Date   

email question

Madison Martin
 

Hi all,
I don't know if anyone can help me, or if there's even anything that can be
done, but I'm getting desperate as getting a gmail account (which is what the
list owner/moderator suggested) for one list is silly. Here's the situation:
I'm subscribed to this email list that's on Google Groups, don't know how long
it's been there. Anyway, it's a grate list and I've been a member for years.
Anyway, I haven't received any emails from the list in months. At first I just
thought that it wasn't active anymore, but it's very much still active. Yes I'm
still subscribed, and the owner/moderator checked my settings and I'm supposed
to receive all list mail. Yes I've checked my junk/spam folder and there's
nothing there. The email address has been added to the trusted senders list, and
I've tried unsubscribing and re-subscribing more then once and still nothing. I
can send messages to the list and they go through and list members can reply,
but I just don't receive any list mail. I'm running Windows 10 version 1909,
Jaws 2018 and Outlook 2013. Does anyone have any suggestions or ideas, anything
I/my carrier/the moderator could/should check/try? Like I said it's a grate list
and I really don't want to have to unsubscribe perminatly or get a gmail account
for one list. Please help. Look forward to any thoughts/suggestions anyone may
have!!!!! Thank you so much, any help is much appreciated!!

Madison


Re: NVDA & vocalizer voices

Dave
 

Hi Walter,


Those voices do not come with NVDA.  Those are bought as an Add On to NVDA.  I bought them from some place called Code-something.  Sorry, their name starts with the word Code, but I can't remember the rest of their name.


However, I had nothing but problems with their Vocalizer voices for NVDA. 


In Win 10, I started using the Voices that come with Win 10, and I use the one named David, which to my ears is clean and clear enough for my uses. 


I like the Vocalizer voices and use them with JAWS all the time, but just had funky problems using them consistently with NVDA.


Others mileage may vary.


Grumpy Dave



On 10/15/2020 3:21 AM, Walter Ramage via groups.io wrote:

Hi all.  I have just installed one of the vocalizer voices on my Win10 machine and I went to NVDA to enable it but the voice I chose isn't there. It and other voices show in NVDA on my Win7 machine but for some reason it doesn't on my Win10 machine.  Am I missing something or not doing something I should?  after installing the vocalizer voice I did a restart to be sure but it still doesn't show.  Walter.




Re: 5g and me

Gene
 

See this discussion:
I'm saying that you shouldn't just use any third party charger.
https://www.androidcentral.com/it-safe-use-third-party-charging-accessories-your-phone

Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2020 9:16 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] 5g and me

I guess I am a horrid lucky naughty child! I am able to use THIRD PARTY
CHARGERS for all My Shiny Android Toys with no problems. Typically, the
chargers that have shipped with my toys have not been long enough for my
liking. I have purchased THIRD PARTY chargers off Amazon that are about 10
feet long; some of these have been five chargers to a pack.

I've plugged in these chargers all over the place such that I'm never too
far away from one; I also bring one with me daily as part of my travel pouch
alongside a power bank for emergency use only. I do make sure that all the
third party chargers I have support data transfer.

All that said, I charge My Android toys once every two or three days and I
leave them all humming on their batteries 24 hours a day with all their
bells and whistles turned on.

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado


Re: 5g and me

Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

On Thu, Oct 15, 2020 at 10:16 AM, Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc. wrote:
I am able to use THIRD PARTY CHARGERS for all My Shiny Android Toys with no problems.
Same here.  Match the output specs of the OEM charger exactly or fairly closely and you're generally good to go.  I have never had an issue with a charger harming a device.  The biggest/worst difference was when using one with a significantly lower power output than the OEM model which meant significantly longer charge times (and that was one I didn't buy, but borrowed).

As an aside with regard to the earlier parts of this conversation, as a professional computer tech who works primarily with residential clients, I'd say that at least 50%, if not more, of my clients would consider "a couple of hundred dollars" a major price difference that they'd have to think long and hard about.  And now being at a time of life where I'm not working full time, and not being "made of money," I understand and respect that.  I've never owned a flagship smartphone or computer (even though I'm in the business) because both are way more than I've ever needed as far as their capabilities go and way more than I need to spend as a result.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


Re: 5g and me

Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
 

I guess I am a horrid lucky naughty child! I am able to use THIRD PARTY
CHARGERS for all My Shiny Android Toys with no problems. Typically, the
chargers that have shipped with my toys have not been long enough for my
liking. I have purchased THIRD PARTY chargers off Amazon that are about 10
feet long; some of these have been five chargers to a pack.

I've plugged in these chargers all over the place such that I'm never too
far away from one; I also bring one with me daily as part of my travel pouch
alongside a power bank for emergency use only. I do make sure that all the
third party chargers I have support data transfer.

All that said, I charge My Android toys once every two or three days and I
leave them all humming on their batteries 24 hours a day with all their
bells and whistles turned on.

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado


Re: Inquiry: Seeking sites where I can download free graphics for printing

Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

On Thu, Oct 15, 2020 at 01:05 AM, Ron Canazzi wrote:
Have you ever used this site?
-
Yes.  It's a search engine, just like Google, but with an emphasis on privacy.  Within the first ten search results are multiple public domain image libraries with millions of images available.  These include, but are not limited to:

Creative Commons Search

https://www.pexels.com/public-domain-images/ 

The Library of Congress "Free to Use" Image Library

and if you go beyond the first 10 there are many other options as well.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


Re: Inquiry: Seeking sites where I can download free graphics for printing

Ron Canazzi
 

Hi Jaffer,

I just want to download a few picturesque Fall and holiday graphics to print with my new printer.  I want to see how this printer works (of course I will have to show the printed pages to someone who can actually see them) for analysis.


On 10/15/2020 7:20 AM, Jaffar Sidek wrote:

Hello.  May I know what kinds are graphics you are wanting to download and print?  Cheers!

On 15/10/2020 1:05 pm, Ron Canazzi wrote:
Hi Brian,

Have you ever used this site? I can't make head nor tail out of it. I see a search field, but when I type in something all I get is a bunch of references to the availability of public domain images, what constitutes public domain access and so on.  I never see any results.


On 10/14/2020 10:26 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=public+domain+image+library 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


-- 
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"

-- 
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


Re: 5g and me

Gene
 

And to a lot of people, it is important. the majority of people don't have enough money that they can just throw it away. Something like forty [percent of Americans, in a survey taken before the pandemic, didn't have enough savings to last for one month if an unexpected misfortune occurred.
https://www.cnbc.com/2020/08/19/nearly-40percent-of-cash-strapped-americans-cant-last-a-month-on-savings.html

Of course, people who can easily afford to throw money away are welcome to do so, but many people who could, still don't want to.

Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: Monte Single
Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2020 8:23 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] 5g and me

Gene,

Your sstatements about computer useage and hardware may all be correct.
That fact is that another 500 or 1000 dollars to a fairly large per centage of the population, doesn't matter. Tey feel that spending more money will serve them better.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: October 15, 2020 5:07 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] 5g and me

I've seen others, and I believe you, too, make the future proof argument for buying a more powerful computer than the person's anticipated needs because it will be useful longer because you never know when your needs will change.
I've always thought such arguments were not good ones. For one thing, a lot of people will continue to use computers in about the same ways as now and if they do use them in more demanding ways, those will not likely tax the computer if they buy a computer that isn't just barely powerful enough to do what they want.

Also, technology continues to become more powerful and cost less. So, in five years, the projected reliable life of a computer, you will be able to buy one to meet your needs then for less money than you are paying now. In addition, though it’s a gamble, many computers last more than five years, many significantly more. Every dollar you overspend to be future proofed that you didn't need because your needs didn't change and all the extra power of your computer remains unused is increasingly wasted, the longer your computer lasts.

It makes much more sense to buy a computer that is powerful enough to meet your current needs well if you don't anticipate major changes in how you will use your computer and are reasonably confident that you won't do things in future that will exceed the ability of the computer.

Spending one-thousand dollars to future proof a machine, just in case, maybe you use your machine much differently in the future, when you could spend five hundred dollars today and three hundred dollars in fived or seven or eight years for another machine that you would probably use in similar ways as you do now or not much, is a bad idea.

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: enes sarıbaş
Sent: Wednesday, October 14, 2020 9:27 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] 5g and me



Hi Brian,

Just for clerification, I have confirmed 5g signals do exist in my area for
my network. Even without the massive bandwidth, the lower latency itself
will probably result in better quality improvements. Also, all versions of
the IPhone by default include 5g.


On 10/14/2020 9:18 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Wed, Oct 14, 2020 at 10:11 PM, enes sarıbaş wrote:
One reason, future proofing, I want to get the highest end version of the
IPhone 12, though 5g isn't very wiedespread now, it will be in three years
or so.-
I am at a loss as to how doing this, now, squares with your own earlier
assertion, "I think 5g is more significant for fixed wireless than
smartphones."

Going to a 5G device now, when it is obscenely expensive, and where the
ability to exploit 5G is limited to a very few locations, seems to me to be
a supreme waste.

And 3 years is an eternity in the world of technology, and smartphones in
particular, and what's Apple's flagship now, will be mid-range in 3 years,
and much cheaper.

Going to a 5G smartphone now, unless you live in a major metropolitan area,
is locking your money up in a frozen asset you cannot even use for its
intended purpose.

--


Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely
fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


Re: 5g and me

Monte Single
 

Gene,

Your sstatements about computer useage and hardware may all be correct.
That fact is that another 500 or 1000 dollars to a fairly large per centage of the population, doesn't matter. Tey feel that spending more money will serve them better.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: October 15, 2020 5:07 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] 5g and me

I've seen others, and I believe you, too, make the future proof argument for buying a more powerful computer than the person's anticipated needs because it will be useful longer because you never know when your needs will change.
I've always thought such arguments were not good ones. For one thing, a lot of people will continue to use computers in about the same ways as now and if they do use them in more demanding ways, those will not likely tax the computer if they buy a computer that isn't just barely powerful enough to do what they want.

Also, technology continues to become more powerful and cost less. So, in five years, the projected reliable life of a computer, you will be able to buy one to meet your needs then for less money than you are paying now. In addition, though it’s a gamble, many computers last more than five years, many significantly more. Every dollar you overspend to be future proofed that you didn't need because your needs didn't change and all the extra power of your computer remains unused is increasingly wasted, the longer your computer lasts.

It makes much more sense to buy a computer that is powerful enough to meet your current needs well if you don't anticipate major changes in how you will use your computer and are reasonably confident that you won't do things in future that will exceed the ability of the computer.

Spending one-thousand dollars to future proof a machine, just in case, maybe you use your machine much differently in the future, when you could spend five hundred dollars today and three hundred dollars in fived or seven or eight years for another machine that you would probably use in similar ways as you do now or not much, is a bad idea.

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: enes sarıbaş
Sent: Wednesday, October 14, 2020 9:27 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] 5g and me



Hi Brian,

Just for clerification, I have confirmed 5g signals do exist in my area for
my network. Even without the massive bandwidth, the lower latency itself
will probably result in better quality improvements. Also, all versions of
the IPhone by default include 5g.


On 10/14/2020 9:18 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Wed, Oct 14, 2020 at 10:11 PM, enes sarıbaş wrote:
One reason, future proofing, I want to get the highest end version of the
IPhone 12, though 5g isn't very wiedespread now, it will be in three years
or so.-
I am at a loss as to how doing this, now, squares with your own earlier
assertion, "I think 5g is more significant for fixed wireless than
smartphones."

Going to a 5G device now, when it is obscenely expensive, and where the
ability to exploit 5G is limited to a very few locations, seems to me to be
a supreme waste.

And 3 years is an eternity in the world of technology, and smartphones in
particular, and what's Apple's flagship now, will be mid-range in 3 years,
and much cheaper.

Going to a 5G smartphone now, unless you live in a major metropolitan area,
is locking your money up in a frozen asset you cannot even use for its
intended purpose.

--


Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely
fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


Re: 5g and me

Monte Single
 

I'm using an I core 3 processor on an eight year old machine and it has no problem with websites.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of enes saribas
Sent: October 15, 2020 5:27 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] 5g and me

This isn't correct. Browsers, and other day to day applications even, dramatically have increased ram usage, as well as CPU power. For example, Zoom will only let you blur the background of video if you have a quad core processor. If you buy a dual core as opposed to a quad core processor for example, it will struggle at even the most basic of tasks, and in 5 years, or even in a few years, programas even screen readers will begin to lag. This happened with my core I5 4200M. I thought a dual core was ok, though this was a system gifted to me. Had I been choosing my own system then, I would've gone for an I7, and now, this dual core is not even good enough for browsing. Large websites will freeze it and even when I had it, intensive apps like finereader will lag significantly independant of ram. This is exactly I future proofed my next laptop, with a 1tb SSD, 32 gb of ram, and an r7 4800H processor from AMD, with a 4.2 GHZ boost across all cores. This should be powerful enough to run anything conceivable in the next 5 or so years, except maybe AI workloads.
On 10/15/2020 6:07 AM, Gene wrote:
I've seen others, and I believe you, too, make the future proof
argument for buying a more powerful computer than the person's
anticipated needs because it will be useful longer because you never
know when your needs will change. I've always thought such arguments
were not good ones. For one thing, a lot of people will continue to
use computers in about the same ways as now and if they do use them in
more demanding ways, those will not likely tax the computer if they
buy a computer that isn't just barely powerful enough to do what they
want.

Also, technology continues to become more powerful and cost less. So,
in five years, the projected reliable life of a computer, you will be
able to buy one to meet your needs then for less money than you are
paying now. In addition, though it’s a gamble, many computers last
more than five years, many significantly more. Every dollar you
overspend to be future proofed that you didn't need because your needs
didn't change and all the extra power of your computer remains unused
is increasingly wasted, the longer your computer lasts.

It makes much more sense to buy a computer that is powerful enough to
meet your current needs well if you don't anticipate major changes in
how you will use your computer and are reasonably confident that you
won't do things in future that will exceed the ability of the computer.

Spending one-thousand dollars to future proof a machine, just in case,
maybe you use your machine much differently in the future, when you
could spend five hundred dollars today and three hundred dollars in
fived or seven or eight years for another machine that you would
probably use in similar ways as you do now or not much, is a bad idea.

Gene
-----Original Message----- From: enes sarıbaş
Sent: Wednesday, October 14, 2020 9:27 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] 5g and me



Hi Brian,

Just for clerification, I have confirmed 5g signals do exist in my
area for my network. Even without the massive bandwidth, the lower
latency itself will probably result in better quality improvements.
Also, all versions of the IPhone by default include 5g.


On 10/14/2020 9:18 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Wed, Oct 14, 2020 at 10:11 PM, enes sarıbaş wrote:
One reason, future proofing, I want to get the highest end version of
the IPhone 12, though 5g isn't very wiedespread now, it will be in
three years or so.- I am at a loss as to how doing this, now, squares
with your own earlier assertion, "I think 5g is more significant for
fixed wireless than smartphones."

Going to a 5G device now, when it is obscenely expensive, and where
the ability to exploit 5G is limited to a very few locations, seems to
me to be a supreme waste.

And 3 years is an eternity in the world of technology, and smartphones
in particular, and what's Apple's flagship now, will be mid-range in 3
years, and much cheaper.

Going to a 5G smartphone now, unless you live in a major metropolitan
area, is locking your money up in a frozen asset you cannot even use
for its intended purpose.


Re: 5g and me

Gene
 

I'll add that I did a little looking, and I didn't remember the situation properly. The situation is that older operating systems won't run on new processors, but that Windows 10 can run on processors that are quite old. But a qquestion I don't know anything about is, if a computer is using the traditional BIOS, does that limit Windows 10 in any way that matters?

Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: Gene
Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2020 7:15 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] 5g and me

And I suspect you spent over a thousand dollars to do what a five hundred
dollar computer can do, less if on sale ormanufacturer refurbished. I don't
know enough technically to discuss some of your technical points, but I'll
say the following:
The advice I see from computer advisors is that for the majority of people,
purchasing a machine somewhere in the five hundred dollar range will meet
their needs. And even if memory requirements have gone up for some
programs, they haven't gone up nearly enough that more than 8GB of ram is
recommended for the majority of users. That is the recommendation and it
has been for years.

A little money here, a little money there, a more powerful processor, and
pretty soon, you are spending five hundred dollars or more than you need to
and gambling that your machine will last far longer than the generally
agreed on length for reliable service, five years. I think it is a very bad
gamble, not because the machine won't last longer, it may well do so, but
you are spending a lot more money now for performance parameters that will
be much less expensive when you replace the computer. And the typical user,
buying a machine around the five hundred dollar range today, unless their
uses change radically, won't have problems that will require a new machine
probably for the life of the current one.

And what about technological changes itself? If you bought a machine in the
Windows 7 days that was future proofed, in your opinion at that time, it
might not run Windows 10 now. My understanding is, and if I'm wrong, I'm
sure I will be corrected, that a lot of Windows 7 machines won't run Windows
10 because Microsoft now requires that different processors be used.

While I don't think that sort of thing will happen if one buys a machine now
for use seven or ten years into the future and are attempting to future
proof it, you are again gambling that newer technologies wohn't come along
that will render your computer less useable, no matter how you future proof
it now.

Gene.
-----Original Message-----
From: enes sarıbaş
Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2020 6:27 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] 5g and me

This isn't correct. Browsers, and other day to day applications even,
dramatically have increased ram usage, as well as CPU power. For
example, Zoom will only let you blur the background of video if you
have a quad core processor. If you buy a dual core as opposed to a quad
core processor for example, it will struggle at even the most basic of
tasks, and in 5 years, or even in a few years, programas even screen
readers will begin to lag. This happened with my core I5 4200M. I
thought a dual core was ok, though this was a system gifted to me. Had I
been choosing my own system then, I would've gone for an I7, and now,
this dual core is not even good enough for browsing. Large websites will
freeze it and even when I had it, intensive apps like finereader will
lag significantly independant of ram. This is exactly I future proofed
my next laptop, with a 1tb SSD, 32 gb of ram, and an r7 4800H processor
from AMD, with a 4.2 GHZ boost across all cores. This should be powerful
enough to run anything conceivable in the next 5 or so years, except
maybe AI workloads.
On 10/15/2020 6:07 AM, Gene wrote:
I've seen others, and I believe you, too, make the future proof argument for buying a more powerful computer than the person's anticipated needs because it will be useful longer because you never know when your needs will change. I've always thought such arguments were not good ones. For one thing, a lot of people will continue to use computers in about the same ways as now and if they do use them in more demanding ways, those will not likely tax the computer if they buy a computer that isn't just barely powerful enough to do what they want.

Also, technology continues to become more powerful and cost less. So, in five years, the projected reliable life of a computer, you will be able to buy one to meet your needs then for less money than you are paying now. In addition, though it’s a gamble, many computers last more than five years, many significantly more. Every dollar you overspend to be future proofed that you didn't need because your needs didn't change and all the extra power of your computer remains unused is increasingly wasted, the longer your computer lasts.

It makes much more sense to buy a computer that is powerful enough to meet your current needs well if you don't anticipate major changes in how you will use your computer and are reasonably confident that you won't do things in future that will exceed the ability of the computer.

Spending one-thousand dollars to future proof a machine, just in case, maybe you use your machine much differently in the future, when you could spend five hundred dollars today and three hundred dollars in fived or seven or eight years for another machine that you would probably use in similar ways as you do now or not much, is a bad idea.

Gene
-----Original Message----- From: enes sarıbaş
Sent: Wednesday, October 14, 2020 9:27 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] 5g and me



Hi Brian,

Just for clerification, I have confirmed 5g signals do exist in my area for my network. Even without the massive bandwidth, the lower latency itself will probably result in better quality improvements. Also, all versions of the IPhone by default include 5g.


On 10/14/2020 9:18 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Wed, Oct 14, 2020 at 10:11 PM, enes sarıbaş wrote:
One reason, future proofing, I want to get the highest end version of the IPhone 12, though 5g isn't very wiedespread now, it will be in three years or so.-
I am at a loss as to how doing this, now, squares with your own earlier assertion, "I think 5g is more significant for fixed wireless than smartphones."

Going to a 5G device now, when it is obscenely expensive, and where the ability to exploit 5G is limited to a very few locations, seems to me to be a supreme waste.

And 3 years is an eternity in the world of technology, and smartphones in particular, and what's Apple's flagship now, will be mid-range in 3 years, and much cheaper.

Going to a 5G smartphone now, unless you live in a major metropolitan area, is locking your money up in a frozen asset you cannot even use for its intended purpose.


Re: Odd changes from m.facebook

David Goldfield <david.goldfield@...>
 

Hi. You might have an easier time if you go to
https://mbasic.facebook.com

David Goldfield,
Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist
JAWS Certified, 2019

WWW.DavidGoldfield.org

On 10/15/2020 8:28 AM, Robert Mendoza wrote:
Hi, does anyone here noticed of the interface of the site for m.facebook
It was changed though from the usual format and could not able to navigate the other link faster yet they made it simple but, hard to find where you wanting to visit like the Pages, group, etc.






Re: Odd changes to m.facebook

Robert Mendoza
 

Now I see how to navigate to the Groups, pages , etc
you need to go first from the profile at the very top there is saying main menu button and once you hit it it expanded


But, one more thing to ask I could not find the button where you could mentioned

On 10/15/2020 8:30 PM, Robert Mendoza via groups.io wrote:
Hi, does anyone here noticed of the interface of the site for m.facebook
It was changed though from the usual format and could not able to navigate the other link faster yet they made it simple but, hard to find where you wanting to visit like the Pages, group, etc.






Odd changes to m.facebook

Robert Mendoza
 

Hi, does anyone here noticed of the interface of the site for m.facebook
It was changed though from the usual format and could not able to navigate the other link faster yet they made it simple but, hard to find where you wanting to visit like the Pages, group, etc.


Odd changes from m.facebook

Robert Mendoza
 

Hi, does anyone here noticed of the interface of the site for m.facebook
It was changed though from the usual format and could not able to navigate the other link faster yet they made it simple but, hard to find where you wanting to visit like the Pages, group, etc.


Re: 5g and me

Gene
 

And I suspect you spent over a thousand dollars to do what a five hundred dollar computer can do, less if on sale ormanufacturer refurbished. I don't know enough technically to discuss some of your technical points, but I'll say the following:
The advice I see from computer advisors is that for the majority of people, purchasing a machine somewhere in the five hundred dollar range will meet their needs. And even if memory requirements have gone up for some programs, they haven't gone up nearly enough that more than 8GB of ram is recommended for the majority of users. That is the recommendation and it has been for years.

A little money here, a little money there, a more powerful processor, and pretty soon, you are spending five hundred dollars or more than you need to and gambling that your machine will last far longer than the generally agreed on length for reliable service, five years. I think it is a very bad gamble, not because the machine won't last longer, it may well do so, but you are spending a lot more money now for performance parameters that will be much less expensive when you replace the computer. And the typical user, buying a machine around the five hundred dollar range today, unless their uses change radically, won't have problems that will require a new machine probably for the life of the current one.

And what about technological changes itself? If you bought a machine in the Windows 7 days that was future proofed, in your opinion at that time, it might not run Windows 10 now. My understanding is, and if I'm wrong, I'm sure I will be corrected, that a lot of Windows 7 machines won't run Windows 10 because Microsoft now requires that different processors be used.

While I don't think that sort of thing will happen if one buys a machine now for use seven or ten years into the future and are attempting to future proof it, you are again gambling that newer technologies wohn't come along that will render your computer less useable, no matter how you future proof it now.

Gene.

-----Original Message-----
From: enes sarıbaş
Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2020 6:27 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] 5g and me

This isn't correct. Browsers, and other day to day applications even,
dramatically have increased ram usage, as well as CPU power. For
example, Zoom will only let you blur the background of video if you
have a quad core processor. If you buy a dual core as opposed to a quad
core processor for example, it will struggle at even the most basic of
tasks, and in 5 years, or even in a few years, programas even screen
readers will begin to lag. This happened with my core I5 4200M. I
thought a dual core was ok, though this was a system gifted to me. Had I
been choosing my own system then, I would've gone for an I7, and now,
this dual core is not even good enough for browsing. Large websites will
freeze it and even when I had it, intensive apps like finereader will
lag significantly independant of ram. This is exactly I future proofed
my next laptop, with a 1tb SSD, 32 gb of ram, and an r7 4800H processor
from AMD, with a 4.2 GHZ boost across all cores. This should be powerful
enough to run anything conceivable in the next 5 or so years, except
maybe AI workloads.
On 10/15/2020 6:07 AM, Gene wrote:
I've seen others, and I believe you, too, make the future proof argument for buying a more powerful computer than the person's anticipated needs because it will be useful longer because you never know when your needs will change. I've always thought such arguments were not good ones. For one thing, a lot of people will continue to use computers in about the same ways as now and if they do use them in more demanding ways, those will not likely tax the computer if they buy a computer that isn't just barely powerful enough to do what they want.

Also, technology continues to become more powerful and cost less. So, in five years, the projected reliable life of a computer, you will be able to buy one to meet your needs then for less money than you are paying now. In addition, though it’s a gamble, many computers last more than five years, many significantly more. Every dollar you overspend to be future proofed that you didn't need because your needs didn't change and all the extra power of your computer remains unused is increasingly wasted, the longer your computer lasts.

It makes much more sense to buy a computer that is powerful enough to meet your current needs well if you don't anticipate major changes in how you will use your computer and are reasonably confident that you won't do things in future that will exceed the ability of the computer.

Spending one-thousand dollars to future proof a machine, just in case, maybe you use your machine much differently in the future, when you could spend five hundred dollars today and three hundred dollars in fived or seven or eight years for another machine that you would probably use in similar ways as you do now or not much, is a bad idea.

Gene
-----Original Message----- From: enes sarıbaş
Sent: Wednesday, October 14, 2020 9:27 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] 5g and me



Hi Brian,

Just for clerification, I have confirmed 5g signals do exist in my area for my network. Even without the massive bandwidth, the lower latency itself will probably result in better quality improvements. Also, all versions of the IPhone by default include 5g.


On 10/14/2020 9:18 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Wed, Oct 14, 2020 at 10:11 PM, enes sarıbaş wrote:
One reason, future proofing, I want to get the highest end version of the IPhone 12, though 5g isn't very wiedespread now, it will be in three years or so.-
I am at a loss as to how doing this, now, squares with your own earlier assertion, "I think 5g is more significant for fixed wireless than smartphones."

Going to a 5G device now, when it is obscenely expensive, and where the ability to exploit 5G is limited to a very few locations, seems to me to be a supreme waste.

And 3 years is an eternity in the world of technology, and smartphones in particular, and what's Apple's flagship now, will be mid-range in 3 years, and much cheaper.

Going to a 5G smartphone now, unless you live in a major metropolitan area, is locking your money up in a frozen asset you cannot even use for its intended purpose.


Re: 5g and me

enes sarıbaş
 

This isn't correct. Browsers, and other day to day applications even, dramatically have increased ram usage, as well as CPU power. For example, Zoom will only let you blur the background of video  if you have a quad core processor. If you buy a dual core as opposed to a quad core processor for example, it will struggle at even the most basic of tasks, and in 5 years, or even in a few years, programas even screen readers will begin to lag. This happened with my core I5 4200M. I thought a dual core was ok, though this was a system gifted to me. Had I been choosing my own system then, I would've gone for an I7, and now, this dual core is not even good enough for browsing. Large websites will freeze it and even when I had it, intensive apps like finereader will lag significantly independant of ram. This is exactly I future proofed my next laptop, with a 1tb SSD, 32 gb of ram, and an r7 4800H processor from AMD, with a 4.2 GHZ boost across all cores. This should be powerful enough to run anything conceivable in the next 5 or so years, except maybe AI workloads.

On 10/15/2020 6:07 AM, Gene wrote:
I've seen others, and I believe you, too, make the future proof argument for buying a more powerful computer than the person's anticipated needs because it will be useful longer because you never know when your needs will change. I've always thought such arguments were not good ones.  For one thing, a lot of people will continue to use computers in about the same ways as now and if they do use them in more demanding ways, those will not likely tax the computer if they buy a computer that isn't just barely powerful enough to do what they want.

Also, technology continues to become more powerful and cost less. So, in five years, the projected reliable life of a computer, you will be able to buy one to meet your needs then for less money than you are paying now.  In addition, though it’s a gamble, many computers last more than five years, many  significantly more. Every dollar you overspend to be future proofed that you didn't need because your needs didn't change and all the extra power of your computer remains unused is increasingly wasted, the longer your computer lasts.

It makes much more sense to buy a computer that is powerful enough to meet your current needs well if you don't anticipate major changes in how you will use your computer and are reasonably confident that you won't do things in future that will exceed the ability of the computer.

Spending one-thousand dollars to future proof a machine, just in case, maybe you use your machine much differently in the future, when you could spend five hundred dollars today and three hundred dollars in fived or seven or eight years for another machine that you would probably use in similar ways as you do now or not much, is a bad idea.

Gene
-----Original Message----- From: enes sarıbaş
Sent: Wednesday, October 14, 2020 9:27 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] 5g and me



Hi Brian,

Just for clerification, I have confirmed 5g signals do exist in my area for my network. Even without the massive bandwidth,  the lower latency itself will probably result in better quality improvements. Also, all versions of the IPhone by default include 5g.


On 10/14/2020 9:18 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Wed, Oct 14, 2020 at 10:11 PM, enes sarıbaş wrote:
One reason, future proofing, I want to get the highest end version of the IPhone 12, though 5g isn't very wiedespread now, it will be in three years or so.-
I am at a loss as to how doing this, now, squares with your own earlier assertion, "I think 5g is more significant for fixed wireless than smartphones."

Going to a 5G device now, when it is obscenely expensive, and where the ability to exploit 5G is limited to a very few locations, seems to me to be a supreme waste.

And 3 years is an eternity in the world of technology, and smartphones in particular, and what's Apple's flagship now, will be mid-range in 3 years, and much cheaper.

Going to a 5G smartphone now, unless you live in a major metropolitan area, is locking your money up in a frozen asset you cannot even use for its intended purpose.


Re: Inquiry: Seeking sites where I can download free graphics for printing

Jaffar Sidek
 

Hello.  May I know what kinds are graphics you are wanting to download and print?  Cheers!

On 15/10/2020 1:05 pm, Ron Canazzi wrote:
Hi Brian,

Have you ever used this site? I can't make head nor tail out of it. I see a search field, but when I type in something all I get is a bunch of references to the availability of public domain images, what constitutes public domain access and so on.  I never see any results.


On 10/14/2020 10:26 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=public+domain+image+library 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


-- 
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


Re: 5g and me

Gene
 

I've seen others, and I believe you, too, make the future proof argument for buying a more powerful computer than the person's anticipated needs because it will be useful longer because you never know when your needs will change. I've always thought such arguments were not good ones. For one thing, a lot of people will continue to use computers in about the same ways as now and if they do use them in more demanding ways, those will not likely tax the computer if they buy a computer that isn't just barely powerful enough to do what they want.

Also, technology continues to become more powerful and cost less. So, in five years, the projected reliable life of a computer, you will be able to buy one to meet your needs then for less money than you are paying now. In addition, though it’s a gamble, many computers last more than five years, many significantly more. Every dollar you overspend to be future proofed that you didn't need because your needs didn't change and all the extra power of your computer remains unused is increasingly wasted, the longer your computer lasts.

It makes much more sense to buy a computer that is powerful enough to meet your current needs well if you don't anticipate major changes in how you will use your computer and are reasonably confident that you won't do things in future that will exceed the ability of the computer.

Spending one-thousand dollars to future proof a machine, just in case, maybe you use your machine much differently in the future, when you could spend five hundred dollars today and three hundred dollars in fived or seven or eight years for another machine that you would probably use in similar ways as you do now or not much, is a bad idea.

Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: enes sarıbaş
Sent: Wednesday, October 14, 2020 9:27 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] 5g and me



Hi Brian,

Just for clerification, I have confirmed 5g signals do exist in my area for my network. Even without the massive bandwidth, the lower latency itself will probably result in better quality improvements. Also, all versions of the IPhone by default include 5g.


On 10/14/2020 9:18 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Wed, Oct 14, 2020 at 10:11 PM, enes sarıbaş wrote:
One reason, future proofing, I want to get the highest end version of the IPhone 12, though 5g isn't very wiedespread now, it will be in three years or so.-
I am at a loss as to how doing this, now, squares with your own earlier assertion, "I think 5g is more significant for fixed wireless than smartphones."

Going to a 5G device now, when it is obscenely expensive, and where the ability to exploit 5G is limited to a very few locations, seems to me to be a supreme waste.

And 3 years is an eternity in the world of technology, and smartphones in particular, and what's Apple's flagship now, will be mid-range in 3 years, and much cheaper.

Going to a 5G smartphone now, unless you live in a major metropolitan area, is locking your money up in a frozen asset you cannot even use for its intended purpose.

--


Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


NVDA & vocalizer voices

Walter Ramage
 

Hi all.  I have just installed one of the vocalizer voices on my Win10 machine and I went to NVDA to enable it but the voice I chose isn't there. It and other voices show in NVDA on my Win7 machine but for some reason it doesn't on my Win10 machine.  Am I missing something or not doing something I should?  after installing the vocalizer voice I did a restart to be sure but it still doesn't show.  Walter.



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