Date   

Re: computer & internal HD questions

Nancy Hill
 

Thanks for the info! I did find out that altho 32 bit, it is '64 ready. So, how does one convert over to 64 bit?

Here's another: How can you tell the max amount of memory that your computer can handle? I think the old computer must just have 2 memory slots as it just has 3 gigs of memory with 2 gigs in one slot and

1 in the other.

Thanks,
Nancy

On 12/1/2015 3:12 PM, Carlos wrote:
The capacity of the drive is not so important. It is the physical form factor that matters. If you purchased a 2.5 form factor drive which is the most common standard for laptops, then the new drive will fit in the same drive bay once the old one is removed.

Yes, such housings are usually referred to as enclosures. Most stores that sell computer parts should have them. I prefer shopping on Amazon myself. Just make sure to search for one which supports 2.5 form factor drives.

A 64 bit processor is capable of running a 32 bit operating system so yes it is possible.

There is a 32 bit version of Windows 10 so assuming that your machine meets the system requirements, you will still be able to upgrade it even if it is a 32 bit processor.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Nancy Hill" <girlyscream@comcast.net>
To: <TechTalk@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, December 01, 2015 2:50 PM
Subject: [TechTalk] computer & internal HD questions


Hi...

I have a 1 T new internal HD. It is NOT SS. How can I tell if it would fit where an original 250 g HD is? Can you tell without opening up the laptop?

If I don't use it as a replacement HD, isn't there a way you can get some kind of housing to put it in to convert it into an 'external' drive? What is that kind of thing called, and where is the best place to get one?

My old computer presented as a 32 bit system, but it seems
like I remember something about my old computer perhaps being '64 bit ready or upgradeable. Does that sound possible or am I just mis-remembering?

I sort of have it in the back of my mind that I could upgrade that machine to win 10 as it is currently has win 7 and jaws 15. If it turns out that my old computer is to remain 32 bit, would an upgrade to win 10 be doable?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Many thanks,
Nancy





Re: How to Rescue a Wet Cell Phone, Article Included #article

Mike B. <mb69mach1@...>
 

Howdy All,
 
Below is the article:
How to Rescue a Wet Phone
Category:
Gadgets
 
For a variety of reasons most of them hilarious to onlookers some 22 million phones are drowned each year. When your phone (or any electronic device)
stops working after falling into the sink, toilet, bathtub, swimming pool, or the ocean, can it be saved? In many cases the answer is “yes,” if you do
the right things and don’t do the wrong things.  Here's what you need to know if your device is dunked...
 
rankinfile.com
 
HELP! I Dropped My Phone in The...
 
A while ago, I dropped my brand-new Samsung Galaxy phone in a puddle of dirty slush, just outside a Chinese restaurant in Brooklyn, NY.  While sipping
my wonton soup, I tried to figure out how to get home without my non-functioning phone's GPS assistance.
 
I thought about asking for a takeout container filled with uncooked rice, but my fortune cookie told me "You will soon witness a miracle." So I decided
against the rice, and that turned out to be a good thing.
 
Fortunately, I already knew that the worst thing you can do is the first thing most people want to do: press the power button to see if the device will
still work. That is a good way to create a short circuit that will fry the electronics and ensure the device never works again.  So resist the urge to
power-up a dripping wet phone.  (Hey, that would make an excellent fortune cookie saying!)
 
Rescue a drowned phone
 
Of course, if a device won’t power up then the obvious next step is to plug it into a battery charger, right? No; that’s like tossing a hair dryer into
a bathtub. You may fry the charger as well as the device.
 
Speaking of hair dryers, they are often used to dry out a wet phone, laptop, tablet, or other device. This technique is based on the right idea: get rid
of all moisture before attempting to power up the device. But it’s a long, tedious process if done correctly.
 
It is useless to dry only the outside of the device; it’s the moisture deep in the circuitry that causes electrical shorts. So to blow-dry a device effectively
you will have to open its case, voiding the device’s warranty in many cases. Even then, you won’t be able to blow warm air directly on all wet components
unless you completely disassemble the device. There are plenty of Youtube videos that show how to take apart various gadgets, but it's really something
that’s best left to trained professionals.  It is a good idea to open the device if it has a removable back panel, remove the battery, SIM card and memory
cards, and set them aside.
 
Hair dryer heat can damage circuitry as easily as electricity can. Never leave a hair dryer blowing on a wet device even on its lowest heat setting. The
“no heat, air only” setting will still generate hot air from the dryer’s motor if the dryer runs a long time.
 
If you dropped your phone in salty or dirty water, I recommend gently rinsing it in distilled water or isopropyl alcohol BEFORE attempting to dry it out.
 Distilled water does not conduct electricity and can safely be used for this purpose.  Alcohol binds with water is very good at pulling moisture out of
small spaces.
 
What About the Rice Method?
 
You've probably heard that the best thing to do with a phone after it's been dunked is to put it in a sealed container with uncooked rice.  Gazelle, a
company that buys and resells used electronics,
tested various drying agents
 on phones that had been submerged in water. What they found was that "Dry, uncooked conventional rice was the worst of the seven options tested. It absorbed
the least water in 24 hours, losing out to silica gel, cat litter, couscous, instant oatmeal, classic oatmeal and instant rice."
 
What Gazelle and other researchers have found is that natural evaporation is the safest way to dry out a wet device. Just let the device sit in low humidity
for at least three days. A fan gently blowing across the device will help by removing humid air that arises from the drying device. Do not leave the device
where it will be exposed to direct sunlight, which may overheat it.
 
Desiccants such as rice and silica gel are able to absorb only tiny amounts of humidity from ambient air; they are not sponges for soaking up spoonfuls
of water that may be inside of a drowned phone, tablet or laptop.   Burying your device in a bucket of rice or silica gel granules will slow drying considerably,
giving the wet components more time to rust, and dust from the desiccant may cause more problems.  Use it only as a last resort, after giving the air-dry
method a try.
 
Put It In the Dryer?
 
Of course, putting your wet phone in a clothes dryer, oven, or microwave is a bad idea.  But if you’re really in a hurry and are fortunate enough to live
near a
TekDry service center,
you can get your device professionally dried in as little as 20 minutes.  There is no charge if your device fails to respond to the TekDry treatment, but
if it works be prepared to spend up to $70 for rescuing a phone; more for a tablet or laptop.  TekDry also offers a
mail-in service.
 They will attempt to fix your phone and send it back to you. You only pay when it works.
 
The videos on the TekDry site show an impressive contraption, and give me a pretty good idea of how the patented system works.  You device is hermetically
sealed inside of a pressure vessel. Air is evacuated, creating a vacuum that pulls water out of the device. (One of the videos actually shows water bubbling
out of a phone’s ports as air is exhausted.) To speed evaporation safely, the chamber is heated precisely and gently to a temperature lower than the maximum
operating temperature specified by the device’s manufacturer.
 
Keep in mind that you might successfully dry out your device, but it may fail to power on due to a battery that was fried by the submersion.  Before giving
up, try a new battery (or borrow a friend's battery) and see if that does the trick.
Take care.
Mike
Take care.
Mike

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, December 01, 2015 1:27 PM
Subject: [TechTalk] How to Rescue a Wet Cell Phone

 
Some of you who have accidently dropped your cell phone into the sink or toilet may find this article interesting:
 
 
 
Gerald
 
 


Re: This is Nothing New, was: The deep/Dark net, Scar'r'r'r'r'ry!

Jeremy <icu8it2@...>
 

Rofllmao, if it'd not be harmful to who ever was attempting to make it, it'd certainly most likely give their credit card reason to gripe and complain! Wow, 30000 dollars? That's a lot of dinner at the Chinese buffet, which sounds a lot better.

On 12/1/2015 12:33 PM, enes sarıbaş wrote:
hi,
This seems like a joke. Constructing such a device would surely kill the constructer.

On 12/1/2015 8:26 AM, Carlos wrote:
LOL although this most certainly qualifies as technology, I will ban any member who I discover has been constructing thermonuclear devices.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Ron Canazzi" <aa2vm@roadrunner.com>
To: <TechTalk@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, December 01, 2015 1:17 AM
Subject: This is Nothing New, was: [TechTalk] The deep/Dark net, Scar'r'r'r'r'ry!


Hi Group,

I don't think this so called deep dark net is really anything new. Way back on August 29, 1997, using a half forgotten search engine called Infoseek (does that still exist? I'll have to check after I am done with this post.) I found the below information.

How To Build An Atom Bomb

The following paper is taken from The Journal of Irreproducible
Results, Volume 25/Number 4/1979. P.O. Box 234 Chicago Heights,
Illinois 60411

1.INTRODUCTION

Worldwide controversy has been generated recently from several
court decisions in the United States which have restricted
popular magazines from printing articles which describe how to
make an atomic bomb. The reason usually given by the courts is
that national security would be compromised if such information
were generally available. But, since it is commonly known that
all of the information is publicly available in most major
metropolitan libraries, obviously the court's officially stated
position is covering up a more important factor; namely, that
such atomic devices would prove too difficult for the average
citizen to construct. The United States courts cannot afford to
insult the vast majorities by insinuating that they do not have
the intelligence of a cabbage, and thus the "official" press
releases claim national security as a blanket restriction.
The rumors that have unfortunately occurred as a result of
widespread misinformation can (and must) be cleared up now, for
the construction project this month is the construction of a
thermonuclear device, which will hopefully clear up any
misconceptions you might have about such a project. We will see
how easy it is to make a device of your very own in ten easy
steps, to have and hold as you see fit, without annoying
interference from the government or the courts.

The project will cost between $5,000 and $30,000, depending on
how fancy you want the final product to be. Since last week's
column, "Let's Make a Time Machine", was received so well in the
new step-by-step format, this month's column will follow the
same format.

2. CONSTRUCTION METHOD

1. First, obtain about 50 pounds (110 kg) of weapons grade
Plutonium at your local supplier (see NOTE 1). A nuclear power
plant is not recommended, as large quantities of missing
Plutonium tends to make plant engineers unhappy. We suggest that
you contact your local terrorist organization, or perhaps the
Junior Achievement in your neighborhood.
2. Please remember that Plutonium, especially pure, refined
Plutonium, is somewhat dangerous. Wash your hands with soap and
warm water after handling the material, and don't allow your
children or pets to play in it or eat it. Any left over
Plutonium dust is excellent as an insect repellant. You may wish
to keep the substance in a lead box if you can find one in your
local junk yard, but an old coffee can will do nicely.
3. Fashion together a metal enclosure to house the device. Most
common varieties of sheet metal can be bent to disguise this
enclosure as, for example, a briefcase, a lunch pail, or a
Buick. Do not use tinfoil.
4. Arrange the Plutonium into two hemispheral shapes, separated
by about 4 cm. Use rubber cement to hold the Plutonium dust
together. 5.Now get about 100 pounds (220 kg) of trinitrotoluene
(TNT). Gelignite is much better, but messier to work with. Your
helpful hardware man will be happy to provide you with this
item.
6. Pack the TNT around the hemisphere arrangement constructed in
step 4. If you cannot find Gelignite, fell free to use TNT
packed in with Playdo or any modeling clay. Colored clay is
acceptable, but there is no need to get fancy at this point.
7. Enclose the structure from step 6 into the enclosure made in
step 3. Use a strong glue such as "Crazy Glue" to bind the
hemisphere arrangement against the enclosure to prevent
accidental detonation which might result from vibration or
mishandling.
8. To detonate the device, obtain a radio controlled (RC) servo
mechanism, as found in RC model airplanes and cars. With a
modicum of effort, a remote plunger can be made that will strike
a detonator cap to effect a small explosion. These detonator
caps can be found in the electrical supply section of your local
supermarket. We recommend the "Blast-O-Mactic" brand because they
are no deposit-no return.
9. Now hide the completed device from the neighbors and
children. The garage is not recommended because of high humidity
and the extreme range of temperatures experienced there. Nuclear
devices have been known to spontaneously detonate in these
unstable conditions. The hall closet or under the kitchen sink
will be perfectly suitable.
10. Now you are the proud owner of a working thermonuclear
device! It is a great ice-breaker at parties, and in a pinch,
can be used for national defense.

3. THEORY OF OPERATION

The device basically works when the detonated TNT compresses the
Plutonium into a critical mass. The critical mass then produces
a nuclear chain reaction similar to the domino chain reaction
(discussed in this column, "Dominos on the March", March, 1968).
The chain reaction then promptly produces a big thermonuclear
reaction. And there you have it, a 10 megaton explosion!

4. NEXT MONTH'S COLUMN

In next month's column, we will learn how to clone your
neighbor's wife in six easy steps. This project promises to be
an exciting weekend full of fun and profit. Common kitchen
utensils will be all you need. See you next month!

5. NOTES

1. Plutonium (PU), atomic number 94, is a radioactive metallic
element formed by the decay of Neptunium and is similar in
chemical structure to Uranium, Saturium, Jupiternium, and
Marisum.

6. PREVIOUS MONTH'S COLUMNS

1. Let's Make Test Tube Babies! May, 1979
2. Let's Make a Solar System! June, 1979
3. Let's Make an Economic Recession! July, 1979
4. Let's Make an Anti-Gravity Machine! August, 1979
5. Let's Make Contact with an Alien Race! September, 1979


On 11/30/2015 1:25 PM, rajmund wrote:
Hello,
I actually fully agree with this. In school, when I mentioned that you could find instructions to make a bomb, they didn't believe. Took me 2 minutes, to find one, that explains how to make one out of batteries, and cans,, on an airport. Do I recommend it? No. But, the fact is, its on there.

----- Original Message -----
From: Travis Siegel <tsiegel@softcon.com>
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Date: Monday, November 30, 2015 2:49 pm
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] The deep/Dark net, Scar'r'r'r'r'ry!


Seriously folks. This supposed deep net is just another site on the world
wide web. (ok, not just one, but several) it's not hard to hide a site
from the search engines, there's all kinds of tools for doing this (or you
could just put in a robot.txt file, and they'll ignore your page) The only
thing is: most folks want to be found on the web, so they don't take steps
to keep themselves out of the search engines, and so they become part of
the actual web, those who (for whatever reason) don't want to be part of
the web simply take steps to prevent indexing, and keep their sites off of
places that would advertise it. And for some reason, these sites have
come to be referred to as the deep net. Honestly, who cares. You can
find anything you want on the internet if you search long enough, (yes,
even porn and bomb making instructions) so I don't see what the big hoopla
is because some folks don't want their sites off the grid as it were.
It's nothing new. During the bbs era, loads of bbses sprung up that
weren't advertised, and were passed only via word of mouth, so folks
weren't likely to stumble upon them accidentally. This is no different.
It's simply a scary sounding label for sites who don't want the public
visiting them, and who take steps to ensure their privacy. Big deal.
Is there scary and dangerous stuff there, most certainly, but you know
what? The internet is a dangerous place too if you wnder into some of it's
backroads and get involved in places that are less than reputable. It's
no different.

On Mon, 30 Nov 2015, Walter Ramage wrote:

I'd go along with that but I can understand the curiosity factor having a
strong pull on folks. I used to imagine getting in there would be
difficult, in otherwords you would need to be some kind of super tech geek
but no, it is very simple and that makes it even more scarey. Walter.

-----Original Message-----
From: Carlos [mailto:carlos1106@nyc.rr.com]
Sent: 30 November 2015 14:29
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] The deep/Dark net, Scar'r'r'r'r'ry!

I think it is something people in general should avoid.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Walter Ramage" <wpr@blueyonder.co.uk>
To: <TechTalk@groups.io>
Sent: Monday, November 30, 2015 9:24 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] The deep/Dark net, Scar'r'r'r'r'ry!


Hi. Yes? but it also sounds very dangerous, unless you know what you are
doing. Personally, I think it is a place the avrage person should avoid.
Walter.

-----Original Message-----
From: goshawk on horseback [mailto:goshawk_on_horseback@fastmail.co.uk]
Sent: 30 November 2015 14:14
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] The deep/Dark net, Scar'r'r'r'r'ry!

unfortunately not, it does however sound very interesting.

Simon



----- Original Message -----
From: Walter Ramage <mailto:wpr@blueyonder.co.uk>
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Sent: Monday, November 30, 2015 2:04 PM
Subject: [TechTalk] The deep/Dark net, Scar'r'r'r'r'ry!


Hi guys. I've just finished reading Lee Child's latest book. The
thrust of the book is the Deep net and what can be found there. I
wondered
if that could really be true, that is, the things described so I've just
done a Google search and read an article on the deep/Dark net and how to
access it. It seams it is rather easy but apparently very dangerous. The
trick is to enter and leave without being discovered and traced. I like
many are amazed at what can be found on the surface net, the wealth of
info
is so vast but it would seem that is just the tip of the iceberg because
the
deep/dark net is hundreds of times larger than the surface net and there
is
where you will find all sorts of unpleasant and frightening things. There
sickening sights that deal with porn and kiddy porn and sites that deal
with
illegal drugs. Sights for obtaining weapons and tuition on how to make
explosives and also assassin web sites where you can arrange a hit. My
mind
boggles at just how depraved the world is and what extent some people will
go to. Interestingly the article I read said that not all deep web stuff
is
bad and that we often use it without knowing. For example every time you
order goods on line and those secure edit boxes where you put your credit
details, that is on the deep net. Apparently the deep web is run on the
TOR
network and the page where you place your confidential information cannot
be
found by using conventional search engins, that's the deep net. However
it
seems a very scarey place unless you know what you are doing, although the
article gave instructions, I'll stay well clear. How about you guys, have
you ever tried exploring that place, if so, is it as scarey as it seems? ?
Walter.



________________________________

Avast logo <http://www.avast.com/> This email has been checked for
viruses by Avast antivirus software.
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Sent from a Braille Sense








How to Rescue a Wet Cell Phone #article

Gerald Levy
 

 
Some of you who have accidently dropped your cell phone into the sink or toilet may find this article interesting:
 
 
 
Gerald
 
 


Re: Warning about strange browser popups

Armando Vias <armando.l.vias@...>
 

I think so.

--
Armando Vias: Admin/owner of the TechTips Mailing List
To join the list, send an email to
techtips+subscribe@groups.io with the subject "Subscribe."
You can talk about anything technology on this list.


Re: Avast free antivirus

Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
 

Hello Everyone:
 
I simply use the free version of Avast!  I've never had to tinker with it, it does its own thing with respect to updates.  I hear the voice tell me:  "Avast database has been updated!"
 
When the one year or 14 months expire, I simply re-enter my E-mail address and I am good to go for another year or thereabout.  I've never felt it necessary to grab a paid version, and I've not had any problems with virus attacks since I've deployed it.  I don't even recall how long I've been using Avast, but, without a doubt, it's been longer than ten years if I'm not mistaking. 
 
At this point in time, I'm not sure if I want to try any other virus checker; I leave that which is working alone until I am forced to go a different route. 
 
Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado



Re: Warning about strange browser popups

Gerald Levy
 

Is the latest free version of AVG accessible with JAWS 16?

Gerald

-----Original Message-----
From: Armando Vias
Sent: Tuesday, December 01, 2015 3:46 PM
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Warning about strange browser popups

Choose AVG check box and press the get installers button. Save
the installer in the downloads folder. Open the installer and
wait. AVG should be installed now.

--
Armando Vias: Admin/owner of the TechTips Mailing List
To join the list, send an email to
techtips+subscribe@groups.io with the subject "Subscribe."
You can talk about anything technology on this list.


How to make e-mails continue to show as read.

Carolyn Arnold
 

I have Windows 10 and Outlook 2013. This must be a generic problem with Outlook, because once I look at a message, and not enter it, it does not show as unread. Does anyone know the commands to return my boxes to where the message continue to show as read until they’ve been opened?

 

Best from,

 

Carolyn

 


Re: Warning about strange browser popups

Armando Vias <armando.l.vias@...>
 

Choose AVG check box and press the get installers button. Save the installer in the downloads folder. Open the installer and wait. AVG should be installed now.

--
Armando Vias: Admin/owner of the TechTips Mailing List
To join the list, send an email to
techtips+subscribe@groups.io with the subject "Subscribe."
You can talk about anything technology on this list.


Re: Warning about strange browser popups

Armando Vias <armando.l.vias@...>
 

Well, you can get all the virus software from www.ninite.com/accessible and look under the security heading.

--
Armando Vias: Admin/owner of the TechTips Mailing List
To join the list, send an email to
techtips+subscribe@groups.io with the subject "Subscribe."
You can talk about anything technology on this list.


Re: Warning about strange browser popups

Sylvia <sylvia0647@...>
 

Hi Beth, I have MSE and just did a full scan. Nothing was found. I will run
malware bites later.

-----Original Message-----
From: Beth [mailto:thebluesisloose@gmail.com]
Sent: Tuesday, December 01, 2015 3:33 PM
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Warning about strange browser popups

Sylvia, I think you ... have a virus. I have to be careful
writing this because I personaly had one of those, but Blake
handed me a copy of AVG, but that was when I had Windows 7.
strangely, no such problems with Win10. What malwadre protection
do you use? Antivirus? I heard that Blake's stepfather had
probems with MacAffee Antivirus, and now his pc is dead. ...
Dead.
Beth

----- Original Message -----
From: "Sylvia" <sylvia0647@gmail.com
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Date sent: Tue, 1 Dec 2015 09:38:19 -0500
Subject: [TechTalk] Warning about strange browser popups

Hi list, I hope this message isn't off topic but I wanted to warn
people
about some rather strange browser popups. I was doing a google
search
yesterday and I got a strange error message that stated that
there was
suspicious behavior associated with my account. I was given a
phone number
to call so that a Microsoft technician could assist me in solving
the
problem. Does anyone know if these messages have anything to do
with
malware? I've done a scan and nothing was found. No, I'm not
going to call
the number either. lol


Re: Warning about strange browser popups

Beth
 

Sylvia, I think you ... have a virus. I have to be careful writing this because I personaly had one of those, but Blake handed me a copy of AVG, but that was when I had Windows 7. strangely, no such problems with Win10. What malwadre protection do you use? Antivirus? I heard that Blake's stepfather had probems with MacAffee Antivirus, and now his pc is dead. ... Dead.
Beth

----- Original Message -----
From: "Sylvia" <sylvia0647@gmail.com
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Date sent: Tue, 1 Dec 2015 09:38:19 -0500
Subject: [TechTalk] Warning about strange browser popups

Hi list, I hope this message isn't off topic but I wanted to warn people
about some rather strange browser popups. I was doing a google search
yesterday and I got a strange error message that stated that there was
suspicious behavior associated with my account. I was given a phone number
to call so that a Microsoft technician could assist me in solving the
problem. Does anyone know if these messages have anything to do with
malware? I've done a scan and nothing was found. No, I'm not going to call
the number either. lol


Re: computer & internal HD questions

Carlos
 

The capacity of the drive is not so important. It is the physical form factor that matters. If you purchased a 2.5 form factor drive which is the most common standard for laptops, then the new drive will fit in the same drive bay once the old one is removed.

Yes, such housings are usually referred to as enclosures. Most stores that sell computer parts should have them. I prefer shopping on Amazon myself. Just make sure to search for one which supports 2.5 form factor drives.

A 64 bit processor is capable of running a 32 bit operating system so yes it is possible.

There is a 32 bit version of Windows 10 so assuming that your machine meets the system requirements, you will still be able to upgrade it even if it is a 32 bit processor.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Nancy Hill" <girlyscream@comcast.net>
To: <TechTalk@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, December 01, 2015 2:50 PM
Subject: [TechTalk] computer & internal HD questions


Hi...

I have a 1 T new internal HD. It is NOT SS. How can I tell if it would fit where an original 250 g HD is? Can you tell without opening up the laptop?

If I don't use it as a replacement HD, isn't there a way you can get some kind of housing to put it in to convert it into an 'external' drive? What is that kind of thing called, and where is the best place to get one?

My old computer presented as a 32 bit system, but it seems
like I remember something about my old computer perhaps being '64 bit ready or upgradeable. Does that sound possible or am I just mis-remembering?

I sort of have it in the back of my mind that I could upgrade that machine to win 10 as it is currently has win 7 and jaws 15. If it turns out that my old computer is to remain 32 bit, would an upgrade to win 10 be doable?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Many thanks,
Nancy


computer & internal HD questions

Nancy Hill
 

Hi...

I have a 1 T new internal HD. It is NOT SS. How can I tell if it would fit where an original 250 g HD is? Can you tell without opening up the laptop?

If I don't use it as a replacement HD, isn't there a way you can get some kind of housing to put it in to convert it into an 'external' drive? What is that kind of thing called, and where is the best place to get one?

My old computer presented as a 32 bit system, but it seems
like I remember something about my old computer perhaps being '64 bit ready or upgradeable. Does that sound possible or am I just mis-remembering?

I sort of have it in the back of my mind that I could upgrade that machine to win 10 as it is currently has win 7 and jaws 15. If it turns out that my old computer is to remain 32 bit, would an upgrade to win 10 be doable?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Many thanks,
Nancy


Re: Avast free antivirus

enes sarıbaş
 

hi,
the 2016 version seems to have introduced aditional accessibility issues by changing the interface. Has anyone found a way to access the settings button?

On 12/1/2015 5:33 PM, Troy Burnham wrote:
Hi All,
 
Does anybody on the list use Avast free antivirus and if so is the 2016 version accessible with Jaws, and if not what is the latest version that is accessible?
 
I've been using Avast for a couple of years but last week I decided to try Vipre, but I ended up getting my money back on that earlier this morning because it just wasn't working well for me on a couple of different levels.  The problem now is that I deleted my avast installation file last week when I got Vipre since I thought I'd be keeping that, so now I'm looking for avast again and I need to know what version to look for.
 
Troy
 
 


Re: This is Nothing New, was: The deep/Dark net, Scar'r'r'r'r'ry!

Carlos
 

If you were referring to my comment, then yes. It was most certainly a joke.

----- Original Message -----
From: "enes saribas" <enes.saribas@gmail.com>
To: <TechTalk@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, December 01, 2015 1:33 PM
Subject: Re: This is Nothing New, was: [TechTalk] The deep/Dark net, Scar'r'r'r'r'ry!


hi,
This seems like a joke. Constructing such a device would surely kill the constructer.

On 12/1/2015 8:26 AM, Carlos wrote:
LOL although this most certainly qualifies as technology, I will ban any member who I discover has been constructing thermonuclear devices.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Ron Canazzi" <aa2vm@roadrunner.com>
To: <TechTalk@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, December 01, 2015 1:17 AM
Subject: This is Nothing New, was: [TechTalk] The deep/Dark net, Scar'r'r'r'r'ry!


Hi Group,

I don't think this so called deep dark net is really anything new. Way back on August 29, 1997, using a half forgotten search engine called Infoseek (does that still exist? I'll have to check after I am done with this post.) I found the below information.

How To Build An Atom Bomb

The following paper is taken from The Journal of Irreproducible
Results, Volume 25/Number 4/1979. P.O. Box 234 Chicago Heights,
Illinois 60411

1.INTRODUCTION

Worldwide controversy has been generated recently from several
court decisions in the United States which have restricted
popular magazines from printing articles which describe how to
make an atomic bomb. The reason usually given by the courts is
that national security would be compromised if such information
were generally available. But, since it is commonly known that
all of the information is publicly available in most major
metropolitan libraries, obviously the court's officially stated
position is covering up a more important factor; namely, that
such atomic devices would prove too difficult for the average
citizen to construct. The United States courts cannot afford to
insult the vast majorities by insinuating that they do not have
the intelligence of a cabbage, and thus the "official" press
releases claim national security as a blanket restriction.
The rumors that have unfortunately occurred as a result of
widespread misinformation can (and must) be cleared up now, for
the construction project this month is the construction of a
thermonuclear device, which will hopefully clear up any
misconceptions you might have about such a project. We will see
how easy it is to make a device of your very own in ten easy
steps, to have and hold as you see fit, without annoying
interference from the government or the courts.

The project will cost between $5,000 and $30,000, depending on
how fancy you want the final product to be. Since last week's
column, "Let's Make a Time Machine", was received so well in the
new step-by-step format, this month's column will follow the
same format.

2. CONSTRUCTION METHOD

1. First, obtain about 50 pounds (110 kg) of weapons grade
Plutonium at your local supplier (see NOTE 1). A nuclear power
plant is not recommended, as large quantities of missing
Plutonium tends to make plant engineers unhappy. We suggest that
you contact your local terrorist organization, or perhaps the
Junior Achievement in your neighborhood.
2. Please remember that Plutonium, especially pure, refined
Plutonium, is somewhat dangerous. Wash your hands with soap and
warm water after handling the material, and don't allow your
children or pets to play in it or eat it. Any left over
Plutonium dust is excellent as an insect repellant. You may wish
to keep the substance in a lead box if you can find one in your
local junk yard, but an old coffee can will do nicely.
3. Fashion together a metal enclosure to house the device. Most
common varieties of sheet metal can be bent to disguise this
enclosure as, for example, a briefcase, a lunch pail, or a
Buick. Do not use tinfoil.
4. Arrange the Plutonium into two hemispheral shapes, separated
by about 4 cm. Use rubber cement to hold the Plutonium dust
together. 5.Now get about 100 pounds (220 kg) of trinitrotoluene
(TNT). Gelignite is much better, but messier to work with. Your
helpful hardware man will be happy to provide you with this
item.
6. Pack the TNT around the hemisphere arrangement constructed in
step 4. If you cannot find Gelignite, fell free to use TNT
packed in with Playdo or any modeling clay. Colored clay is
acceptable, but there is no need to get fancy at this point.
7. Enclose the structure from step 6 into the enclosure made in
step 3. Use a strong glue such as "Crazy Glue" to bind the
hemisphere arrangement against the enclosure to prevent
accidental detonation which might result from vibration or
mishandling.
8. To detonate the device, obtain a radio controlled (RC) servo
mechanism, as found in RC model airplanes and cars. With a
modicum of effort, a remote plunger can be made that will strike
a detonator cap to effect a small explosion. These detonator
caps can be found in the electrical supply section of your local
supermarket. We recommend the "Blast-O-Mactic" brand because they
are no deposit-no return.
9. Now hide the completed device from the neighbors and
children. The garage is not recommended because of high humidity
and the extreme range of temperatures experienced there. Nuclear
devices have been known to spontaneously detonate in these
unstable conditions. The hall closet or under the kitchen sink
will be perfectly suitable.
10. Now you are the proud owner of a working thermonuclear
device! It is a great ice-breaker at parties, and in a pinch,
can be used for national defense.

3. THEORY OF OPERATION

The device basically works when the detonated TNT compresses the
Plutonium into a critical mass. The critical mass then produces
a nuclear chain reaction similar to the domino chain reaction
(discussed in this column, "Dominos on the March", March, 1968).
The chain reaction then promptly produces a big thermonuclear
reaction. And there you have it, a 10 megaton explosion!

4. NEXT MONTH'S COLUMN

In next month's column, we will learn how to clone your
neighbor's wife in six easy steps. This project promises to be
an exciting weekend full of fun and profit. Common kitchen
utensils will be all you need. See you next month!

5. NOTES

1. Plutonium (PU), atomic number 94, is a radioactive metallic
element formed by the decay of Neptunium and is similar in
chemical structure to Uranium, Saturium, Jupiternium, and
Marisum.

6. PREVIOUS MONTH'S COLUMNS

1. Let's Make Test Tube Babies! May, 1979
2. Let's Make a Solar System! June, 1979
3. Let's Make an Economic Recession! July, 1979
4. Let's Make an Anti-Gravity Machine! August, 1979
5. Let's Make Contact with an Alien Race! September, 1979


On 11/30/2015 1:25 PM, rajmund wrote:
Hello,
I actually fully agree with this. In school, when I mentioned that you could find instructions to make a bomb, they didn't believe. Took me 2 minutes, to find one, that explains how to make one out of batteries, and cans,, on an airport. Do I recommend it? No. But, the fact is, its on there.

----- Original Message -----
From: Travis Siegel <tsiegel@softcon.com>
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Date: Monday, November 30, 2015 2:49 pm
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] The deep/Dark net, Scar'r'r'r'r'ry!


Seriously folks. This supposed deep net is just another site on the world
wide web. (ok, not just one, but several) it's not hard to hide a site
from the search engines, there's all kinds of tools for doing this (or you
could just put in a robot.txt file, and they'll ignore your page) The only
thing is: most folks want to be found on the web, so they don't take steps
to keep themselves out of the search engines, and so they become part of
the actual web, those who (for whatever reason) don't want to be part of
the web simply take steps to prevent indexing, and keep their sites off of
places that would advertise it. And for some reason, these sites have
come to be referred to as the deep net. Honestly, who cares. You can
find anything you want on the internet if you search long enough, (yes,
even porn and bomb making instructions) so I don't see what the big hoopla
is because some folks don't want their sites off the grid as it were.
It's nothing new. During the bbs era, loads of bbses sprung up that
weren't advertised, and were passed only via word of mouth, so folks
weren't likely to stumble upon them accidentally. This is no different.
It's simply a scary sounding label for sites who don't want the public
visiting them, and who take steps to ensure their privacy. Big deal.
Is there scary and dangerous stuff there, most certainly, but you know
what? The internet is a dangerous place too if you wnder into some of it's
backroads and get involved in places that are less than reputable. It's
no different.

On Mon, 30 Nov 2015, Walter Ramage wrote:

I'd go along with that but I can understand the curiosity factor having a
strong pull on folks. I used to imagine getting in there would be
difficult, in otherwords you would need to be some kind of super tech geek
but no, it is very simple and that makes it even more scarey. Walter.

-----Original Message-----
From: Carlos [mailto:carlos1106@nyc.rr.com]
Sent: 30 November 2015 14:29
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] The deep/Dark net, Scar'r'r'r'r'ry!

I think it is something people in general should avoid.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Walter Ramage" <wpr@blueyonder.co.uk>
To: <TechTalk@groups.io>
Sent: Monday, November 30, 2015 9:24 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] The deep/Dark net, Scar'r'r'r'r'ry!


Hi. Yes? but it also sounds very dangerous, unless you know what you are
doing. Personally, I think it is a place the avrage person should avoid.
Walter.

-----Original Message-----
From: goshawk on horseback [mailto:goshawk_on_horseback@fastmail.co.uk]
Sent: 30 November 2015 14:14
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] The deep/Dark net, Scar'r'r'r'r'ry!

unfortunately not, it does however sound very interesting.

Simon



----- Original Message -----
From: Walter Ramage <mailto:wpr@blueyonder.co.uk>
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Sent: Monday, November 30, 2015 2:04 PM
Subject: [TechTalk] The deep/Dark net, Scar'r'r'r'r'ry!


Hi guys. I've just finished reading Lee Child's latest book. The
thrust of the book is the Deep net and what can be found there. I
wondered
if that could really be true, that is, the things described so I've just
done a Google search and read an article on the deep/Dark net and how to
access it. It seams it is rather easy but apparently very dangerous. The
trick is to enter and leave without being discovered and traced. I like
many are amazed at what can be found on the surface net, the wealth of
info
is so vast but it would seem that is just the tip of the iceberg because
the
deep/dark net is hundreds of times larger than the surface net and there
is
where you will find all sorts of unpleasant and frightening things. There
sickening sights that deal with porn and kiddy porn and sites that deal
with
illegal drugs. Sights for obtaining weapons and tuition on how to make
explosives and also assassin web sites where you can arrange a hit. My
mind
boggles at just how depraved the world is and what extent some people will
go to. Interestingly the article I read said that not all deep web stuff
is
bad and that we often use it without knowing. For example every time you
order goods on line and those secure edit boxes where you put your credit
details, that is on the deep net. Apparently the deep web is run on the
TOR
network and the page where you place your confidential information cannot
be
found by using conventional search engins, that's the deep net. However
it
seems a very scarey place unless you know what you are doing, although the
article gave instructions, I'll stay well clear. How about you guys, have
you ever tried exploring that place, if so, is it as scarey as it seems? ?
Walter.



________________________________

Avast logo <http://www.avast.com/> This email has been checked for
viruses by Avast antivirus software.
www.avast.com <http://www.avast.com/>













Sent from a Braille Sense







Re: This is Nothing New, was: The deep/Dark net, Scar'r'r'r'r'ry!

enes sarıbaş
 

hi,
This seems like a joke. Constructing such a device would surely kill the constructer.

On 12/1/2015 8:26 AM, Carlos wrote:
LOL although this most certainly qualifies as technology, I will ban any member who I discover has been constructing thermonuclear devices.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Ron Canazzi" <aa2vm@roadrunner.com>
To: <TechTalk@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, December 01, 2015 1:17 AM
Subject: This is Nothing New, was: [TechTalk] The deep/Dark net, Scar'r'r'r'r'ry!


Hi Group,

I don't think this so called deep dark net is really anything new. Way back on August 29, 1997, using a half forgotten search engine called Infoseek (does that still exist? I'll have to check after I am done with this post.) I found the below information.

How To Build An Atom Bomb

The following paper is taken from The Journal of Irreproducible
Results, Volume 25/Number 4/1979. P.O. Box 234 Chicago Heights,
Illinois 60411

1.INTRODUCTION

Worldwide controversy has been generated recently from several
court decisions in the United States which have restricted
popular magazines from printing articles which describe how to
make an atomic bomb. The reason usually given by the courts is
that national security would be compromised if such information
were generally available. But, since it is commonly known that
all of the information is publicly available in most major
metropolitan libraries, obviously the court's officially stated
position is covering up a more important factor; namely, that
such atomic devices would prove too difficult for the average
citizen to construct. The United States courts cannot afford to
insult the vast majorities by insinuating that they do not have
the intelligence of a cabbage, and thus the "official" press
releases claim national security as a blanket restriction.
The rumors that have unfortunately occurred as a result of
widespread misinformation can (and must) be cleared up now, for
the construction project this month is the construction of a
thermonuclear device, which will hopefully clear up any
misconceptions you might have about such a project. We will see
how easy it is to make a device of your very own in ten easy
steps, to have and hold as you see fit, without annoying
interference from the government or the courts.

The project will cost between $5,000 and $30,000, depending on
how fancy you want the final product to be. Since last week's
column, "Let's Make a Time Machine", was received so well in the
new step-by-step format, this month's column will follow the
same format.

2. CONSTRUCTION METHOD

1. First, obtain about 50 pounds (110 kg) of weapons grade
Plutonium at your local supplier (see NOTE 1). A nuclear power
plant is not recommended, as large quantities of missing
Plutonium tends to make plant engineers unhappy. We suggest that
you contact your local terrorist organization, or perhaps the
Junior Achievement in your neighborhood.
2. Please remember that Plutonium, especially pure, refined
Plutonium, is somewhat dangerous. Wash your hands with soap and
warm water after handling the material, and don't allow your
children or pets to play in it or eat it. Any left over
Plutonium dust is excellent as an insect repellant. You may wish
to keep the substance in a lead box if you can find one in your
local junk yard, but an old coffee can will do nicely.
3. Fashion together a metal enclosure to house the device. Most
common varieties of sheet metal can be bent to disguise this
enclosure as, for example, a briefcase, a lunch pail, or a
Buick. Do not use tinfoil.
4. Arrange the Plutonium into two hemispheral shapes, separated
by about 4 cm. Use rubber cement to hold the Plutonium dust
together. 5.Now get about 100 pounds (220 kg) of trinitrotoluene
(TNT). Gelignite is much better, but messier to work with. Your
helpful hardware man will be happy to provide you with this
item.
6. Pack the TNT around the hemisphere arrangement constructed in
step 4. If you cannot find Gelignite, fell free to use TNT
packed in with Playdo or any modeling clay. Colored clay is
acceptable, but there is no need to get fancy at this point.
7. Enclose the structure from step 6 into the enclosure made in
step 3. Use a strong glue such as "Crazy Glue" to bind the
hemisphere arrangement against the enclosure to prevent
accidental detonation which might result from vibration or
mishandling.
8. To detonate the device, obtain a radio controlled (RC) servo
mechanism, as found in RC model airplanes and cars. With a
modicum of effort, a remote plunger can be made that will strike
a detonator cap to effect a small explosion. These detonator
caps can be found in the electrical supply section of your local
supermarket. We recommend the "Blast-O-Mactic" brand because they
are no deposit-no return.
9. Now hide the completed device from the neighbors and
children. The garage is not recommended because of high humidity
and the extreme range of temperatures experienced there. Nuclear
devices have been known to spontaneously detonate in these
unstable conditions. The hall closet or under the kitchen sink
will be perfectly suitable.
10. Now you are the proud owner of a working thermonuclear
device! It is a great ice-breaker at parties, and in a pinch,
can be used for national defense.

3. THEORY OF OPERATION

The device basically works when the detonated TNT compresses the
Plutonium into a critical mass. The critical mass then produces
a nuclear chain reaction similar to the domino chain reaction
(discussed in this column, "Dominos on the March", March, 1968).
The chain reaction then promptly produces a big thermonuclear
reaction. And there you have it, a 10 megaton explosion!

4. NEXT MONTH'S COLUMN

In next month's column, we will learn how to clone your
neighbor's wife in six easy steps. This project promises to be
an exciting weekend full of fun and profit. Common kitchen
utensils will be all you need. See you next month!

5. NOTES

1. Plutonium (PU), atomic number 94, is a radioactive metallic
element formed by the decay of Neptunium and is similar in
chemical structure to Uranium, Saturium, Jupiternium, and
Marisum.

6. PREVIOUS MONTH'S COLUMNS

1. Let's Make Test Tube Babies! May, 1979
2. Let's Make a Solar System! June, 1979
3. Let's Make an Economic Recession! July, 1979
4. Let's Make an Anti-Gravity Machine! August, 1979
5. Let's Make Contact with an Alien Race! September, 1979


On 11/30/2015 1:25 PM, rajmund wrote:
Hello,
I actually fully agree with this. In school, when I mentioned that you could find instructions to make a bomb, they didn't believe. Took me 2 minutes, to find one, that explains how to make one out of batteries, and cans,, on an airport. Do I recommend it? No. But, the fact is, its on there.

----- Original Message -----
From: Travis Siegel <tsiegel@softcon.com>
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Date: Monday, November 30, 2015 2:49 pm
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] The deep/Dark net, Scar'r'r'r'r'ry!


Seriously folks. This supposed deep net is just another site on the world
wide web. (ok, not just one, but several) it's not hard to hide a site
from the search engines, there's all kinds of tools for doing this (or you
could just put in a robot.txt file, and they'll ignore your page) The only
thing is: most folks want to be found on the web, so they don't take steps
to keep themselves out of the search engines, and so they become part of
the actual web, those who (for whatever reason) don't want to be part of
the web simply take steps to prevent indexing, and keep their sites off of
places that would advertise it. And for some reason, these sites have
come to be referred to as the deep net. Honestly, who cares. You can
find anything you want on the internet if you search long enough, (yes,
even porn and bomb making instructions) so I don't see what the big hoopla
is because some folks don't want their sites off the grid as it were.
It's nothing new. During the bbs era, loads of bbses sprung up that
weren't advertised, and were passed only via word of mouth, so folks
weren't likely to stumble upon them accidentally. This is no different.
It's simply a scary sounding label for sites who don't want the public
visiting them, and who take steps to ensure their privacy. Big deal.
Is there scary and dangerous stuff there, most certainly, but you know
what? The internet is a dangerous place too if you wnder into some of it's
backroads and get involved in places that are less than reputable. It's
no different.

On Mon, 30 Nov 2015, Walter Ramage wrote:

I'd go along with that but I can understand the curiosity factor having a
strong pull on folks. I used to imagine getting in there would be
difficult, in otherwords you would need to be some kind of super tech geek
but no, it is very simple and that makes it even more scarey. Walter.

-----Original Message-----
From: Carlos [mailto:carlos1106@nyc.rr.com]
Sent: 30 November 2015 14:29
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] The deep/Dark net, Scar'r'r'r'r'ry!

I think it is something people in general should avoid.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Walter Ramage" <wpr@blueyonder.co.uk>
To: <TechTalk@groups.io>
Sent: Monday, November 30, 2015 9:24 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] The deep/Dark net, Scar'r'r'r'r'ry!


Hi. Yes? but it also sounds very dangerous, unless you know what you are
doing. Personally, I think it is a place the avrage person should avoid.
Walter.

-----Original Message-----
From: goshawk on horseback [mailto:goshawk_on_horseback@fastmail.co.uk]
Sent: 30 November 2015 14:14
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] The deep/Dark net, Scar'r'r'r'r'ry!

unfortunately not, it does however sound very interesting.

Simon



----- Original Message -----
From: Walter Ramage <mailto:wpr@blueyonder.co.uk>
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Sent: Monday, November 30, 2015 2:04 PM
Subject: [TechTalk] The deep/Dark net, Scar'r'r'r'r'ry!


Hi guys. I've just finished reading Lee Child's latest book. The
thrust of the book is the Deep net and what can be found there. I
wondered
if that could really be true, that is, the things described so I've just
done a Google search and read an article on the deep/Dark net and how to
access it. It seams it is rather easy but apparently very dangerous. The
trick is to enter and leave without being discovered and traced. I like
many are amazed at what can be found on the surface net, the wealth of
info
is so vast but it would seem that is just the tip of the iceberg because
the
deep/dark net is hundreds of times larger than the surface net and there
is
where you will find all sorts of unpleasant and frightening things. There
sickening sights that deal with porn and kiddy porn and sites that deal
with
illegal drugs. Sights for obtaining weapons and tuition on how to make
explosives and also assassin web sites where you can arrange a hit. My
mind
boggles at just how depraved the world is and what extent some people will
go to. Interestingly the article I read said that not all deep web stuff
is
bad and that we often use it without knowing. For example every time you
order goods on line and those secure edit boxes where you put your credit
details, that is on the deep net. Apparently the deep web is run on the
TOR
network and the page where you place your confidential information cannot
be
found by using conventional search engins, that's the deep net. However
it
seems a very scarey place unless you know what you are doing, although the
article gave instructions, I'll stay well clear. How about you guys, have
you ever tried exploring that place, if so, is it as scarey as it seems? ?
Walter.



________________________________

Avast logo <http://www.avast.com/> This email has been checked for
viruses by Avast antivirus software.
www.avast.com <http://www.avast.com/>













Sent from a Braille Sense






Re: g key on my laptop

Blaster
 

Hi,

On many laptop keyboards the key can be flipped up to reveal a plastic
square ring with a hinged key cap and in the middle, a little rubber
pimple cup. The little rubber cup provides the bounce for the key. It
seems your keyboard uses a interlocking scissored hinge where the
hinge assembly itself provides the bounce for the key. The replacement
kits only cost about $5, but you'd need sighted assistance to identify
which variation of the key assembly you have, so you can buy the
correct one. Then getting them to help you replace the key itself
after it comes in the mail. It's not that it's difficult, it's more
like it's delicate work. If it was the rubber cup version I'd
encourage you to flip the key up and check the condition of the cup.
Repositioning the cup or even replacing the cup would be relatively
easy. However, On your laptop there are six interlocking thin wire
posts that interlock to create the hinged key, than it needs to be
carefully positioned over 4 little metal hooks on the board. You can
do a google search for "replacement laptop keys" to get more of an
idea on how this is done.

HTH,
Blaster

On 12/1/15, Adrien Collins <adriencollins22160@gmail.com> wrote:
Hi

It is a lenovo b590.

Regards

Adrien


-----Original Message-----
From: Blaster Nil8 [mailto:blaster.nil8@gmail.com]
Sent: Monday, November 30, 2015 11:11 PM
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] g key on my laptop

What make and model laptop are you using?

Blaster


On 11/30/15, Adrien Collins <adriencollins22160@gmail.com> wrote:
Hi

I packed up my laptop when I moved last week, since then the
g key has been sticking, not quite sure why, how can I fix
this please?

Regards

Adrien












Question for users of one password pro on iOS

Jessica Dail <jldail13@...>
 

Hi
I'm considering purchasing one passwords pro features, for iOS.
I would like to know how people who use this part of the application, do so?
For example, what do you store in each section?
I'm trying to look for practical ideas, so I can decide whether or not to make the purchase.
Thanks for any ideas you may have,
Jessica

Sent from my iPhone


I would like to broadcast on the net, and haven't a clue on what I need to do etc.

Jim Rawls
 

Hi All,

I am a jazz enthusiast, with a large collection of all kinds of jazz. I have had my own radio show on a local station here, but they have gone to an all rock format, and I don’t fit in there any more. So, what must one do to have a program on the net? Any help here would be greatly appreciated. Thanks. Jim

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