Date   

Re: blood pressure moniter

Pamela Dominguez
 

It has to do with whether the doctor thinks you are not capable because you are blind, so you need help.  Pam.
 

Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 8:39 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter
 

 

Where did you receive your medical training?  Wrapping a blood pressure cuff around your upper arm has nothing whatsoever to do with being blind or sighted or "common sense".  It is a matter of proper technique.  Medical students spend countless hours in medical school and residency learning the proper way to take a patient's blood pressure.  They are never taught to fasten the cuff first and then slide it over the patient's hand and then slide it up in place around the upper arm.  They are taught to have the patient rest his elbow on a flat surface and then wrap the cuff snugly around the upper arm.  This is the only proper technique for obtaining consistently accurate readings.  Doing it your way is considered unacceptable.  I know what I'm talking about because I was pre-med in college and kept up with some of my classmates who went on to medical school and became doctors.  But if your technique works for you, then keep doing it this way.  But don't sit there and accuse doctors of not knowing anything about blindness, because wrapping a blood pressure cuff properly to get accurate results has nothing to do withbeing blind or sighted.

 

Gerald

 

 

On 10/15/2019 7:30 AM, Gene wrote:
As far as doctors telling blind people what they can and can't do, their advice is no more accurate than anyone else's.  They are doctors.  That doesn't mean they know anything about blindness and I evaluate their advice on the basis that if it makes sense, fine, if it doesn't, well, that's just one more sighted person who thinks he knows about blindness who, as is so often the case, doesn't. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 6:20 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter
 

 

Really?  Once you slide the cuff in place around your upper arm, if you unfasten the velcro fasteners to make the cuff tighter with your free hand , it is liable to fall off or slide out of place unless you have somebody else on hand to help you adjust it.  My doctor has advised me never to attach the cuff this way because it could result in inaccurate readings.  He suggested that if I didn't have another person on hand to wrap the cuff properly around my upper arm, then I should consider a wrist monitor instead.   

 

Gerald

 

 

On 10/14/2019 11:57 PM, Gene wrote:
You could easily tighten it and experiment. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, October 14, 2019 10:44 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter
 
That would be my problem, Gerald.  I would make it too loose.

Jan



Virus-free. www.avg.com


Re: blood pressure moniter

Carolyn Arnold
 

I still have the old cassette in the case with the monitor.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Pamela Dominguez
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 4:20 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter

There are three buttons on the bottom of mine. I don’t remember what they say when you press them, but supposedly, when I bought it from Independent living Aids, I think they said they set it up for me. But they got pressed. I’ll have to take the machine out and see if I can just take my blood pressure the way it is, and see if I really need anything done to it. There used to be a cassette of instructions, but after all these years, I have lost it. Pam.

From: Gene <mailto:gsasner@gmail.com>
Sent: Monday, October 14, 2019 8:19 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter

I didn't have to set up anything on the speak to me unit. I'm sure you can set up some sort of profile for you, in terms of seeing information under your name or something similar, such as user 1. But I'm the only user. Andd I have access to the memory, which allows me to go back and see a lot of previous readings. Because I didn't set up a profile, they weren't marked in any way as to time and day, which I suspect is done with a profile. But if I take three measurements in a certain morning and I want to check them, I can go through and hear those measurements. The memory goes back much further.

The machine isn't ideal because you can't set up a profile by yourself but it is very adequate and completely accessible for performing its main function. If you want perfection, you often won't get something that is very useable.

Regarding accuracy of measure, proper instructions tell you to take three measurements of blood pressure for each session. I don't recall how far apart they should be spaced. I often take three.

As far as the white coat syndrome is concerned, that refers to some peoples' reaction when having their pressure taken in a doctor's office. I suppose some people might be anxious at home, but I would think they would know it.

Where I find a home unit especially helpful is in the following two areas:
It helps me know if the medicines, at the doses prescribed, are working adequately or reasonably. That helps me tailor the dose with the doctor in a timely manner.

Another very important use I find is that I can regulate and really get a senbse of whether I've eaten too much salty food, depending on whether my blood pressure goes up too far.

I keep track of my sodium but this sort of monitoring helps me know, in my case, not just from a general rule, about what my daily limit should be.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc. <mailto:ukekearuaro@valtdnet.com>
Sent: Monday, October 14, 2019 2:46 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter

Yes, indeed, the arm blood pressure monitors are far more accurate. That said, blood pressure monitors never truly give the same readings no matter how many times you run a test. For example, someone could have the blood pressure checked and it could be in the high hell; for such folks, just wait a few seconds or about a minute and check again, a different reading will be obtained. People who have what is typically labelled White Collar Syndrome will usually have their readings skying through the roofs at initial read.

My company has always wanted to carry for sale talking blood pressure monitors; I personally had the honor and pleasure of testing two such devices when the company was approached by its makers. In fact, company still has these two demo units on its shelf and I still play ball with them now and then.

I didn't make a decision as to whether or not my company will agree to be a reseller of the monitors I tested. Why? Despite reading the instructions a thousand times over, I didn't figure out an easy way of getting them set up.
I suggested to the two makers to consider a different implementation of the speech readout; no, they weren't open to that idea. I also told them that I didn't want the selling price to go past $50 minus shipping should that be necessary. No, my view did not count! They would sell the product to my company at $58.75; hmm, not enough room for a mark-up that will not break too many banks!

Ok, I let out too many secrets; so back to my hiding tent I go! But just before I run, I agree with Gene's comments that a reading comparison of some kind be done at a doctor's office in order to help determine whether or not the readings will be reasonably reliable. Anyhow, I keep talking to blood pressure makers with the hope that my company and I will stumble on one that we can put through the torture test before announcing its availability to the general public. Indeed, got to make a penny and a farthing over there to stay employed, but, no, conscience won't let me sell something that does not satisfy the torture test in my covert chambers.

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado





<http://www.avg.com/email-signature?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient> Virus-free. www.avg.com <http://www.avg.com/email-signature?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient>


Re: blood pressure moniter

Pamela Dominguez
 

That sounds typical!  Our doctor never said anything like that, though.  Pam.
 

Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 7:20 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter
 

 

Really?  Once you slide the cuff in place around your upper arm, if you unfasten the velcro fasteners to make the cuff tighter with your free hand , it is liable to fall off or slide out of place unless you have somebody else on hand to help you adjust it.  My doctor has advised me never to attach the cuff this way because it could result in inaccurate readings.  He suggested that if I didn't have another person on hand to wrap the cuff properly around my upper arm, then I should consider a wrist monitor instead.   

 

Gerald

 

 

On 10/14/2019 11:57 PM, Gene wrote:
You could easily tighten it and experiment. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, October 14, 2019 10:44 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter
 
That would be my problem, Gerald.  I would make it too loose.

Jan



Virus-free. www.avg.com


Re: blood pressure moniter

Pamela Dominguez
 

There are three buttons on the bottom of mine.  I don’t remember what they say when you press them, but supposedly, when I bought it from Independent living  Aids, I think they said they set it up for me.  But they got pressed.  I’ll have to take the machine out and see if I can just take my blood pressure the way it is, and see if I really need anything done to it.  There used to be a cassette of instructions, but after all these years, I have lost it.  Pam.
 

From: Gene
Sent: Monday, October 14, 2019 8:19 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter
 
I didn't have to set up anything on the speak to me unit.  I'm sure you can set up some sort of profile for you, in terms of seeing information under your name or something similar, such as user 1.  But I'm the only user.  Andd I have access to the memory, which allows me to go back and see a lot of previous readings.  Because I didn't set up a profile, they weren't marked in any way as to time and day, which I suspect is done with a profile.  But if I take three measurements in a certain morning and I want to check them, I can go through and hear those measurements.  The memory goes back much further.
 
The machine isn't ideal because you can't set up a profile by yourself but it is very adequate and completely accessible for performing its main function.  If you want perfection, you often won't get something that is very useable.
 
Regarding accuracy of measure, proper instructions tell you to take three measurements of blood pressure for each session.  I don't recall how far apart they should be spaced.  I often take three.
 
As far as the white coat syndrome is concerned, that refers to some peoples' reaction when having their pressure taken in a doctor's office.  I suppose some people might be anxious at home, but I would think they would know it. 
 
Where I find a home unit especially helpful is in the following two areas:
It helps me know if the medicines, at the doses prescribed, are working adequately or reasonably.  That helps me tailor the dose with the doctor in a timely manner.
 
Another very important use I find is that I can regulate and really get a senbse of whether I've eaten too much salty food, depending on whether my blood pressure goes up too far. 
 
I keep track of my sodium but this sort of monitoring helps me know, in my case, not just from a general rule, about what my daily limit should be.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, October 14, 2019 2:46 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter
 
Yes, indeed, the arm blood pressure monitors are far more accurate.  That
said, blood pressure monitors never truly give the same readings no matter
how many times you run a test.  For example, someone could have the blood
pressure checked and it could be in the high hell; for such folks, just wait
a few seconds or about a minute and check again, a different reading will be
obtained.  People who have what is typically labelled White Collar Syndrome
will usually have their readings skying through the roofs at initial read.

My company has always wanted to carry for sale talking blood pressure
monitors; I personally had the honor and pleasure of testing two such
devices when the company was approached by its makers.  In fact, company
still has these two demo units on its shelf and I still play ball with them
now and then. 

I didn't make a decision as to whether or not my company will agree to be a
reseller of the monitors I tested.  Why?  Despite reading the instructions a
thousand times over, I didn't figure out an easy way of getting them set up.
I suggested to the two makers to consider a different implementation of the
speech readout; no, they weren't open to that idea.  I also told them that I
didn't want the selling price to go past $50 minus shipping should that be
necessary.  No, my view did not count!  They would sell the product to my
company at $58.75; hmm, not enough room for a mark-up that will not break
too many banks!

Ok, I let out too many secrets; so back to my hiding tent I go!  But just
before I run, I agree with Gene's comments that a reading comparison of some
kind be done at a doctor's office in order to help determine whether or not
the readings will be reasonably reliable.  Anyhow, I keep talking to blood
pressure makers with the hope that my company and I will stumble on one that
we can put through the torture test before announcing its availability to
the general public.  Indeed, got to make a penny and a farthing over there
to stay employed, but, no, conscience won't let me sell something that does
not satisfy the torture test in my covert chambers.

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado    




Virus-free. www.avg.com


Re: blood pressure moniter

Gene
 

I was looking at mine after I sent my message.  I don't think this one has a rod.  I used one for years that did.  But the way this one is made, it is very easy to tighten or loosen it.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----

Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 12:15 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter

Mine must be like yours, Gene.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 7:28 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter

I'm telling you from experience that it isn't, at least not
on the cuff used with my machine.  It doesn't slide or fall
off.  You loosen the velcroe and there is a metal rod that
the part of the cuff is under that keeps it in place.  it
doesn't keep it from moving, but it keeps it from falling
away from the other part.  So you can make it looser or
tighter and then press the part you are sliding against the
other part to make the velcroe tight. 
 
Gene

From: Gerald Levy via Groups.Io
<mailto:bwaylimited@...
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 6:20 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter





Really?  Once you slide the cuff in place around your upper
arm, if you unfasten the velcro fasteners to make the cuff
tighter with your free hand , it is liable to fall off or
slide out of place unless you have somebody else on hand to
help you adjust it.  My doctor has advised me never to
attach the cuff this way because it could result in
inaccurate readings.  He suggested that if I didn't have
another person on hand to wrap the cuff properly around my
upper arm, then I should consider a wrist monitor instead.






Gerald








On 10/14/2019 11:57 PM, Gene wrote:


You could easily tighten it and experiment. 

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: jan howells via Groups.Io
<mailto:gale7978@...
Sent: Monday, October 14, 2019 10:44 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter

That would be my problem, Gerald.  I would make it
too loose.

Jan









Re: No spell checker in WLM after setting up a new laptop

James Bentley
 

Hi Gene and list,
 
Just in case any one else runs up on this problem, I found the solution.
 
In a spelling tab under Windows live mail options, there is a checkbox that needs to be checked.  It is called something like check my spelling as I type.Well, when I saw that, I unchecked it because all of the junk that is put on the screen to do spell checking as you type usually screws up Jaws.
 
Well, I was wrong.  I checked the check box.  And, Spell checking now works fine.  I found the info on fixing this on Google.
 
LOL, I was what was causing the problem. 
 
Cheers,
 
James B, P.S. Gene,  Good to have you back.
 

From: Gene
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 10:50 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] No spell checker in WLM after setting up a new laptop
 
Windows Live Mail has its own spell checker.  You are thinking of Outlook Express.  The spell checker should be available when the program is installed, and I don't know what may be causing the problem.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: M.E.N.
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 10:28 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] No spell checker in WLM after setting up a new laptop
 
do you have MS Office installed on the laptop? I believe that WLM gets the spell checker from Office.
 
From: James Bentley
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 7:27 AM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] No spell checker in WLM after setting up a new laptop
 
Hi,
 
I seem to remember this problem comeing up beforewith other listers.  Now, its me.
 
What do I need to do to get spell checking up and running?
 
Loads of thanks,
 
James B
 
 


help balloons

Monte Single
 

Hi List,

I was checking out a google search and ended up with a;

 

Skype for business

 

Window always open on my pc.

When I open the menu and choose “close”  it says something about waiting for messages and go to help balloon.

I went to “ease of access”  and set the ballons to stay open for a minute.

How do I get to these balloons  and kill skype.

I tried doing it in msconfig startup but there is no skype there.

I tried removing it under  programs and features but skype is not there either.

How can I kill this pest.

It’s going to spoil my lunch.

Thanks,

Monte


Re: iPhone XS Max Urgent Help.

Carolyn Arnold
 

Best advice I can give is call Apple Accessibility:

877-204-3930

There have been a lot of VoiceOver problem with 13, and
Apple needs to know how many so that they can address the
problem quickly and accurately.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of George Zaynoun
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 9:41 AM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] iPhone XS Max Urgent Help.

Hi!
To begin with and before I get the question I am on the last
update on iOS.
I was editing an email and was using SmartBeetle Braille
display.
Suddenly speech stopped completely and the cursor on the
Braille display began dancing but I couldn't navigate any
more.
Tried to restart my Braille display as I do in such
situations for no avail. Exited and restarted VoiceOver with
both Siri and the side button and Siri is confirming as
usual but the Braille is remembering even when VoiceOver the
last state it was displaying i.e the last words I wrote.
I am enabling Voice Control to try open
settings-general-shut down but no voice feedback.
Tried connecting it to iTunes but it is saying I must
continue on the iPhone to allow Sync.
Finally I chased a sighted woman and she confirmed my
worries, the slider to shut down does not work and not when
I connect it to iTunes either to allow sync with pc.
Now I want to force it shut down but how for heavens sake?
I am getting notifications from the apps on it and it rings,
any help thanks.

--
Georges Zeinoun
Timmerv. 6A ITR LGH1102, 54163 SKÖVDE SWEDEN
Tel: +46 (500) 48 29 29 Mobile: +46 (70) 366 63 29


Re: blood pressure moniter

Carolyn Arnold
 

My sighted husband liked for me to adjust the cuff for him,
but I have no problem doing my own. I think he can do it,
but he thinks it is more accurate, if I adjust it for him.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 7:41 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter

And even if what you are saying is correct, which it isn't,
and I base that on more than fifteen years' experience, not
on a doctor's advice who doesn't have any idea what blind
people can do, if you adjust it with the help of a sighted
person, you don't have to adjust it again. You don't keep
changing the adjustment. You adjust it and, when adjusted,
it stays adjusted. Just one more example of blind people
receiving inferior medical treatment because they are blind.
Use the less accurate wrist monitor. You will get a less
accurate reading, but that's just part of being blind.

Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Gene <mailto:gsasner@gmail.com>
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 6:30 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter

As far as doctors telling blind people what they can and
can't do, their advice is no more accurate than anyone
else's. They are doctors. That doesn't mean they know
anything about blindness and I evaluate their advice on the
basis that if it makes sense, fine, if it doesn't, well,
that's just one more sighted person who thinks he knows
about blindness who, as is so often the case, doesn't.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Gerald Levy via Groups.Io
<mailto:bwaylimited=verizon.net@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 6:20 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter





Really? Once you slide the cuff in place around your upper
arm, if you unfasten the velcro fasteners to make the cuff
tighter with your free hand , it is liable to fall off or
slide out of place unless you have somebody else on hand to
help you adjust it. My doctor has advised me never to
attach the cuff this way because it could result in
inaccurate readings. He suggested that if I didn't have
another person on hand to wrap the cuff properly around my
upper arm, then I should consider a wrist monitor instead.






Gerald








On 10/14/2019 11:57 PM, Gene wrote:


You could easily tighten it and experiment.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: jan howells via Groups.Io
<mailto:gale7978=aol.com@groups.io>
Sent: Monday, October 14, 2019 10:44 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter

That would be my problem, Gerald. I would make it
too loose.

Jan


Re: blood pressure moniter

Carolyn Arnold
 

Mine must be like yours, Gene.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 7:28 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter

I'm telling you from experience that it isn't, at least not
on the cuff used with my machine. It doesn't slide or fall
off. You loosen the velcroe and there is a metal rod that
the part of the cuff is under that keeps it in place. it
doesn't keep it from moving, but it keeps it from falling
away from the other part. So you can make it looser or
tighter and then press the part you are sliding against the
other part to make the velcroe tight.

Gene

From: Gerald Levy via Groups.Io
<mailto:bwaylimited=verizon.net@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 6:20 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter





Really? Once you slide the cuff in place around your upper
arm, if you unfasten the velcro fasteners to make the cuff
tighter with your free hand , it is liable to fall off or
slide out of place unless you have somebody else on hand to
help you adjust it. My doctor has advised me never to
attach the cuff this way because it could result in
inaccurate readings. He suggested that if I didn't have
another person on hand to wrap the cuff properly around my
upper arm, then I should consider a wrist monitor instead.






Gerald








On 10/14/2019 11:57 PM, Gene wrote:


You could easily tighten it and experiment.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: jan howells via Groups.Io
<mailto:gale7978=aol.com@groups.io>
Sent: Monday, October 14, 2019 10:44 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter

That would be my problem, Gerald. I would make it
too loose.

Jan


Re: blood pressure moniter

Carolyn Arnold
 

I never have a problem getting my arm blood pressure monitor
in place and adjusted using one hand.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gerald Levy
via Groups.Io
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 7:20 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter




Really? Once you slide the cuff in place around your upper
arm, if you unfasten the velcro fasteners to make the cuff
tighter with your free hand , it is liable to fall off or
slide out of place unless you have somebody else on hand to
help you adjust it. My doctor has advised me never to
attach the cuff this way because it could result in
inaccurate readings. He suggested that if I didn't have
another person on hand to wrap the cuff properly around my
upper arm, then I should consider a wrist monitor instead.






Gerald








On 10/14/2019 11:57 PM, Gene wrote:


You could easily tighten it and experiment.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: jan howells via Groups.Io
<mailto:gale7978=aol.com@groups.io>
Sent: Monday, October 14, 2019 10:44 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter

That would be my problem, Gerald. I would make it
too loose.

Jan


let me try this again concerning battery drainage

Wayne Scott
 



Wayne Scott "Everything happens in God's chime." 
 It sounds like the problem might be the battery optimization in IOS 13. Turn that off by going into settings, battery, battery health, and then battery optimization. Click on that to turn it off. There ar
two options: turn off until tomorrow, or turn off for good. I turn off the second one. I don't know why my phone leaves my emails blank whenever I reply to someone. I've restarted it and it still does it. I think this is a bug. 


Re: Mute This Topic?

Cristóbal
 

A very useful feature indeed. If you’re subscribed to a lot of Groups.Io mailing lists, it’s worth it to go through the trouble of creating an account just for this alone.

 

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 9:35 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Mute This Topic?

 

As I recall, mute this topic is a link.  You may be reading mail as plain text so the program probably won't follow a link when you press enter on it.  I haven't used this feature and I'm writing to see if people will comment on my reply. 

 

Aside from reading mail as plain text, do you have an account?  I believe that if you don't have an account set up, you can't use this feature.  But you should still be taken somewhere in your default browser if you press enter on mute this topic and you are reading mail as HTML.

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 9:18 AM

Subject: [TechTalk] Mute This Topic?

 

Hello List, I am using Outlook 2016 on a Windows 10 desk top computer with Jaws 2019 to read my messages.  From time to time, a subject in which I have no interest comes up and I would like to not have to wade through it again and again.

 

One of the options on this list is:

“Mute This Topic”, but neither pressing Enter or Space bar nor Tab, have stopped this topic from popping up again and again.

 

Does anyone here know how to make this work?

 

I would really appreciate help on this, since it would definitely cut down on the time it takes to go through messages!

 

Sincerely, Vicky V

 

 

Virus-free. www.avg.com


Re: Mute This Topic?

Gene
 

As I recall, mute this topic is a link.  You may be reading mail as plain text so the program probably won't follow a link when you press enter on it.  I haven't used this feature and I'm writing to see if people will comment on my reply. 
 
Aside from reading mail as plain text, do you have an account?  I believe that if you don't have an account set up, you can't use this feature.  But you should still be taken somewhere in your default browser if you press enter on mute this topic and you are reading mail as HTML.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 9:18 AM
Subject: [TechTalk] Mute This Topic?

Hello List, I am using Outlook 2016 on a Windows 10 desk top computer with Jaws 2019 to read my messages.  From time to time, a subject in which I have no interest comes up and I would like to not have to wade through it again and again.

 

One of the options on this list is:

“Mute This Topic”, but neither pressing Enter or Space bar nor Tab, have stopped this topic from popping up again and again.

 

Does anyone here know how to make this work?

 

I would really appreciate help on this, since it would definitely cut down on the time it takes to go through messages!

 

Sincerely, Vicky V

 


Virus-free. www.avg.com


Re: No spell checker in WLM after setting up a new laptop

Gene
 

Windows Live Mail has its own spell checker.  You are thinking of Outlook Express.  The spell checker should be available when the program is installed, and I don't know what may be causing the problem.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
From: M.E.N.
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 10:28 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] No spell checker in WLM after setting up a new laptop

do you have MS Office installed on the laptop? I believe that WLM gets the spell checker from Office.
 
From: James Bentley
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 7:27 AM
Subject: [TechTalk] No spell checker in WLM after setting up a new laptop
 
Hi,
 
I seem to remember this problem comeing up beforewith other listers.  Now, its me.
 
What do I need to do to get spell checking up and running?
 
Loads of thanks,
 
James B
 
 


Re: No spell checker in WLM after setting up a new laptop

M.E.N. <magpie.mn@...>
 

do you have MS Office installed on the laptop? I believe that WLM gets the spell checker from Office.
 

From: James Bentley
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 7:27 AM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] No spell checker in WLM after setting up a new laptop
 
Hi,
 
I seem to remember this problem comeing up beforewith other listers.  Now, its me.
 
What do I need to do to get spell checking up and running?
 
Loads of thanks,
 
James B
 
 


Re: blood pressure moniter

Kay Malmquist
 

Yes,well this time I have to agree with Gene.  If you are the only one using the cuff, you can adjust it to your arm and leave it there.  I just got out of the hospital and was there for a couple of days.  I had my own cuff that was on the machine that was in my room and they did not un-Velcro it.  A couple of times they did, but for the most part it was left alone.  Now, as far as doctors are concerned,  they do have no idea as to what a blind person is capable of.  Thank God I am a good advocate for myself.  I went in to my supposed primary care doctor because I had to have a physical to get another guide dog.  One of the things they needed to do of course was a Uren analysis.  That would require a person to pee in a cup.  Pardon my bluntness.  So, we get to the end of the physical, with this doctor asking the dumbest and strangest questions.  Now, his nurse comes in to finish up with the lab work requirements.  He is reading them out loud and gets to the part where it says urinalysis unable to get due to inability of patient to urinate in a cup.  I asked him what the heck that was about.  He said that he didn't know and asked me if I could do that ok?  Of course I said I could and that this doctor hadn't even asked me if that would be a problem.  This nurse was totally ok and wondered why he the doctor would do such a thing.  Dealing with medical issues with my last husband before he died and my mom, I have come to learn that the stupidity and ignorance in the medical profession is rampant and stunningly amazing.  So, in summarizing, don't take the word of a doctor or nurse that thinks they have your best interests in mind.  Some are really good, but there are many that don't have a clue and don't have any intention of educating themselves.
 
 
Kay Malmquist
kay.malmquist@...
KINDNESS
Kindness in words creates confidence.
Kindness in thinking creates profoundness.
Kindness in giving creates love.
-- Lao-Tzu

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 7:39 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter


Where did you receive your medical training?  Wrapping a blood pressure cuff around your upper arm has nothing whatsoever to do with being blind or sighted or "common sense".  It is a matter of proper technique.  Medical students spend countless hours in medical school and residency learning the proper way to take a patient's blood pressure.  They are never taught to fasten the cuff first and then slide it over the patient's hand and then slide it up in place around the upper arm.  They are taught to have the patient rest his elbow on a flat surface and then wrap the cuff snugly around the upper arm.  This is the only proper technique for obtaining consistently accurate readings.  Doing it your way is considered unacceptable.  I know what I'm talking about because I was pre-med in college and kept up with some of my classmates who went on to medical school and became doctors.  But if your technique works for you, then keep doing it this way.  But don't sit there and accuse doctors of not knowing anything about blindness, because wrapping a blood pressure cuff properly to get accurate results has nothing to do withbeing blind or sighted.


Gerald



On 10/15/2019 7:30 AM, Gene wrote:
As far as doctors telling blind people what they can and can't do, their advice is no more accurate than anyone else's.  They are doctors.  That doesn't mean they know anything about blindness and I evaluate their advice on the basis that if it makes sense, fine, if it doesn't, well, that's just one more sighted person who thinks he knows about blindness who, as is so often the case, doesn't. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 6:20 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter


Really?  Once you slide the cuff in place around your upper arm, if you unfasten the velcro fasteners to make the cuff tighter with your free hand , it is liable to fall off or slide out of place unless you have somebody else on hand to help you adjust it.  My doctor has advised me never to attach the cuff this way because it could result in inaccurate readings.  He suggested that if I didn't have another person on hand to wrap the cuff properly around my upper arm, then I should consider a wrist monitor instead.   


Gerald



On 10/14/2019 11:57 PM, Gene wrote:
You could easily tighten it and experiment. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, October 14, 2019 10:44 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] blood pressure moniter

That would be my problem, Gerald.  I would make it too loose.

Jan



Re: Looking for Player app for Windows 10 to speed up audiobooks

Gene
 

There are other programs that do this as well, but the best one I know of is Windows Media Player.  Unfortunately, the interface for doing this isn't convenient to use.  So if you try other programs and you aren't satisfied, let us know and I'll figure out how to do this with, I believe a version of media Player that has the same interface as yours.
 
Gene

----- Original message -----
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 9:52 AM
Subject: [TechTalk] Looking for Player app for Windows 10 to speed up audiobooks

Could someone recommend an audio player for Windows 10 in which I can speed up an audiobook by rate and not increase the pitch, kind of the way that the Victor Stream does it? 


Re: Looking for Player app for Windows 10 to speed up audiobooks

Smiling?
 

VLC. Just grab it from ninite.com.

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Steven Johnson
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 7:53 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Looking for Player app for Windows 10 to speed up audiobooks

 

Could someone recommend an audio player for Windows 10 in which I can speed up an audiobook by rate and not increase the pitch, kind of the way that the Victor Stream does it? 


Looking for Player app for Windows 10 to speed up audiobooks

Steven Johnson <saxmonger@...>
 

Could someone recommend an audio player for Windows 10 in which I can speed up an audiobook by rate and not increase the pitch, kind of the way that the Victor Stream does it? 

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