Date   

Re: No spell checker in WLM after setting up a new laptop

M.E.N. <magpie.mn@...>
 

do you have MS Office installed on the laptop? I believe that WLM gets the spell checker from Office.
 

From: James Bentley
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 7:27 AM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] No spell checker in WLM after setting up a new laptop
 
Hi,
 
I seem to remember this problem comeing up beforewith other listers.  Now, its me.
 
What do I need to do to get spell checking up and running?
 
Loads of thanks,
 
James B
 
 


Re: blood pressure moniter

Kay Malmquist
 

Yes,well this time I have to agree with Gene.  If you are the only one using the cuff, you can adjust it to your arm and leave it there.  I just got out of the hospital and was there for a couple of days.  I had my own cuff that was on the machine that was in my room and they did not un-Velcro it.  A couple of times they did, but for the most part it was left alone.  Now, as far as doctors are concerned,  they do have no idea as to what a blind person is capable of.  Thank God I am a good advocate for myself.  I went in to my supposed primary care doctor because I had to have a physical to get another guide dog.  One of the things they needed to do of course was a Uren analysis.  That would require a person to pee in a cup.  Pardon my bluntness.  So, we get to the end of the physical, with this doctor asking the dumbest and strangest questions.  Now, his nurse comes in to finish up with the lab work requirements.  He is reading them out loud and gets to the part where it says urinalysis unable to get due to inability of patient to urinate in a cup.  I asked him what the heck that was about.  He said that he didn't know and asked me if I could do that ok?  Of course I said I could and that this doctor hadn't even asked me if that would be a problem.  This nurse was totally ok and wondered why he the doctor would do such a thing.  Dealing with medical issues with my last husband before he died and my mom, I have come to learn that the stupidity and ignorance in the medical profession is rampant and stunningly amazing.  So, in summarizing, don't take the word of a doctor or nurse that thinks they have your best interests in mind.  Some are really good, but there are many that don't have a clue and don't have any intention of educating themselves.
 
 
Kay Malmquist
kay.malmquist@...
KINDNESS
Kindness in words creates confidence.
Kindness in thinking creates profoundness.
Kindness in giving creates love.
-- Lao-Tzu

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 7:39 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter


Where did you receive your medical training?  Wrapping a blood pressure cuff around your upper arm has nothing whatsoever to do with being blind or sighted or "common sense".  It is a matter of proper technique.  Medical students spend countless hours in medical school and residency learning the proper way to take a patient's blood pressure.  They are never taught to fasten the cuff first and then slide it over the patient's hand and then slide it up in place around the upper arm.  They are taught to have the patient rest his elbow on a flat surface and then wrap the cuff snugly around the upper arm.  This is the only proper technique for obtaining consistently accurate readings.  Doing it your way is considered unacceptable.  I know what I'm talking about because I was pre-med in college and kept up with some of my classmates who went on to medical school and became doctors.  But if your technique works for you, then keep doing it this way.  But don't sit there and accuse doctors of not knowing anything about blindness, because wrapping a blood pressure cuff properly to get accurate results has nothing to do withbeing blind or sighted.


Gerald



On 10/15/2019 7:30 AM, Gene wrote:
As far as doctors telling blind people what they can and can't do, their advice is no more accurate than anyone else's.  They are doctors.  That doesn't mean they know anything about blindness and I evaluate their advice on the basis that if it makes sense, fine, if it doesn't, well, that's just one more sighted person who thinks he knows about blindness who, as is so often the case, doesn't. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 6:20 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter


Really?  Once you slide the cuff in place around your upper arm, if you unfasten the velcro fasteners to make the cuff tighter with your free hand , it is liable to fall off or slide out of place unless you have somebody else on hand to help you adjust it.  My doctor has advised me never to attach the cuff this way because it could result in inaccurate readings.  He suggested that if I didn't have another person on hand to wrap the cuff properly around my upper arm, then I should consider a wrist monitor instead.   


Gerald



On 10/14/2019 11:57 PM, Gene wrote:
You could easily tighten it and experiment. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, October 14, 2019 10:44 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter

That would be my problem, Gerald.  I would make it too loose.

Jan



Re: Looking for Player app for Windows 10 to speed up audiobooks

Gene
 

There are other programs that do this as well, but the best one I know of is Windows Media Player.  Unfortunately, the interface for doing this isn't convenient to use.  So if you try other programs and you aren't satisfied, let us know and I'll figure out how to do this with, I believe a version of media Player that has the same interface as yours.
 
Gene

----- Original message -----
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 9:52 AM
Subject: [TechTalk] Looking for Player app for Windows 10 to speed up audiobooks

Could someone recommend an audio player for Windows 10 in which I can speed up an audiobook by rate and not increase the pitch, kind of the way that the Victor Stream does it? 


Re: Looking for Player app for Windows 10 to speed up audiobooks

Smiling?
 

VLC. Just grab it from ninite.com.

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Steven Johnson
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 7:53 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Looking for Player app for Windows 10 to speed up audiobooks

 

Could someone recommend an audio player for Windows 10 in which I can speed up an audiobook by rate and not increase the pitch, kind of the way that the Victor Stream does it? 


Looking for Player app for Windows 10 to speed up audiobooks

Steven Johnson <saxmonger@...>
 

Could someone recommend an audio player for Windows 10 in which I can speed up an audiobook by rate and not increase the pitch, kind of the way that the Victor Stream does it? 


No spell checker in WLM after setting up a new laptop

James Bentley
 

Hi,
 
I seem to remember this problem comeing up beforewith other listers.  Now, its me.
 
What do I need to do to get spell checking up and running?
 
Loads of thanks,
 
James B
 
 


Mute This Topic?

Vicky Vaughan <vrvaughan63@...>
 

Hello List, I am using Outlook 2016 on a Windows 10 desk top computer with Jaws 2019 to read my messages.  From time to time, a subject in which I have no interest comes up and I would like to not have to wade through it again and again.

 

One of the options on this list is:

“Mute This Topic”, but neither pressing Enter or Space bar nor Tab, have stopped this topic from popping up again and again.

 

Does anyone here know how to make this work?

 

I would really appreciate help on this, since it would definitely cut down on the time it takes to go through messages!

 

Sincerely, Vicky V

 


Virus-free. www.avg.com


Re: blood pressure moniter

Gene
 

I did.  He said it about matched his measurement.  But that doesn't prove anything.  Suppose someone's machine isn't as accurate in general?  Suppose my method were less accurate and that, combined with my machine's possible inaccuracy meant that the two combined to proeduce an accurate measurement? 
 
More to the point, if someone wanted to test the two methods to see if there were any difference, you could take three measurements using your method, opening the cuff, then wrapping it around the arm three times and taking three measurements, then setting the cuff and sliding it off and on again and taking three measurements.  You would leave about the same time between measurements. 
 
If the measurements were about the same each way, then you can conclude that my method is as accurate as the other.  I see no reason for there to be a difference. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 8:59 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter


To prove that your method works as accurately and reliably  as you claim, have you ever taken your talking upper-arm blood pressure monitor to your doctor's office, taken your blood bressure yourself under his supervision using your technique of sliding the fastened cuff over your hand and then pushing it up into position around your upper arm  and then having the doctor take your pressure again his way with a professional-grade monitor or even your own monitor and comparing the results?


Gerald



On 10/15/2019 9:01 AM, Gene wrote:
If it has nothing to do with being blind or sighted, then a blind person can do it as well as a sighted person can.  And despite what you say, there is no logical reason why my system won't work well.  Maybe they are taught to do it your way because different people have different size arms and they want to start fresh with different people.  You completely neglect to take that into consideration.  Using the cuff on the same person with the same size arm removes the need to use the method you describe. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 7:39 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter


Where did you receive your medical training?  Wrapping a blood pressure cuff around your upper arm has nothing whatsoever to do with being blind or sighted or "common sense".  It is a matter of proper technique.  Medical students spend countless hours in medical school and residency learning the proper way to take a patient's blood pressure.  They are never taught to fasten the cuff first and then slide it over the patient's hand and then slide it up in place around the upper arm.  They are taught to have the patient rest his elbow on a flat surface and then wrap the cuff snugly around the upper arm.  This is the only proper technique for obtaining consistently accurate readings.  Doing it your way is considered unacceptable.  I know what I'm talking about because I was pre-med in college and kept up with some of my classmates who went on to medical school and became doctors.  But if your technique works for you, then keep doing it this way.  But don't sit there and accuse doctors of not knowing anything about blindness, because wrapping a blood pressure cuff properly to get accurate results has nothing to do withbeing blind or sighted.


Gerald



On 10/15/2019 7:30 AM, Gene wrote:
As far as doctors telling blind people what they can and can't do, their advice is no more accurate than anyone else's.  They are doctors.  That doesn't mean they know anything about blindness and I evaluate their advice on the basis that if it makes sense, fine, if it doesn't, well, that's just one more sighted person who thinks he knows about blindness who, as is so often the case, doesn't. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 6:20 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter


Really?  Once you slide the cuff in place around your upper arm, if you unfasten the velcro fasteners to make the cuff tighter with your free hand , it is liable to fall off or slide out of place unless you have somebody else on hand to help you adjust it.  My doctor has advised me never to attach the cuff this way because it could result in inaccurate readings.  He suggested that if I didn't have another person on hand to wrap the cuff properly around my upper arm, then I should consider a wrist monitor instead.   


Gerald



On 10/14/2019 11:57 PM, Gene wrote:
You could easily tighten it and experiment. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, October 14, 2019 10:44 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter

That would be my problem, Gerald.  I would make it too loose.

Jan



Re: iPhone XS Max Urgent Help.

George Zaynoun
 

Thank you my namesake but the serene is shouting and it is calling sos.
Original message:

Plug phone in
Now do the following
You need to do the first two steps fast then hold the third sted.
Tapval up and tap val down button then hold in the power on off button to
your phone restarts
-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of George
Zaynoun
Sent: October 15, 2019 6:41
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] iPhone XS Max Urgent Help.
Hi!
To begin with and before I get the question I am on the last update on iOS.
I was editing an email and was using SmartBeetle Braille display.
Suddenly speech stopped completely and the cursor on the Braille display
began dancing but I couldn't navigate any more.
Tried to restart my Braille display as I do in such situations for no avail.
Exited and restarted VoiceOver with both Siri and the side button and Siri
is confirming as usual but the Braille is remembering even when VoiceOver
the last state it was displaying i.e the last words I wrote.
I am enabling Voice Control to try open settings-general-shut down but no
voice feedback.
Tried connecting it to iTunes but it is saying I must continue on the iPhone
to allow Sync.
Finally I chased a sighted woman and she confirmed my worries, the slider to
shut down does not work and not when I connect it to iTunes either to allow
sync with pc.
Now I want to force it shut down but how for heavens sake?
I am getting notifications from the apps on it and it rings, any help
thanks.
--
Georges Zeinoun
Timmerv. 6A ITR LGH1102, 54163 SKÖVDE SWEDEN
Tel: +46 (500) 48 29 29 Mobile: +46 (70) 366 63 29




--
Georges Zeinoun
Timmerv. 6A ITR LGH1102, 54163 SKÖVDE SWEDEN
Tel: +46 (500) 48 29 29 Mobile: +46 (70) 366 63 29


Re: blood pressure moniter

Gerald Levy
 


To prove that your method works as accurately and reliably  as you claim, have you ever taken your talking upper-arm blood pressure monitor to your doctor's office, taken your blood bressure yourself under his supervision using your technique of sliding the fastened cuff over your hand and then pushing it up into position around your upper arm  and then having the doctor take your pressure again his way with a professional-grade monitor or even your own monitor and comparing the results?


Gerald



On 10/15/2019 9:01 AM, Gene wrote:
If it has nothing to do with being blind or sighted, then a blind person can do it as well as a sighted person can.  And despite what you say, there is no logical reason why my system won't work well.  Maybe they are taught to do it your way because different people have different size arms and they want to start fresh with different people.  You completely neglect to take that into consideration.  Using the cuff on the same person with the same size arm removes the need to use the method you describe. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 7:39 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter


Where did you receive your medical training?  Wrapping a blood pressure cuff around your upper arm has nothing whatsoever to do with being blind or sighted or "common sense".  It is a matter of proper technique.  Medical students spend countless hours in medical school and residency learning the proper way to take a patient's blood pressure.  They are never taught to fasten the cuff first and then slide it over the patient's hand and then slide it up in place around the upper arm.  They are taught to have the patient rest his elbow on a flat surface and then wrap the cuff snugly around the upper arm.  This is the only proper technique for obtaining consistently accurate readings.  Doing it your way is considered unacceptable.  I know what I'm talking about because I was pre-med in college and kept up with some of my classmates who went on to medical school and became doctors.  But if your technique works for you, then keep doing it this way.  But don't sit there and accuse doctors of not knowing anything about blindness, because wrapping a blood pressure cuff properly to get accurate results has nothing to do withbeing blind or sighted.


Gerald



On 10/15/2019 7:30 AM, Gene wrote:
As far as doctors telling blind people what they can and can't do, their advice is no more accurate than anyone else's.  They are doctors.  That doesn't mean they know anything about blindness and I evaluate their advice on the basis that if it makes sense, fine, if it doesn't, well, that's just one more sighted person who thinks he knows about blindness who, as is so often the case, doesn't. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 6:20 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter


Really?  Once you slide the cuff in place around your upper arm, if you unfasten the velcro fasteners to make the cuff tighter with your free hand , it is liable to fall off or slide out of place unless you have somebody else on hand to help you adjust it.  My doctor has advised me never to attach the cuff this way because it could result in inaccurate readings.  He suggested that if I didn't have another person on hand to wrap the cuff properly around my upper arm, then I should consider a wrist monitor instead.   


Gerald



On 10/14/2019 11:57 PM, Gene wrote:
You could easily tighten it and experiment. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, October 14, 2019 10:44 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter

That would be my problem, Gerald.  I would make it too loose.

Jan



Re: iPhone XS Max Urgent Help.

george b <gbmagoo@...>
 

Plug phone in
Now do the following

You need to do the first two steps fast then hold the third sted.

Tapval up and tap val down button then hold in the power on off button to
your phone restarts

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of George
Zaynoun
Sent: October 15, 2019 6:41
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] iPhone XS Max Urgent Help.

Hi!
To begin with and before I get the question I am on the last update on iOS.
I was editing an email and was using SmartBeetle Braille display.
Suddenly speech stopped completely and the cursor on the Braille display
began dancing but I couldn't navigate any more.
Tried to restart my Braille display as I do in such situations for no avail.
Exited and restarted VoiceOver with both Siri and the side button and Siri
is confirming as usual but the Braille is remembering even when VoiceOver
the last state it was displaying i.e the last words I wrote.
I am enabling Voice Control to try open settings-general-shut down but no
voice feedback.
Tried connecting it to iTunes but it is saying I must continue on the iPhone
to allow Sync.
Finally I chased a sighted woman and she confirmed my worries, the slider to
shut down does not work and not when I connect it to iTunes either to allow
sync with pc.
Now I want to force it shut down but how for heavens sake?
I am getting notifications from the apps on it and it rings, any help
thanks.

--
Georges Zeinoun
Timmerv. 6A ITR LGH1102, 54163 SKÖVDE SWEDEN
Tel: +46 (500) 48 29 29 Mobile: +46 (70) 366 63 29


iPhone XS Max Urgent Help.

George Zaynoun
 

Hi!
To begin with and before I get the question I am on the last update on iOS.
I was editing an email and was using SmartBeetle Braille display.
Suddenly speech stopped completely and the cursor on the Braille display began dancing but I couldn't navigate any more.
Tried to restart my Braille display as I do in such situations for no avail. Exited and restarted VoiceOver with both Siri and the side button and Siri is confirming as usual but the Braille is remembering even when VoiceOver the last state it was displaying i.e the last words I wrote.
I am enabling Voice Control to try open settings-general-shut down but no voice feedback.
Tried connecting it to iTunes but it is saying I must continue on the iPhone to allow Sync.
Finally I chased a sighted woman and she confirmed my worries, the slider to shut down does not work and not when I connect it to iTunes either to allow sync with pc.
Now I want to force it shut down but how for heavens sake?
I am getting notifications from the apps on it and it rings, any help thanks.

--
Georges Zeinoun
Timmerv. 6A ITR LGH1102, 54163 SKÖVDE SWEDEN
Tel: +46 (500) 48 29 29 Mobile: +46 (70) 366 63 29


Re: blood pressure moniter

Gene
 

If it has nothing to do with being blind or sighted, then a blind person can do it as well as a sighted person can.  And despite what you say, there is no logical reason why my system won't work well.  Maybe they are taught to do it your way because different people have different size arms and they want to start fresh with different people.  You completely neglect to take that into consideration.  Using the cuff on the same person with the same size arm removes the need to use the method you describe. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 7:39 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter


Where did you receive your medical training?  Wrapping a blood pressure cuff around your upper arm has nothing whatsoever to do with being blind or sighted or "common sense".  It is a matter of proper technique.  Medical students spend countless hours in medical school and residency learning the proper way to take a patient's blood pressure.  They are never taught to fasten the cuff first and then slide it over the patient's hand and then slide it up in place around the upper arm.  They are taught to have the patient rest his elbow on a flat surface and then wrap the cuff snugly around the upper arm.  This is the only proper technique for obtaining consistently accurate readings.  Doing it your way is considered unacceptable.  I know what I'm talking about because I was pre-med in college and kept up with some of my classmates who went on to medical school and became doctors.  But if your technique works for you, then keep doing it this way.  But don't sit there and accuse doctors of not knowing anything about blindness, because wrapping a blood pressure cuff properly to get accurate results has nothing to do withbeing blind or sighted.


Gerald



On 10/15/2019 7:30 AM, Gene wrote:
As far as doctors telling blind people what they can and can't do, their advice is no more accurate than anyone else's.  They are doctors.  That doesn't mean they know anything about blindness and I evaluate their advice on the basis that if it makes sense, fine, if it doesn't, well, that's just one more sighted person who thinks he knows about blindness who, as is so often the case, doesn't. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 6:20 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter


Really?  Once you slide the cuff in place around your upper arm, if you unfasten the velcro fasteners to make the cuff tighter with your free hand , it is liable to fall off or slide out of place unless you have somebody else on hand to help you adjust it.  My doctor has advised me never to attach the cuff this way because it could result in inaccurate readings.  He suggested that if I didn't have another person on hand to wrap the cuff properly around my upper arm, then I should consider a wrist monitor instead.   


Gerald



On 10/14/2019 11:57 PM, Gene wrote:
You could easily tighten it and experiment. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, October 14, 2019 10:44 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter

That would be my problem, Gerald.  I would make it too loose.

Jan



Re: blood pressure moniter

Gene
 

Countless hours learning how to take blood pressure?  Where do they have time to learn anything else?  If it were that difficult, no layman could do it. 
 
And where did you get your medical degree? 
 Why do you insist you are right no matter how much experience and knowledge others have on a subject. 
 
If you want to believe a doctor who spent time, but not countless hours, learning how to take blood pressure, but who obviously knows nothing about blindness over my between roughly fifteen and twenty years of experience, that's your privelege.  I hope others following this thread will believe that someone with between fifteen and twenty years experience doing this as a blind person may know more about the subject than a doctor who obviously knows nothing about blindness.
 
I would advise you to stop glorifying authorities and start paying serious attentiont to blind people who have spend countless hours learning to live and function as blind people.
 
Gene

Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 7:39 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter


Where did you receive your medical training?  Wrapping a blood pressure cuff around your upper arm has nothing whatsoever to do with being blind or sighted or "common sense".  It is a matter of proper technique.  Medical students spend countless hours in medical school and residency learning the proper way to take a patient's blood pressure.  They are never taught to fasten the cuff first and then slide it over the patient's hand and then slide it up in place around the upper arm.  They are taught to have the patient rest his elbow on a flat surface and then wrap the cuff snugly around the upper arm.  This is the only proper technique for obtaining consistently accurate readings.  Doing it your way is considered unacceptable.  I know what I'm talking about because I was pre-med in college and kept up with some of my classmates who went on to medical school and became doctors.  But if your technique works for you, then keep doing it this way.  But don't sit there and accuse doctors of not knowing anything about blindness, because wrapping a blood pressure cuff properly to get accurate results has nothing to do withbeing blind or sighted.


Gerald



On 10/15/2019 7:30 AM, Gene wrote:
As far as doctors telling blind people what they can and can't do, their advice is no more accurate than anyone else's.  They are doctors.  That doesn't mean they know anything about blindness and I evaluate their advice on the basis that if it makes sense, fine, if it doesn't, well, that's just one more sighted person who thinks he knows about blindness who, as is so often the case, doesn't. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 6:20 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter


Really?  Once you slide the cuff in place around your upper arm, if you unfasten the velcro fasteners to make the cuff tighter with your free hand , it is liable to fall off or slide out of place unless you have somebody else on hand to help you adjust it.  My doctor has advised me never to attach the cuff this way because it could result in inaccurate readings.  He suggested that if I didn't have another person on hand to wrap the cuff properly around my upper arm, then I should consider a wrist monitor instead.   


Gerald



On 10/14/2019 11:57 PM, Gene wrote:
You could easily tighten it and experiment. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, October 14, 2019 10:44 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter

That would be my problem, Gerald.  I would make it too loose.

Jan



Re: blood pressure moniter

Gerald Levy
 


Where did you receive your medical training?  Wrapping a blood pressure cuff around your upper arm has nothing whatsoever to do with being blind or sighted or "common sense".  It is a matter of proper technique.  Medical students spend countless hours in medical school and residency learning the proper way to take a patient's blood pressure.  They are never taught to fasten the cuff first and then slide it over the patient's hand and then slide it up in place around the upper arm.  They are taught to have the patient rest his elbow on a flat surface and then wrap the cuff snugly around the upper arm.  This is the only proper technique for obtaining consistently accurate readings.  Doing it your way is considered unacceptable.  I know what I'm talking about because I was pre-med in college and kept up with some of my classmates who went on to medical school and became doctors.  But if your technique works for you, then keep doing it this way.  But don't sit there and accuse doctors of not knowing anything about blindness, because wrapping a blood pressure cuff properly to get accurate results has nothing to do withbeing blind or sighted.


Gerald



On 10/15/2019 7:30 AM, Gene wrote:
As far as doctors telling blind people what they can and can't do, their advice is no more accurate than anyone else's.  They are doctors.  That doesn't mean they know anything about blindness and I evaluate their advice on the basis that if it makes sense, fine, if it doesn't, well, that's just one more sighted person who thinks he knows about blindness who, as is so often the case, doesn't. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 6:20 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter


Really?  Once you slide the cuff in place around your upper arm, if you unfasten the velcro fasteners to make the cuff tighter with your free hand , it is liable to fall off or slide out of place unless you have somebody else on hand to help you adjust it.  My doctor has advised me never to attach the cuff this way because it could result in inaccurate readings.  He suggested that if I didn't have another person on hand to wrap the cuff properly around my upper arm, then I should consider a wrist monitor instead.   


Gerald



On 10/14/2019 11:57 PM, Gene wrote:
You could easily tighten it and experiment. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, October 14, 2019 10:44 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter

That would be my problem, Gerald.  I would make it too loose.

Jan



Re: blood pressure moniter

Monte Single
 

Hold your arm straight out while adjusting  the cuff.  It  cannot slide off..

Maybe your doctor is used to having a helper.

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gerald Levy via Groups.Io
Sent: October-15-19 5:20 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter

 

 

Really?  Once you slide the cuff in place around your upper arm, if you unfasten the velcro fasteners to make the cuff tighter with your free hand , it is liable to fall off or slide out of place unless you have somebody else on hand to help you adjust it.  My doctor has advised me never to attach the cuff this way because it could result in inaccurate readings.  He suggested that if I didn't have another person on hand to wrap the cuff properly around my upper arm, then I should consider a wrist monitor instead.   

 

Gerald

 

 

On 10/14/2019 11:57 PM, Gene wrote:

You could easily tighten it and experiment. 

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Monday, October 14, 2019 10:44 PM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter

 

That would be my problem, Gerald.  I would make it too loose.

Jan


Re: blood pressure moniter

Gene
 

And even if what you are saying is correct, which it isn't, and I base that on more than fifteen years' experience, not on a doctor's advice who doesn't have any idea what blind people can do, if you adjust it with the help of a sighted person, you don't have to adjust it again.  You don't keep changing the adjustment.  You adjust it and, when adjusted, it stays adjusted.  Just one more example of blind people receiving inferior medical treatment because they are blind.  Use the less accurate wrist monitor.  You will get a less accurate reading, but that's just part of being blind. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
From: Gene
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 6:30 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter

As far as doctors telling blind people what they can and can't do, their advice is no more accurate than anyone else's.  They are doctors.  That doesn't mean they know anything about blindness and I evaluate their advice on the basis that if it makes sense, fine, if it doesn't, well, that's just one more sighted person who thinks he knows about blindness who, as is so often the case, doesn't. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 6:20 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter


Really?  Once you slide the cuff in place around your upper arm, if you unfasten the velcro fasteners to make the cuff tighter with your free hand , it is liable to fall off or slide out of place unless you have somebody else on hand to help you adjust it.  My doctor has advised me never to attach the cuff this way because it could result in inaccurate readings.  He suggested that if I didn't have another person on hand to wrap the cuff properly around my upper arm, then I should consider a wrist monitor instead.   


Gerald



On 10/14/2019 11:57 PM, Gene wrote:
You could easily tighten it and experiment. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, October 14, 2019 10:44 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter

That would be my problem, Gerald.  I would make it too loose.

Jan



Re: blood pressure moniter

Gene
 

As far as doctors telling blind people what they can and can't do, their advice is no more accurate than anyone else's.  They are doctors.  That doesn't mean they know anything about blindness and I evaluate their advice on the basis that if it makes sense, fine, if it doesn't, well, that's just one more sighted person who thinks he knows about blindness who, as is so often the case, doesn't. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 6:20 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter


Really?  Once you slide the cuff in place around your upper arm, if you unfasten the velcro fasteners to make the cuff tighter with your free hand , it is liable to fall off or slide out of place unless you have somebody else on hand to help you adjust it.  My doctor has advised me never to attach the cuff this way because it could result in inaccurate readings.  He suggested that if I didn't have another person on hand to wrap the cuff properly around my upper arm, then I should consider a wrist monitor instead.   


Gerald



On 10/14/2019 11:57 PM, Gene wrote:
You could easily tighten it and experiment. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, October 14, 2019 10:44 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter

That would be my problem, Gerald.  I would make it too loose.

Jan



Re: blood pressure moniter

Gene
 

I'm telling you from experience that it isn't, at least not on the cuff used with my machine.  It doesn't slide or fall off.  You loosen the velcroe and there is a metal rod that the part of the cuff is under that keeps it in place.  it doesn't keep it from moving, but it keeps it from falling away from the other part.  So you can make it looser or tighter and then press the part you are sliding against the other part to make the velcroe tight. 
 
Gene

Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 6:20 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter


Really?  Once you slide the cuff in place around your upper arm, if you unfasten the velcro fasteners to make the cuff tighter with your free hand , it is liable to fall off or slide out of place unless you have somebody else on hand to help you adjust it.  My doctor has advised me never to attach the cuff this way because it could result in inaccurate readings.  He suggested that if I didn't have another person on hand to wrap the cuff properly around my upper arm, then I should consider a wrist monitor instead.   


Gerald



On 10/14/2019 11:57 PM, Gene wrote:
You could easily tighten it and experiment. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, October 14, 2019 10:44 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter

That would be my problem, Gerald.  I would make it too loose.

Jan



Re: blood pressure moniter

Gerald Levy
 


Really?  Once you slide the cuff in place around your upper arm, if you unfasten the velcro fasteners to make the cuff tighter with your free hand , it is liable to fall off or slide out of place unless you have somebody else on hand to help you adjust it.  My doctor has advised me never to attach the cuff this way because it could result in inaccurate readings.  He suggested that if I didn't have another person on hand to wrap the cuff properly around my upper arm, then I should consider a wrist monitor instead.   


Gerald



On 10/14/2019 11:57 PM, Gene wrote:
You could easily tighten it and experiment. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, October 14, 2019 10:44 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter

That would be my problem, Gerald.  I would make it too loose.

Jan


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