Date   

Re: using gmail and thunderbird and getting lots of spam

Troy Burnham
 

The only reason I even go into the spam folder in thunderbird is to make sure there's nothing there that's been misclassified as spam that should've come to my inbox. I usually go in every couple of days and delete what's there because I can sometimes get a couple of hundred spam messages a day and I'd hate to have to go through that many messages looking for legitimate messages if I let them build up any longer than that. I just wonder why this problem just started recently when I've actually been using gmail for quite a while.

Troy




On 9/16/2020 12:59 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
It's neither a Gmail problem nor a Thunderbird problem.

Gmail has some of the best spam filtering in the business, and it's doing with spam exactly what it should do - classifying it as such and moving those messages to the spam folder.

Gmail itself will, as Gene has noted, purge off anything in the spam folder that's older than 30 days each and every day, and that will be purged out of your spam folder under Thunderbird as well provided you're using IMAP access to your account, which has been the Gmail default access method for years now.

Neither Gmail nor Thunderbird have any ability to prevent you from getting spam nor to control the volume of spam you receive.  What they can do is filter/classify it appropriately and move it to a folder where it will not be a nuisance in daily life.

It is a good idea to check one's spam folder daily for any possible "not spam" messages that may have been classified as such incorrectly.  But I have not had Gmail do this to me for many years, and that's on multiple accounts.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com



Re: just curious

james hooper
 

Yes I am going to check that out just wanted other ideas smile.

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Pamela Dominguez
Sent: Wednesday, September 16, 2020 1:09 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] just curious

 

Did you get my message about the Aftershocks titanium bone conductor headset?  Pam.

 

Sent: Tuesday, September 15, 2020 7:37 PM

Subject: [TechTalk] just curious

 

Greetings all are anyone using blue tooth devices around their neck or earphones I am looking for something other then an ear piece.

 

Virus-free. www.avg.com


Re: just curious

Pamela Dominguez
 

Did you get my message about the Aftershocks titanium bone conductor headset?  Pam.
 

Sent: Tuesday, September 15, 2020 7:37 PM
Subject: [TechTalk] just curious
 

Greetings all are anyone using blue tooth devices around their neck or earphones I am looking for something other then an ear piece.


Virus-free. www.avg.com


Re: Thunder Thinks This Is Spam

Pamela Dominguez
 

You didn't leave the message underneath that you are questioning, so we don't know what you are talking about. Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Ann Parsons
Sent: Tuesday, September 15, 2020 3:37 PM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Thunder Thinks This Is Spam

Hi all,

What has? There's nothing that makes sense here.

Ann P.

--
Ann K. Parsons
Portal Tutoring
EMAIL: akp@...
Author of The Demmies: http://www.dldbooks.com/annparsons/
Portal Tutoring web site: http://www.portaltutoring.info
Skype: Putertutor

"All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost."




--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


Re: using gmail and thunderbird and getting lots of spam

Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

It's neither a Gmail problem nor a Thunderbird problem.

Gmail has some of the best spam filtering in the business, and it's doing with spam exactly what it should do - classifying it as such and moving those messages to the spam folder.

Gmail itself will, as Gene has noted, purge off anything in the spam folder that's older than 30 days each and every day, and that will be purged out of your spam folder under Thunderbird as well provided you're using IMAP access to your account, which has been the Gmail default access method for years now.

Neither Gmail nor Thunderbird have any ability to prevent you from getting spam nor to control the volume of spam you receive.  What they can do is filter/classify it appropriately and move it to a folder where it will not be a nuisance in daily life.

It is a good idea to check one's spam folder daily for any possible "not spam" messages that may have been classified as such incorrectly.  But I have not had Gmail do this to me for many years, and that's on multiple accounts.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


Re: using gmail and thunderbird and getting lots of spam

Gene
 

The spam folder is emptied automatically in GMail every thirty days.  I doubt you can do anything.  Since you get so much spam, it would be a good idea to check the folder daily, perhaps more than once, depending on how fast mail builds up there, to be sure no messages that are legitimate end up there.


Gene

On 9/16/2020 11:23 AM, Troy Burnham wrote:
Hi all,

I know there's another similar thread going on but after reading part of it I didn't see anything helpful so I thought I'd start my own thread.

I've been using thunderbird for a couple of years now and have been using gmail for a few months. There is a spam folder in my thunderbird and there used to never be anything in it but for the past couple of months that folder is staying full of spam, I realize it's a gmail problem and not a thunderbird problem but is there anything I can do? Btw I'm still on version 68 of thunderbird, I haven't upgraded to 78 yet because I've been seeing problems that other users are having.

Thanks.

Troy






using gmail and thunderbird and getting lots of spam

Troy Burnham
 

Hi all,

I know there's another similar thread going on but after reading part of it I didn't see anything helpful so I thought I'd start my own thread.

I've been using thunderbird for a couple of years now and have been using gmail for a few months. There is a spam folder in my thunderbird and there used to never be anything in it but for the past couple of months that folder is staying full of spam, I realize it's a gmail problem and not a thunderbird problem but is there anything I can do? Btw I'm still on version 68 of thunderbird, I haven't upgraded to 78 yet because I've been seeing problems that other users are having.

Thanks.

Troy


Re: Faxing questions

Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

Kathy,

I'll answer your last question first.  Most word processors have a built in template for a FAX Cover Sheet.  There are scads of them in MS-Word, the simplest one of which is "Fax cover sheet (standard format)."  But in all cases most contain a table with labels for the things you enter.  It's pretty straightforward.  A cover sheet really only needs to contain your name and contact information, the name and contact information for the person/department to whom the FAX is being sent, and after that any "special instructions" for the recipient if that's applicable.

One can encrypt a file (which will password protect it) and it is safe to send via e-mail, as only the recipient will be provided with the password, and that is done in an e-mail message that is separate from the one in which the file is being sent, so if one or the other message were intercepted the two pieces necessary for getting at the information are not available.

Many companies, and virtually all medical offices, now have what are called client or patient portals, where you log in via the web and the whole interaction is going on in an encrypted session, so all kinds of sensitive information can be safely exchanged.

I've actually sent things like scans of my driver's license and similar unencrypted in the past because the actual probability of any given email message being intercepted is quite low, but there is definitely a risk involved in doing so, but one I was willing to accept.

I just don't understand why the FAX has not died the death it so justly deserves after all these years. 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


Re: Faxing questions

Kathy Pingstock
 

Brian I forgot to ask what do you put on a cover letter when you’re doing faxing question


On Sep 16, 2020, at 11:04 AM, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

Kathy,

            I would feel far more secure about using the Staples service than submitting anything online, which would mean having an electronic copy out there.  The folks at Staples fax a lot of stuff and they don't give a flying fig about what they're faxing that I've ever noticed.  If you hand them the ready to fax item, including the cover sheet, they grab it, fax it, hand it back and charge you.

            And, by the way, I would also take the time to complain to the entity that's insisting on a FAX.  Very few of us ever had FAX machines and these days even fewer of us do.  It's perfectly possible to send the same document via e-mail or via a secure customer portal, and in this day and age that's what they should be doing.  Insisting on FAX makes customers' lives miserable for no reason.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


Re: Faxing questions

Kathy Pingstock
 

Thank you so much for your input, can things be send  like account numbers and Social Security and stuff securely and safely through an email to the company because maybe I can make that suggestion


 I know they want a copy of my new ID with my new name and stuff on it Kathy Sent from my iPhone

On Sep 16, 2020, at 11:04 AM, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

Kathy,

            I would feel far more secure about using the Staples service than submitting anything online, which would mean having an electronic copy out there.  The folks at Staples fax a lot of stuff and they don't give a flying fig about what they're faxing that I've ever noticed.  If you hand them the ready to fax item, including the cover sheet, they grab it, fax it, hand it back and charge you.

            And, by the way, I would also take the time to complain to the entity that's insisting on a FAX.  Very few of us ever had FAX machines and these days even fewer of us do.  It's perfectly possible to send the same document via e-mail or via a secure customer portal, and in this day and age that's what they should be doing.  Insisting on FAX makes customers' lives miserable for no reason.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


Re: Thunder Thinks This Is Spam

Gene
 

I was asking about the twitter client.

Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: lynn white
Sent: Wednesday, September 16, 2020 10:32 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Thunder Thinks This Is Spam

Hi Gene,

If you're talking about the w TB, it's working fine. If you're talking
about that Twitter client, the original installation worked great. But
when I tried to igrate the portable installation, it was a no go.

On 9/16/2020 10:27 AM, Gene wrote:
Did the installed version work well or don't you have any information?

Gene
-----Original Message----- From: lynn white
Sent: Wednesday, September 16, 2020 10:26 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Thunder Thinks This Is Spam

I can only relate a portable experience based a Twitter client that I
think is totally gone.

But, when I had it, the portable experience was awul. Not saying that
all portable experiences would be bad. But that particular experience
left a very bad taste in my mouth. One day, I might experience another
portable client.

On 9/16/2020 10:15 AM, Gene wrote:
Perhaps if the user encounters problems he/she may want to test on an installed version. But I am very satisfied with Firefox Portable and until the latest version of Thunderbird, 78.x, the portable versions I've tried have worked well. While I don't know this, I think I'd see the same problems with the installed 78.x Thunderbird as with the portable version, but I haven't tested that. We'll see if others report the problems I found.

There may be portable programs that don't have all the features of installed ones and there may be times when screen-readers don't work well or as well with portable versions. But I think it’s a good idea to try portable versions and use them, if satisfied. We all know how accessibility can change from one version of a program to another. Portable versions allow you to try a new version and retain either the installed version you are using or retain the portable version you are currently using.

Also, another important consideration is that you appear far less likely to have potentially unwanted programs installed when using free software if you use portable programs. I can't generalize from these instances, but I've seen two instances where the installed version of something tried to install potentially unwanted programs and the portable version didn't. Considering that many of the installers don't provide accessible ways of informing the user that such programs will be installed unless they are declined, its actually somewhat dangerous to install free programs if portable versions are available and work well.

Gene
-----Original Message----- From: Brian Vogel
Sent: Wednesday, September 16, 2020 9:58 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Thunder Thinks This Is Spam

On Wed, Sep 16, 2020 at 10:45 AM, Lynette wrote:
this message makes no sense because of your practice of never including info about what you are responding to.-
Agreed. It came out of nowhere and was apropos of nothing in the context of this topic.

But, back to Thunderbird. I am going to give the exact opposite advice from Gene. Portable versions are great things, and I use a lot of them, but if you're using a machine you "always use" and want an e-mail client it is best practice to use the installed version. There are differences between portable and installed versions of virtually any product that has both. And when it comes to using screen readers with them, you can be virtually certain that all testing related to the interaction between the two things is going to have used the installed versions of both. You're just adding a layer of uncertainty that seldom has any practical benefit by using a portable version of something that has an installed version.








Re: Thunder Thinks This Is Spam

lynn white
 

Hi Gene,

If you're talking about the w TB, it's working fine. If you're talking about that Twitter client, the original installation worked great. But when I tried to igrate the portable installation, it was a no go.

On 9/16/2020 10:27 AM, Gene wrote:
Did the installed version work well or don't you have any information?

Gene
-----Original Message----- From: lynn white
Sent: Wednesday, September 16, 2020 10:26 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Thunder Thinks This Is Spam

I can only relate a portable experience based a Twitter client that I
think is totally gone.

But, when I had it, the portable experience was awul. Not saying that
all portable experiences would be bad. But that particular experience
left a very bad taste in my mouth. One day, I might experience another
portable client.

On 9/16/2020 10:15 AM, Gene wrote:
Perhaps if the user encounters problems he/she may want to test on an installed version.  But I am very satisfied with Firefox Portable and until the latest version of Thunderbird, 78.x, the portable versions I've tried have worked well.  While I don't know this, I think I'd see the same problems with the installed 78.x Thunderbird as with the portable version, but I haven't tested that.  We'll see if others report the problems I found.

There may be portable programs that don't have all the features of installed ones and there may be times when screen-readers don't work well or as well with portable versions.  But I think it’s a good idea to try portable versions and use them, if satisfied.  We all know how accessibility can change from one version of a program to another. Portable versions allow you to try a new version and retain either the installed version you are using or retain the portable version you are currently using.

Also, another important consideration is that you appear far less likely to have potentially unwanted programs installed when using free software if you use portable programs.  I can't generalize from these instances, but I've seen two instances where the installed version of something tried to install potentially unwanted programs and the portable version didn't. Considering that many of the installers don't provide accessible ways of informing the user that such programs will be installed unless they are declined, its actually somewhat dangerous to install free programs if portable versions are available and work well.

Gene
-----Original Message----- From: Brian Vogel
Sent: Wednesday, September 16, 2020 9:58 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Thunder Thinks This Is Spam

On Wed, Sep 16, 2020 at 10:45 AM, Lynette wrote:
this message makes no sense because of your practice of never including info about what you are responding to.-
Agreed.  It came out of nowhere and was apropos of nothing in the context of this topic.

But, back to Thunderbird.  I am going to give the exact opposite advice from Gene.   Portable versions are great things, and I use a lot of them, but if you're using a machine you "always use" and want an e-mail client it is best practice to use the installed version.  There are differences between portable and installed versions of virtually any product that has both.  And when it comes to using screen readers with them, you can be virtually certain that all testing related to the interaction between the two things is going to have used the installed versions of both. You're just adding a layer of uncertainty that seldom has any practical benefit by using a portable version of something that has an installed version.







Re: Thunder Thinks This Is Spam

Gene
 

Did the installed version work well or don't you have any information?

Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: lynn white
Sent: Wednesday, September 16, 2020 10:26 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Thunder Thinks This Is Spam

I can only relate a portable experience based a Twitter client that I
think is totally gone.

But, when I had it, the portable experience was awul. Not saying that
all portable experiences would be bad. But that particular experience
left a very bad taste in my mouth. One day, I might experience another
portable client.

On 9/16/2020 10:15 AM, Gene wrote:
Perhaps if the user encounters problems he/she may want to test on an installed version. But I am very satisfied with Firefox Portable and until the latest version of Thunderbird, 78.x, the portable versions I've tried have worked well. While I don't know this, I think I'd see the same problems with the installed 78.x Thunderbird as with the portable version, but I haven't tested that. We'll see if others report the problems I found.

There may be portable programs that don't have all the features of installed ones and there may be times when screen-readers don't work well or as well with portable versions. But I think it’s a good idea to try portable versions and use them, if satisfied. We all know how accessibility can change from one version of a program to another. Portable versions allow you to try a new version and retain either the installed version you are using or retain the portable version you are currently using.

Also, another important consideration is that you appear far less likely to have potentially unwanted programs installed when using free software if you use portable programs. I can't generalize from these instances, but I've seen two instances where the installed version of something tried to install potentially unwanted programs and the portable version didn't. Considering that many of the installers don't provide accessible ways of informing the user that such programs will be installed unless they are declined, its actually somewhat dangerous to install free programs if portable versions are available and work well.

Gene
-----Original Message----- From: Brian Vogel
Sent: Wednesday, September 16, 2020 9:58 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Thunder Thinks This Is Spam

On Wed, Sep 16, 2020 at 10:45 AM, Lynette wrote:
this message makes no sense because of your practice of never including info about what you are responding to.-
Agreed. It came out of nowhere and was apropos of nothing in the context of this topic.

But, back to Thunderbird. I am going to give the exact opposite advice from Gene. Portable versions are great things, and I use a lot of them, but if you're using a machine you "always use" and want an e-mail client it is best practice to use the installed version. There are differences between portable and installed versions of virtually any product that has both. And when it comes to using screen readers with them, you can be virtually certain that all testing related to the interaction between the two things is going to have used the installed versions of both. You're just adding a layer of uncertainty that seldom has any practical benefit by using a portable version of something that has an installed version.


Re: Thunder Thinks This Is Spam

lynn white
 

I can only relate a portable experience based a Twitter client that I think is totally gone.

But, when I had it, the portable experience was awul. Not saying that all portable experiences would be bad. But that particular experience left a very bad taste in my mouth. One day, I might experience another portable client.

On 9/16/2020 10:15 AM, Gene wrote:
Perhaps if the user encounters problems he/she may want to test on an installed version.  But I am very satisfied with Firefox Portable and until the latest version of Thunderbird, 78.x, the portable versions I've tried have worked well.  While I don't know this, I think I'd see the same problems with the installed 78.x Thunderbird as with the portable version, but I haven't tested that.  We'll see if others report the problems I found.

There may be portable programs that don't have all the features of installed ones and there may be times when screen-readers don't work well or as well with portable versions.  But I think it’s a good idea to try portable versions and use them, if satisfied.  We all know how accessibility can change from one version of a program to another.  Portable versions allow you to try a new version and retain either the installed version you are using or retain the portable version you are currently using.

Also, another important consideration is that you appear far less likely to have potentially unwanted programs installed when using free software if you use portable programs.  I can't generalize from these instances, but I've seen two instances where the installed version of something tried to install potentially unwanted programs and the portable version didn't.  Considering that many of the installers don't provide accessible ways of informing the user that such programs will be installed unless they are declined, its actually somewhat dangerous to install free programs if portable versions are available and work well.

Gene
-----Original Message----- From: Brian Vogel
Sent: Wednesday, September 16, 2020 9:58 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Thunder Thinks This Is Spam

On Wed, Sep 16, 2020 at 10:45 AM, Lynette wrote:
this message makes no sense because of your practice of never including info about what you are responding to.-
Agreed.  It came out of nowhere and was apropos of nothing in the context of this topic.

But, back to Thunderbird.  I am going to give the exact opposite advice from Gene.   Portable versions are great things, and I use a lot of them, but if you're using a machine you "always use" and want an e-mail client it is best practice to use the installed version.  There are differences between portable and installed versions of virtually any product that has both.  And when it comes to using screen readers with them, you can be virtually certain that all testing related to the interaction between the two things is going to have used the installed versions of both. You're just adding a layer of uncertainty that seldom has any practical benefit by using a portable version of something that has an installed version.


Re: Thunder Thinks This Is Spam

lynn white
 

I can only relate a portable experience based a Twitter client that I think is totally gone.

But, when I had it, the portable experience was awul. Not saying that all portable experiences would be bad. But that particular experience left a very bad taste in my mouth. One day, I might experience another portable client.

On 9/16/2020 10:15 AM, Gene wrote:
Perhaps if the user encounters problems he/she may want to test on an installed version.  But I am very satisfied with Firefox Portable and until the latest version of Thunderbird, 78.x, the portable versions I've tried have worked well.  While I don't know this, I think I'd see the same problems with the installed 78.x Thunderbird as with the portable version, but I haven't tested that.  We'll see if others report the problems I found.

There may be portable programs that don't have all the features of installed ones and there may be times when screen-readers don't work well or as well with portable versions.  But I think it’s a good idea to try portable versions and use them, if satisfied.  We all know how accessibility can change from one version of a program to another.  Portable versions allow you to try a new version and retain either the installed version you are using or retain the portable version you are currently using.

Also, another important consideration is that you appear far less likely to have potentially unwanted programs installed when using free software if you use portable programs.  I can't generalize from these instances, but I've seen two instances where the installed version of something tried to install potentially unwanted programs and the portable version didn't.  Considering that many of the installers don't provide accessible ways of informing the user that such programs will be installed unless they are declined, its actually somewhat dangerous to install free programs if portable versions are available and work well.

Gene
-----Original Message----- From: Brian Vogel
Sent: Wednesday, September 16, 2020 9:58 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Thunder Thinks This Is Spam

On Wed, Sep 16, 2020 at 10:45 AM, Lynette wrote:
this message makes no sense because of your practice of never including info about what you are responding to.-
Agreed.  It came out of nowhere and was apropos of nothing in the context of this topic.

But, back to Thunderbird.  I am going to give the exact opposite advice from Gene.   Portable versions are great things, and I use a lot of them, but if you're using a machine you "always use" and want an e-mail client it is best practice to use the installed version.  There are differences between portable and installed versions of virtually any product that has both.  And when it comes to using screen readers with them, you can be virtually certain that all testing related to the interaction between the two things is going to have used the installed versions of both. You're just adding a layer of uncertainty that seldom has any practical benefit by using a portable version of something that has an installed version.


Re: Thunder Thinks This Is Spam

lynn white
 

Agreed.

On 9/16/2020 9:44 AM, Lynette wrote:
Actually, this message makes no sense because of your practice of never including info about what you are responding t.


-----Original Message----- From: Ann Parsons
Sent: Tuesday, September 15, 2020 12:37 PM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Thunder Thinks This Is Spam

Hi all,

What has?  There's nothing that makes sense here.

Ann P.


Re: Thunder Thinks This Is Spam

Gene
 

Perhaps if the user encounters problems he/she may want to test on an installed version. But I am very satisfied with Firefox Portable and until the latest version of Thunderbird, 78.x, the portable versions I've tried have worked well. While I don't know this, I think I'd see the same problems with the installed 78.x Thunderbird as with the portable version, but I haven't tested that. We'll see if others report the problems I found.

There may be portable programs that don't have all the features of installed ones and there may be times when screen-readers don't work well or as well with portable versions. But I think it’s a good idea to try portable versions and use them, if satisfied. We all know how accessibility can change from one version of a program to another. Portable versions allow you to try a new version and retain either the installed version you are using or retain the portable version you are currently using.

Also, another important consideration is that you appear far less likely to have potentially unwanted programs installed when using free software if you use portable programs. I can't generalize from these instances, but I've seen two instances where the installed version of something tried to install potentially unwanted programs and the portable version didn't. Considering that many of the installers don't provide accessible ways of informing the user that such programs will be installed unless they are declined, its actually somewhat dangerous to install free programs if portable versions are available and work well.

Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel
Sent: Wednesday, September 16, 2020 9:58 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Thunder Thinks This Is Spam

On Wed, Sep 16, 2020 at 10:45 AM, Lynette wrote:
this message makes no sense because of your practice of never including info about what you are responding to.-
Agreed. It came out of nowhere and was apropos of nothing in the context of this topic.

But, back to Thunderbird. I am going to give the exact opposite advice from Gene. Portable versions are great things, and I use a lot of them, but if you're using a machine you "always use" and want an e-mail client it is best practice to use the installed version. There are differences between portable and installed versions of virtually any product that has both. And when it comes to using screen readers with them, you can be virtually certain that all testing related to the interaction between the two things is going to have used the installed versions of both. You're just adding a layer of uncertainty that seldom has any practical benefit by using a portable version of something that has an installed version.

--


Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


Re: Faxing questions

Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

Kathy,

            I would feel far more secure about using the Staples service than submitting anything online, which would mean having an electronic copy out there.  The folks at Staples fax a lot of stuff and they don't give a flying fig about what they're faxing that I've ever noticed.  If you hand them the ready to fax item, including the cover sheet, they grab it, fax it, hand it back and charge you.

            And, by the way, I would also take the time to complain to the entity that's insisting on a FAX.  Very few of us ever had FAX machines and these days even fewer of us do.  It's perfectly possible to send the same document via e-mail or via a secure customer portal, and in this day and age that's what they should be doing.  Insisting on FAX makes customers' lives miserable for no reason.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


Re: Thunder Thinks This Is Spam

Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

On Wed, Sep 16, 2020 at 10:45 AM, Lynette wrote:
this message makes no sense because of your practice of never including info about what you are responding to.
-
Agreed.  It came out of nowhere and was apropos of nothing in the context of this topic.

But, back to Thunderbird.  I am going to give the exact opposite advice from Gene.   Portable versions are great things, and I use a lot of them, but if you're using a machine you "always use" and want an e-mail client it is best practice to use the installed version.  There are differences between portable and installed versions of virtually any product that has both.  And when it comes to using screen readers with them, you can be virtually certain that all testing related to the interaction between the two things is going to have used the installed versions of both.  You're just adding a layer of uncertainty that seldom has any practical benefit by using a portable version of something that has an installed version.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


Re: Thunder Thinks This Is Spam

Gene
 

You aren't creating a portable version from the currently installed version.  You are placing a portable version on your machine. I haven't looked into whether you can import settings and messages and the address book from the installed version.


Gene

On 9/16/2020 9:35 AM, Lynette wrote:
If you are currently using TB, and  you create a portable version, will all your setting transfer to the portable version?
TIA
Lynette


-----Original Message----- From: Gene
Sent: Tuesday, September 15, 2020 7:33 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Thunder Thinks This Is Spam

I don't know what is causing it.  Do you have more than one account?  If so,
you need to turn off the setting for all accounts individually.

You said this just started happening.  Brian spoke of possible corruption of
the program and that could be.  You may want to uninstall and install it
again as he suggests.  Something detrimental evidently happened since you
didn't have this behavior before.

Even if you solve the problem, you may still want to consider the following:
One thing I encourage people to do is use Thunderbird portable. You can keep
your installed version and try the portable version so you will have no
delay or interruption in receiving e-mail.

The reasons I say that people should use the portable version are that you
can move the program to any machine you want and have all your e-mail and
settings, except that I don't know if you will have message rules
transferred.
You can run it from something like a thumb drive if you are using a machine
that isn't yours and that you don't have the program on.  And you can keep a
backup copy so that if the program becomes corrupted, you can simply delete
it and copy the backup copy to the location where you usually have the
program.  To keep the backup copy current, you can delete the backup when
you want and copy the one you are using to that location again. This will
preserve your e-mail and any changes you have made to the program, such as
settings changes and probably add-ons as well.

You won't have to trouble shoot problems anymore that arise from corruption
of the program.  You can just replace it by deleting it and copying the
backup copy to the location you run the program from.
Although I use the Brave browser for most of my browsing, I use Firefox
portable off and on and I use the portable version for the same reasons.

I use portable versions of programs where they either do everything the
installed version does or where the portable version does the things I want
it to do.

-----Original Message----- From: lynn white
Sent: Tuesday, September 15, 2020 9:16 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Thunder Thinks This Is Spam

Hey Gene,

First of all, thank you as always. I perform the step by step method
that you gave. Unfortunately, I'm still getting this message from the
Tbird.

If you have any other ideas, I've got an open ear.

On 9/15/2020 9:04 AM, Gene wrote:
You can turn off the spam filter.  You don't needit if your provider filters spam well.  I don't use a spam filter on my machine and I get almost no spam because the GMail spam filter filters out just about everything.

Here is how you do it.
New main steps start on new lines.
I'll go into more detail if you need me to about how to find things.
Open tools with alt t.
Type s to open the account settings dialog.
Down arrow to junk settings.
Tab a few times until you get to Enable adaptive junk mail controls for this account.
Uncheckit with the space bar.
Tab to and activate the ok button.
The intrusive and annoying messages will be gone and you may wwell se little or no more spam than you do now.

Gene
-----Original Message----- From: lynn white
Sent: Tuesday, September 15, 2020 8:48 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Thunder Thinks This Is Spam

This has suddenly started popping up for every message. Fixes? Thanks.








I use portable versions of programs where they do the same things as the
nonportable versions or if they do what I want even if they don't do
everything.

Gene