blood pressure moniter

Gene
 

We don't know how often you are measured at a doctors.  But accuracy in a home device matters if you rely on it.  If it tells you your blood pressure is 130 when its really 150, over a long period of time that matters. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, October 14, 2019 10:48 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter

I somehow doubt in-home monitoring requires that accuracy as well. If I
want it to be that accurate I suppose I can go to the doctor's office.



Re: blood pressure moniter

jan howells <gale7978@...>
 

Where do they sell the wrist blood pressure units with speech?


Re: blood pressure moniter

Hope Williamson <hopeisjoyful@...>
 

I somehow doubt in-home monitoring requires that accuracy as well. If I want it to be that accurate I suppose I can go to the doctor's office.


Re: blood pressure moniter

Dave Mitchel
 

no, I do not remember...sorry.
I tried using seeing A-I but nothing to read.
it is about the size of a pack of cigarettes with a velcro strap to hold onto your wrist.

Dave

-----Original Message-----
From: Amy Gordon
Sent: Monday, October 14, 2019 8:13 AM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter

Dave,
Do you know what the name of the blood pressure moniter is you got
on Amazon?
Thanks

On 10/14/19, Dave Mitchel <dbmitchel@centurylink.net> wrote:
I use the wrist type and it works fine for me. I got mine from amazon for
about $15 about a year ago.
I admit the voice isn't great, but you get used to that.


-----Original Message-----
From: Hope Williamson
Sent: Monday, October 14, 2019 6:37 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter

I'm also looking for one. The nurse that came here told me to get a
wrist one because it would probably be easier than having to use the arm
one.







Re: blood pressure moniter

Gerald Levy
 

But a dentist is not a medical doctor and does not usually require the accuracy of an upper-arm monitor.


Gerald

On 10/14/2019 11:40 AM, Hope Williamson wrote:
I've seen a dentist use a wrist one on me.



Re: blood pressure moniter

Hope Williamson <hopeisjoyful@...>
 

I've seen a dentist use a wrist one on me.


Re: blood pressure moniter

Carolyn Arnold
 

I just think the arm ones are more accurate, even thought that they cost more. Regardless, I am pretty certain that they are more accurate. Do you ever see a doctor or nurse use a wrist one on you?

Best regards,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Hope Williamson
Sent: Monday, October 14, 2019 9:54 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter

Hi Gene, I'm already pretty suspicious of Doctor's and nurses because of something that happened 4 years ago. It's a long story, but basically a doctor got me to track my fluid intake and output something I couldn't do by myself while I was staying with my parents briefly. She had no idea how much of a problem this was for me, and since none of you know my health conditions or my mother for that matter, you don't either.

I'm pretty sure the ones you put around your arm are cheaper than the wrist ones. Although I'll have to look at prices again.


Re: blood pressure moniter

Carolyn Arnold
 

I think you are right, Gene. I have had an arm one for over 20 years that I got from Maxi-Aids.

Best regards,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Monday, October 14, 2019 9:49 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter

Be very suspicious of what health people tel you will be easier because they may wel be basing their statements on some completely inaccurate idea about blindness.

The wrist ones are less accurate. As far as accuracy and quality, I can't compare different brands nor apps versus stand alone units. I can tell you that Speak to Me has a unit, I believe the same stand alone machine is available at Walgreen's, but others might definitely know and it may be a little less. But I tend to support blind small businesses, even if I pay a little more.

I havewn't compared my unit to other machines, but it appears to be reasonably accurate, though that is more a guess and an Impression than a statement. Whatever the case, even if mine isn't particularly accurate, it gives me an idea if my blood pressure is more or less within the limits it should be. I would suggest that, if you get one, take it to a doctor's office where they take manual blood pressure measurements and compare three readings of your machine to three readings they get.

Gene
------ Original Message -----

From: Hope Williamson <mailto:hopeisjoyful@gmail.com>
Sent: Monday, October 14, 2019 8:37 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter

I'm also looking for one. The nurse that came here told me to get a wrist one because it would probably be easier than having to use the arm one.


Re: blood pressure moniter

Gerald Levy
 

No, no.  Wrist blood pressure monitors are generally cheaper and less accurate than upper-arm monitors. All doctors use upper-arm monitors, and many still prefer the old-fashioned analog type.


Gerald

On 10/14/2019 9:54 AM, Hope Williamson wrote:
Hi Gene, I'm already pretty suspicious of Doctor's and nurses because of something that happened 4 years ago. It's a long story, but basically a doctor got me to track my fluid intake and output something I couldn't do by myself while I was staying with my parents briefly. She had no idea how much of a problem this was for me, and since none of you know my health conditions or my mother for that matter, you don't either.

    I'm pretty sure the ones you put around your arm are cheaper than the wrist ones. Although I'll have to look at prices again.




Re: songs out of order when I sinc with itunes

Josh Kennedy
 

sounds like a lot of work. I wonder if making an m3u playlist would be a better solution/ I tried vlc to make an m3u playlist, but I cannot edit it in vlc and it too uses the tags putting the episodes out of order. But at least the m3u file is easily editable in notepad. Could I build an m3u playlist from scratch in notepad and therefore, force my itunes and other players to play the episodes in order without all the extra work of re-tagging? also vlc seems to mark up its m3u playlist with comments. I am guessing these lines are ignored because they start with a number sign or hash mark. 

Josh

18401 - 18420 of 102163