Date   

Re: if you were getting a new computer.

enes sarıbaş
 

32 also makes a difference on extremely high core machines.

On 4/18/2021 6:12 PM, chris judge wrote:
I know Gene, you always argue this point. You also say solid state hard drives don't make that much of a difference. I have used both and in my experience they do.

Chris Judge


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: April 18, 2021 7:33 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

I doubt it. If you have 8gb and you are only using six, how is having 10 more unused GB going to matter? If you have a race car or a station wagon and you are driving on highways at about 65 or 70 miles an hour, what difference does it make whether your car's top speed is 120 or 220 miles per hour.

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: chris judge
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 5:18 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

They sure do, and there is definitely a difference between 8 gig and 16. Few people who have experienced both will dispute that.


Chris Judge


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Janet
Sent: April 18, 2021 4:48 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

Hi John,
I have to agree with you when you say SSDS do make a difference, as I have a
519 SSD, and my Laptop boots on within a second! With my desktop with 2 TBS
HD it takes at least 3 minutes to boot up!
Janet


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
John Holcomb II
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:11 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

Yeah SSDs really do make a difference in my experience.
But having said that there's no real need for most to get more than 256GB.
Now there's one thing to keep in mind though.
If it’s a laptop, and everything is sottered onto the board, then no
upgrades would be possible, in that case if you can future proofing
wouldn't be a bad idea.
John


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:05 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

I meant solid state drives. It is evidently incorrect to refer to them as
digital drives.

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: John Holcomb II
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 11:58 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.



It was made by Intel I and is on the way out.

I forget what it is though.

Digital drive? I’ve never heard anyone call anything a digital drive before.
What is that.

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Monte
Single
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 12:45 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Hi List,



I am not in the market for a new computer, knock on wood.

What is the new memory I hear of these days. It is called octane memory.

Is this part of the ram, processor, of drive?



Cheers,



Monte





From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of enes
saribas
Sent: April 18, 2021 9:59 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





As I said though, programs are getting bigger. I'd go with at 16 gb if
budget allowed to be safe. But the 512 drives have more write capacity
before they have to be replaced, and also faster write performance.



On 4/18/2021 9:04 AM, John Holcomb II wrote:



I don’t think most normal users would need 512GB.

IT really depends on what he is doing.

With read/write at 500 MB for a Sata-based SSD, he doesn’t need to worry too
much about that either.

I’d say a Core I5 would do it. AMD vs. intel either of these would be fine.

We have no idea what kinda budget he is working with so THESE are just some
points to consider.

I do however agree with the 8GB ram.

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of
enes saribas
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:55 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





At a bare minimum, go for gigabit ethernet options, 8 gb of dual channel
ram, an ssd of at least 512 gb, 1tb if you can aford it, even if you don't
use 1tb the 1tb drive has a much higher write speed and endurance. A
processor should be at least current gen 11th gen intel or fifth gen AMD r5,
don't getv stuff like pentium/celeron/i3 processors.



On 4/15/2021 1:30 PM, Jim Rawls wrote:



I will let you know as I find out.





From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
John Holcomb II
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 7:28 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Do you forsee yourself doing anything more then broadcasting?

I’d go with two sound cards for one thing.

Is there a price you have to contend with?

How are you storing your music files?

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of
Jim Rawls
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 2:26 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Hi all,

It looks like I can select what I want on the computer I am getting, so, I
want your opinions.

What would you like on your computer? Since I am into music, and use music
files for my global voice shows, I obviously want a good player, and, a good
recorder to use. I want win amp as my primary player, and have been using
virtual recorder, but I’m open to suggestions on any recorder you like.
How much memory etc. would you like? any of these thoughts are
appreciated. I am running jaws 2018, but will be running jaws 2021 on my
new computer.[Jim






































Re: if you were getting a new computer.

Gene
 

Yes, I knew we were discussing 16GB but for some reason, I wasn't thinking about it correctly. That may mean that the price difference might be between thirty and fourty-five dollars. That isn't that much money so for a lot of people, it might not matter. I therefore will say that I was objecting on the basis of thinking about the question incorrectly.

While I remain skeptical the difference matters to any extent to the average user, the amount of money isn't much. Those who really have to watch money may want to not get the extra GB, however.

Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: John Holcomb II
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 6:26 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

It depends on who you buy it from.
Also I'm not sure which programs leak.
Geen, not 16 more GB. No.
We were saying that 8GB is good enough for most people but if you can afford it having 16GB or more is better.
Less cashing to the drive.
SSDS do have a limited read/write cycles.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 4:01 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

I just looked at a few search results. Are they reflective of current prices? They indicate that 16gb of RAM costs something like 93 or 98 dollars. That's a lot of money to spend to avoid closing and reopening this or that program a few hours earlier.

Is that the cost of adding RAM when you purchase a machine?

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: Gene
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 2:50 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

I think this needs more discussion. How much does 16 more gb of memory cost? Why not just close programs now and then if they have memory leaks?
And what programs are known to have memory leaks that are popular and in common use?

I don't see any general advice from computer advisors to get 16GB of RAM if you are a typical user. If you spend fifty dollars more, as I said, for some people that isn't much money. for others, it is a lot. I don't think such generalizations should be made without discussions of such points.
Let's say, for example, that a certain browser has a memory leak and that using it for two or three hours can impair performance using 8GB of ram. Is it worth getting more RAM so you can keep it opened for 6 hours? Why not just close and reopen it every now and then? Why not the same with other programs?

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: Janet
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 2:43 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.



Hi Everyone,

Thomas says: 8gb is good but 16gb is even better. Memory leak, left over
chunk of program which its not cleanup by windows, that much of ram will
help the virtual files as well. If there's not much writing onto the
harddrive, your SSD or your harddrive will be even happier.



Janet says:

I agree with you one hundred percent!



Janet





From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Thomas N. Chan
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 12:55 PM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





I would always say, what can the original request can afford.



8gb is good but 16gb is even better. Memory leak, left over chunk of program
which its not cleanup by windows, that much of ram will help the virtual
files as well. If there's not much writing onto the harddrive, your SSD or
your harddrive will be even happier.



If you open so many programs example, some of the older or initial or least
program will just be, push down to the virtual swap files.



Those running in the background, will have the similar SOP.



More ram, is no big deal, so long is within your budget.







harddrive, is good if you can afford bigger ones. For me, I got 256GB SSD
back then, but I have upgraded to 1tb 2 years later. But of course, you need
to reinstall windows but for me, I just clone over.







The rest, I will not comment. But I do have an external USB 3 soundcard by
Creative. I can have multiple input, mic in, aux in and 5.1 output.



But thats an old model already . But 3.5mm jack speaker or sound card is
still around.













Regards,
Thomas N. Chan











On Mon, 19 Apr 2021 at 01:16, Monte Single <mrsingle@sasktel.net> wrote:



Heck, you could spend an extra thousand dollars just by getting high end
video and processor.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: April 18, 2021 10:38 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

I doubt programs are getting that much bigger. Since I haven't seen this
elsewhere, I'll put it in the interesting category but I'd want a good deal
more verification. And even if they are, I am not convinced that justifies
getting more than 8GB for the average user. You can add this expense and
that expense until you are spending one-hundred or two or three hundred
dollars more than you have to and derive no meaningful benefit.

https://www.makeuseof.com/tag/much-ram-really-need/

Regarding digital drives, they are so fast to start with that even if the
larger drives are faster, does that matter? What are we talking about,
perhaps half a second speed difference to load a program? and can you
document that larger digital drives will last longer and that it matters?
Digital drives, from what I've readd will generally last far longer than the
computer using them so I remain to be convinced.

Regarding price, following your recommendations for a hard drive and for
RAM, how much more money would you be spending?

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: enes sarıbaş
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 10:58 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.



As I said though, programs are getting bigger. I'd go with at 16 gb if
budget allowed to be safe. But the 512 drives have more write capacity
before they have to be replaced, and also faster write performance.


On 4/18/2021 9:04 AM, John Holcomb II wrote:


I don’t think most normal users would need 512GB.

IT really depends on what he is doing.

With read/write at 500 MB for a Sata-based SSD, he doesn’t need to worry too
much about that either.

I’d say a Core I5 would do it. AMD vs. intel either of these would be fine.

We have no idea what kinda budget he is working with so THESE are just some
points to consider.

I do however agree with the 8GB ram.

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of
enes saribas
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:55 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





At a bare minimum, go for gigabit ethernet options, 8 gb of dual channel
ram, an ssd of at least 512 gb, 1tb if you can aford it, even if you don't
use 1tb the 1tb drive has a much higher write speed and endurance. A
processor should be at least current gen 11th gen intel or fifth gen AMD r5,
don't getv stuff like pentium/celeron/i3 processors.



On 4/15/2021 1:30 PM, Jim Rawls wrote:



I will let you know as I find out.





From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
John Holcomb II
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 7:28 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Do you forsee yourself doing anything more then broadcasting?

I’d go with two sound cards for one thing.

Is there a price you have to contend with?

How are you storing your music files?

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of
Jim Rawls
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 2:26 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Hi all,

It looks like I can select what I want on the computer I am getting, so, I
want your opinions.

What would you like on your computer? Since I am into music, and use music
files for my global voice shows, I obviously want a good player, and, a good
recorder to use. I want win amp as my primary player, and have been using
virtual recorder, but I’m open to suggestions on any recorder you like.
How much memory etc. would you like? any of these thoughts are
appreciated. I am running jaws 2018, but will be running jaws 2021 on my
new computer.[Jim


Re: if you were getting a new computer.

enes sarıbaş
 

That is why I said if budget allows. If the budget does allow, its a good choice.

On 4/18/2021 3:23 PM, Gene wrote:
That isn't the point.  People sometimes prescribe something, such as, you should get 16GB of RAM or something of the sort.  That is completely devoid of context and is contrary to the reputable and knowledgeable computer advisors I've read.  Just saying everyone has their own opinion is meaningless.  What is the context?  Is the opinion overgeneralized?  Does it take into account variations such as the way the user uses a computer and the amount of money the person can comfortably spend?

And opinions are often based on facts.  I am presenting my opinions because I think the discussion is overgeneralized and needs context.

People can see my opinion and other peoples' and draw their own conclusions or they may have a better idea what kind of information to find out about or what kind of questions to ask.  .

Gene
-----Original Message----- From: Janet
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 3:10 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

Gene,
Everyone has their own opinion , everyone might use their PCs in different ways than you do.  In short, however someone wants to use their PC, is just entirely up to them.  You like, all the rest of us are most definitely entitled to your own opinion, and there is nothing wrong with that.  If someone asks for an opinion, that is all we can give is our opinions.


Janet
-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 2:50 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

I think this needs more discussion.  How much does 16 more gb of memory
cost?  Why not just close programs now and then if they have memory leaks?
And what programs are known to have memory leaks that are popular and in
common use?

I don't see any general advice from computer advisors to get 16GB of RAM if
you are a typical user.  If you spend fifty dollars more, as I said, for
some people that isn't much money.  for others, it is a lot.  I don't think
such generalizations should be made without discussions of such points.
Let's say, for example, that a certain browser has a memory leak and that
using it for two or three hours can impair performance using 8GB of ram.  Is
it worth getting more RAM so you can keep it opened for 6 hours? Why not
just close and reopen it every now and then?  Why not the same with other
programs?

Gene
-----Original Message----- From: Janet
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 2:43 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.



Hi Everyone,

Thomas says: 8gb is good but 16gb is even better. Memory leak, left over
chunk of program which its not cleanup by windows, that much of ram will
help the virtual files as well. If there's not much writing onto the
harddrive, your SSD or your harddrive will be even happier.



Janet says:

I agree with you one hundred percent!



Janet





From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Thomas N. Chan
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 12:55 PM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





I would always say, what can the original request can afford.



8gb is good but 16gb is even better. Memory leak, left over chunk of program
which its not cleanup by windows, that much of ram will help the virtual
files as well. If there's not much writing onto the harddrive, your SSD or
your harddrive will be even happier.



If you open so many programs example, some of the older or initial or least
program will just be, push down to the virtual swap files.



Those running in the background, will have the similar  SOP.



More ram, is no big deal, so long is within your budget.







harddrive, is good if you can afford bigger ones. For me, I got 256GB SSD
back then, but I have upgraded to 1tb 2 years later. But of course, you need
to reinstall windows but for me, I just clone over.







The rest, I will not comment. But I do have an external USB 3 soundcard by
Creative. I can have multiple input, mic in, aux in and 5.1 output.



But thats an old model already . But 3.5mm jack speaker or sound card is
still around.













Regards,
Thomas N. Chan











On Mon, 19 Apr 2021 at 01:16, Monte Single <mrsingle@sasktel.net> wrote:



Heck, you could spend an extra thousand dollars just by getting high end
video and processor.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: April 18, 2021 10:38 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

I doubt programs are getting that much bigger.  Since I haven't seen this
elsewhere, I'll put it in the interesting category but I'd want a good deal
more verification.  And even if they are, I am not convinced that justifies
getting more than 8GB for the average user.  You can add this expense and
that expense until you are spending one-hundred or two or three hundred
dollars more than you have to and derive no meaningful benefit.

https://www.makeuseof.com/tag/much-ram-really-need/

Regarding digital drives, they are so fast to start with that even if the
larger drives are faster, does that matter?  What are we talking about,
perhaps half a second speed difference to load a program?  and can you
document that larger digital drives will last longer and that it matters?
Digital drives, from what I've readd will generally last far longer than the
computer using them so I remain to be convinced.

Regarding price, following your recommendations for a hard drive and for
RAM, how much more money would you be spending?

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: enes sarıbaş
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 10:58 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.



As I said though, programs are getting bigger. I'd go with at 16 gb if
budget allowed to be safe. But the 512 drives have more  write capacity
before they have to be replaced, and also faster write performance.


On 4/18/2021 9:04 AM, John Holcomb II wrote:


I don’t think most normal users would need 512GB.

IT really depends on what he is doing.

With read/write at 500 MB for a Sata-based SSD, he doesn’t need to worry too
much about that either.

I’d say  a Core I5 would do it. AMD vs. intel either of these would be fine.

We have no idea what kinda budget he is working with so THESE are just some
points to consider.

I do however agree with the 8GB ram.

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of
enes saribas
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:55 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





At a bare minimum, go for gigabit ethernet options, 8 gb of dual channel
ram, an ssd of at least 512 gb, 1tb if you can aford it, even if you don't
use 1tb the 1tb drive has a much higher write speed and endurance. A
processor should be at least current gen 11th gen intel or fifth gen AMD r5,
don't getv stuff like pentium/celeron/i3 processors.



On 4/15/2021 1:30 PM, Jim Rawls wrote:



I will let you know as I find out.





From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
John Holcomb II
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 7:28 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Do you forsee yourself  doing anything more then  broadcasting?

I’d go with two sound cards  for one  thing.

Is there a price you have to contend with?

How are you storing your music files?

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of
Jim Rawls
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 2:26 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Hi all,

It looks like I can select what I want on the computer I am getting, so, I
want your opinions.

What would you like on your computer? Since I am into music, and use music
files for my global voice shows, I obviously want a good player, and, a good
recorder to use. I want win amp as my primary player, and have been using
virtual recorder, but  I’m open to suggestions on any  recorder you like.
How much memory etc. would you like?   any of these thoughts are
appreciated. I am running jaws 2018, but will be running jaws 2021 on my
new computer.[Jim




































Re: if you were getting a new computer.

enes sarıbaş
 

Because time is literally money. By constantly waste time with my computer when I can just add more ram and make into a nonissue?

On 4/18/2021 2:50 PM, Gene wrote:
I think this needs more discussion.  How much does 16 more gb of memory cost?  Why not just close programs now and then if they have memory leaks? And what programs are known to have memory leaks that are popular and in common use?

I don't see any general advice from computer advisors to get 16GB of RAM if you are a typical user.  If you spend fifty dollars more, as I said, for some people that isn't much money.  for others, it is a lot.  I don't think such generalizations should be made without discussions of such points. Let's say, for example, that a certain browser has a memory leak and that using it for two or three hours can impair performance using 8GB of ram.  Is it worth getting more RAM so you can keep it opened for 6 hours?  Why not just close and reopen it every now and then?  Why not the same with other programs?

Gene
-----Original Message----- From: Janet
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 2:43 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.



Hi Everyone,

Thomas says: 8gb is good but 16gb is even better. Memory leak, left over chunk of program which its not cleanup by windows, that much of ram will help the virtual files as well. If there's not much writing onto the harddrive, your SSD or your harddrive will be even happier.



Janet says:

I agree with you one hundred percent!



Janet





From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Thomas N. Chan
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 12:55 PM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





I would always say, what can the original request can afford.



8gb is good but 16gb is even better. Memory leak, left over chunk of program which its not cleanup by windows, that much of ram will help the virtual files as well. If there's not much writing onto the harddrive, your SSD or your harddrive will be even happier.



If you open so many programs example, some of the older or initial or least program will just be, push down to the virtual swap files.



Those running in the background, will have the similar  SOP.



More ram, is no big deal, so long is within your budget.







harddrive, is good if you can afford bigger ones. For me, I got 256GB SSD back then, but I have upgraded to 1tb 2 years later. But of course, you need to reinstall windows but for me, I just clone over.







The rest, I will not comment. But I do have an external USB 3 soundcard by Creative. I can have multiple input, mic in, aux in and 5.1 output.



But thats an old model already . But 3.5mm jack speaker or sound card is still around.













Regards,
Thomas N. Chan











On Mon, 19 Apr 2021 at 01:16, Monte Single <mrsingle@sasktel.net> wrote:



Heck, you could spend an extra thousand dollars just by getting high end video and processor.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: April 18, 2021 10:38 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

I doubt programs are getting that much bigger.  Since I haven't seen this elsewhere, I'll put it in the interesting category but I'd want a good deal more verification.  And even if they are, I am not convinced that justifies getting more than 8GB for the average user.  You can add this expense and that expense until you are spending one-hundred or two or three hundred dollars more than you have to and derive no meaningful benefit.

https://www.makeuseof.com/tag/much-ram-really-need/

Regarding digital drives, they are so fast to start with that even if the larger drives are faster, does that matter?  What are we talking about, perhaps half a second speed difference to load a program?  and can you document that larger digital drives will last longer and that it matters?
Digital drives, from what I've readd will generally last far longer than the computer using them so I remain to be convinced.

Regarding price, following your recommendations for a hard drive and for RAM, how much more money would you be spending?

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: enes sarıbaş
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 10:58 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.



As I said though, programs are getting bigger. I'd go with at 16 gb if
budget allowed to be safe. But the 512 drives have more  write capacity
before they have to be replaced, and also faster write performance.


On 4/18/2021 9:04 AM, John Holcomb II wrote:


I don’t think most normal users would need 512GB.

IT really depends on what he is doing.

With read/write at 500 MB for a Sata-based SSD, he doesn’t need to worry too
much about that either.

I’d say  a Core I5 would do it. AMD vs. intel either of these would be fine.

We have no idea what kinda budget he is working with so THESE are just some
points to consider.

I do however agree with the 8GB ram.

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of
enes saribas
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:55 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





At a bare minimum, go for gigabit ethernet options, 8 gb of dual channel
ram, an ssd of at least 512 gb, 1tb if you can aford it, even if you don't
use 1tb the 1tb drive has a much higher write speed and endurance. A
processor should be at least current gen 11th gen intel or fifth gen AMD r5,
don't getv stuff like pentium/celeron/i3 processors.



On 4/15/2021 1:30 PM, Jim Rawls wrote:



I will let you know as I find out.





From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
John Holcomb II
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 7:28 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Do you forsee yourself  doing anything more then  broadcasting?

I’d go with two sound cards  for one  thing.

Is there a price you have to contend with?

How are you storing your music files?

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of
Jim Rawls
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 2:26 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Hi all,

It looks like I can select what I want on the computer I am getting, so, I
want your opinions.

What would you like on your computer? Since I am into music, and use music
files for my global voice shows, I obviously want a good player, and, a good
recorder to use. I want win amp as my primary player, and have been using
virtual recorder, but  I’m open to suggestions on any  recorder you like.
How much memory etc. would you like?   any of these thoughts are
appreciated. I am running jaws 2018, but will be running jaws 2021 on my
new computer.[Jim


























Re: if you were getting a new computer.

enes sarıbaş
 

You could, but a midrange graphics card is ok. Blind people have little to no use for graphics.

On 4/18/2021 12:14 PM, Monte Single wrote:
Heck, you could spend an extra thousand dollars just by getting high end video and processor.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: April 18, 2021 10:38 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

I doubt programs are getting that much bigger. Since I haven't seen this elsewhere, I'll put it in the interesting category but I'd want a good deal more verification. And even if they are, I am not convinced that justifies getting more than 8GB for the average user. You can add this expense and that expense until you are spending one-hundred or two or three hundred dollars more than you have to and derive no meaningful benefit.

https://www.makeuseof.com/tag/much-ram-really-need/

Regarding digital drives, they are so fast to start with that even if the larger drives are faster, does that matter? What are we talking about, perhaps half a second speed difference to load a program? and can you document that larger digital drives will last longer and that it matters?
Digital drives, from what I've readd will generally last far longer than the computer using them so I remain to be convinced.

Regarding price, following your recommendations for a hard drive and for RAM, how much more money would you be spending?

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: enes sarıbaş
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 10:58 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.



As I said though, programs are getting bigger. I'd go with at 16 gb if
budget allowed to be safe. But the 512 drives have more write capacity
before they have to be replaced, and also faster write performance.


On 4/18/2021 9:04 AM, John Holcomb II wrote:


I don’t think most normal users would need 512GB.

IT really depends on what he is doing.

With read/write at 500 MB for a Sata-based SSD, he doesn’t need to worry too
much about that either.

I’d say a Core I5 would do it. AMD vs. intel either of these would be fine.

We have no idea what kinda budget he is working with so THESE are just some
points to consider.

I do however agree with the 8GB ram.

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of
enes saribas
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:55 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





At a bare minimum, go for gigabit ethernet options, 8 gb of dual channel
ram, an ssd of at least 512 gb, 1tb if you can aford it, even if you don't
use 1tb the 1tb drive has a much higher write speed and endurance. A
processor should be at least current gen 11th gen intel or fifth gen AMD r5,
don't getv stuff like pentium/celeron/i3 processors.



On 4/15/2021 1:30 PM, Jim Rawls wrote:



I will let you know as I find out.





From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
John Holcomb II
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 7:28 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Do you forsee yourself doing anything more then broadcasting?

I’d go with two sound cards for one thing.

Is there a price you have to contend with?

How are you storing your music files?

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of
Jim Rawls
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 2:26 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Hi all,

It looks like I can select what I want on the computer I am getting, so, I
want your opinions.

What would you like on your computer? Since I am into music, and use music
files for my global voice shows, I obviously want a good player, and, a good
recorder to use. I want win amp as my primary player, and have been using
virtual recorder, but I’m open to suggestions on any recorder you like.
How much memory etc. would you like? any of these thoughts are
appreciated. I am running jaws 2018, but will be running jaws 2021 on my
new computer.[Jim













Re: if you were getting a new computer.

enes sarıbaş
 

Gene,

It actually does make a huge difference in drives. For example, the 1tb samsung 970 plus while costing more, has a sustained write speed of 1700 mbps even when cache is exhausted, as opposed to the 900 of the 512 gb drive, and the 256 goes even lower.

Programs are substantially   using more ram. Browsers and windows itself is. The price of a ram at a 16 gb level will be just under 100 dollars, maybe 70 or so, but it changes b based on speed. The price difference between 8 and 16 gb is negligible. Me, I went all out with a 2x 16 gb kit for 32 gb to future proof my machine, and because 32 gb has more memory contacts on higher core pcs and increases performance more.

On 4/18/2021 11:38 AM, Gene wrote:
I doubt programs are getting that much bigger.  Since I haven't seen this elsewhere, I'll put it in the interesting category but I'd want a good deal more verification.  And even if they are, I am not convinced that justifies getting more than 8GB for the average user.  You can add this expense and that expense until you are spending one-hundred or two or three hundred dollars more than you have to and derive no meaningful benefit.

https://www.makeuseof.com/tag/much-ram-really-need/

Regarding digital drives, they are so fast to start with that even if the larger drives are faster, does that matter?  What are we talking about, perhaps half a second speed difference to load a program?  and can you document that larger digital drives will last longer and that it matters? Digital drives, from what I've readd will generally last far longer than the computer using them so I remain to be convinced.

Regarding price, following your recommendations for a hard drive and for RAM, how much more money would you be spending?

Gene
-----Original Message----- From: enes sarıbaş
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 10:58 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.



As I said though, programs are getting bigger. I'd go with at 16 gb if budget allowed to be safe. But the 512 drives have more write capacity before they have to be replaced, and also faster write performance.


On 4/18/2021 9:04 AM, John Holcomb II wrote:


I don’t think most normal users would need 512GB.

IT really depends on what he is doing.

With read/write at 500 MB for a Sata-based SSD, he doesn’t need to worry too much about that either.

I’d say  a Core I5 would do it. AMD vs. intel either of these would be fine.

We have no idea what kinda budget he is working with so THESE are just some points to consider.

I do however agree with the 8GB ram.

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of enes saribas
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:55 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





At a bare minimum, go for gigabit ethernet options, 8 gb of dual channel ram, an ssd of at least 512 gb, 1tb if you can aford it, even if you don't use 1tb the 1tb drive has a much higher write speed and endurance. A processor should be at least current gen 11th gen intel or fifth gen AMD r5, don't getv stuff like pentium/celeron/i3 processors.



On 4/15/2021 1:30 PM, Jim Rawls wrote:



I will let you know as I find out.





From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of John Holcomb II
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 7:28 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Do you forsee yourself  doing anything more then  broadcasting?

I’d go with two sound cards  for one  thing.

Is there a price you have to contend with?

How are you storing your music files?

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of Jim Rawls
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 2:26 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Hi all,

It looks like I can select what I want on the computer I am getting, so, I want your opinions.

What would you like on your computer? Since I am into music, and use music files for my global voice shows, I obviously want a good player, and, a good recorder to use. I want win amp as my primary player, and have been using virtual recorder, but  I’m open to suggestions on any  recorder you like. How much memory etc. would you like?   any of these thoughts are appreciated. I am running jaws 2018, but will be running jaws 2021 on my new computer.[Jim









Re: if you were getting a new computer.

Gene
 

I didn't say SSDs don't make a considerable difference. I said the difference doesn't matter to me and I am not convinced it would be important for many users, depending on how they use a computer.

I don't know the price of an SSD now compared with that of a mechanical drive but if there is still a price difference that matters, depending on what the difference is, I still might not get one in a new computer.

If I did things regularly where the difference really mattered, I would be far more likely to get one even if the cost amounted to something.

If people want speed because they want speed and can afford it, then they may do whatever they want and I wouldn't say anything. But I think that people who recommend things because they are faster should not only discuss that aspect, but what the cost is and where it really matters.

I haven't used one but say it speeds up web page loading by two or three seconds. I don't know if it does. If I spend between fifty seconds and two minutes looking at a page and it loads in two seconds instead of five, does three seconds a page matter enough to spend the extra money on an SSD, if there is still a significant difference and depending on my financial situation?

Working on a document in a word processor is almost all time spent working on the document. the same with streaming. Time is almost all spent listening to whatever it is.

I don't know enough about mechanical drives to know if this consideration matters, but if I traveled a good deal and used my laptop while traveling, it might make sense to buy an SSD because of badd jolts while traveling, such as a bad pothole or, though rare, the very bad air pocket. I don't know how well mechanical drives are protected from such shocks these days. SSDs wouldn't be bothered at all so that may be another reason to use one.

In short, I object to discussions about speed when people ask what they should get being made without considering these sorts of questions.

Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: chris judge
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 6:12 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

I know Gene, you always argue this point. You also say solid state hard drives don't make that much of a difference. I have used both and in my experience they do.

Chris Judge


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: April 18, 2021 7:33 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

I doubt it. If you have 8gb and you are only using six, how is having 10 more unused GB going to matter? If you have a race car or a station wagon and you are driving on highways at about 65 or 70 miles an hour, what difference does it make whether your car's top speed is 120 or 220 miles per hour.

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: chris judge
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 5:18 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

They sure do, and there is definitely a difference between 8 gig and 16. Few people who have experienced both will dispute that.


Chris Judge


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Janet
Sent: April 18, 2021 4:48 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

Hi John,
I have to agree with you when you say SSDS do make a difference, as I have a
519 SSD, and my Laptop boots on within a second! With my desktop with 2 TBS
HD it takes at least 3 minutes to boot up!
Janet


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
John Holcomb II
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:11 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

Yeah SSDs really do make a difference in my experience.
But having said that there's no real need for most to get more than 256GB.
Now there's one thing to keep in mind though.
If it’s a laptop, and everything is sottered onto the board, then no
upgrades would be possible, in that case if you can future proofing
wouldn't be a bad idea.
John


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:05 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

I meant solid state drives. It is evidently incorrect to refer to them as
digital drives.

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: John Holcomb II
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 11:58 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.



It was made by Intel I and is on the way out.

I forget what it is though.

Digital drive? I’ve never heard anyone call anything a digital drive before.
What is that.

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Monte
Single
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 12:45 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Hi List,



I am not in the market for a new computer, knock on wood.

What is the new memory I hear of these days. It is called octane memory.

Is this part of the ram, processor, of drive?



Cheers,



Monte





From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of enes
saribas
Sent: April 18, 2021 9:59 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





As I said though, programs are getting bigger. I'd go with at 16 gb if
budget allowed to be safe. But the 512 drives have more write capacity
before they have to be replaced, and also faster write performance.



On 4/18/2021 9:04 AM, John Holcomb II wrote:



I don’t think most normal users would need 512GB.

IT really depends on what he is doing.

With read/write at 500 MB for a Sata-based SSD, he doesn’t need to worry too
much about that either.

I’d say a Core I5 would do it. AMD vs. intel either of these would be fine.

We have no idea what kinda budget he is working with so THESE are just some
points to consider.

I do however agree with the 8GB ram.

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of
enes saribas
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:55 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





At a bare minimum, go for gigabit ethernet options, 8 gb of dual channel
ram, an ssd of at least 512 gb, 1tb if you can aford it, even if you don't
use 1tb the 1tb drive has a much higher write speed and endurance. A
processor should be at least current gen 11th gen intel or fifth gen AMD r5,
don't getv stuff like pentium/celeron/i3 processors.



On 4/15/2021 1:30 PM, Jim Rawls wrote:



I will let you know as I find out.





From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
John Holcomb II
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 7:28 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Do you forsee yourself doing anything more then broadcasting?

I’d go with two sound cards for one thing.

Is there a price you have to contend with?

How are you storing your music files?

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of
Jim Rawls
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 2:26 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Hi all,

It looks like I can select what I want on the computer I am getting, so, I
want your opinions.

What would you like on your computer? Since I am into music, and use music
files for my global voice shows, I obviously want a good player, and, a good
recorder to use. I want win amp as my primary player, and have been using
virtual recorder, but I’m open to suggestions on any recorder you like.
How much memory etc. would you like? any of these thoughts are
appreciated. I am running jaws 2018, but will be running jaws 2021 on my
new computer.[Jim


Re: if you were getting a new computer.

Janet
 

Pam,
Wow, you're the only one I ever heard that from. My Laptop will boot up in barely a second. I do have a 512 SSD.

Janet

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Pamela Dominguez
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 8:35 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

I have an ssd, and I can't really tell the difference. My laptop definitely
does not boot up within a second! Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Janet
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 3:47 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

Hi John,
I have to agree with you when you say SSDS do make a difference, as I have a
519 SSD, and my Laptop boots on within a second! With my desktop with 2 TBS
HD it takes at least 3 minutes to boot up!
Janet


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
John Holcomb II
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:11 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

Yeah SSDs really do make a difference in my experience.
But having said that there's no real need for most to get more than 256GB.
Now there's one thing to keep in mind though.
If it’s a laptop, and everything is sottered onto the board, then no
upgrades would be possible, in that case if you can future proofing
wouldn't be a bad idea.
John


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:05 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

I meant solid state drives. It is evidently incorrect to refer to them as
digital drives.

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: John Holcomb II
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 11:58 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.



It was made by Intel I and is on the way out.

I forget what it is though.

Digital drive? I’ve never heard anyone call anything a digital drive before.
What is that.

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Monte
Single
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 12:45 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Hi List,



I am not in the market for a new computer, knock on wood.

What is the new memory I hear of these days. It is called octane memory.

Is this part of the ram, processor, of drive?



Cheers,



Monte





From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of enes
saribas
Sent: April 18, 2021 9:59 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





As I said though, programs are getting bigger. I'd go with at 16 gb if
budget allowed to be safe. But the 512 drives have more write capacity
before they have to be replaced, and also faster write performance.



On 4/18/2021 9:04 AM, John Holcomb II wrote:



I don’t think most normal users would need 512GB.

IT really depends on what he is doing.

With read/write at 500 MB for a Sata-based SSD, he doesn’t need to worry too
much about that either.

I’d say a Core I5 would do it. AMD vs. intel either of these would be fine.

We have no idea what kinda budget he is working with so THESE are just some
points to consider.

I do however agree with the 8GB ram.

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of
enes saribas
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:55 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





At a bare minimum, go for gigabit ethernet options, 8 gb of dual channel
ram, an ssd of at least 512 gb, 1tb if you can aford it, even if you don't
use 1tb the 1tb drive has a much higher write speed and endurance. A
processor should be at least current gen 11th gen intel or fifth gen AMD r5,
don't getv stuff like pentium/celeron/i3 processors.



On 4/15/2021 1:30 PM, Jim Rawls wrote:



I will let you know as I find out.





From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
John Holcomb II
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 7:28 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Do you forsee yourself doing anything more then broadcasting?

I’d go with two sound cards for one thing.

Is there a price you have to contend with?

How are you storing your music files?

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of
Jim Rawls
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 2:26 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Hi all,

It looks like I can select what I want on the computer I am getting, so, I
want your opinions.

What would you like on your computer? Since I am into music, and use music
files for my global voice shows, I obviously want a good player, and, a good
recorder to use. I want win amp as my primary player, and have been using
virtual recorder, but I’m open to suggestions on any recorder you like.
How much memory etc. would you like? any of these thoughts are
appreciated. I am running jaws 2018, but will be running jaws 2021 on my
new computer.[Jim
























--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


Re: if you were getting a new computer.

John Holcomb II
 

Hey Pam,
So how old is your laptop and what is the processor/ram amount?
Is your SSD SATA based or MvME?
I have a SATA based SSD in my 2011 HP computer, and it definitely is not as fast as bootup as my X1 Carbon from a few years ago.
Have you noticed that programs launch faster?
I sure have, and saving a big file is also quicker.
John

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Pamela Dominguez
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 9:35 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

I have an ssd, and I can't really tell the difference. My laptop definitely does not boot up within a second! Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Janet
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 3:47 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

Hi John,
I have to agree with you when you say SSDS do make a difference, as I have a
519 SSD, and my Laptop boots on within a second! With my desktop with 2 TBS HD it takes at least 3 minutes to boot up!
Janet


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of John Holcomb II
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:11 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

Yeah SSDs really do make a difference in my experience.
But having said that there's no real need for most to get more than 256GB.
Now there's one thing to keep in mind though.
If it’s a laptop, and everything is sottered onto the board, then no upgrades would be possible, in that case if you can future proofing wouldn't be a bad idea.
John


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:05 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

I meant solid state drives. It is evidently incorrect to refer to them as digital drives.

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: John Holcomb II
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 11:58 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.



It was made by Intel I and is on the way out.

I forget what it is though.

Digital drive? I’ve never heard anyone call anything a digital drive before.
What is that.

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Monte Single
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 12:45 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Hi List,



I am not in the market for a new computer, knock on wood.

What is the new memory I hear of these days. It is called octane memory.

Is this part of the ram, processor, of drive?



Cheers,



Monte





From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of enes saribas
Sent: April 18, 2021 9:59 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





As I said though, programs are getting bigger. I'd go with at 16 gb if budget allowed to be safe. But the 512 drives have more write capacity before they have to be replaced, and also faster write performance.



On 4/18/2021 9:04 AM, John Holcomb II wrote:



I don’t think most normal users would need 512GB.

IT really depends on what he is doing.

With read/write at 500 MB for a Sata-based SSD, he doesn’t need to worry too much about that either.

I’d say a Core I5 would do it. AMD vs. intel either of these would be fine.

We have no idea what kinda budget he is working with so THESE are just some points to consider.

I do however agree with the 8GB ram.

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of enes saribas
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:55 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





At a bare minimum, go for gigabit ethernet options, 8 gb of dual channel ram, an ssd of at least 512 gb, 1tb if you can aford it, even if you don't use 1tb the 1tb drive has a much higher write speed and endurance. A processor should be at least current gen 11th gen intel or fifth gen AMD r5, don't getv stuff like pentium/celeron/i3 processors.



On 4/15/2021 1:30 PM, Jim Rawls wrote:



I will let you know as I find out.





From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of John Holcomb II
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 7:28 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Do you forsee yourself doing anything more then broadcasting?

I’d go with two sound cards for one thing.

Is there a price you have to contend with?

How are you storing your music files?

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of Jim Rawls
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 2:26 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Hi all,

It looks like I can select what I want on the computer I am getting, so, I want your opinions.

What would you like on your computer? Since I am into music, and use music files for my global voice shows, I obviously want a good player, and, a good recorder to use. I want win amp as my primary player, and have been using virtual recorder, but I’m open to suggestions on any recorder you like.
How much memory etc. would you like? any of these thoughts are
appreciated. I am running jaws 2018, but will be running jaws 2021 on my new computer.[Jim
























--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


Re: if you were getting a new computer.

Pamela Dominguez
 

I have an ssd, and I can't really tell the difference. My laptop definitely does not boot up within a second! Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Janet
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 3:47 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

Hi John,
I have to agree with you when you say SSDS do make a difference, as I have a 519 SSD, and my Laptop boots on within a second! With my desktop with 2 TBS HD it takes at least 3 minutes to boot up!
Janet


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of John Holcomb II
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:11 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

Yeah SSDs really do make a difference in my experience.
But having said that there's no real need for most to get more than 256GB.
Now there's one thing to keep in mind though.
If it’s a laptop, and everything is sottered onto the board, then no upgrades would be possible, in that case if you can future proofing wouldn't be a bad idea.
John


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:05 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

I meant solid state drives. It is evidently incorrect to refer to them as digital drives.

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: John Holcomb II
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 11:58 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.



It was made by Intel I and is on the way out.

I forget what it is though.

Digital drive? I’ve never heard anyone call anything a digital drive before.
What is that.

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Monte
Single
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 12:45 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Hi List,



I am not in the market for a new computer, knock on wood.

What is the new memory I hear of these days. It is called octane memory.

Is this part of the ram, processor, of drive?



Cheers,



Monte





From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of enes
saribas
Sent: April 18, 2021 9:59 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





As I said though, programs are getting bigger. I'd go with at 16 gb if
budget allowed to be safe. But the 512 drives have more write capacity
before they have to be replaced, and also faster write performance.



On 4/18/2021 9:04 AM, John Holcomb II wrote:



I don’t think most normal users would need 512GB.

IT really depends on what he is doing.

With read/write at 500 MB for a Sata-based SSD, he doesn’t need to worry too
much about that either.

I’d say a Core I5 would do it. AMD vs. intel either of these would be fine.

We have no idea what kinda budget he is working with so THESE are just some
points to consider.

I do however agree with the 8GB ram.

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of
enes saribas
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:55 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





At a bare minimum, go for gigabit ethernet options, 8 gb of dual channel
ram, an ssd of at least 512 gb, 1tb if you can aford it, even if you don't
use 1tb the 1tb drive has a much higher write speed and endurance. A
processor should be at least current gen 11th gen intel or fifth gen AMD r5,
don't getv stuff like pentium/celeron/i3 processors.



On 4/15/2021 1:30 PM, Jim Rawls wrote:



I will let you know as I find out.





From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
John Holcomb II
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 7:28 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Do you forsee yourself doing anything more then broadcasting?

I’d go with two sound cards for one thing.

Is there a price you have to contend with?

How are you storing your music files?

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of
Jim Rawls
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 2:26 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Hi all,

It looks like I can select what I want on the computer I am getting, so, I
want your opinions.

What would you like on your computer? Since I am into music, and use music
files for my global voice shows, I obviously want a good player, and, a good
recorder to use. I want win amp as my primary player, and have been using
virtual recorder, but I’m open to suggestions on any recorder you like.
How much memory etc. would you like? any of these thoughts are
appreciated. I am running jaws 2018, but will be running jaws 2021 on my
new computer.[Jim
























--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


Re: if you were getting a new computer.

John Holcomb II
 

Let’s t try that again as I wrote it wrong.

Less then $0.04 per gigabyte.

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Holcomb II via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 7:42 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

 

I completely agree with you there.

1TB spinning drives are relatively cheap these days.

As in less than $0.4 per gigabyte.

John

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Thomas N. Chan
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 7:35 PM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

 

If money permit, and you can't afford to get a higher storage SSD, then go for the standard range of 256gb for your boot drive, then get whatever you can afford for storage for normal spinning drive. You can get 1tb or more with very good price tag on them., 

the speed what they are providing is more than enough for what you want to accomplish.

At least you can archive and store your media on the spinning drive. They don't need the speed and performance for reading a 5 to 10mb mp3 files. even for a 1gb video, a normal 1tb black or blue series is more than enough.

You can use that for your backup to capture  drive images since your boot drive is only 256gb.

 

at least this is my approach if your budget fall within as well.


Regards,
Thomas N. Chan

 

 

On Mon, 19 Apr 2021 at 07:12, chris judge <chrisjudge1967@...> wrote:

I know Gene, you always argue this point. You also say solid state hard drives don't make that much of a difference. I have used both and in my experience they do.

Chris Judge


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: April 18, 2021 7:33 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

I doubt it.  If you have 8gb and you are only using six, how is having 10 more unused GB going to matter?  If you have a race car or a station wagon and you are driving on highways at about 65 or 70 miles an hour, what difference does it make whether your car's top speed is 120 or 220 miles per hour.

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: chris judge
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 5:18 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

They sure do, and there is definitely a difference between 8 gig and 16. Few people who have experienced both will dispute that.


Chris Judge


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Janet
Sent: April 18, 2021 4:48 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

Hi John,
I have to agree with you when you say SSDS do make a difference, as I have a
519 SSD, and my Laptop boots on within a second!  With my desktop with 2 TBS
HD it takes at least 3 minutes to boot up!
Janet


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
John Holcomb II
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:11 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

Yeah SSDs really do make a difference in my experience.
But having said that there's no real need for most to get more than 256GB.
Now there's one thing to keep in mind though.
If it’s a laptop, and everything is sottered onto the board, then no
upgrades would be possible, in that case if you can  future proofing
wouldn't be a bad idea.
John


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:05 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

I meant solid state drives.  It is evidently incorrect to refer to them as
digital drives.

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: John Holcomb II
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 11:58 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.



It was made by Intel I and is on the way out.

I forget what it is though.

Digital drive? I’ve never heard anyone call anything a digital drive before.
What is that.

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Monte
Single
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 12:45 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Hi List,



I am not in the market for a new computer, knock on wood.

What is the new memory I hear of these days.  It is called octane memory.

Is this part of the ram, processor, of drive?



Cheers,



Monte





From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of enes
saribas
Sent: April 18, 2021 9:59 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





As I said though, programs are getting bigger. I'd go with at 16 gb if
budget allowed to be safe. But the 512 drives have more  write capacity
before they have to be replaced, and also faster write performance.



On 4/18/2021 9:04 AM, John Holcomb II wrote:



I don’t think most normal users would need 512GB.

IT really depends on what he is doing.

With read/write at 500 MB for a Sata-based SSD, he doesn’t need to worry too
much about that either.

I’d say  a Core I5 would do it. AMD vs. intel either of these would be fine.

We have no idea what kinda budget he is working with so THESE are just some
points to consider.

I do however agree with the 8GB ram.

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of
enes saribas
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:55 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





At a bare minimum, go for gigabit ethernet options, 8 gb of dual channel
ram, an ssd of at least 512 gb, 1tb if you can aford it, even if you don't
use 1tb the 1tb drive has a much higher write speed and endurance. A
processor should be at least current gen 11th gen intel or fifth gen AMD r5,
don't getv stuff like pentium/celeron/i3 processors.



On 4/15/2021 1:30 PM, Jim Rawls wrote:



I will let you know as I find out.





From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
John Holcomb II
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 7:28 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Do you forsee yourself  doing anything more then  broadcasting?

I’d go with two sound cards  for one  thing.

Is there a price you have to contend with?

How are you storing your music files?

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of
Jim Rawls
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 2:26 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Hi all,

It looks like I can select what I want on the computer I am getting, so, I
want your opinions.

What would you like on your computer? Since I am into music, and use music
files for my global voice shows, I obviously want a good player, and, a good
recorder to use. I want win amp as my primary player, and have been using
virtual recorder, but  I’m open to suggestions on any  recorder you like.
How much memory etc. would you like?   any of these thoughts are
appreciated. I am running jaws 2018, but will be running jaws 2021 on my
new computer.[Jim






































Re: if you were getting a new computer.

John Holcomb II
 

I completely agree with you there.

1TB spinning drives are relatively cheap these days.

As in less than $0.4 per gigabyte.

John

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Thomas N. Chan
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 7:35 PM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

 

If money permit, and you can't afford to get a higher storage SSD, then go for the standard range of 256gb for your boot drive, then get whatever you can afford for storage for normal spinning drive. You can get 1tb or more with very good price tag on them., 

the speed what they are providing is more than enough for what you want to accomplish.

At least you can archive and store your media on the spinning drive. They don't need the speed and performance for reading a 5 to 10mb mp3 files. even for a 1gb video, a normal 1tb black or blue series is more than enough.

You can use that for your backup to capture  drive images since your boot drive is only 256gb.

 

at least this is my approach if your budget fall within as well.


Regards,
Thomas N. Chan

 

 

On Mon, 19 Apr 2021 at 07:12, chris judge <chrisjudge1967@...> wrote:

I know Gene, you always argue this point. You also say solid state hard drives don't make that much of a difference. I have used both and in my experience they do.

Chris Judge


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: April 18, 2021 7:33 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

I doubt it.  If you have 8gb and you are only using six, how is having 10 more unused GB going to matter?  If you have a race car or a station wagon and you are driving on highways at about 65 or 70 miles an hour, what difference does it make whether your car's top speed is 120 or 220 miles per hour.

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: chris judge
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 5:18 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

They sure do, and there is definitely a difference between 8 gig and 16. Few people who have experienced both will dispute that.


Chris Judge


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Janet
Sent: April 18, 2021 4:48 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

Hi John,
I have to agree with you when you say SSDS do make a difference, as I have a
519 SSD, and my Laptop boots on within a second!  With my desktop with 2 TBS
HD it takes at least 3 minutes to boot up!
Janet


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
John Holcomb II
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:11 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

Yeah SSDs really do make a difference in my experience.
But having said that there's no real need for most to get more than 256GB.
Now there's one thing to keep in mind though.
If it’s a laptop, and everything is sottered onto the board, then no
upgrades would be possible, in that case if you can  future proofing
wouldn't be a bad idea.
John


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:05 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

I meant solid state drives.  It is evidently incorrect to refer to them as
digital drives.

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: John Holcomb II
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 11:58 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.



It was made by Intel I and is on the way out.

I forget what it is though.

Digital drive? I’ve never heard anyone call anything a digital drive before.
What is that.

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Monte
Single
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 12:45 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Hi List,



I am not in the market for a new computer, knock on wood.

What is the new memory I hear of these days.  It is called octane memory.

Is this part of the ram, processor, of drive?



Cheers,



Monte





From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of enes
saribas
Sent: April 18, 2021 9:59 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





As I said though, programs are getting bigger. I'd go with at 16 gb if
budget allowed to be safe. But the 512 drives have more  write capacity
before they have to be replaced, and also faster write performance.



On 4/18/2021 9:04 AM, John Holcomb II wrote:



I don’t think most normal users would need 512GB.

IT really depends on what he is doing.

With read/write at 500 MB for a Sata-based SSD, he doesn’t need to worry too
much about that either.

I’d say  a Core I5 would do it. AMD vs. intel either of these would be fine.

We have no idea what kinda budget he is working with so THESE are just some
points to consider.

I do however agree with the 8GB ram.

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of
enes saribas
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:55 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





At a bare minimum, go for gigabit ethernet options, 8 gb of dual channel
ram, an ssd of at least 512 gb, 1tb if you can aford it, even if you don't
use 1tb the 1tb drive has a much higher write speed and endurance. A
processor should be at least current gen 11th gen intel or fifth gen AMD r5,
don't getv stuff like pentium/celeron/i3 processors.



On 4/15/2021 1:30 PM, Jim Rawls wrote:



I will let you know as I find out.





From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
John Holcomb II
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 7:28 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Do you forsee yourself  doing anything more then  broadcasting?

I’d go with two sound cards  for one  thing.

Is there a price you have to contend with?

How are you storing your music files?

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of
Jim Rawls
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 2:26 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Hi all,

It looks like I can select what I want on the computer I am getting, so, I
want your opinions.

What would you like on your computer? Since I am into music, and use music
files for my global voice shows, I obviously want a good player, and, a good
recorder to use. I want win amp as my primary player, and have been using
virtual recorder, but  I’m open to suggestions on any  recorder you like.
How much memory etc. would you like?   any of these thoughts are
appreciated. I am running jaws 2018, but will be running jaws 2021 on my
new computer.[Jim







































Re: if you were getting a new computer.

Jacob
 

OK, a few questions.
Is this new computer going to be a desktop or laptop?
If it is a desktop, will it be pre-built or custom built?
besides audio recording, playback and editing, what will you be using this computer for?
What's your budget?
 


Re: if you were getting a new computer.

John Holcomb II
 

Geen,
So there's two ways you can build a computer.
You can buy for only what you use now, or you can future proof the thing so it'll last longer.
Especially when you consider (if it’s a laptop) that things are sottered onto the mother board, and can't be user upgradable in some cases.
Keep in mind how long PCs can last.
I've got A windows 7 laptop which I know will run Windows 10.
It has a second Gen Core I7 and runs great for what I need.
The max amount of ram that thing can support is 16GB and it does make a difference. Its from 2011!
I'm going to guess that most people do not go upgrading hardwhere or reinstalling Windows often.
If you have the money to do so (and those words are important), having more RAM certainly can't hurt.
Faster processor can't hurt either. M.2 based SSD vs SATA based can't hurt either.
Can you do with An I5 and a spinning hard drive and 8GB? Sure. And if you cant afford the extra money for the ram, or if you have to choose how far your money goes, SSD all the way would be my first pick.
Then if you've got more money after that then expand the ram next.
I've seen computers last for over 10 years. Of Corse there are budget constrains that many people have to work with, and that's understandable.
We also have no idea what the requirements of Windows 10 will be in 10 years either. Or if they'll be on another version of Windows by that point.
My experience says hardware doesn't die, and you can spend more now and have it last longer.
If it’s a desktop, the hard drive will die first, especially if it’s a spinning drive.
Also, if this is your only computer, do you really wanna be without while someone replaces things because you found out in a few years that you need more RAM or a bigger SSD?
John

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 6:56 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

I've just read a lot of a long Quara thread on the subject. After seeing many different opinions and some discussion, I'll say that I don't know if having 16GB of RAM will speed up a computer even if you never use 8GB. I will say that I question whether it matters much for the typical user. If I can save between sixty and 85 dollars roughly by having 8 GB of RAM, I'll have 8GB. I'm not so affluent that I want to spend the extra money for possible gains in performance that would so minimally affect my computer use. Most of my time is spent listening to audio, reading e-mails, answering some, browsing the Internet and doing some audio recording and editing.

Saving a few seconds here and there is meaningless. And let's say I want to have my browser be faster. If I use an ad blocker, I've already significantly speeded up my browser and gotten more protection against possibly corrupted advertising that is malicious. And I haven't spent an extra penny.

If I really wanted to speed it up, I could get an SSD drive. Getting an SSD drive would speed up my machine much more than adding RAM when I'm not using all I currently have.

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: Gene
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 5:32 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

I doubt it. If you have 8gb and you are only using six, how is having 10 more unused GB going to matter? If you have a race car or a station wagon and you are driving on highways at about 65 or 70 miles an hour, what difference does it make whether your car's top speed is 120 or 220 miles per hour.

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: chris judge
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 5:18 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

They sure do, and there is definitely a difference between 8 gig and 16. Few people who have experienced both will dispute that.


Chris Judge


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Janet
Sent: April 18, 2021 4:48 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

Hi John,
I have to agree with you when you say SSDS do make a difference, as I have a
519 SSD, and my Laptop boots on within a second! With my desktop with 2 TBS HD it takes at least 3 minutes to boot up!
Janet


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of John Holcomb II
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:11 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

Yeah SSDs really do make a difference in my experience.
But having said that there's no real need for most to get more than 256GB.
Now there's one thing to keep in mind though.
If it’s a laptop, and everything is sottered onto the board, then no upgrades would be possible, in that case if you can future proofing wouldn't be a bad idea.
John


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:05 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

I meant solid state drives. It is evidently incorrect to refer to them as digital drives.

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: John Holcomb II
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 11:58 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.



It was made by Intel I and is on the way out.

I forget what it is though.

Digital drive? I’ve never heard anyone call anything a digital drive before.
What is that.

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Monte Single
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 12:45 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Hi List,



I am not in the market for a new computer, knock on wood.

What is the new memory I hear of these days. It is called octane memory.

Is this part of the ram, processor, of drive?



Cheers,



Monte





From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of enes saribas
Sent: April 18, 2021 9:59 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





As I said though, programs are getting bigger. I'd go with at 16 gb if budget allowed to be safe. But the 512 drives have more write capacity before they have to be replaced, and also faster write performance.



On 4/18/2021 9:04 AM, John Holcomb II wrote:



I don’t think most normal users would need 512GB.

IT really depends on what he is doing.

With read/write at 500 MB for a Sata-based SSD, he doesn’t need to worry too much about that either.

I’d say a Core I5 would do it. AMD vs. intel either of these would be fine.

We have no idea what kinda budget he is working with so THESE are just some points to consider.

I do however agree with the 8GB ram.

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of enes saribas
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:55 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





At a bare minimum, go for gigabit ethernet options, 8 gb of dual channel ram, an ssd of at least 512 gb, 1tb if you can aford it, even if you don't use 1tb the 1tb drive has a much higher write speed and endurance. A processor should be at least current gen 11th gen intel or fifth gen AMD r5, don't getv stuff like pentium/celeron/i3 processors.



On 4/15/2021 1:30 PM, Jim Rawls wrote:



I will let you know as I find out.





From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of John Holcomb II
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 7:28 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Do you forsee yourself doing anything more then broadcasting?

I’d go with two sound cards for one thing.

Is there a price you have to contend with?

How are you storing your music files?

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of Jim Rawls
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 2:26 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Hi all,

It looks like I can select what I want on the computer I am getting, so, I want your opinions.

What would you like on your computer? Since I am into music, and use music files for my global voice shows, I obviously want a good player, and, a good recorder to use. I want win amp as my primary player, and have been using virtual recorder, but I’m open to suggestions on any recorder you like.
How much memory etc. would you like? any of these thoughts are
appreciated. I am running jaws 2018, but will be running jaws 2021 on my new computer.[Jim


Re: if you were getting a new computer.

Thomas N. Chan
 

If money permit, and you can't afford to get a higher storage SSD, then go for the standard range of 256gb for your boot drive, then get whatever you can afford for storage for normal spinning drive. You can get 1tb or more with very good price tag on them., 
the speed what they are providing is more than enough for what you want to accomplish.
At least you can archive and store your media on the spinning drive. They don't need the speed and performance for reading a 5 to 10mb mp3 files. even for a 1gb video, a normal 1tb black or blue series is more than enough.
You can use that for your backup to capture  drive images since your boot drive is only 256gb.

at least this is my approach if your budget fall within as well.

Regards,
Thomas N. Chan


On Mon, 19 Apr 2021 at 07:12, chris judge <chrisjudge1967@...> wrote:
I know Gene, you always argue this point. You also say solid state hard drives don't make that much of a difference. I have used both and in my experience they do.

Chris Judge


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: April 18, 2021 7:33 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

I doubt it.  If you have 8gb and you are only using six, how is having 10 more unused GB going to matter?  If you have a race car or a station wagon and you are driving on highways at about 65 or 70 miles an hour, what difference does it make whether your car's top speed is 120 or 220 miles per hour.

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: chris judge
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 5:18 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

They sure do, and there is definitely a difference between 8 gig and 16. Few people who have experienced both will dispute that.


Chris Judge


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Janet
Sent: April 18, 2021 4:48 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

Hi John,
I have to agree with you when you say SSDS do make a difference, as I have a
519 SSD, and my Laptop boots on within a second!  With my desktop with 2 TBS
HD it takes at least 3 minutes to boot up!
Janet


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
John Holcomb II
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:11 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

Yeah SSDs really do make a difference in my experience.
But having said that there's no real need for most to get more than 256GB.
Now there's one thing to keep in mind though.
If it’s a laptop, and everything is sottered onto the board, then no
upgrades would be possible, in that case if you can  future proofing
wouldn't be a bad idea.
John


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:05 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

I meant solid state drives.  It is evidently incorrect to refer to them as
digital drives.

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: John Holcomb II
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 11:58 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.



It was made by Intel I and is on the way out.

I forget what it is though.

Digital drive? I’ve never heard anyone call anything a digital drive before.
What is that.

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Monte
Single
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 12:45 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Hi List,



I am not in the market for a new computer, knock on wood.

What is the new memory I hear of these days.  It is called octane memory.

Is this part of the ram, processor, of drive?



Cheers,



Monte





From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of enes
saribas
Sent: April 18, 2021 9:59 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





As I said though, programs are getting bigger. I'd go with at 16 gb if
budget allowed to be safe. But the 512 drives have more  write capacity
before they have to be replaced, and also faster write performance.



On 4/18/2021 9:04 AM, John Holcomb II wrote:



I don’t think most normal users would need 512GB.

IT really depends on what he is doing.

With read/write at 500 MB for a Sata-based SSD, he doesn’t need to worry too
much about that either.

I’d say  a Core I5 would do it. AMD vs. intel either of these would be fine.

We have no idea what kinda budget he is working with so THESE are just some
points to consider.

I do however agree with the 8GB ram.

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of
enes saribas
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:55 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





At a bare minimum, go for gigabit ethernet options, 8 gb of dual channel
ram, an ssd of at least 512 gb, 1tb if you can aford it, even if you don't
use 1tb the 1tb drive has a much higher write speed and endurance. A
processor should be at least current gen 11th gen intel or fifth gen AMD r5,
don't getv stuff like pentium/celeron/i3 processors.



On 4/15/2021 1:30 PM, Jim Rawls wrote:



I will let you know as I find out.





From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
John Holcomb II
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 7:28 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Do you forsee yourself  doing anything more then  broadcasting?

I’d go with two sound cards  for one  thing.

Is there a price you have to contend with?

How are you storing your music files?

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of
Jim Rawls
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 2:26 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Hi all,

It looks like I can select what I want on the computer I am getting, so, I
want your opinions.

What would you like on your computer? Since I am into music, and use music
files for my global voice shows, I obviously want a good player, and, a good
recorder to use. I want win amp as my primary player, and have been using
virtual recorder, but  I’m open to suggestions on any  recorder you like.
How much memory etc. would you like?   any of these thoughts are
appreciated. I am running jaws 2018, but will be running jaws 2021 on my
new computer.[Jim








































Re: if you were getting a new computer.

John Holcomb II
 

It depends on who you buy it from.
Also I'm not sure which programs leak.
Geen, not 16 more GB. No.
We were saying that 8GB is good enough for most people but if you can afford it having 16GB or more is better.
Less cashing to the drive.
SSDS do have a limited read/write cycles.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 4:01 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

I just looked at a few search results. Are they reflective of current prices? They indicate that 16gb of RAM costs something like 93 or 98 dollars. That's a lot of money to spend to avoid closing and reopening this or that program a few hours earlier.

Is that the cost of adding RAM when you purchase a machine?

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: Gene
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 2:50 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

I think this needs more discussion. How much does 16 more gb of memory cost? Why not just close programs now and then if they have memory leaks?
And what programs are known to have memory leaks that are popular and in common use?

I don't see any general advice from computer advisors to get 16GB of RAM if you are a typical user. If you spend fifty dollars more, as I said, for some people that isn't much money. for others, it is a lot. I don't think such generalizations should be made without discussions of such points.
Let's say, for example, that a certain browser has a memory leak and that using it for two or three hours can impair performance using 8GB of ram. Is it worth getting more RAM so you can keep it opened for 6 hours? Why not just close and reopen it every now and then? Why not the same with other programs?

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: Janet
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 2:43 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.



Hi Everyone,

Thomas says: 8gb is good but 16gb is even better. Memory leak, left over
chunk of program which its not cleanup by windows, that much of ram will
help the virtual files as well. If there's not much writing onto the
harddrive, your SSD or your harddrive will be even happier.



Janet says:

I agree with you one hundred percent!



Janet





From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Thomas N. Chan
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 12:55 PM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





I would always say, what can the original request can afford.



8gb is good but 16gb is even better. Memory leak, left over chunk of program
which its not cleanup by windows, that much of ram will help the virtual
files as well. If there's not much writing onto the harddrive, your SSD or
your harddrive will be even happier.



If you open so many programs example, some of the older or initial or least
program will just be, push down to the virtual swap files.



Those running in the background, will have the similar SOP.



More ram, is no big deal, so long is within your budget.







harddrive, is good if you can afford bigger ones. For me, I got 256GB SSD
back then, but I have upgraded to 1tb 2 years later. But of course, you need
to reinstall windows but for me, I just clone over.







The rest, I will not comment. But I do have an external USB 3 soundcard by
Creative. I can have multiple input, mic in, aux in and 5.1 output.



But thats an old model already . But 3.5mm jack speaker or sound card is
still around.













Regards,
Thomas N. Chan











On Mon, 19 Apr 2021 at 01:16, Monte Single <mrsingle@sasktel.net> wrote:



Heck, you could spend an extra thousand dollars just by getting high end
video and processor.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: April 18, 2021 10:38 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

I doubt programs are getting that much bigger. Since I haven't seen this
elsewhere, I'll put it in the interesting category but I'd want a good deal
more verification. And even if they are, I am not convinced that justifies
getting more than 8GB for the average user. You can add this expense and
that expense until you are spending one-hundred or two or three hundred
dollars more than you have to and derive no meaningful benefit.

https://www.makeuseof.com/tag/much-ram-really-need/

Regarding digital drives, they are so fast to start with that even if the
larger drives are faster, does that matter? What are we talking about,
perhaps half a second speed difference to load a program? and can you
document that larger digital drives will last longer and that it matters?
Digital drives, from what I've readd will generally last far longer than the
computer using them so I remain to be convinced.

Regarding price, following your recommendations for a hard drive and for
RAM, how much more money would you be spending?

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: enes sarıbaş
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 10:58 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.



As I said though, programs are getting bigger. I'd go with at 16 gb if
budget allowed to be safe. But the 512 drives have more write capacity
before they have to be replaced, and also faster write performance.


On 4/18/2021 9:04 AM, John Holcomb II wrote:


I don’t think most normal users would need 512GB.

IT really depends on what he is doing.

With read/write at 500 MB for a Sata-based SSD, he doesn’t need to worry too
much about that either.

I’d say a Core I5 would do it. AMD vs. intel either of these would be fine.

We have no idea what kinda budget he is working with so THESE are just some
points to consider.

I do however agree with the 8GB ram.

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of
enes saribas
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:55 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





At a bare minimum, go for gigabit ethernet options, 8 gb of dual channel
ram, an ssd of at least 512 gb, 1tb if you can aford it, even if you don't
use 1tb the 1tb drive has a much higher write speed and endurance. A
processor should be at least current gen 11th gen intel or fifth gen AMD r5,
don't getv stuff like pentium/celeron/i3 processors.



On 4/15/2021 1:30 PM, Jim Rawls wrote:



I will let you know as I find out.





From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
John Holcomb II
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 7:28 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Do you forsee yourself doing anything more then broadcasting?

I’d go with two sound cards for one thing.

Is there a price you have to contend with?

How are you storing your music files?

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of
Jim Rawls
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 2:26 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Hi all,

It looks like I can select what I want on the computer I am getting, so, I
want your opinions.

What would you like on your computer? Since I am into music, and use music
files for my global voice shows, I obviously want a good player, and, a good
recorder to use. I want win amp as my primary player, and have been using
virtual recorder, but I’m open to suggestions on any recorder you like.
How much memory etc. would you like? any of these thoughts are
appreciated. I am running jaws 2018, but will be running jaws 2021 on my
new computer.[Jim


Re: All About Intel Octane Memory!

John Holcomb II
 

Yeah um, no.
I don't think its worth the expense.
John

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Janet
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 3:56 PM
To: 'main@TechTalk.groups.io' <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: [TechTalk] All About Intel Optane Memory!

Hi Everyone,
Here's some information about Intel Optane Memory. It is a lot of info, so
grab your cup of coffee or whatever you might be drinking, because you might
need to sit down for this one!

Janet

Intel Optane Memory: everything you need to know By Jarred Walton November
19, 2019 What is Intel Optane Memory, how does it work, and is it worth
buying?
SSDs are becoming more affordable all the time, but it can still be tough to
fit everything you'd like faster access to onto a single drive. We discuss
the choice between HDD vs SSD in more detail elsewhere, but Intel Optane
Memory looks to bridge the gap between the faster speeds of a solid-state
drive and the space available on a mechanical hard drive. Here's everything
you need to know about how Intel Optane Memory works, the benefits, and the
possible drawbacks.
What is Intel Optane Memory?
Fundamentally, Optane Memory is a form of disk caching. The idea is to
provide users with the fast data access of SSDs combined with the high
capacity of HDDs. (Technically, Optane Memory can be used with an SSD as
well, but for purposes of this article I'll just say HDD for the slower mass
storage.) Commonly used data gets replicated onto fast M.2 Optane Memory
storage while less important data is pulled from the hard drive. It's great
in theory, but Optane Memory isn't always a perfect solution.
How Intel Optane Memory works
Optane Memory uses a "least recently used" (LRU) approach to determine what
gets stored in the fast cache. All initial data reads come from the slower
HDD storage, and the data gets copied over to the cache. Data writes go
first to the cache and then get replicated over to the HDD. Each time a
block of data in the cache gets read or written, its last access time is
updated. Eventually, the cache fills up and old data gets evicted-and it
will be the data that has been sitting unused for the longest amount of
time. The larger your cache, the more data it can hold, and the more likely
reads and writes will use fast cached storage rather than hitting your slow
HDD.
That brings up the tricky question of how large the cache needs to be in
order to hold all the "important" data. Originally released in 16GB and 32GB
capacities, Intel later added a 64GB Optane Memory option, and you can also
use an Intel Optane 800p drive as an even larger 118GB Optane Memory cache
if you so choose.
The reason for the larger capacities is simple: for some users, 16GB and
32GB caches simply aren't large enough. Windows 10 alone can use a big chunk
of the 16GB model for commonly accessed data. Run a few applications or
games and "old" data gets kicked out of the cache.
In a worst-case scenario, sequentially accessing slightly more than 16GB of
data (eg, 17GB) first fills up the Optane Memory cache, then evicts the
oldest 1GB data to make room for the last 1GB of data, and then flushes the
whole cache as "new" uncached data is accessed again. Any data not already
in the Optane Memory cache ends up with HDD performance, largely negating
the benefits. This specific scenario is unlikely to happen in the real
world-a lot of data usually gets used multiple times and will benefit from
caching-but having a cache that's large enough to hold the working data set
is ideal.
The difficulty comes in determining exactly what gets cached in the first
place. Optane Memory relies on Intel's Rapid Storage Technology (RST)
application and drivers, and RST has some intelligence in what types of data
get stored in the cache. For example, if you're viewing a large HD movie
stored on your PC, there's no real benefit to putting all 8GB of movie data
into the cache. Movies are read sequentially at relatively low rates (maybe
5-15MB/s) and would simply waste cache space.
Intel hasn't provided exact details on its caching algorithm, but even a
small 16GB Optane Memory module can provide a noticeable improvement in
Windows boot times and game load times-despite the fact that many games are
now in the 50-100GB range. At the same time, it's easy to get into a place
where the 16GB Optane Memory size is limiting.
AnandTech as an example
did some benchmarks with and without Optane Memory on various capacities,
and the larger data sets in some tests caused even a 64GB module to
basically fall back to HDD levels of performance.
Intel Optane Memory specs
Optane Memory tends to either work great (all the important data is in the
cache) or only okay (some data is on slower storage). Technically, the
Optane Memory drives have different performance depending on whether you
have the 16GB, 32GB, or 64GB models, but I don't generally recommend the
16GB option.
Here's how the three models compare, and again it's worth pointing out that
Intel Optane 800p SSDs (58GB and 118GB) can also work as Optane Memory
drives.
Maximum sequential throughput is limited by the PCIe x2 interface on the
higher capacity models, but in practice it doesn't matter much. Few
real-world operations will saturate the x2 link-copying files can get there,
along with some synthetic benchmarks, but if you're loading applications and
games Optane Memory is plenty fast.
Optane Memory is built using Intel's 3D XPoint Technology, a form of
non-volatile memory that's sort of like the NAND used in most other SSDs,
except it relies on changing material properties rather than storing
charges. First discussed in 2015, 3D XPoint made a lot of promises: faster
read and write speeds compared to NAND, higher capacities, and extreme
durability. The specs are certainly better than NAND in most regards, though
not quite as good as initial claims-at least not yet.
The raw throughput for Optane Memory isn't really any faster than NAND right
now, but one of the big advantages of Optane Memory is the low latency
access times. Where most NAND-based SSDs have read/write latencies of around
100/50µs, Optane Memory latencies are 18/7µs for the 32/64GB drives. That's
more theoretical, especially since some data accesses may not be cached and
so HDD latencies come into play, but when testing the similar Intel Optane
800p SSDs, overall performance was often better than significantly larger
SSDs.
Intel Optane Memory performance
While Intel touts the ability for Optane Memory to accelerate slower SSDs as
well as HDDs, the latter is the most common use case. For most real-world
use cases, Optane Memory performs as advertised. A 32GB or 64GB module
paired with a larger HDD yields performance results-Windows boot times,
application and game load times, level load times, etc.-that are similar to
that of a decent SSD.
To give some specific examples, I loaded several games (multiple times),
including Anthem, The Division 2, and Metro Exodus. HDD load times were
about
30 percent slower (using one of the fastest HDDs available, a WD Black 4TB).
With Optane Memory, load times are nearly identical to most SATA SSDs
(including Crucial MX500 and Samsung 860 Evo). Windows boot times with
Optane Memory are also nearly the same as with a good SSD-about 12 seconds,
compared to 30 seconds for the HDD. But there's one caveat.
The biggest concern is that the first access of any uncached data ends up
with HDD speeds. Over the long haul this becomes less critical, but in
testing right after enabling Optane, the first boot of Windows is only
marginally faster-it's subsequent boot times that are improved. Loading a
game or application the first time will also be slow-and if you fill your
cache (a real possibility with the 16GB model) you're going to get "first
run" performance on applications more often. If your cache is large enough
for your routine workloads, Optane Memory can be substantially faster than a
hard drive, but it needs a bit of warming up before it's fully ready to go.
How this plays out depends on what you're doing. For lighter use cases, a
32GB Optane Memory drive is generally sufficient, but heavy workloads can
definitely reach the point where even 64GB isn't enough. Do note that
AnandTech's heavy test scenario is certainly not representative of most end
user daily routines, however.
How much does Intel Optane Memory cost?
Given the generally good performance, price is obviously a major
consideration. A 2TB HDD paired up with a fast Optane Memory cache sounds
like a reasonable solution. Right now, Optane Memory will set you back
$28 for 16GB,
$88 for 32GB,
or
$111 for 64GB,
or
$199 for 128GB.
The original pricing from Intel was a bit more sensible ($39, $69, $129, and
$199), but retail pricing is all over the place.
I still strongly recommend against the 16GB model, just because it's so easy
to exceed its cache capacity (plus it's slower in general), and given the
relatively similar pricing on the 32GB and 64GB options (yes, the 800p 58GB
functions as a 64GB Optane Memory drive), grabbing the 800p 58GB makes the
most sense. Of course you have to factor in overall pricing with a hard
drive, so that's another
$60 for 2TB of storage.
Right now, SSD prices have dropped to the point where the cost of a 32GB
Optane Memory drive isn't far off the price of a 1TB SATA SSD, and you can
get a good 1TB SATA SSD for less than the cost of the 64GB model. The 118GB
meanwhile is pretty much out of consideration, as it costs as much as a 2TB
NVMe SSD.
The SSD will deliver 'fast' performance for all data, while Optane Memory
can be slightly faster for cached data and slower for anything not in the
cache.
If you want a single drive that does everything well and holds 2TB, a 64GB
Optane Memory stick combined with a hard drive now costs about $160-more
than a decent 1TB SATA SSD, and $80 less than a fast 2TB NVMe SSD.
System requirements for Intel Optane Memory Given the name, it's no surprise
that Intel Optane Memory is only for Intel platforms. Specifically, Optane
Memory requires a motherboard with either a 200-series or 300-series
chipset-the one exception being the H310, which doesn't support Optane
Memory. It will also work on X299 chipset boards. There are also CPU
requirements, and you'll need a 7th Gen or later Intel CPU. There are
exceptions on the CPU front, however: all Core i3/i5/i7/i9 CPUs support
Optane Memory, but Pentium and Celeron models do not.
Optane Memory modules come in an M.2 2280 form factor and will require the
use of one of your M.2 slots. Some motherboards only include a single M.2
slot, which precludes using Optane Memory alongside an M.2 NVMe SSD. Intel
does offer combination drives that include both Optane Memory and 660p SSD
storage on a single M.2 stick, but those are for OEMs and system builders.
They could start showing up at retail if demand is high enough, but so far
that hasn't been the case.
Besides the hardware requirements, Optane Memory has some software and OS
requirements. You'll need Windows 10 version 1803 or later (that's the April
2018 update, so any Win10 install should be viable by now). You'll also need
Intel's RST 15.5 or later software. Again, that shouldn't pose a problem
considering the latest release is 17.7-and you'll want to use the latest RST
as there have been quite a few improvements over the past year with Optane
Memory support.
Alternatives to Intel Optane Memory
There are other SSD caching solutions available, including PrimoCache and
AMD's StoreMI, which is based off Enmotus FuzeDrive.
Those solutions can use an Intel Optane Memory module as the cache / fast
tier, but the actual implementation behaves differently. StoreMI/FuzeDrive
for example uses tiered storage as opposed to SSD caching. I won't get into
all the nitty gritty details, but tiered storage is generally considered a
superior approach to pure caching. You get the combined storage capacity of
all tiers, for example, rather than duplicating data on fast and slow tiers.
StoreMI is free with any AMD Ryzen 400-series or later chipset motherboard,
or Threadripper X399 and TRX40 motherboards. You can also purchase FuzeDrive
and use it with any other motherboard-AMD or Intel.
One thing to note is that caching drives (ie, with Optane Memory or
PrimoCache) often end up doing more writes than normal SSDs, plus smaller
NAND SSDs often have relatively weak performance. That's where 3D XPoint's
advantages are more apparent. Where modern NAND cells can be erased and
rewritten anywhere from 1,000-3,000 times (for TLC/MLC NAND) before the cell
walls wear out and stop storing charges properly, 3D XPoint endurance is
much higher-at least
20,000 cycles, probably more. That might not sound like much, but when
you're dealing with smaller SSDs as caching drives it can certainly help.
Is Intel Optane Memory worth buying?
In the current market, Optane Memory is difficult to recommend for DIY PC
builders. Pairing up a higher capacity HDD with Optane Memory can give
SSD-like performance for far more data, but we still prefer a single large
SSD. While 4TB SSDs remain very expensive, 2TB models have dropped below the
$200 range.
Unless you need more than 2TB of fast / cached storage, a single SSD is
arguably much easier to deal with. For 4TB and larger HDDs, however, Optane
Memory remains viable. The problem is that Optane Memory is best with a 64GB
module, which costs as much as a 1TB SSD.
Personally, I'd rather have a 1TB or 2TB SSD and no HDD, or a 500GB SSD with
an HDD, than to end up with a 64GB cache and an HDD. I'm okay with doing a
bit of storage micromanagement to put data that doesn't require fast access
on my HDD and keep important data on my SSD.
If you want a simpler solution that doesn't require managing storage on a
lower level, and particularly if you're not routinely using massive data
sets that could flush out your SSD cache, Optane Memory is worth a look.
That's especially true with prebuilts from OEMs (eg, Dell, HP, Alienware,
Lenovo, etc.), as Optane Memory sometimes gets tossed in at a discounted
rate.
In terms of performance, SSDs will always beat HDDs, but an HDD with Optane
Memory can be a reasonable compromise.
Jarred Walton

https://www.pcgamer.com/intel-optane-memory-everything-you-need-to-know/

Peace Be With You.


Re: if you were getting a new computer.

chris judge
 

I know Gene, you always argue this point. You also say solid state hard drives don't make that much of a difference. I have used both and in my experience they do.

Chris Judge

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: April 18, 2021 7:33 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

I doubt it. If you have 8gb and you are only using six, how is having 10 more unused GB going to matter? If you have a race car or a station wagon and you are driving on highways at about 65 or 70 miles an hour, what difference does it make whether your car's top speed is 120 or 220 miles per hour.

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: chris judge
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 5:18 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

They sure do, and there is definitely a difference between 8 gig and 16. Few people who have experienced both will dispute that.


Chris Judge


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Janet
Sent: April 18, 2021 4:48 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

Hi John,
I have to agree with you when you say SSDS do make a difference, as I have a
519 SSD, and my Laptop boots on within a second! With my desktop with 2 TBS
HD it takes at least 3 minutes to boot up!
Janet


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
John Holcomb II
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:11 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

Yeah SSDs really do make a difference in my experience.
But having said that there's no real need for most to get more than 256GB.
Now there's one thing to keep in mind though.
If it’s a laptop, and everything is sottered onto the board, then no
upgrades would be possible, in that case if you can future proofing
wouldn't be a bad idea.
John


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:05 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

I meant solid state drives. It is evidently incorrect to refer to them as
digital drives.

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: John Holcomb II
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 11:58 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.



It was made by Intel I and is on the way out.

I forget what it is though.

Digital drive? I’ve never heard anyone call anything a digital drive before.
What is that.

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Monte
Single
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 12:45 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Hi List,



I am not in the market for a new computer, knock on wood.

What is the new memory I hear of these days. It is called octane memory.

Is this part of the ram, processor, of drive?



Cheers,



Monte





From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of enes
saribas
Sent: April 18, 2021 9:59 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





As I said though, programs are getting bigger. I'd go with at 16 gb if
budget allowed to be safe. But the 512 drives have more write capacity
before they have to be replaced, and also faster write performance.



On 4/18/2021 9:04 AM, John Holcomb II wrote:



I don’t think most normal users would need 512GB.

IT really depends on what he is doing.

With read/write at 500 MB for a Sata-based SSD, he doesn’t need to worry too
much about that either.

I’d say a Core I5 would do it. AMD vs. intel either of these would be fine.

We have no idea what kinda budget he is working with so THESE are just some
points to consider.

I do however agree with the 8GB ram.

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of
enes saribas
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:55 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





At a bare minimum, go for gigabit ethernet options, 8 gb of dual channel
ram, an ssd of at least 512 gb, 1tb if you can aford it, even if you don't
use 1tb the 1tb drive has a much higher write speed and endurance. A
processor should be at least current gen 11th gen intel or fifth gen AMD r5,
don't getv stuff like pentium/celeron/i3 processors.



On 4/15/2021 1:30 PM, Jim Rawls wrote:



I will let you know as I find out.





From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
John Holcomb II
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 7:28 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Do you forsee yourself doing anything more then broadcasting?

I’d go with two sound cards for one thing.

Is there a price you have to contend with?

How are you storing your music files?

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of
Jim Rawls
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 2:26 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Hi all,

It looks like I can select what I want on the computer I am getting, so, I
want your opinions.

What would you like on your computer? Since I am into music, and use music
files for my global voice shows, I obviously want a good player, and, a good
recorder to use. I want win amp as my primary player, and have been using
virtual recorder, but I’m open to suggestions on any recorder you like.
How much memory etc. would you like? any of these thoughts are
appreciated. I am running jaws 2018, but will be running jaws 2021 on my
new computer.[Jim


Re: if you were getting a new computer.

Gene
 

I'll provide the link. I forgot to include it in my last message.
https://superuser.com/questions/786683/are-computers-with-more-ram-potentially-faster-if-not-all-memory-is-usually-in-u

I didn't remember the source correctly. It is a Super User forum.

Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: Gene
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 5:32 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

I doubt it. If you have 8gb and you are only using six, how is having 10
more unused GB going to matter? If you have a race car or a station wagon
and you are driving on highways at about 65 or 70 miles an hour, what
difference does it make whether your car's top speed is 120 or 220 miles per
hour.

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: chris judge
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 5:18 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

They sure do, and there is definitely a difference between 8 gig and 16. Few
people who have experienced both will dispute that.


Chris Judge


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Janet
Sent: April 18, 2021 4:48 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

Hi John,
I have to agree with you when you say SSDS do make a difference, as I have a
519 SSD, and my Laptop boots on within a second! With my desktop with 2 TBS
HD it takes at least 3 minutes to boot up!
Janet


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
John Holcomb II
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:11 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

Yeah SSDs really do make a difference in my experience.
But having said that there's no real need for most to get more than 256GB.
Now there's one thing to keep in mind though.
If it’s a laptop, and everything is sottered onto the board, then no
upgrades would be possible, in that case if you can future proofing
wouldn't be a bad idea.
John


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:05 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

I meant solid state drives. It is evidently incorrect to refer to them as
digital drives.

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: John Holcomb II
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 11:58 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.



It was made by Intel I and is on the way out.

I forget what it is though.

Digital drive? I’ve never heard anyone call anything a digital drive before.
What is that.

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Monte
Single
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 12:45 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Hi List,



I am not in the market for a new computer, knock on wood.

What is the new memory I hear of these days. It is called octane memory.

Is this part of the ram, processor, of drive?



Cheers,



Monte





From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of enes
saribas
Sent: April 18, 2021 9:59 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





As I said though, programs are getting bigger. I'd go with at 16 gb if
budget allowed to be safe. But the 512 drives have more write capacity
before they have to be replaced, and also faster write performance.



On 4/18/2021 9:04 AM, John Holcomb II wrote:



I don’t think most normal users would need 512GB.

IT really depends on what he is doing.

With read/write at 500 MB for a Sata-based SSD, he doesn’t need to worry too
much about that either.

I’d say a Core I5 would do it. AMD vs. intel either of these would be fine.

We have no idea what kinda budget he is working with so THESE are just some
points to consider.

I do however agree with the 8GB ram.

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of
enes saribas
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:55 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





At a bare minimum, go for gigabit ethernet options, 8 gb of dual channel
ram, an ssd of at least 512 gb, 1tb if you can aford it, even if you don't
use 1tb the 1tb drive has a much higher write speed and endurance. A
processor should be at least current gen 11th gen intel or fifth gen AMD r5,
don't getv stuff like pentium/celeron/i3 processors.



On 4/15/2021 1:30 PM, Jim Rawls wrote:



I will let you know as I find out.





From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
John Holcomb II
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 7:28 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Do you forsee yourself doing anything more then broadcasting?

I’d go with two sound cards for one thing.

Is there a price you have to contend with?

How are you storing your music files?

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of
Jim Rawls
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 2:26 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Hi all,

It looks like I can select what I want on the computer I am getting, so, I
want your opinions.

What would you like on your computer? Since I am into music, and use music
files for my global voice shows, I obviously want a good player, and, a good
recorder to use. I want win amp as my primary player, and have been using
virtual recorder, but I’m open to suggestions on any recorder you like.
How much memory etc. would you like? any of these thoughts are
appreciated. I am running jaws 2018, but will be running jaws 2021 on my
new computer.[Jim


Re: if you were getting a new computer.

Gene
 

I've just read a lot of a long Quara thread on the subject. After seeing many different opinions and some discussion, I'll say that I don't know if having 16GB of RAM will speed up a computer even if you never use 8GB. I will say that I question whether it matters much for the typical user. If I can save between sixty and 85 dollars roughly by having 8 GB of RAM, I'll have 8GB. I'm not so affluent that I want to spend the extra money for possible gains in performance that would so minimally affect my computer use. Most of my time is spent listening to audio, reading e-mails, answering some, browsing the Internet and doing some audio recording and editing.

Saving a few seconds here and there is meaningless. And let's say I want to have my browser be faster. If I use an ad blocker, I've already significantly speeded up my browser and gotten more protection against possibly corrupted advertising that is malicious. And I haven't spent an extra penny.

If I really wanted to speed it up, I could get an SSD drive. Getting an SSD drive would speed up my machine much more than adding RAM when I'm not using all I currently have.

Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: Gene
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 5:32 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

I doubt it. If you have 8gb and you are only using six, how is having 10
more unused GB going to matter? If you have a race car or a station wagon
and you are driving on highways at about 65 or 70 miles an hour, what
difference does it make whether your car's top speed is 120 or 220 miles per
hour.

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: chris judge
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 5:18 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

They sure do, and there is definitely a difference between 8 gig and 16. Few
people who have experienced both will dispute that.


Chris Judge


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Janet
Sent: April 18, 2021 4:48 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

Hi John,
I have to agree with you when you say SSDS do make a difference, as I have a
519 SSD, and my Laptop boots on within a second! With my desktop with 2 TBS
HD it takes at least 3 minutes to boot up!
Janet


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
John Holcomb II
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:11 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

Yeah SSDs really do make a difference in my experience.
But having said that there's no real need for most to get more than 256GB.
Now there's one thing to keep in mind though.
If it’s a laptop, and everything is sottered onto the board, then no
upgrades would be possible, in that case if you can future proofing
wouldn't be a bad idea.
John


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:05 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.

I meant solid state drives. It is evidently incorrect to refer to them as
digital drives.

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: John Holcomb II
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 11:58 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.



It was made by Intel I and is on the way out.

I forget what it is though.

Digital drive? I’ve never heard anyone call anything a digital drive before.
What is that.

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Monte
Single
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 12:45 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Hi List,



I am not in the market for a new computer, knock on wood.

What is the new memory I hear of these days. It is called octane memory.

Is this part of the ram, processor, of drive?



Cheers,



Monte





From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of enes
saribas
Sent: April 18, 2021 9:59 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





As I said though, programs are getting bigger. I'd go with at 16 gb if
budget allowed to be safe. But the 512 drives have more write capacity
before they have to be replaced, and also faster write performance.



On 4/18/2021 9:04 AM, John Holcomb II wrote:



I don’t think most normal users would need 512GB.

IT really depends on what he is doing.

With read/write at 500 MB for a Sata-based SSD, he doesn’t need to worry too
much about that either.

I’d say a Core I5 would do it. AMD vs. intel either of these would be fine.

We have no idea what kinda budget he is working with so THESE are just some
points to consider.

I do however agree with the 8GB ram.

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of
enes saribas
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 1:55 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





At a bare minimum, go for gigabit ethernet options, 8 gb of dual channel
ram, an ssd of at least 512 gb, 1tb if you can aford it, even if you don't
use 1tb the 1tb drive has a much higher write speed and endurance. A
processor should be at least current gen 11th gen intel or fifth gen AMD r5,
don't getv stuff like pentium/celeron/i3 processors.



On 4/15/2021 1:30 PM, Jim Rawls wrote:



I will let you know as I find out.





From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
John Holcomb II
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 7:28 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Do you forsee yourself doing anything more then broadcasting?

I’d go with two sound cards for one thing.

Is there a price you have to contend with?

How are you storing your music files?

John







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io On Behalf Of
Jim Rawls
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 2:26 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] if you were getting a new computer.





Hi all,

It looks like I can select what I want on the computer I am getting, so, I
want your opinions.

What would you like on your computer? Since I am into music, and use music
files for my global voice shows, I obviously want a good player, and, a good
recorder to use. I want win amp as my primary player, and have been using
virtual recorder, but I’m open to suggestions on any recorder you like.
How much memory etc. would you like? any of these thoughts are
appreciated. I am running jaws 2018, but will be running jaws 2021 on my
new computer.[Jim

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