Date   

Re: sharing a message from a daily summary delivery format?

Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
 

Sharon, you can certainly forward the message in question to another list;
however, if I were you, I would walk an extra step: That is, I WOULD DELETE
ALL REFERENCES to the list from which the message is being forwarded at the
top and bottom portions.

Hope I made some sense, not enough caffeine today but some brilliant
sunshine that I'm enjoying instead; so, I'm coherently incoherent!!

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado


Re: Bell Orbell like synths?

Pamela Dominguez
 

My favorite instrument is vibes, or, as they call it vibraphone or some people call it vibraharp.  I found synthetic vibes in  some keyboards, but what I discovered was that the tones on the notes from note to note were two precise, so they sounded fake.  I could tell they were using fake ones when I heard them in commercials, also.  Pam.
 

Sent: Tuesday, May 12, 2020 8:53 AM
Subject: [TechTalk] Bell Orbell like synths?
 

Hi List, Have any of you ever found a keyboard that had really good bell or chime or good xylophone synths?

 

Many sincere thanks for any help in finding one!

 

Vicky V


Virus-free. www.avg.com


Re: sharing a message from a daily summary delivery format?

Gene
 

I don't use summaries.  I find them inefficient and it means that if I ever have something I want to discuss, I have to wait until the next summary comes out before I can respond to anything or see what help or information is given.  I would think it would be far more efficient and desirable to receive individual messages and if you want, define a message rule to place all messages from a certain list in a certain folder. 
 
Also, you can read messages by conversation so that each subject is seen one time and if you want to read the messages in that thread, you open the conversation and read them.  You can also delete entire threads at one time if you read messages by conversation.
 
It doesn't matter how you send the information to another list.  Just use an appropriate subject line if you copy and paste.  I don't know if there is a rule or preference about including the name of the person who wrote the message.  I often see it, but at times, someone will say something like a list member sent this way of doing this or that when people are answering questions.  People often keep information about how to do something but they don't keep the name of the sender. 
 
Others may know if there is a preference in what is called netiquette about this.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, May 12, 2020 10:55 AM
Subject: [TechTalk] sharing a message from a daily summary delivery format?

Hi,Hi,


Hi,


I came across a message that I'd really like to forward or copy to
another list.  Is it possible to forward it, or is it okay to just copy
and paste the contents?


Thanks,,





Re: Work Around For Excel Latest Version With NVDA And New Interface for File Importation

Dave
 

And I just just bought the newest flavor of Microsoft's Office 365.


After downloading it, I attempted to use MS Word, and found it so much different than my old Office 2010, I put it aside with a plan to come back to it later.


I use Xcel as well, and now it looks like I'll be Jumping through even more Hoops in order to use it.



How much closer to the Line can we get before the Tool to make the User more Productive, makes us less Productive?


Grumpy Dave


sharing a message from a daily summary delivery format?

Sharon Hooley
 

Hi,Hi,


Hi,


I came across a message that I'd really like to forward or copy to another list.  Is it possible to forward it, or is it okay to just copy and paste the contents?


Thanks,,


Re: Work Around For Excel Latest Version With NVDA And New Interface for File Importation

Dave
 

Sounds like another example of two more steps forward, and perhaps a step or three backwards.


Grumpy Dave


Work Around For Excel Latest Version With NVDA And New Interface for File Importation

Ron Canazzi
 

Hi Group,

I had requested some help on several lists as to the new more graphical data importation interface within Excel latest version. It is very graphical and neither JAWS or NVDA works well with it. The work around is to use the 'legacy wizard system.'  To do this you Press alt + A for data, tab once to the list of choices, press enter and then arrow down to legacy wizard and press enter.  You get a choice of several.  Choose the desired legacy wizard interface and the old dialogue type interface launches.  There are a series of associated hotkeys to accomplish this, but I haven't memorized them yet.  When it gets to the application of multiple hotkeys to the level of 5 or 6, I find it almost easier to use the ribbon interface to navigate to the proper item.

...Oh for the good old days of menus and dialogues!

--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


Bell Orbell like synths?

Vicky Vaughan
 

Hi List, Have any of you ever found a keyboard that had really good bell or chime or good xylophone synths?

 

Many sincere thanks for any help in finding one!

 

Vicky V


Virus-free. www.avg.com


Re: Electronic keyboards

Walter Ramage
 

Hi.  On another list somebody recommended the Yamaha Juno wich apparently has that facility, that is accessability via a Usb drive.  Walter.

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Mich Verrier
Sent: 11 May 2020 23:25
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Electronic keyboards

 

I also have a related question as well. Are there any keybords that are good sounding but rellitivley cheep? I am looking at around the 300 or 400 raige? Since a keybord that costs up to 2 or 3 thousend is way way out of my price rainge. Also accesibillidey would be a good thig to know about as well. I remember reading about a keybord somewhere that you could get with a optinal thumb drive witch once plugd into the keybord it would make everything accessible using speech bu I forget what name or make that was. I want to say Yamaha or something but I could be wrong. From Mich.

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Donald Roberts
Sent: May 11, 2020 6:21 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Electronic keyboards

 

I have a related question.  Of all electronic keyboards, is there any which can produce a reasonable facsimile of that wonderful Hammond B2 sound?

 

Thanks.

 

Don Roberts

 

On 5/11/2020 11:31 AM, Steve Matzura wrote:

If you subscribe to the MIDI-Mag email list, you'll get probably more answers than you might know what to do with (LOL), so I'll start you off with this:

 

Just over two years ago, Casio came out with the CTX700 line of single-manual keyboards. There is nothing built or programmed into these keyboards that's particularly accessible--no speech, no key clicks, etc.--but with a little memorization of a few things, you'll figure out how to get around the system quickly I'm sure.

 

But above and beyond how easy these are to use, it's really all about how they sound. Here's a short demo that lets you hear a lot of the machine's bread-and-butter sounds, and here's another longer and more advanced demo where there's very little you don't get to hear.

 

To be fair, there are probably other manufacturers that offer similar gear. The only reason I mentioned this make and model is because it's what I know just a little about, and I've listened to many YouTube videos about it. There are people who are brand-loyal, and maybe Casio isn't their brand; there are those who don't like a specific manufacturer's sound, and that's fine, too. I offer the preceding links as information only.

 

On 5/11/2020 12:13 PM, Walter Ramage via groups.io wrote:

Hi All.  It has been about 38 years since I had an electronic keyboard.  It was a JVC and even back then it cost me £1000 new.  It was an easy keyboard to use because it had physical buttons to select the various functions and had loads of features.  It has been a long time but if my memory serves me correct it was a 4.5 or 5 octive single manual.

 

Now about 38 years on it has crossed my mind that it might be interesting to purchase a new keyboard.  The problem is I've not kept up with musical keyboards, either single or double manual so I don't know how technology has impacted on them.  I imagine that most if not all functions are accessed via touch screen or maybe a phone app.

 

Does anybody have any opinion or information on modern-day electronic keyboards?

 

Now for your information, I don't do cheap so the £150 Yamaha  keyboard one might buy their kids for Christmas is not what I would be looking for but something more professional or semi-professional but it would need to be accessible.  At the moment a keyboard isn't on my buy list but if I can get info about one that isn't in the 10's of thousands of pounds then I might find my interest grow.  Way back those 38 years the keyboards of quality were JVC or Roland and Casio and Yamaha  were a rung or two down the ranking ladder although in the 90's my uncle got a Yamaha that sounded rather good.  I am here thinking of a single manual  as I don't know if I have the space to fit a double manual in here.  Any information or opinions appreciated.  Walter.

 


Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: Electronic keyboards

Dave
 

To get a Good Quality Digital Keyboard for less than it would cost in the store is done by searching the Used Market.


You don't want a keyboard that has been part of the Gear and professional Keyboardist used in every gig they played all around the Country.


Way too much Wear and Tear.


Some where, there is a Grandma, who forked out $1500 or more, for a Yamaha, or Roland, or Korg Keyboard and now she is Dead, or doesn't use it, and it's up for sale for around the price you were talking about spending.



Good Hunting,


Grumpy Dave


Re: Electronic keyboards

Dave
 

Does anyone make a Keyboard that comes close to the Hammond sound?  Yes,
I have heard them.  Sorry, can't tell you Brand names.


I've even heard a Guitar Pedal simulate an Organ that sounds not half bad.


Amazing what they can do these days with Sampling on Steroids.


Grumpy Dave


Re: Electronic keyboards

Mich Verrier
 

Hi I found this and hope that this helps.

https://yamahamusicians.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=11044

btw it would help if people could not only give the name but moddle number of the keybord forinstince just saying I had a keybord and it was a Yamaha doesn’t really help much jmo. From Mich.

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of David Moore
Sent: May 11, 2020 6:33 PM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Electronic keyboards

 

I had a great keyboard at the same time. I found one a year ago with buttons. It has so many great sounds and many built in songs. It is an Yamahaw.

 

On Mon, May 11, 2020, 12:13 PM Walter Ramage via groups.io <wpr=blueyonder.co.uk@groups.io> wrote:

Hi All.  It has been about 38 years since I had an electronic keyboard.  It was a JVC and even back then it cost me £1000 new.  It was an easy keyboard to use because it had physical buttons to select the various functions and had loads of features.  It has been a long time but if my memory serves me correct it was a 4.5 or 5 octive single manual.

 

Now about 38 years on it has crossed my mind that it might be interesting to purchase a new keyboard.  The problem is I've not kept up with musical keyboards, either single or double manual so I don't know how technology has impacted on them.  I imagine that most if not all functions are accessed via touch screen or maybe a phone app.

 

Does anybody have any opinion or information on modern-day electronic keyboards?

 

Now for your information, I don't do cheap so the £150 Yamaha  keyboard one might buy their kids for Christmas is not what I would be looking for but something more professional or semi-professional but it would need to be accessible.  At the moment a keyboard isn't on my buy list but if I can get info about one that isn't in the 10's of thousands of pounds then I might find my interest grow.  Way back those 38 years the keyboards of quality were JVC or Roland and Casio and Yamaha  were a rung or two down the ranking ladder although in the 90's my uncle got a Yamaha that sounded rather good.  I am here thinking of a single manual  as I don't know if I have the space to fit a double manual in here.  Any information or opinions appreciated.  Walter.

 

 

Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: Electronic keyboards

David Moore
 

I had a great keyboard at the same time. I found one a year ago with buttons. It has so many great sounds and many built in songs. It is an Yamahaw.


On Mon, May 11, 2020, 12:13 PM Walter Ramage via groups.io <wpr=blueyonder.co.uk@groups.io> wrote:

Hi All.  It has been about 38 years since I had an electronic keyboard.  It was a JVC and even back then it cost me £1000 new.  It was an easy keyboard to use because it had physical buttons to select the various functions and had loads of features.  It has been a long time but if my memory serves me correct it was a 4.5 or 5 octive single manual.

 

Now about 38 years on it has crossed my mind that it might be interesting to purchase a new keyboard.  The problem is I've not kept up with musical keyboards, either single or double manual so I don't know how technology has impacted on them.  I imagine that most if not all functions are accessed via touch screen or maybe a phone app.

 

Does anybody have any opinion or information on modern-day electronic keyboards?

 

Now for your information, I don't do cheap so the £150 Yamaha  keyboard one might buy their kids for Christmas is not what I would be looking for but something more professional or semi-professional but it would need to be accessible.  At the moment a keyboard isn't on my buy list but if I can get info about one that isn't in the 10's of thousands of pounds then I might find my interest grow.  Way back those 38 years the keyboards of quality were JVC or Roland and Casio and Yamaha  were a rung or two down the ranking ladder although in the 90's my uncle got a Yamaha that sounded rather good.  I am here thinking of a single manual  as I don't know if I have the space to fit a double manual in here.  Any information or opinions appreciated.  Walter.

 


Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: Electronic keyboards

Mich Verrier
 

I also have a related question as well. Are there any keybords that are good sounding but rellitivley cheep? I am looking at around the 300 or 400 raige? Since a keybord that costs up to 2 or 3 thousend is way way out of my price rainge. Also accesibillidey would be a good thig to know about as well. I remember reading about a keybord somewhere that you could get with a optinal thumb drive witch once plugd into the keybord it would make everything accessible using speech bu I forget what name or make that was. I want to say Yamaha or something but I could be wrong. From Mich.

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Donald Roberts
Sent: May 11, 2020 6:21 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Electronic keyboards

 

I have a related question.  Of all electronic keyboards, is there any which can produce a reasonable facsimile of that wonderful Hammond B2 sound?

 

Thanks.

 

Don Roberts

 

On 5/11/2020 11:31 AM, Steve Matzura wrote:

If you subscribe to the MIDI-Mag email list, you'll get probably more answers than you might know what to do with (LOL), so I'll start you off with this:

 

Just over two years ago, Casio came out with the CTX700 line of single-manual keyboards. There is nothing built or programmed into these keyboards that's particularly accessible--no speech, no key clicks, etc.--but with a little memorization of a few things, you'll figure out how to get around the system quickly I'm sure.

 

But above and beyond how easy these are to use, it's really all about how they sound. Here's a short demo that lets you hear a lot of the machine's bread-and-butter sounds, and here's another longer and more advanced demo where there's very little you don't get to hear.

 

To be fair, there are probably other manufacturers that offer similar gear. The only reason I mentioned this make and model is because it's what I know just a little about, and I've listened to many YouTube videos about it. There are people who are brand-loyal, and maybe Casio isn't their brand; there are those who don't like a specific manufacturer's sound, and that's fine, too. I offer the preceding links as information only.

 

On 5/11/2020 12:13 PM, Walter Ramage via groups.io wrote:

Hi All.  It has been about 38 years since I had an electronic keyboard.  It was a JVC and even back then it cost me £1000 new.  It was an easy keyboard to use because it had physical buttons to select the various functions and had loads of features.  It has been a long time but if my memory serves me correct it was a 4.5 or 5 octive single manual.

 

Now about 38 years on it has crossed my mind that it might be interesting to purchase a new keyboard.  The problem is I've not kept up with musical keyboards, either single or double manual so I don't know how technology has impacted on them.  I imagine that most if not all functions are accessed via touch screen or maybe a phone app.

 

Does anybody have any opinion or information on modern-day electronic keyboards?

 

Now for your information, I don't do cheap so the £150 Yamaha  keyboard one might buy their kids for Christmas is not what I would be looking for but something more professional or semi-professional but it would need to be accessible.  At the moment a keyboard isn't on my buy list but if I can get info about one that isn't in the 10's of thousands of pounds then I might find my interest grow.  Way back those 38 years the keyboards of quality were JVC or Roland and Casio and Yamaha  were a rung or two down the ranking ladder although in the 90's my uncle got a Yamaha that sounded rather good.  I am here thinking of a single manual  as I don't know if I have the space to fit a double manual in here.  Any information or opinions appreciated.  Walter.

 


Re: Electronic keyboards

Donald Roberts
 

I have a related question.  Of all electronic keyboards, is there any which can produce a reasonable facsimile of that wonderful Hammond B2 sound?


Thanks.


Don Roberts


On 5/11/2020 11:31 AM, Steve Matzura wrote:

If you subscribe to the MIDI-Mag email list, you'll get probably more answers than you might know what to do with (LOL), so I'll start you off with this:


Just over two years ago, Casio came out with the CTX700 line of single-manual keyboards. There is nothing built or programmed into these keyboards that's particularly accessible--no speech, no key clicks, etc.--but with a little memorization of a few things, you'll figure out how to get around the system quickly I'm sure.


But above and beyond how easy these are to use, it's really all about how they sound. Here's a short demo that lets you hear a lot of the machine's bread-and-butter sounds, and here's another longer and more advanced demo where there's very little you don't get to hear.


To be fair, there are probably other manufacturers that offer similar gear. The only reason I mentioned this make and model is because it's what I know just a little about, and I've listened to many YouTube videos about it. There are people who are brand-loyal, and maybe Casio isn't their brand; there are those who don't like a specific manufacturer's sound, and that's fine, too. I offer the preceding links as information only.


On 5/11/2020 12:13 PM, Walter Ramage via groups.io wrote:

Hi All.  It has been about 38 years since I had an electronic keyboard.  It was a JVC and even back then it cost me £1000 new.  It was an easy keyboard to use because it had physical buttons to select the various functions and had loads of features.  It has been a long time but if my memory serves me correct it was a 4.5 or 5 octive single manual.

 

Now about 38 years on it has crossed my mind that it might be interesting to purchase a new keyboard.  The problem is I've not kept up with musical keyboards, either single or double manual so I don't know how technology has impacted on them.  I imagine that most if not all functions are accessed via touch screen or maybe a phone app.

 

Does anybody have any opinion or information on modern-day electronic keyboards?

 

Now for your information, I don't do cheap so the £150 Yamaha  keyboard one might buy their kids for Christmas is not what I would be looking for but something more professional or semi-professional but it would need to be accessible.  At the moment a keyboard isn't on my buy list but if I can get info about one that isn't in the 10's of thousands of pounds then I might find my interest grow.  Way back those 38 years the keyboards of quality were JVC or Roland and Casio and Yamaha  were a rung or two down the ranking ladder although in the 90's my uncle got a Yamaha that sounded rather good.  I am here thinking of a single manual  as I don't know if I have the space to fit a double manual in here.  Any information or opinions appreciated.  Walter.



Clickable.

Carolyn Arnold
 

I just switched from Internet Explorer to Google Chrome, and
when I went to Google to check something, I kept getting
clickable. Is there a way to shut that up? Thanks for help.


Re: Capturing Both Video and Audio of my Computer for Videos

Melissa
 

On 5/11/20, George McCoy <slr1bpz@...> wrote:
I agree completely with Steve. I use OBS quite often with very good
results verified by people who can see the video.


George


On 5/9/2020 8:23 AM, Steve Matzura wrote:

The best solution for this is OBS Studio <https://obsproject.com/>.
The configuration and setup is a little tricky, especially in the
video section, but it does exactly what you want.


Someone talked about Zoom's video quality not being great, and
something about one's face not appearing correctly. With OBS, there's
no face because there's no camera, unles you set it up that way. If
you want to narrate your video during its creation, you'll need a
mixer to which you can send the output of JAWS plus a microphone to
capture your narration. If none of these are necesary, then OBS is the
correct solution.


On 5/9/2020 8:58 AM, Gene wrote:
But you need a room to use. I wouldn't assume that the visual
quality you are getting is desirable. I read an article recently
that the video quality looks odd, something about the way your face
is framed in Zoom video.
Gene
----- Origial Message -----
*From:* Debbie April Yuille <mailto:debbiey1982@...>
*Sent:* Saturday, May 09, 2020 6:13 AM
*To:* main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
*Subject:* Re: [TechTalk] Capturing Both Video and Audio of my
Computer for Videos

Oh my god! This is awesome! Sam you are a jenious!

Thank you so much.

Debbie

*From:*main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
<main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>> *On Behalf
Of *Sam Taylor
*Sent:* Saturday, 9 May 2020 5:46 PM
*To:* main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
*Subject:* Re: [TechTalk] Capturing Both Video and Audio of my
Computer for Videos

Hi Debbie,

Whilst there is probably a way built into Windows, I use Zoom for
this. It allows me to pause or resume my video at will, record audio
only if i wish, and share my device's screen.

Cheers

Sam

On 9/05/2020 5:43 pm, Debbie April Yuille wrote:

Hi All







Does anyone know of accessible software to capture video of what's
on the

screen, while allowing the audio of my voice and JAWS to be heard. I
like

how Freedom Scientific does and I'd like to be able to do that for my
own

technology videos.







Thanks



Debbie











Thanks



Debbie



Yes I've just begun to play with OBS Studio for presentations I need
to make. It seems to be working quite well.


Re: Electronic keyboards

Melissa
 

On 5/11/20, Damien Garwood <@daygar> wrote:
Hi Walter,
Just a few points I forgot to put in my last message.
The Tyros 5 was around 3800 new but because it's a discontinued model
you could probably get it cheaper. I believe you can get it as a 61 or
76 key.
The Juno DS model is under 1000, but, based on the sounds of the Juno-G,
I'm going to bet that the DS sounds are even better, and I believe those
come as 61, 76, and 88 key varieties.
I believe these keyboards don't come with internal speakers, so you'll
have to get some external monitors or whatever. The Tyros does have its
own speakers which you can either buy separately or as a
keyboard/speaker package.
The Tyros is considered a workstation and the Juno I believe is a synth,
so both have their advantages and disadvantages (Tyros is better at
sampled instruments). Both work with MIDI via USB.
Unfortunately, these keyboards don't have any forms of real
accessibility built in, but they do use buttons and knobs to do things,
and for the most basic things you need only press one or two buttons.
The more complicated things (like internal audio recorder/midi
sequencer/song finder etc) you would need to memorise menus and so on.
Cheers,
Damien.

On 11/05/2020 05:13 pm, Walter Ramage via groups.io wrote:
Hi All. It has been about 38 years since I had an electronic keyboard.
It was a JVC and even back then it cost me £1000 new. It was an easy
keyboard to use because it had physical buttons to select the various
functions and had loads of features. It has been a long time but if my
memory serves me correct it was a 4.5 or 5 octive single manual.

Now about 38 years on it has crossed my mind that it might be
interesting to purchase a new keyboard. The problem is I've not kept up
with musical keyboards, either single or double manual so I don't know
how technology has impacted on them. I imagine that most if not all
functions are accessed via touch screen or maybe a phone app.

Does anybody have any opinion or information on modern-day electronic
keyboards?

Now for your information, I don't do cheap so the £150 Yamaha keyboard
one might buy their kids for Christmas is not what I would be looking
for but something more professional or semi-professional but it would
need to be accessible. At the moment a keyboard isn't on my buy list
but if I can get info about one that isn't in the 10's of thousands of
pounds then I might find my interest grow. Way back those 38 years the
keyboards of quality were JVC or Roland and Casio and Yamaha were a
rung or two down the ranking ladder although in the 90's my uncle got a
Yamaha that sounded rather good. I am here thinking of a single manual
as I don't know if I have the space to fit a double manual in here. Any
information or opinions appreciated. Walter.


<https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient>

Virus-free. www.avast.com
<https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient>



<#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>


Hi I have a Casio Privia that has the 88 weighted keys. I paid $400
for it last year. It has buttons. A lot of things you do by pressing
the function button and one or more keys simultaneously. I have the
documentation in PDF in you want it. Just reply to me off the list and
I'll send it. Hope this helps.
Melissa


Looking for some small analog speakers

Steve Matzura
 

I've been looking for some small (two- or three-inch diameter, no bigger) analog speakers. I want to use them on scanner and amature radio equipment that sits on a table and has its speaker mounted on its underside, effectively somewhat muting the internal speaker. If it's a Bluetooth speaker and not silly-expensive, I'm interested, but the Bluetooth aspect doesn't interest me at all for this application. Yes, I could get a few Bluetooth transmitters and plug them all into the backs of these radios, but I'm really not interested in Bluetooth at all. Give me wires and I'm a happy man. Recommendations welcome.


Re: Electronic keyboards

Walter Ramage
 

Hi. Way back at the beginning of this century whe had in our pockets a
mobile phone and we had at home a computer or carried a laptop. Now we have
a pocket computer with a phone attached.

From the comments I've recieved so far it would appear that keyboards and
computers are starting to merge together to the point some might ask "is
this a computer with musical abilities or is it a musical instrument with a
computer built in. The resulting sounds might bee good but it is a shame
one has to be musically talented and at the same time have some advanced
computer or electronic knowledge. I wonder if double manuals are as complex
as single manuals. Walter.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Damien Garwood
Sent: 11 May 2020 17:46
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Electronic keyboards

Hi Walter,
Just a few points I forgot to put in my last message.
The Tyros 5 was around 3800 new but because it's a discontinued model
you could probably get it cheaper. I believe you can get it as a 61 or
76 key.
The Juno DS model is under 1000, but, based on the sounds of the Juno-G,
I'm going to bet that the DS sounds are even better, and I believe those
come as 61, 76, and 88 key varieties.
I believe these keyboards don't come with internal speakers, so you'll
have to get some external monitors or whatever. The Tyros does have its
own speakers which you can either buy separately or as a
keyboard/speaker package.
The Tyros is considered a workstation and the Juno I believe is a synth,
so both have their advantages and disadvantages (Tyros is better at
sampled instruments). Both work with MIDI via USB.
Unfortunately, these keyboards don't have any forms of real
accessibility built in, but they do use buttons and knobs to do things,
and for the most basic things you need only press one or two buttons.
The more complicated things (like internal audio recorder/midi
sequencer/song finder etc) you would need to memorise menus and so on.
Cheers,
Damien.

On 11/05/2020 05:13 pm, Walter Ramage via groups.io wrote:
Hi All.  It has been about 38 years since I had an electronic keyboard.
It was a JVC and even back then it cost me £1000 new.  It was an easy
keyboard to use because it had physical buttons to select the various
functions and had loads of features.  It has been a long time but if my
memory serves me correct it was a 4.5 or 5 octive single manual.

Now about 38 years on it has crossed my mind that it might be
interesting to purchase a new keyboard.  The problem is I've not kept up
with musical keyboards, either single or double manual so I don't know
how technology has impacted on them.  I imagine that most if not all
functions are accessed via touch screen or maybe a phone app.

Does anybody have any opinion or information on modern-day electronic
keyboards?

Now for your information, I don't do cheap so the £150 Yamaha  keyboard
one might buy their kids for Christmas is not what I would be looking
for but something more professional or semi-professional but it would
need to be accessible.  At the moment a keyboard isn't on my buy list
but if I can get info about one that isn't in the 10's of thousands of
pounds then I might find my interest grow.  Way back those 38 years the
keyboards of quality were JVC or Roland and Casio and Yamaha  were a
rung or two down the ranking ladder although in the 90's my uncle got a
Yamaha that sounded rather good.  I am here thinking of a single manual
as I don't know if I have the space to fit a double manual in here. Any
information or opinions appreciated.  Walter.


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