Date   

Re: Giving Up on Thunderbird!

Gene
 

Thunderbird has lots of otherfeatures than e-mail, which is why I say, when I discuss the question of upgrading, that if you only use the program for e-mail, I don't think upgrading is necessary. I don't know about the other features of the program, so I don't say you shouldn't upgrade if you use those features.

Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: Ron Canazzi
Sent: Wednesday, September 30, 2020 6:28 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Giving Up on Thunderbird!

Hi Gene,

If what you are saying is true then my question is why do software
companies--even free ones like Mozilla--always mention security as well
as efficiency and functionality when they announce a new update. I could
understand if the only companies doing this were for profit, but Mozilla
is a free download. What is in it for them to announce that a
particular update is a security and efficiency update?


On 9/30/2020 1:09 AM, Gene wrote:
If we were talking about browsers, I would agree not to run old ones.
I did e-mail searches and found very little supporting your position. Almost everything I fouhnd talked about phishihng and social engineering. I did find one discussion about a truly archaic version of Outlook, Outlook 2000 and I found a few general statements about unpatched exploits but almost nothing, thus leading me to continue to believe what I believed before, that exploits in e-mail programs are not generally used in attacks these days.

This discussion, talking about a really archaic version of Outlook has content that may support your contention, but I found almost no other discussion of the question in a search for is it dangerous to use an old version of an e-mail program. And note that this discussion doesn't say that to any of the participants' knowledge, anyone has been hacked through this truly archaic version of Outlook by the use of unpatched exploits It simply says that this or that can be done..
https://security.stackexchange.com/questions/112342/how-vulnerable-is-an-older-version-of-outlook-as-an-email-application

I'm not saying what you say is wrong, but until I get good evidence otherwise, I shall continue to hold my views, that ((1) there is no interest in attacking people through malicious code these days in e-mails and that (2) being on lists like this for years and not having seen one message from anyone about being attacked in other ways than by phishing and social engineering and that 3) the links for about fifteen results I read, I read the links, I didn't go to the pages, but the links don't mention embedded code, they discuss phishing and other forms of social engineering, all this is, in my opinion, strong evidence that I am correct.

I'm not telling anyone they must do anything, either. I'm presenting the reasons I believe I am correct.

Here is the link to one of the searches I did. It was worded about like this:
Are e-mails with malicious code common in 2020

You may see the results. I've looked at the links to something like fifteen results and they all deal with attacks such as phishing and no links mention messages with embedded malicious code.
https://www.google.com/search?gbv=1&q=are+e-mails+with+malicious+code+common+in+2020re+malicious+e-mails+common+in+2020&oq=&aqs=

As I said, I looked at the links themselves, I didn't go to the pages.

If you have good evidence to show that I am or have a reasonable chance of being wrong, that's fine. You have more technical knowledge than I do and you may find such information. I shall continue to believe I am correct unless I see convincing information.

Gene
-----Original Message----- From: Brian Vogel
Sent: Tuesday, September 29, 2020 10:42 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Giving Up on Thunderbird!

On Tue, Sep 29, 2020 at 11:28 PM, Gene wrote:
You may correct me if I'm wrong on these points or disagree-
I am not going to, because you are entirely capable of doing a web search on "email client attacks" or "email attack surfaces" or similar to get reams of documentation on what has been going on for years.

I'm not going to tell anyone they must do anything. I'm also not going to tell them that leaving web browsers or email clients in an un-updated state is a wise or safe thing to do, because it isn't.
--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


Re: Giving Up on Thunderbird!

Ron Canazzi
 

Hi Gerald,

It still doesn't explain what's in it for the distributors of free software. Undoubtedly, those people are taking significant numbers of man hours to develop these new releases.  They rely on donations to get their remuneration.  This is always  a dicey proposition at best.  If they were all making it up, it would seem to be counter productive. If there are really no significant security issues with mail programs, Why not just release periodic updates for new features?  They must be onto something.



On 9/30/2020 8:16 AM, Gerald Levy via groups.io wrote:


Mozilla seems to have a peculiar obsession with security. They are constantly releasing new versions of Firefox and Thunderbird which are purported to be "more secure" than previous versions, but of course, there is really no way to substantiate their claims aside from taking their word for it. I suspect that they use their claims of improved security to justify their ambitious release schedule, a strategy which has largely backfired, because Firefox has experienced a steep decline in share of the browser market.  


Gerald



On 9/30/2020 7:28 AM, Ron Canazzi wrote:
Hi Gene,

If what you are saying is true then my question is why do software companies--even free ones like Mozilla--always mention security as well as efficiency and functionality when they announce a new update. I could understand if the only companies doing this were for profit, but Mozilla is a free download.  What is in it for them to announce that a particular update is a security and efficiency update?


On 9/30/2020 1:09 AM, Gene wrote:
If we were talking about browsers, I would agree not to run old ones.
I did e-mail searches and found very little supporting your position. Almost everything I fouhnd talked about phishihng and social engineering.  I did find one discussion about a truly archaic version of Outlook, Outlook 2000 and I found a few general statements about unpatched exploits but almost nothing, thus leading me to continue to believe what I believed before, that exploits in e-mail programs are not generally used in attacks these days.

This discussion, talking about a really archaic version of Outlook has content that may support your contention, but I found almost no other discussion of the question in a search for is it dangerous to use an old version of an e-mail program.  And note that this discussion doesn't say that to any of the participants' knowledge, anyone has been hacked through this truly archaic version of Outlook by the use of unpatched exploits  It simply says that this or that can be done..
https://security.stackexchange.com/questions/112342/how-vulnerable-is-an-older-version-of-outlook-as-an-email-application

I'm not saying what you say is wrong, but until I get good evidence otherwise, I shall continue to hold my views, that ((1) there is no interest in attacking people through malicious code these days in e-mails and that (2) being on lists like this for years and not having seen one message from anyone about being attacked in other ways than by phishing and social engineering and that 3) the links for about fifteen results I read, I read the links, I didn't go to the pages, but the links don't mention embedded code, they discuss phishing and other forms of social engineering, all this is, in my opinion, strong evidence that I am correct.

I'm not telling anyone they must do anything, either.  I'm presenting the reasons I believe I am correct.

Here is the link to one of the searches I did.  It was worded about like this:
Are e-mails with malicious code common in 2020

You may see the results.  I've looked at the links to something like fifteen results and they all deal with attacks such as phishing and no links mention messages with embedded malicious code.
https://www.google.com/search?gbv=1&q=are+e-mails+with+malicious+code+common+in+2020re+malicious+e-mails+common+in+2020&oq=&aqs=

As I said, I looked at the links themselves, I didn't go to the pages.

If you have good evidence to show that I am or have a reasonable chance of being wrong, that's fine.  You have more technical knowledge than I do and you may find such information.  I shall continue to believe I am correct unless I see convincing information.

Gene
-----Original Message----- From: Brian Vogel
Sent: Tuesday, September 29, 2020 10:42 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Giving Up on Thunderbird!

On Tue, Sep 29, 2020 at 11:28 PM, Gene wrote:
You may correct me if I'm wrong on these points or disagree-
I am not going to, because you are entirely capable of doing a web search on "email client attacks" or "email attack surfaces" or similar to get reams of documentation on what has been going on for years.

I'm not going to tell anyone they must do anything.  I'm also not going to tell them that leaving web browsers or email clients in an un-updated state is a wise or safe thing to do, because it isn't.



-- 
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


Re: Amazon Looking for Screen Reader Users

Sharon Hooley
 

Whoa, that should have been posted last week.  Oh well, I hope there will be other opportunities.


Is it hard to communicate, even with hearing aids?  Visit
www.CochlearAmericas.com

On Sep 29, 2020, at 7:35 AM, Mike B <mb69mach1@...> wrote:


Hi All,
 
This was in last weeks Top Tech Tidbits.
 
15. Amazon Seeks Screen Reader Users for Paid Research.  Amazon is currently seeking screen reader users, age 18 and older, to participate in paid research regarding image descriptions on product web pages. If you are an adult screen reader user you can fill out a brief qualification survey with 5 questions to see if you qualify for the study. If you qualify, they will send an email with instructions and a link to the full study. Those who complete the full study will receive a $100 Amazon gift card. The qualification survey is expected to take only a
few minutes to complete, and will only be active until September 30, 2020:
https://bvi1-qual.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_4HFjROGxCWaII5f

Take care and stay safe.  Mike.
Sent from my iBarstool.  Go dodgers!


Re: firefox question

Kay Malmquist
 

Hi Gene,
That is just the problem. I never hear the shortcut at the end so don't
even know what to press. In this case, it is just asking me if I want
Firefox to remember the password for a certain page and I don't. so turning
this off wouldn't bother me at all. If you know what the shortcuts keys
are, that would be great as well.


Kay Malmquist
kay.malmquist@...

Ask for what you want. Believe that you deserve it, and then allow Life to
give it to you.

- Louise Hay

----- Original Message -----
From: "Gene" <gsasner@...>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, September 29, 2020 3:50 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] firefox question


Someone will tell you how the offers can be stopped, but when you hear such
messages, let them play fully at least once. If you do, you will hear
shortcut commands announced at the end so you don't have to find the
message. You can accept or not accept the offer but I'm speaking more
generally in case you hear other announcements you want to respond to.

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: Kay Malmquist
Sent: Tuesday, September 29, 2020 1:49 PM
To: TechTalk
Subject: [TechTalk] firefox question


When I type in a user name or password Firefox comes up with a question
asking if I want to save this info. I have never been able to figure out
where this question is so I can select the no box or to tell it never to ask
me again. Anyone know how to shut it up? Many thanks for any help.


Kay Malmquist
kay.malmquist@...

Ask for what you want. Believe that you deserve it, and then allow Life to
give it to you.

- Louise Hay


Re: senior moment

Ann Parsons
 

Hi all,

Well, glad I didn't download anything from BlindHelp. Yes it was Ninite I wanted. Thanks.

Ann P.

--
Ann K. Parsons
Portal Tutoring
EMAIL: akp@...
Author of The Demmies: http://www.dldbooks.com/annparsons/
Portal Tutoring web site: http://www.portaltutoring.info
Skype: Putertutor

"All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost."


Re: Giving Up on Thunderbird!

Gerald Levy
 


Mozilla seems to have a peculiar obsession with security. They are constantly releasing new versions of Firefox and Thunderbird which are purported to be "more secure" than previous versions, but of course, there is really no way to substantiate their claims aside from taking their word for it. I suspect that they use their claims of improved security to justify their ambitious release schedule, a strategy which has largely backfired, because Firefox has experienced a steep decline in share of the browser market.  


Gerald



On 9/30/2020 7:28 AM, Ron Canazzi wrote:
Hi Gene,

If what you are saying is true then my question is why do software companies--even free ones like Mozilla--always mention security as well as efficiency and functionality when they announce a new update. I could understand if the only companies doing this were for profit, but Mozilla is a free download.  What is in it for them to announce that a particular update is a security and efficiency update?


On 9/30/2020 1:09 AM, Gene wrote:
If we were talking about browsers, I would agree not to run old ones.
I did e-mail searches and found very little supporting your position. Almost everything I fouhnd talked about phishihng and social engineering.  I did find one discussion about a truly archaic version of Outlook, Outlook 2000 and I found a few general statements about unpatched exploits but almost nothing, thus leading me to continue to believe what I believed before, that exploits in e-mail programs are not generally used in attacks these days.

This discussion, talking about a really archaic version of Outlook has content that may support your contention, but I found almost no other discussion of the question in a search for is it dangerous to use an old version of an e-mail program.  And note that this discussion doesn't say that to any of the participants' knowledge, anyone has been hacked through this truly archaic version of Outlook by the use of unpatched exploits  It simply says that this or that can be done..
https://security.stackexchange.com/questions/112342/how-vulnerable-is-an-older-version-of-outlook-as-an-email-application

I'm not saying what you say is wrong, but until I get good evidence otherwise, I shall continue to hold my views, that ((1) there is no interest in attacking people through malicious code these days in e-mails and that (2) being on lists like this for years and not having seen one message from anyone about being attacked in other ways than by phishing and social engineering and that 3) the links for about fifteen results I read, I read the links, I didn't go to the pages, but the links don't mention embedded code, they discuss phishing and other forms of social engineering, all this is, in my opinion, strong evidence that I am correct.

I'm not telling anyone they must do anything, either.  I'm presenting the reasons I believe I am correct.

Here is the link to one of the searches I did.  It was worded about like this:
Are e-mails with malicious code common in 2020

You may see the results.  I've looked at the links to something like fifteen results and they all deal with attacks such as phishing and no links mention messages with embedded malicious code.
https://www.google.com/search?gbv=1&q=are+e-mails+with+malicious+code+common+in+2020re+malicious+e-mails+common+in+2020&oq=&aqs=

As I said, I looked at the links themselves, I didn't go to the pages.

If you have good evidence to show that I am or have a reasonable chance of being wrong, that's fine.  You have more technical knowledge than I do and you may find such information.  I shall continue to believe I am correct unless I see convincing information.

Gene
-----Original Message----- From: Brian Vogel
Sent: Tuesday, September 29, 2020 10:42 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Giving Up on Thunderbird!

On Tue, Sep 29, 2020 at 11:28 PM, Gene wrote:
You may correct me if I'm wrong on these points or disagree-
I am not going to, because you are entirely capable of doing a web search on "email client attacks" or "email attack surfaces" or similar to get reams of documentation on what has been going on for years.

I'm not going to tell anyone they must do anything.  I'm also not going to tell them that leaving web browsers or email clients in an un-updated state is a wise or safe thing to do, because it isn't.



Re: senior moment

john s
 

Ann, you might be thinking of minnit. I can't remember the spelling.


At 07:04 AM 9/30/2020, Ann Parsons, wrote:
Hi all,

I'm having a senior moment. I was thinking of trying Pontes but I want to download it from that place where you can download all those programs without add-ons and the like. My problem is I can't think of the name of the place to go. I hate this it's right on the tip of my tongue. What is its name, please?

Ann P.

--
Ann K. Parsons
Portal Tutoring
EMAIL: akp@...
Author of The Demmies: http://www.dldbooks.com/annparsons/
Portal Tutoring web site: http://www.portaltutoring.info
Skype: Putertutor

"All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost."



John


Re: senior moment

Ron Canazzi
 

Hi Ann,

Blind Help is where the pirated stuff is. I believe you want ninite.com.  However, I was not aware that ninite had Pontes.  The page for Pontes is:
http://www.pontes.ro/en/scripts/
The direct download page is:
http://www.pontes.ro/en/scripts/#pmd

On 9/30/2020 7:09 AM, John Dowling wrote:
I believe you're thinking of:
http://www.blindhelp.net
John.

Once you replace negative thoughts with positive ones, you'll start having positive results. -Willie Nelson

On Sep 30, 2020, at 7:04 AM, Ann Parsons <akp@...> wrote:

I

--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


Re: senior moment

John Dowling
 

Hi all,
Wo! I completely forgot about ninite.
Guess that's what happens when you don't use windows that much lol.


Once you replace negative thoughts with positive ones, you'll start having positive results. -Willie Nelson

On Sep 30, 2020, at 7:24 AM, Ann Parsons <akp@...> wrote:

Hi all,

Yes, yes, that's it! Thank you!

Ann P.


Original message:
Hi.
Are you thinking of:
www.ninite.com?

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ann
Parsons
Sent: September 30, 2020 8:05 AM
To: techtalk@groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] senior moment
Hi all,
I'm having a senior moment. I was thinking of trying Pontes but I want to
download it from that place where you can download all those programs
without add-ons and the like. My problem is I can't think of the name of
the place to go. I hate this it's right on the tip of my tongue. What is
its name, please?
Ann P.
--
Ann K. Parsons
Portal Tutoring
EMAIL: akp@...
Author of The Demmies: http://www.dldbooks.com/annparsons/
Portal Tutoring web site: http://www.portaltutoring.info
Skype: Putertutor
"All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost."








--
Ann K. Parsons
Portal Tutoring
EMAIL: akp@...
Author of The Demmies: http://www.dldbooks.com/annparsons/
Portal Tutoring web site: http://www.portaltutoring.info
Skype: Putertutor

"All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost."





Re: Giving Up on Thunderbird!

Ron Canazzi
 

Hi Gene,

If what you are saying is true then my question is why do software companies--even free ones like Mozilla--always mention security as well as efficiency and functionality when they announce a new update. I could understand if the only companies doing this were for profit, but Mozilla is a free download.  What is in it for them to announce that a particular update is a security and efficiency update?

On 9/30/2020 1:09 AM, Gene wrote:
If we were talking about browsers, I would agree not to run old ones.
I did e-mail searches and found very little supporting your position. Almost everything I fouhnd talked about phishihng and social engineering.  I did find one discussion about a truly archaic version of Outlook, Outlook 2000 and I found a few general statements about unpatched exploits but almost nothing, thus leading me to continue to believe what I believed before, that exploits in e-mail programs are not generally used in attacks these days.

This discussion, talking about a really archaic version of Outlook has content that may support your contention, but I found almost no other discussion of the question in a search for is it dangerous to use an old version of an e-mail program.  And note that this discussion doesn't say that to any of the participants' knowledge, anyone has been hacked through this truly archaic version of Outlook by the use of unpatched exploits  It simply says that this or that can be done..
https://security.stackexchange.com/questions/112342/how-vulnerable-is-an-older-version-of-outlook-as-an-email-application

I'm not saying what you say is wrong, but until I get good evidence otherwise, I shall continue to hold my views, that ((1) there is no interest in attacking people through malicious code these days in e-mails and that (2) being on lists like this for years and not having seen one message from anyone about being attacked in other ways than by phishing and social engineering and that 3) the links for about fifteen results I read, I read the links, I didn't go to the pages, but the links don't mention embedded code, they discuss phishing and other forms of social engineering, all this is, in my opinion, strong evidence that I am correct.

I'm not telling anyone they must do anything, either.  I'm presenting the reasons I believe I am correct.

Here is the link to one of the searches I did.  It was worded about like this:
Are e-mails with malicious code common in 2020

You may see the results.  I've looked at the links to something like fifteen results and they all deal with attacks such as phishing and no links mention messages with embedded malicious code.
https://www.google.com/search?gbv=1&q=are+e-mails+with+malicious+code+common+in+2020re+malicious+e-mails+common+in+2020&oq=&aqs=

As I said, I looked at the links themselves, I didn't go to the pages.

If you have good evidence to show that I am or have a reasonable chance of being wrong, that's fine.  You have more technical knowledge than I do and you may find such information.  I shall continue to believe I am correct unless I see convincing information.

Gene
-----Original Message----- From: Brian Vogel
Sent: Tuesday, September 29, 2020 10:42 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Giving Up on Thunderbird!

On Tue, Sep 29, 2020 at 11:28 PM, Gene wrote:
You may correct me if I'm wrong on these points or disagree-
I am not going to, because you are entirely capable of doing a web search on "email client attacks" or "email attack surfaces" or similar to get reams of documentation on what has been going on for years.

I'm not going to tell anyone they must do anything.  I'm also not going to tell them that leaving web browsers or email clients in an un-updated state is a wise or safe thing to do, because it isn't.
--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


Re: senior moment

Ann Parsons
 

Hi all,

Yes, yes, that's it! Thank you!

Ann P.


Original message:

Hi.
Are you thinking of:
www.ninite.com?

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ann
Parsons
Sent: September 30, 2020 8:05 AM
To: techtalk@groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] senior moment
Hi all,
I'm having a senior moment. I was thinking of trying Pontes but I want to
download it from that place where you can download all those programs
without add-ons and the like. My problem is I can't think of the name of
the place to go. I hate this it's right on the tip of my tongue. What is
its name, please?
Ann P.
--
Ann K. Parsons
Portal Tutoring
EMAIL: akp@...
Author of The Demmies: http://www.dldbooks.com/annparsons/
Portal Tutoring web site: http://www.portaltutoring.info
Skype: Putertutor
"All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost."







--
Ann K. Parsons
Portal Tutoring
EMAIL: akp@...
Author of The Demmies: http://www.dldbooks.com/annparsons/
Portal Tutoring web site: http://www.portaltutoring.info
Skype: Putertutor

"All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost."


Re: senior moment

chris judge
 

Hi.

Are you thinking of:
www.ninite.com?

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ann
Parsons
Sent: September 30, 2020 8:05 AM
To: techtalk@groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] senior moment

Hi all,

I'm having a senior moment. I was thinking of trying Pontes but I want to
download it from that place where you can download all those programs
without add-ons and the like. My problem is I can't think of the name of
the place to go. I hate this it's right on the tip of my tongue. What is
its name, please?

Ann P.

--
Ann K. Parsons
Portal Tutoring
EMAIL: akp@...
Author of The Demmies: http://www.dldbooks.com/annparsons/
Portal Tutoring web site: http://www.portaltutoring.info
Skype: Putertutor

"All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost."


Re: senior moment

Ann Parsons
 

Hi all,

Actually no, but I'll look at this too.

Ann P.

--
Ann K. Parsons
Portal Tutoring
EMAIL: akp@...
Author of The Demmies: http://www.dldbooks.com/annparsons/
Portal Tutoring web site: http://www.portaltutoring.info
Skype: Putertutor

"All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost."


Re: senior moment

John Dowling
 

I believe you're thinking of:
http://www.blindhelp.net
John.

Once you replace negative thoughts with positive ones, you'll start having positive results. -Willie Nelson

On Sep 30, 2020, at 7:04 AM, Ann Parsons <akp@...> wrote:

I


senior moment

Ann Parsons
 

Hi all,

I'm having a senior moment. I was thinking of trying Pontes but I want to download it from that place where you can download all those programs without add-ons and the like. My problem is I can't think of the name of the place to go. I hate this it's right on the tip of my tongue. What is its name, please?

Ann P.

--
Ann K. Parsons
Portal Tutoring
EMAIL: akp@...
Author of The Demmies: http://www.dldbooks.com/annparsons/
Portal Tutoring web site: http://www.portaltutoring.info
Skype: Putertutor

"All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost."


Re: zoom question

Kimsan
 

Thank you.

No wonder I couldn’t hear when hands were up, only the host can hear it.

 

Kimsan Song

kimsansong@...

If you are into HipHop or R&B, I invite you to subscribe to my youtube artist channel at

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFzrNcgBfHguK-LnnJMMylA

Also, you may follow me on twitter:

https://twitter.com/kims4ns0ng

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kerryann Ifill
Sent: Tuesday, September 29, 2020 2:56 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] zoom question

 

Hello

 

Yes it does provided that no other hand is up.   Also, only if you are the host.

 

Finally, if you go through the participants list, the persons with hands raised appear at the top of the list after the host and.

 

Hope that helps

Kerry



On 29 Sep 2020, at 3:49 PM, Kimsan via groups.io <kimsansong@...> wrote:

 

Hi,

When someone raises their hand, will jaws say such an such has raised their hand?

 

Kimsan Song

If you are into HipHop or R&B, I invite you to subscribe to my youtube artist channel at 

Also, you may follow me on twitter:

 

 


Re: Giving Up on Thunderbird!

Gene
 

If we were talking about browsers, I would agree not to run old ones.
I did e-mail searches and found very little supporting your position. Almost everything I fouhnd talked about phishihng and social engineering. I did find one discussion about a truly archaic version of Outlook, Outlook 2000 and I found a few general statements about unpatched exploits but almost nothing, thus leading me to continue to believe what I believed before, that exploits in e-mail programs are not generally used in attacks these days.

This discussion, talking about a really archaic version of Outlook has content that may support your contention, but I found almost no other discussion of the question in a search for is it dangerous to use an old version of an e-mail program. And note that this discussion doesn't say that to any of the participants' knowledge, anyone has been hacked through this truly archaic version of Outlook by the use of unpatched exploits It simply says that this or that can be done..
https://security.stackexchange.com/questions/112342/how-vulnerable-is-an-older-version-of-outlook-as-an-email-application

I'm not saying what you say is wrong, but until I get good evidence otherwise, I shall continue to hold my views, that ((1) there is no interest in attacking people through malicious code these days in e-mails and that (2) being on lists like this for years and not having seen one message from anyone about being attacked in other ways than by phishing and social engineering and that 3) the links for about fifteen results I read, I read the links, I didn't go to the pages, but the links don't mention embedded code, they discuss phishing and other forms of social engineering, all this is, in my opinion, strong evidence that I am correct.

I'm not telling anyone they must do anything, either. I'm presenting the reasons I believe I am correct.

Here is the link to one of the searches I did. It was worded about like this:
Are e-mails with malicious code common in 2020

You may see the results. I've looked at the links to something like fifteen results and they all deal with attacks such as phishing and no links mention messages with embedded malicious code.
https://www.google.com/search?gbv=1&q=are+e-mails+with+malicious+code+common+in+2020re+malicious+e-mails+common+in+2020&oq=&aqs=

As I said, I looked at the links themselves, I didn't go to the pages.

If you have good evidence to show that I am or have a reasonable chance of being wrong, that's fine. You have more technical knowledge than I do and you may find such information. I shall continue to believe I am correct unless I see convincing information.

Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel
Sent: Tuesday, September 29, 2020 10:42 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Giving Up on Thunderbird!

On Tue, Sep 29, 2020 at 11:28 PM, Gene wrote:
You may correct me if I'm wrong on these points or disagree-
I am not going to, because you are entirely capable of doing a web search on "email client attacks" or "email attack surfaces" or similar to get reams of documentation on what has been going on for years.

I'm not going to tell anyone they must do anything. I'm also not going to tell them that leaving web browsers or email clients in an un-updated state is a wise or safe thing to do, because it isn't.

--


Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


Re: Giving Up on Thunderbird!

Ron Canazzi
 

Hi Rich,

I am using Thunderbird 78.2.2 32 bit latest release with NVDA 2020 latest version and Windows 10 version 2004 latest build and I have absolutely none of the problems you are having.  I am even able to use the Thunderbird add on quick folder key navigation with no problem.

I am wondering what version of NVDA, Thunderbird and Windows you are using.

On 9/29/2020 5:59 PM, Rich DeSteno wrote:
It has been many months now that the Thunderbird email program has been very difficult to use with a screen-reading program. Prior to that, I used Thunderbird successfully for many years.  I mostly use NVDA with it.  For some months now, I often lose speech and the program slows down to an agonizing crawl.  The apparent downloading of email is announced one by one, choking off the speech you actually want to hear.  At times, I have not even been able to accomplish anything for many minutes due to these problems.  I disabled the mail and status toolbars, but that did not help.  Over the last day or two, it appears that the problem has gotten even worse.  Unless someone can suggest a solution to these problems, I am ready to give up on this program.  Thus, I would be interested in hearing recommendations for an email program that actually works well with screen-reading software, including NVDA.  Thanks.
--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


Re: Giving Up on Thunderbird!

 

On Tue, Sep 29, 2020 at 11:28 PM, Gene wrote:
You may correct me if I'm wrong on these points or disagree
-
I am not going to, because you are entirely capable of doing a web search on "email client attacks" or "email attack surfaces" or similar to get reams of documentation on what has been going on for years.

I'm not going to tell anyone they must do anything.  I'm also not going to tell them that leaving web browsers or email clients in an un-updated state is a wise or safe thing to do, because it isn't.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


Re: Giving Up on Thunderbird!

Gene
 

You may correct me if I'm wrong on these points or disagree, but for one thing, some people are still using Outlook Express and I've never once heard of someone being hacked simply by opening a message.

Second, I really doubt that malware developers bother targeting e-mail programs with malicious code. I haven't heard about any such attacks for so long I don't recall when I may have heard of one last. The advice, as good now as it ever was, to not open attachments unless you are sure they are safe is still as good as ever. But why should developers target a number of e-mail programs with exploits that either won't work or will only work with this or that program when phishing and social engineering are so much more effective and so much cheaper and easier to do. Convincing someone to open an attachment or that they need to go to a web site to check on something they have purchased and providing a malicious link to a fraudulent web site are the kinds of things done now.

In short, without real evidence, I remain extremely skeptical that it is dangerous to run an old version of an e-mail program.

Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel
Sent: Tuesday, September 29, 2020 10:07 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Giving Up on Thunderbird!

On Tue, Sep 29, 2020 at 10:50 PM, Gene wrote:
I've said many times on different lists that I see no reason to update thunderbird if all people want to do is use it as an e-mail program.-
Security, plain and simple. Email clients are particularly juicy targets for nefarious actors. It never makes sense to leave an email client that has newer updates running, period. And there is not an IT professional who will ever say otherwise from the perspective of security (which is completely separate from accessibility, and accessibility is a valid consideration, but you need to think about how insecure you're willing to be with regard to programs commonly in contact with cyberspace).

No one ever proposes leaving a web browser that has newer versions un-updated, and for the very same reason.

--


Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com