Date   

Re: Braille Display Questions

Eleni Vamvakari
 

This doesn't sound good at all! Granted, these posts are several
months old, so perhaps, they fixed the issues by now.

https://nvda.groups.io/g/nvda/topic/braille_me_display_not_quite/22588645?p=,,,20,0,0,0::recentpostdate%2Fsticky,,,20,2,0,22588645

On 14/11/2018, Eleni Vamvakari <elvam2167@...> wrote:
I found some information on the Braille Me here, but I am still
seeking reviews. I do know, however, that it supports 50 languages,
which means that it may even natively support polytonic Greek!

http://www.perkinselearning.org/technology/posts/braille-me-new-refreshable-braille-display

On 14/11/2018, Eleni Vamvakari <elvam2167@...> wrote:
Thank you for your detailed and wonderful response! As long as I can
find a driver for it, it doesn't need to be automatically detected.
I'm not sure why you say that Windows XP is hard to get. You can very
easily find it, and laptops on which it is already installed, on Ebay.
By the way, I love your use of "his" and "himself" with "every
person"! I don't mind a loud display. As for the Pacmate, I found
one, complete with display, for $30 cheaper than just the display
alone.

On 14/11/2018, Aman Singer <aman.singer@...> wrote:
Hi,

I will, if I may, answer each requirement separately and sum up at the
end.
I'm sorry to go off on a bit of a tangent, but I should say that it's
nice
to see such a clear set of expectations, it's good to be able to answer
a
properly posed question. You write:

1. Cost: It must cost less than $600, though that is at the high end of
the
spectrum.

New, this limits you to the Orbit and BrailleME. Used, this more or
less,
so far as I know the market, limits you to the Pacmate units and the
older
Alva BC series. If you're willing to take your time, you may get someone
who
will want to sell one of the other displays at the higher end of your
range,
but this isn't certain and you may end up with something with a defect
in,
for example, its dots or keys.


2. It must work with NVDA. If possible, I would like it to connect
automatically.

I don't know of a display which doesn't work with NVDA. As to automatic
detection, I think combining your first and second requirement limits
you
to
the Orbit if you insist on new. I don't know whether the BrailleME will
be
automatically detected but, given that the driver is not in NVDA's core,
I
suspect it will not. The Alva will be automatically detected, the
Pacmate
will not.


3. It must work with Windows XP and 7.

To the best of my knowledge, everything does except, possibly, the
BrailleMe. The Orbit support was added long before Windows XP support
was
dropped by NVDA. You'll have to speak to the BrailleMe's manufacturer to
see
if the unit will work with XP. Note, and I make this as a statement of
fact,
not as any sort of prompt for action, I firmly believe every person
should
choose his own technology to suit himself, that Windows XP support is
hard
to get and is becoming harder to get.


4. It must be able to display Grade 2 American braille (I do not use
UEB) and polytonic Greek (all three accents and two breathing marks).
Ideally, it would also be able to work with Latin, including various
marks
like macron.

This is a matter of software, not hardware. If NVDA is able to display
these things, then you will have them on any display. If NVDA won't
display
them, you won't have them on any display working with NVDA. Note that
the
BrailleMe is a six-dot display, so may not be able to display these if
they
are eight-dot characters. Note also that it is somewhat unlikely, though
not
impossible, that the notes functionality of any display will be able to
translate text imported into it into properly expressed Greek or Latin
braille.


5. Ideally, it would be portable so that I can use it with my laptop.
Otherwise, I will use it with my desktop. I have real serial ports on
my
desktop but not on my laptop. So if it is a portable model, it must
connect
via usb.

Portability is a function of the number of cells. If you want the
display
to be very portable, 20 cells would be better than 40. The 40 cell
displays
can be carried, but do take up more space, I would not carry one without
a
bag. I would not carry an 80 cell display at all. It is difficult, at
this
point, to get a serial braille display and, even if you did, USB to
serial
adapters have become cheap and usable.


6. I would prefer that it have cursor routing buttons, but that is not
strictly necessary.

This is where the Orbit fails completely. It does not have cursor
routing
buttons.

Personally, I would go for an Orbit if I wanted a 20 cell display and
wouldn't mind the lack of cursor routing and the loud refreshing. If I
wanted more cells, cursor routing, or quiet operation, I would try for a
Pacmate 40 or raise my budget. I wouldn't bother to buy the Pacmate
notetaker unit (the notetaker and display are separate). The notetaker
may
access the internet but will be at least slow and have problems,
particularly on the web.
I hope that's of use.
Aman


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf
Of
Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Wednesday, November 14, 2018 2:08 PM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Braille Display Questions

I have written several times about wanting to buy a tactile grapics
display
in order to help me read my Greek (Katharevousa) texts without dealing
with
ocr and so on, as these would simply translate whatever is on the screen
onto the display without any kind of braille or text translation.
Unfortunately, all of the ones which I found seem to still be in
development. In the meantime, I am considering buying a braille
display.
But I don't know which one will meet my needs.
Therefore, I have listed my requirements below. Note that it can be new
or
old. I also don't care if it is a terminal display or a notetaker.
Finally, note that I will still primarily be using speech in my daily
activities. This is just to help me with reading Greek and Latin texts,
with and studying spelling.

1. Cost: It must cost less than $600, though that is at the high end of
the
spectrum.
2. It must work with NVDA. If possible, I would like it to connect
automatically.
3. It must work with Windows XP and 7.
4. It must be able to display Grade 2 American braille (I do not use
UEB) and polytonic Greek (all three accents and two breathing marks).
Ideally, it would also be able to work with Latin, including various
marks
like macron.
5. Ideally, it would be portable so that I can use it with my laptop.
Otherwise, I will use it with my desktop. I have real serial ports on
my
desktop but not on my laptop. So if it is a portable model, it must
connect
via usb.
6. I would prefer that it have cursor routing buttons, but that is not
strictly necessary.

I have seen a PM20 display and a Pacmate Omni 420 at very good prices on
Ebay. The former is strictly a braille display while the latter is a
full
notetaker. But the first actually costs more than the second!
Would there be any benefit in my buying a Pacmate? I know that it
doesn't
run a full version of Windows, so I can't install NVDA on it, nor can I
use
modern versions of Firefox or K-Meleon. But can I still access The
Internet
with it? Has anyone here used the Orbit 20 or the Braille Me? If so,
how
well did they work?

Thanks,
Eleni

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Re: braille wunderground

NLG
 

Try the following link. Put your zipcode at the end after the = (equils).

 

 

http://braille.wunderground.com/cgi-bin/findweather/getForecast?query=

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Pamela Dominguez
Sent: Wednesday, November 14, 2018 9:12 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] braille wunderground

 

On both my computers, I had braille wunderground, and after they had fixed the site last year, it worked fine.  I tried to get it to put on this computer, and the only sites I seem to find are the regular weather underground sites, one of which makes mention of braille wunderground, but that’s all.  These sites are more complicated and visual, and full of stuff like weather maps.  Does anybody have the url for the braille wunderground site that is the regular old one that’s simpler?  I used to have icons on the desktop for it, and I had it set up to display the weather in my area.  Pam. 


Re: Braille Display Questions

Eleni Vamvakari
 

I found some information on the Braille Me here, but I am still
seeking reviews. I do know, however, that it supports 50 languages,
which means that it may even natively support polytonic Greek!

http://www.perkinselearning.org/technology/posts/braille-me-new-refreshable-braille-display

On 14/11/2018, Eleni Vamvakari <elvam2167@...> wrote:
Thank you for your detailed and wonderful response! As long as I can
find a driver for it, it doesn't need to be automatically detected.
I'm not sure why you say that Windows XP is hard to get. You can very
easily find it, and laptops on which it is already installed, on Ebay.
By the way, I love your use of "his" and "himself" with "every
person"! I don't mind a loud display. As for the Pacmate, I found
one, complete with display, for $30 cheaper than just the display
alone.

On 14/11/2018, Aman Singer <aman.singer@...> wrote:
Hi,

I will, if I may, answer each requirement separately and sum up at the
end.
I'm sorry to go off on a bit of a tangent, but I should say that it's
nice
to see such a clear set of expectations, it's good to be able to answer a
properly posed question. You write:

1. Cost: It must cost less than $600, though that is at the high end of
the
spectrum.

New, this limits you to the Orbit and BrailleME. Used, this more or
less,
so far as I know the market, limits you to the Pacmate units and the
older
Alva BC series. If you're willing to take your time, you may get someone
who
will want to sell one of the other displays at the higher end of your
range,
but this isn't certain and you may end up with something with a defect
in,
for example, its dots or keys.


2. It must work with NVDA. If possible, I would like it to connect
automatically.

I don't know of a display which doesn't work with NVDA. As to automatic
detection, I think combining your first and second requirement limits you
to
the Orbit if you insist on new. I don't know whether the BrailleME will
be
automatically detected but, given that the driver is not in NVDA's core,
I
suspect it will not. The Alva will be automatically detected, the Pacmate
will not.


3. It must work with Windows XP and 7.

To the best of my knowledge, everything does except, possibly, the
BrailleMe. The Orbit support was added long before Windows XP support was
dropped by NVDA. You'll have to speak to the BrailleMe's manufacturer to
see
if the unit will work with XP. Note, and I make this as a statement of
fact,
not as any sort of prompt for action, I firmly believe every person
should
choose his own technology to suit himself, that Windows XP support is
hard
to get and is becoming harder to get.


4. It must be able to display Grade 2 American braille (I do not use
UEB) and polytonic Greek (all three accents and two breathing marks).
Ideally, it would also be able to work with Latin, including various
marks
like macron.

This is a matter of software, not hardware. If NVDA is able to display
these things, then you will have them on any display. If NVDA won't
display
them, you won't have them on any display working with NVDA. Note that the
BrailleMe is a six-dot display, so may not be able to display these if
they
are eight-dot characters. Note also that it is somewhat unlikely, though
not
impossible, that the notes functionality of any display will be able to
translate text imported into it into properly expressed Greek or Latin
braille.


5. Ideally, it would be portable so that I can use it with my laptop.
Otherwise, I will use it with my desktop. I have real serial ports on my
desktop but not on my laptop. So if it is a portable model, it must
connect
via usb.

Portability is a function of the number of cells. If you want the
display
to be very portable, 20 cells would be better than 40. The 40 cell
displays
can be carried, but do take up more space, I would not carry one without
a
bag. I would not carry an 80 cell display at all. It is difficult, at
this
point, to get a serial braille display and, even if you did, USB to
serial
adapters have become cheap and usable.


6. I would prefer that it have cursor routing buttons, but that is not
strictly necessary.

This is where the Orbit fails completely. It does not have cursor
routing
buttons.

Personally, I would go for an Orbit if I wanted a 20 cell display and
wouldn't mind the lack of cursor routing and the loud refreshing. If I
wanted more cells, cursor routing, or quiet operation, I would try for a
Pacmate 40 or raise my budget. I wouldn't bother to buy the Pacmate
notetaker unit (the notetaker and display are separate). The notetaker
may
access the internet but will be at least slow and have problems,
particularly on the web.
I hope that's of use.
Aman


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf
Of
Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Wednesday, November 14, 2018 2:08 PM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Braille Display Questions

I have written several times about wanting to buy a tactile grapics
display
in order to help me read my Greek (Katharevousa) texts without dealing
with
ocr and so on, as these would simply translate whatever is on the screen
onto the display without any kind of braille or text translation.
Unfortunately, all of the ones which I found seem to still be in
development. In the meantime, I am considering buying a braille display.
But I don't know which one will meet my needs.
Therefore, I have listed my requirements below. Note that it can be new
or
old. I also don't care if it is a terminal display or a notetaker.
Finally, note that I will still primarily be using speech in my daily
activities. This is just to help me with reading Greek and Latin texts,
with and studying spelling.

1. Cost: It must cost less than $600, though that is at the high end of
the
spectrum.
2. It must work with NVDA. If possible, I would like it to connect
automatically.
3. It must work with Windows XP and 7.
4. It must be able to display Grade 2 American braille (I do not use
UEB) and polytonic Greek (all three accents and two breathing marks).
Ideally, it would also be able to work with Latin, including various
marks
like macron.
5. Ideally, it would be portable so that I can use it with my laptop.
Otherwise, I will use it with my desktop. I have real serial ports on my
desktop but not on my laptop. So if it is a portable model, it must
connect
via usb.
6. I would prefer that it have cursor routing buttons, but that is not
strictly necessary.

I have seen a PM20 display and a Pacmate Omni 420 at very good prices on
Ebay. The former is strictly a braille display while the latter is a
full
notetaker. But the first actually costs more than the second!
Would there be any benefit in my buying a Pacmate? I know that it
doesn't
run a full version of Windows, so I can't install NVDA on it, nor can I
use
modern versions of Firefox or K-Meleon. But can I still access The
Internet
with it? Has anyone here used the Orbit 20 or the Braille Me? If so,
how
well did they work?

Thanks,
Eleni

--
Facebook: elvam2167@...

anyaudio.net: elvam2167

Skype: elvam2167








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Re: Braille Display Questions

Eleni Vamvakari
 

Thank you for your detailed and wonderful response! As long as I can
find a driver for it, it doesn't need to be automatically detected.
I'm not sure why you say that Windows XP is hard to get. You can very
easily find it, and laptops on which it is already installed, on Ebay.
By the way, I love your use of "his" and "himself" with "every
person"! I don't mind a loud display. As for the Pacmate, I found
one, complete with display, for $30 cheaper than just the display
alone.

On 14/11/2018, Aman Singer <aman.singer@...> wrote:
Hi,

I will, if I may, answer each requirement separately and sum up at the end.
I'm sorry to go off on a bit of a tangent, but I should say that it's nice
to see such a clear set of expectations, it's good to be able to answer a
properly posed question. You write:

1. Cost: It must cost less than $600, though that is at the high end of the
spectrum.

New, this limits you to the Orbit and BrailleME. Used, this more or less,
so far as I know the market, limits you to the Pacmate units and the older
Alva BC series. If you're willing to take your time, you may get someone who
will want to sell one of the other displays at the higher end of your range,
but this isn't certain and you may end up with something with a defect in,
for example, its dots or keys.


2. It must work with NVDA. If possible, I would like it to connect
automatically.

I don't know of a display which doesn't work with NVDA. As to automatic
detection, I think combining your first and second requirement limits you to
the Orbit if you insist on new. I don't know whether the BrailleME will be
automatically detected but, given that the driver is not in NVDA's core, I
suspect it will not. The Alva will be automatically detected, the Pacmate
will not.


3. It must work with Windows XP and 7.

To the best of my knowledge, everything does except, possibly, the
BrailleMe. The Orbit support was added long before Windows XP support was
dropped by NVDA. You'll have to speak to the BrailleMe's manufacturer to see
if the unit will work with XP. Note, and I make this as a statement of fact,
not as any sort of prompt for action, I firmly believe every person should
choose his own technology to suit himself, that Windows XP support is hard
to get and is becoming harder to get.


4. It must be able to display Grade 2 American braille (I do not use
UEB) and polytonic Greek (all three accents and two breathing marks).
Ideally, it would also be able to work with Latin, including various marks
like macron.

This is a matter of software, not hardware. If NVDA is able to display
these things, then you will have them on any display. If NVDA won't display
them, you won't have them on any display working with NVDA. Note that the
BrailleMe is a six-dot display, so may not be able to display these if they
are eight-dot characters. Note also that it is somewhat unlikely, though not
impossible, that the notes functionality of any display will be able to
translate text imported into it into properly expressed Greek or Latin
braille.


5. Ideally, it would be portable so that I can use it with my laptop.
Otherwise, I will use it with my desktop. I have real serial ports on my
desktop but not on my laptop. So if it is a portable model, it must connect
via usb.

Portability is a function of the number of cells. If you want the display
to be very portable, 20 cells would be better than 40. The 40 cell displays
can be carried, but do take up more space, I would not carry one without a
bag. I would not carry an 80 cell display at all. It is difficult, at this
point, to get a serial braille display and, even if you did, USB to serial
adapters have become cheap and usable.


6. I would prefer that it have cursor routing buttons, but that is not
strictly necessary.

This is where the Orbit fails completely. It does not have cursor routing
buttons.

Personally, I would go for an Orbit if I wanted a 20 cell display and
wouldn't mind the lack of cursor routing and the loud refreshing. If I
wanted more cells, cursor routing, or quiet operation, I would try for a
Pacmate 40 or raise my budget. I wouldn't bother to buy the Pacmate
notetaker unit (the notetaker and display are separate). The notetaker may
access the internet but will be at least slow and have problems,
particularly on the web.
I hope that's of use.
Aman


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Wednesday, November 14, 2018 2:08 PM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Braille Display Questions

I have written several times about wanting to buy a tactile grapics display
in order to help me read my Greek (Katharevousa) texts without dealing with
ocr and so on, as these would simply translate whatever is on the screen
onto the display without any kind of braille or text translation.
Unfortunately, all of the ones which I found seem to still be in
development. In the meantime, I am considering buying a braille display.
But I don't know which one will meet my needs.
Therefore, I have listed my requirements below. Note that it can be new or
old. I also don't care if it is a terminal display or a notetaker.
Finally, note that I will still primarily be using speech in my daily
activities. This is just to help me with reading Greek and Latin texts,
with and studying spelling.

1. Cost: It must cost less than $600, though that is at the high end of the
spectrum.
2. It must work with NVDA. If possible, I would like it to connect
automatically.
3. It must work with Windows XP and 7.
4. It must be able to display Grade 2 American braille (I do not use
UEB) and polytonic Greek (all three accents and two breathing marks).
Ideally, it would also be able to work with Latin, including various marks
like macron.
5. Ideally, it would be portable so that I can use it with my laptop.
Otherwise, I will use it with my desktop. I have real serial ports on my
desktop but not on my laptop. So if it is a portable model, it must connect
via usb.
6. I would prefer that it have cursor routing buttons, but that is not
strictly necessary.

I have seen a PM20 display and a Pacmate Omni 420 at very good prices on
Ebay. The former is strictly a braille display while the latter is a full
notetaker. But the first actually costs more than the second!
Would there be any benefit in my buying a Pacmate? I know that it doesn't
run a full version of Windows, so I can't install NVDA on it, nor can I use
modern versions of Firefox or K-Meleon. But can I still access The Internet
with it? Has anyone here used the Orbit 20 or the Braille Me? If so, how
well did they work?

Thanks,
Eleni

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anyaudio.net: elvam2167

Skype: elvam2167







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braille wunderground

Pamela Dominguez
 

On both my computers, I had braille wunderground, and after they had fixed the site last year, it worked fine.  I tried to get it to put on this computer, and the only sites I seem to find are the regular weather underground sites, one of which makes mention of braille wunderground, but that’s all.  These sites are more complicated and visual, and full of stuff like weather maps.  Does anybody have the url for the braille wunderground site that is the regular old one that’s simpler?  I used to have icons on the desktop for it, and I had it set up to display the weather in my area.  Pam. 


Re: six dot braille labeler

Pamela Dominguez
 

I like the gadget that you can put on the Perkins, and thread the tape through. Pam


Re: goldwave expert, audio hiss removal

Gene
 

It sounds as though you are changing the main play setting in your sound card.  That will have no effect on the volume level of a StereoMix recording.  You should change the StereoMix setting, which is a sound card setting.  Do you know how to get to the recording settings in your sound card? 
 
There may be a way that you can do this from within Goldwave, I don't know.  I don't use Goldwave.  But if you can, you are changing the sound card StereoMix setting in a different way.
 
I'm not sure what is causing the hiss but I wouldn't be surprised if raising the StereoMix setting to raise the level of the recording makes the hiss too audible, as you are describing when you raise volume in other ways.  What are you recording?  Are you mixing a microphone recording, and a recording from some other sound source such as a turntable or some other sound source?
 
The hiss is not accounted for by what you speculate it is coming from, based on your description of it.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, November 14, 2018 5:40 PM
Subject: [TechTalk] goldwave expert, audio hiss removal

Hello,

I've got several goldwave files that I recorded using the system's
stereo mix as input. Levels were low and I'm not sure how to raise
them without effecting the main system volume. In goldwave I upped the
audio using effects, maximize volume, and selected 90% this brought a
hiss if your familiar with cassette tape hiss probably similar to
that, but what i suspect is actually the noise of my system's CPU and
fans. I've got several points of between five to seven seconds of
nothing but hiss so I can select that audio, in the past when I've
done this this has removed the hiss but it's also had the very
undesired effect of making the voice audio sound muffled or under
water. I'd like to avoid this and am open to any suggestions. These
are flac files so I can and have saved queue points in them and can
reopen them to continue working before I save them in final form.

Second question, unrelated to the first, I know wav files don't
compress well, do flac files? I'd like to keep these original source
files while having the converted finals but i'd like to keep them in
compressed format. Is this worth it?

Thanks.
Dave.



Re: six dot braille labeler

Dave
 

Hello Heather,

Personally, I find the Squeeze type labeler to be more awkward, than
difficult. But, then again, I early on, chose to use the Slate method
to make labels, so I am good at that method.

If you are not strong enough to squeeze the handle on the Braille
labeler, then you may not be able to push the Stylus hard enough to
make a Dot on the Dyna labile tape.

The one thing about the Labeler is that someone else can make the labels,
as there is print on the labeler to help the non-braille reader.

I have made a lot of labels over the years, so if you can read Braille,
having labels will be a Help for you.

using the Slate requires you to insert the tape between two slots, and
then to write Braille one dot at a time, backwards.

I find the label made using the Slate, is easier to read than the ones
made by the label maker. But this is just me. I am not a Braille
Reader, and hate the stuff actually, but grudgingly use it on things
that I really need to know what it is etc.

I label my Stove, the Microwave, and I made a lot of labels that I put
on Magnetic strips to put on Cans of Soups, Vegetables, Fruits, etc.

As long as a magnet can stick to the can top, that can is labeled until
you remove the label just before you open that can of soup.

making these labels took a while, but once I had several labels of each
type of can food I bought, the task was done, and I have used them for
years.

When I was Single, I took labels with me to the store, and the guys at
the Check Out never minded helping me get the right label on the right
can. It wasn't a Big Deal, and since I was usually the first Customer
in the early morning, no one was behind me at the Check Out.

I am thinking the Label Maker might be the better way to go in your case,
unless you are Good with using the Slate.

Now, I have made lots and lots of labels over the years, and my only
issue with the Slate is that I cannot cut the Tape at a 90 degree angle.
So my cut is always at a slight angle. I have a little contest with
myself every time I make a label. OK Dave, lets see if you can get a
Straight Cut this time. Nope! Not this time either! And I've only
been making labels this way for almost 40 years.

Grumpy Dave


Re: six dot braille labeler

John Dowling
 

I would also like to no that.
I’ve only ever used the hand-held one.

We walk by Faith, and NOt by Sight (2 Corinthians 5:7)

On Nov 14, 2018, at 6:04 PM, Pamela Dominguez <pammygirl99@...> wrote:

What is this six dot braille labeler?  Pam
 
Sent: Wednesday, November 14, 2018 5:55 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] six dot braille labeler
 
I was asking because, my caseworker thinks I need one for labeling items. My ms prevents me from being able to squeeze to make the dots with the hand held labeler! So is the 6 dot easier? Heather
 
"Blindness is a characteristic, not a handicap!" Dr. Kenneth Jernigan 
e-mail:
kd5cbl@...
sites:
National Federation of The Blind:
www.nfb.org
An Accessible Online Library:
www.bookshare.org
 
From: Dave
Sent: Wednesday, November 14, 2018 4:42 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] six dot braille labeler
 
I have one of those 6 Dot Braille labelrs, but I like to use a normal
Slate and Stylus instead to make Braille labels. 
 
Grumpy Dave
 
 
 
 

 
 


dropbox question

John Dowling
 

Hi all,
If i have a shared folder in dropbox, but its inside another folder, if I were to move it to the root of my dropbox folder, would that mess it up? Would I still be able to sync files to everyone else? or would this require me to readd the folder.
I hope that made sence.
John


Re: six dot braille labeler

Pamela Dominguez
 

What is this six dot braille labeler?  Pam
 

Sent: Wednesday, November 14, 2018 5:55 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] six dot braille labeler
 

I was asking because, my caseworker thinks I need one for labeling items. My ms prevents me from being able to squeeze to make the dots with the hand held labeler! So is the 6 dot easier? Heather

 

"Blindness is a characteristic, not a handicap!" Dr. Kenneth Jernigan
e-mail:
kd5cbl@...
sites:
National Federation of The Blind:
www.nfb.org
An Accessible Online Library:
www.bookshare.org

 

From: Dave
Sent: Wednesday, November 14, 2018 4:42 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] six dot braille labeler

 

I have one of those 6 Dot Braille labelrs, but I like to use a normal

Slate and Stylus instead to make Braille labels. 

 

Grumpy Dave

 

 

 

 

 

 


Re: Anyone use the Brainport Vision Pro?

Don Risavy, Jr. <djrisavyjr@...>
 

I use the device when was first being developed prior to being approved for use in the US. Although was able to see some things with it wouldn't ever want one myself as yes you have to keep the probe in your mouth on your tongue to see things as the tongue device produces electrical stimulation to the tongue that in turn sends the info to your brain telling you what see. You wear a special pair The glasses that the camera sits on that is wired to the controller that allows you to adjust the electrical thresh hold. The other problem and or issue had with the device was that you're constaly adjusting the intensity on the control panel that wear on your side as it's not wireless which means a lot of stopping and going once figure out what might be seeing.
So that's all can offer to the discussion is that used it when first was being manufactured for production to make sure was safe and also to find out how much it helped you see.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Peter Spitz
Sent: Wednesday, November 14, 2018 1:36 PM
To: main <main@techtalk.groups.io>
Subject: [TechTalk] Anyone use the Brainport Vision Pro?

I have an opportunity to attend training and then get issued a Brainport Vision Pro through the VA. I am totally blind. I am wondering if any other totals have used this product? My biggest issue with the device is that it requires a sensor on my tongue and will have a cord hanging out of my mouth. Not sure if I'm willing to put up with that and I'm wondering how one eats and talks without removing it all the time.

Thanks in advance,

Peter


goldwave expert, audio hiss removal

David Mehler
 

Hello,

I've got several goldwave files that I recorded using the system's
stereo mix as input. Levels were low and I'm not sure how to raise
them without effecting the main system volume. In goldwave I upped the
audio using effects, maximize volume, and selected 90% this brought a
hiss if your familiar with cassette tape hiss probably similar to
that, but what i suspect is actually the noise of my system's CPU and
fans. I've got several points of between five to seven seconds of
nothing but hiss so I can select that audio, in the past when I've
done this this has removed the hiss but it's also had the very
undesired effect of making the voice audio sound muffled or under
water. I'd like to avoid this and am open to any suggestions. These
are flac files so I can and have saved queue points in them and can
reopen them to continue working before I save them in final form.

Second question, unrelated to the first, I know wav files don't
compress well, do flac files? I'd like to keep these original source
files while having the converted finals but i'd like to keep them in
compressed format. Is this worth it?

Thanks.
Dave.


Re: Braille Display Questions

Aman Singer
 

Hi,

I will, if I may, answer each requirement separately and sum up at the end. I'm sorry to go off on a bit of a tangent, but I should say that it's nice to see such a clear set of expectations, it's good to be able to answer a properly posed question. You write:

1. Cost: It must cost less than $600, though that is at the high end of the spectrum.

New, this limits you to the Orbit and BrailleME. Used, this more or less, so far as I know the market, limits you to the Pacmate units and the older Alva BC series. If you're willing to take your time, you may get someone who will want to sell one of the other displays at the higher end of your range, but this isn't certain and you may end up with something with a defect in, for example, its dots or keys.


2. It must work with NVDA. If possible, I would like it to connect automatically.

I don't know of a display which doesn't work with NVDA. As to automatic detection, I think combining your first and second requirement limits you to the Orbit if you insist on new. I don't know whether the BrailleME will be automatically detected but, given that the driver is not in NVDA's core, I suspect it will not. The Alva will be automatically detected, the Pacmate will not.


3. It must work with Windows XP and 7.

To the best of my knowledge, everything does except, possibly, the BrailleMe. The Orbit support was added long before Windows XP support was dropped by NVDA. You'll have to speak to the BrailleMe's manufacturer to see if the unit will work with XP. Note, and I make this as a statement of fact, not as any sort of prompt for action, I firmly believe every person should choose his own technology to suit himself, that Windows XP support is hard to get and is becoming harder to get.


4. It must be able to display Grade 2 American braille (I do not use
UEB) and polytonic Greek (all three accents and two breathing marks).
Ideally, it would also be able to work with Latin, including various marks like macron.

This is a matter of software, not hardware. If NVDA is able to display these things, then you will have them on any display. If NVDA won't display them, you won't have them on any display working with NVDA. Note that the BrailleMe is a six-dot display, so may not be able to display these if they are eight-dot characters. Note also that it is somewhat unlikely, though not impossible, that the notes functionality of any display will be able to translate text imported into it into properly expressed Greek or Latin braille.


5. Ideally, it would be portable so that I can use it with my laptop. Otherwise, I will use it with my desktop. I have real serial ports on my desktop but not on my laptop. So if it is a portable model, it must connect via usb.

Portability is a function of the number of cells. If you want the display to be very portable, 20 cells would be better than 40. The 40 cell displays can be carried, but do take up more space, I would not carry one without a bag. I would not carry an 80 cell display at all. It is difficult, at this point, to get a serial braille display and, even if you did, USB to serial adapters have become cheap and usable.


6. I would prefer that it have cursor routing buttons, but that is not strictly necessary.

This is where the Orbit fails completely. It does not have cursor routing buttons.

Personally, I would go for an Orbit if I wanted a 20 cell display and wouldn't mind the lack of cursor routing and the loud refreshing. If I wanted more cells, cursor routing, or quiet operation, I would try for a Pacmate 40 or raise my budget. I wouldn't bother to buy the Pacmate notetaker unit (the notetaker and display are separate). The notetaker may access the internet but will be at least slow and have problems, particularly on the web.
I hope that's of use.
Aman

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Wednesday, November 14, 2018 2:08 PM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Braille Display Questions

I have written several times about wanting to buy a tactile grapics display in order to help me read my Greek (Katharevousa) texts without dealing with ocr and so on, as these would simply translate whatever is on the screen onto the display without any kind of braille or text translation. Unfortunately, all of the ones which I found seem to still be in development. In the meantime, I am considering buying a braille display. But I don't know which one will meet my needs.
Therefore, I have listed my requirements below. Note that it can be new or old. I also don't care if it is a terminal display or a notetaker. Finally, note that I will still primarily be using speech in my daily activities. This is just to help me with reading Greek and Latin texts, with and studying spelling.

1. Cost: It must cost less than $600, though that is at the high end of the spectrum.
2. It must work with NVDA. If possible, I would like it to connect automatically.
3. It must work with Windows XP and 7.
4. It must be able to display Grade 2 American braille (I do not use
UEB) and polytonic Greek (all three accents and two breathing marks).
Ideally, it would also be able to work with Latin, including various marks like macron.
5. Ideally, it would be portable so that I can use it with my laptop.
Otherwise, I will use it with my desktop. I have real serial ports on my desktop but not on my laptop. So if it is a portable model, it must connect via usb.
6. I would prefer that it have cursor routing buttons, but that is not strictly necessary.

I have seen a PM20 display and a Pacmate Omni 420 at very good prices on Ebay. The former is strictly a braille display while the latter is a full notetaker. But the first actually costs more than the second!
Would there be any benefit in my buying a Pacmate? I know that it doesn't run a full version of Windows, so I can't install NVDA on it, nor can I use modern versions of Firefox or K-Meleon. But can I still access The Internet with it? Has anyone here used the Orbit 20 or the Braille Me? If so, how well did they work?

Thanks,
Eleni

--
Facebook: elvam2167@...

anyaudio.net: elvam2167

Skype: elvam2167


Re: six dot braille labeler

Mich Verrier
 

I have never used one but have thought about getting one. How ever I am not shure if they are beaing sold any more or if you can use that clear papper with them the smooth kind. From Mich.

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Monte Single
Sent: November 14, 2018 5:28 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] six dot braille labeler

 

I have used them.  They were the same as print ones with  a head that also showed braille.  Worked well.  Remember to leave a few blank spaces at the beginning and end of each label before pressing the cut.

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of heather albright
Sent: November-14-18 4:07 PM
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] six dot braille labeler

 

Hello, I wanted to know if anyone has experience with the six dot braille label maker? I wanted to know how user friendly it was etc. Thanks Heather

 

"Blindness is a characteristic, not a handicap!" Dr. Kenneth Jernigan
e-mail:
kd5cbl@...
sites:
National Federation of The Blind:
www.nfb.org
An Accessible Online Library:
www.bookshare.org

 


Re: six dot braille labeler

heather albright
 

I was asking because, my caseworker thinks I need one for labeling items. My ms prevents me from being able to squeeze to make the dots with the hand held labeler! So is the 6 dot easier? Heather

 

"Blindness is a characteristic, not a handicap!" Dr. Kenneth Jernigan
e-mail:
kd5cbl@...
sites:
National Federation of The Blind:
www.nfb.org
An Accessible Online Library:
www.bookshare.org

 

From: Dave
Sent: Wednesday, November 14, 2018 4:42 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] six dot braille labeler

 

I have one of those 6 Dot Braille labelrs, but I like to use a normal

Slate and Stylus instead to make Braille labels. 

 

Grumpy Dave

 

 

 

 

 

 


Re: six dot braille labeler

Dave
 

I have one of those 6 Dot Braille labelrs, but I like to use a normal
Slate and Stylus instead to make Braille labels.

Grumpy Dave


Re: six dot braille labeler

Monte Single
 

I have used them.  They were the same as print ones with  a head that also showed braille.  Worked well.  Remember to leave a few blank spaces at the beginning and end of each label before pressing the cut.

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of heather albright
Sent: November-14-18 4:07 PM
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] six dot braille labeler

 

Hello, I wanted to know if anyone has experience with the six dot braille label maker? I wanted to know how user friendly it was etc. Thanks Heather

 

"Blindness is a characteristic, not a handicap!" Dr. Kenneth Jernigan
e-mail:
kd5cbl@...
sites:
National Federation of The Blind:
www.nfb.org
An Accessible Online Library:
www.bookshare.org

 


six dot braille labeler

heather albright
 

Hello, I wanted to know if anyone has experience with the six dot braille label maker? I wanted to know how user friendly it was etc. Thanks Heather

 

"Blindness is a characteristic, not a handicap!" Dr. Kenneth Jernigan
e-mail:
kd5cbl@...
sites:
National Federation of The Blind:
www.nfb.org
An Accessible Online Library:
www.bookshare.org

 


Re: Braille Display Questions

Steve Matzura
 

Save aggrevation and time and  get the APH Orbit. Twenty cells, portable, $500, meets all other requirements, done.

On 11/14/2018 2:07 PM, Eleni Vamvakari wrote:
I have written several times about wanting to buy a tactile grapics
display in order to help me read my Greek (Katharevousa) texts without
dealing with ocr and so on, as these would simply translate whatever
is on the screen onto the display without any kind of braille or text
translation. Unfortunately, all of the ones which I found seem to
still be in development. In the meantime, I am considering buying a
braille display. But I don't know which one will meet my needs.
Therefore, I have listed my requirements below. Note that it can be
new or old. I also don't care if it is a terminal display or a
notetaker. Finally, note that I will still primarily be using speech
in my daily activities. This is just to help me with reading Greek
and Latin texts, with and studying spelling.

1. Cost: It must cost less than $600, though that is at the high end
of the spectrum.
2. It must work with NVDA. If possible, I would like it to connect
automatically.
3. It must work with Windows XP and 7.
4. It must be able to display Grade 2 American braille (I do not use
UEB) and polytonic Greek (all three accents and two breathing marks).
Ideally, it would also be able to work with Latin, including various
marks like macron.
5. Ideally, it would be portable so that I can use it with my laptop.
Otherwise, I will use it with my desktop. I have real serial ports on
my desktop but not on my laptop. So if it is a portable model, it
must connect via usb.
6. I would prefer that it have cursor routing buttons, but that is
not strictly necessary.

I have seen a PM20 display and a Pacmate Omni 420 at very good prices
on Ebay. The former is strictly a braille display while the latter is
a full notetaker. But the first actually costs more than the second!
Would there be any benefit in my buying a Pacmate? I know that it
doesn't run a full version of Windows, so I can't install NVDA on it,
nor can I use modern versions of Firefox or K-Meleon. But can I still
access The Internet with it? Has anyone here used the Orbit 20 or the
Braille Me? If so, how well did they work?

Thanks,
Eleni