Date   

Re: jaws question!

Brent Harding
 


How would I make it so that JFW only alerts to a specific color, say, yellow text? At home I couldn't care less, but at work, yellow indicates things that need to be read verbatim, and things can change any time. I've been lucky to not get caught out missing any, but there are a few pesky places where the two different systems have slightly different variations on the required text, one might or might not be the yellow one though.
 

----- Original Message -----
From: Carlos
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 5:48 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] jaws question!

For once I'm guessing since I'm not sure about this setting, but you can try the following.
 
1. Press JAWS key and 6 to open the Settings Center.
 
2. Press Control Shift D to open the default configuration file.
 
3. Tab to the treeview and arrow down to
"Text Analyzer"
 
4. Press the Right Arrow key to expand it.
 
5. Arrow down to
"Font Changes to Check"
 
6. Press the Right Arrow key to expand it.
 
7. Uncheck the items
"Name"
and
"Color"
and possibly
"Size"
and
"Attributes"
as well depending on how much unwanted feedback you are receiving.
 
8. Select the
"OK"
button to close the Settings Center and save the changes.
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 6:15 PM
Subject: [TechTalk] jaws question!

I just got my computer back working today. I had to have a new power supply put in. now I am back and running on it, but Jaws is now telling me the font and color in messages. very irritating and I cannot find where to change the setting. help please! I really don’t care what font or background there is visible.
thanks in advance! Dave oh, jaws 17 on W8.1


Re: advice needed re xP Utility problem

Carlos
 

Is it a new package of discs?  Some burners have problems with different brands of blank discs.

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 10:54 PM
Subject: [TechTalk] advice needed re xP Utility problem

Hi list, to put the problem simply my X P  Utility burner         suddenly  wont  recognise a blank disk, I have tried numerous  Blanks   still no  recognition, , but no problems  reading mp3 or Wav disks   .Any advise will be much appreciated. Alan


advice needed re xP Utility problem

Alan Pollard
 

Hi list, to put the problem simply my X P  Utility burner         suddenly  wont  recognise a blank disk, I have tried numerous  Blanks   still no  recognition, , but no problems  reading mp3 or Wav disks   .Any advise will be much appreciated. Alan


Re: Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog #article

Carlos
 

Indeed, or vice versa. I recall someone on another list recently having a problem with a website using Chrome which worked fine in Firefox and IE.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Flor Lynch" <florlync@iol.ie>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 9:05 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog


In terms of accessibility, It's one of those glass is half-empty or half-full arguments as regards Chrome with JAWS. I think it's at least half full now. Chrome works best in a few situations where neither Internet Explorer or Firefox does well. (I'm thinking of an online form I had to fill in in 2015.) It seems to have a simpler interface.

-----Original Message-----
From: Matt
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 10:24 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

Well I have been always a IE man most of the time! Now let's talk about chrome ! Just how accessible is Chrome with Jaws the last time I tried it it was not very good.


Matt.from.florida@gmail.com


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Aidan
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 4:21 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

I must agree with jean and carlos here. As long as we as blind people keep making excuses for microsoft then we should not be surprise where it goes. Its not exceptable what they are doing for the last few years, and nothing they say will change my attidute towards them. Now its time for practise, to show us what they really can do. Its easy to talk. There are many developers asking for feedback and doing nothing about it wich prove that feedback alone is no way to be sure if the product will improve. Microsoft does not care about accessibility and I keep to that statement until they prove me wrong. These smaller changes we see now is just to keep us in a so called more happyer zone because they know there are people like rj wich will buy into that nonsense. And why can we not complain? We have every write to complain. Accessibility is a rite, and we shall keep enforcing and demanding it. Yes your attitude must be write but in this case ms is more than aware of the reality of the situation. They know they are guilty but they won't admit it to the public. To keep saying things like "at least they will do something" is a waste of time and it bring us no where. Either they deliver or the other screenreaders get stronger. And why shall I use the simpel ej browser anyway if firefox and chrome work so well?

On 02/07/2016, Carlos <carlos1106@nyc.rr.com> wrote:
I didn't say that other screen readers would just disappear, but I
believe that third-party developers might have less incentive to
invest much time and effort in serious development if a full-blown
screen reader were built-in. The screen reader market already has a
limited margin for profit

and Microsoft would always have the edge in terms of adding new
features if

they became seriously invested in Narrator. Consumers might also have
less

incentive to purchase third-party screen readers if most of the
functionality they need were already included in Windows. Windows is
not Android. The alternatives are either very expensive or free in
the case of

NVDA. In the case of more expensive screen readers, consumers would
almost

always choose the fully functional option that is built-in and does
not cost

nearly $1000. Organizations which provide sponsorship for obtaining
computers would also have less reason to purchase screen readers like JAWS.

Of course some people might think this is a good thing, but if sales
of JAWS

were to drop significantly, eventually it might make continuing to
produce the product unviable which in turn means fewer options. It is
hard to say whether NVDA would be affected, but the development of
NVDA is supported partially by donations and partially by the
motivation of the developers, either of which could potentially be
affected by the inclusion of a full-blown screen reader in Windows.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Rajmund" <brajmund2000@gmail.com>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 2:25 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the
Windows 10

Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog


Hi Carlos,
I deleted your original post, but, know how you're saying Mac? To my
knowledge, talkBack is built into android, yet, there's another one
called ShinePlus. I wonder, if, say, MS made a fully built in screen
reader, as long as windows was opened, I can't see why something like
would NVDA died. Apple is different, as their system is not opened.

Sent from a BrailleNote

----- Original Message -----
From: "RJ Sandefur" <manbatsandefur@outlook.com
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Date sent: Sat, 2 Jul 2016 18:11:19 +0000
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the
Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

No it wouldn't. RJ


On 7/2/2016 1:53 PM, Carlos wrote:
Whether Narrator becomes a full-blown screen reader some day, it has
a long way to go. And in my opinion, making Narrator a full-blown
screen reader would only stifle development for the competition. It
is good to have options and Macs are a good example of what happens
when a full-blown screen reader is built-in to the operating system.
----- Original Message -----
From: "RJ Sandefur" <manbatsandefur@outlook.com
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 1:41 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the
Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog


I am not usually one to use this type of strong language, but really?
How do you think NVDA and Jaws got to where they are? Feedback!
Let's
all give narrator a chance. Microsoft alone won't make the
screenreader, but together, the end users,(Us the blind community)
will make Narrator a screenreader which could even beat out voice
over if we really wanted it bad enough. RJ


On 7/2/2016 1:19 PM, Marie wrote:
I find Narrator useful on occasion, but it is far from being a full
screen reader and I would hate it if they made it like the Apple
devices where it is your only choice.
Marie


-----Original Message----- From: Carlos
Sent: Saturday, July 2, 2016 5:33 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the
Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

If they are going somewhere with Narrator, then they should simply
release a major upgrade when it is ready to be used as a full-blown
screen reader. At this point it is wasted effort to introduce these
minor changes since it is still not functional enough to be used by
most on a daily basis.
Gradually
introducing features that most people probably won't use because
there is a better free alternative seems like effort that could be
more productively invested somewhere else for now.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Jeremy" <jeremy.richards7@gmail.com
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 8:00 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the
Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog


Yeah, but they might be going somewhere with it which we don't know
about just yet. Some of the features discussed in the article seem
as though they may have been influenced by general screen reader
tech.

They might first want to start with the Windows OS then ultimately
create a VoiceOver competitor for future Windows devices.

With technology advancing as it does, why not accept the help from
one of the biggest computer software developers in the world?
Furthermore,
this
development might yield discoveries which will help with other
related disabilities experienced by an aging population.

JR

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On
Behalf Of Carlos
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 4:03 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the
Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

And honestly, the focus on Narrator seems like wasted time and
somewhat excessive in my opinion. How many people really use
Narrator on a daily basis? The fact is that most users only run
Narrator in an emergency or to finish setting up Windows. It is
useful and convenient to have, but for most it does not provide
enough functionality to be used as a primary screen reader. These
days those who cannot afford one of the expensive screen readers will
most likely use NVDA. And Narrator has a long way to go before it
can compete with NVDA. That being the case, I believe their time and
effort would be better spent on improving accessibility in other
areas. If NVDA did not exist, then the efforts to improve Narrator
might seem more significant, but again in my opinion at this time,
it just seems like wasted effort.

----- Original Message -----
From: Gene <mailto:gsasner@ripco.com
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 6:23 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the
Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

I have defended Microsoft for years when I thought they deserved it.
I will
not defend them in their accessibility implementation of
accessibility in Windows 10. My thoughts on the blog entry are below






--
Facebook: m.facebook.com/aidan.maher92
Skype: andries4451
Twitter: smarttalk7
Audioboo: www.audioboo.com/DjSpotlight









Re: Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog #article

Flor Lynch
 

In terms of accessibility, It's one of those glass is half-empty or half-full arguments as regards Chrome with JAWS. I think it's at least half full now. Chrome works best in a few situations where neither Internet Explorer or Firefox does well. (I'm thinking of an online form I had to fill in in 2015.) It seems to have a simpler interface.

-----Original Message-----
From: Matt
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 10:24 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

Well I have been always a IE man most of the time! Now let's talk about chrome ! Just how accessible is Chrome with Jaws the last time I tried it it was not very good.


Matt.from.florida@gmail.com


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Aidan
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 4:21 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

I must agree with jean and carlos here. As long as we as blind people keep making excuses for microsoft then we should not be surprise where it goes. Its not exceptable what they are doing for the last few years, and nothing they say will change my attidute towards them. Now its time for practise, to show us what they really can do. Its easy to talk. There are many developers asking for feedback and doing nothing about it wich prove that feedback alone is no way to be sure if the product will improve. Microsoft does not care about accessibility and I keep to that statement until they prove me wrong. These smaller changes we see now is just to keep us in a so called more happyer zone because they know there are people like rj wich will buy into that nonsense. And why can we not complain? We have every write to complain. Accessibility is a rite, and we shall keep enforcing and demanding it. Yes your attitude must be write but in this case ms is more than aware of the reality of the situation. They know they are guilty but they won't admit it to the public. To keep saying things like "at least they will do something" is a waste of time and it bring us no where. Either they deliver or the other screenreaders get stronger. And why shall I use the simpel ej browser anyway if firefox and chrome work so well?

On 02/07/2016, Carlos <carlos1106@nyc.rr.com> wrote:
I didn't say that other screen readers would just disappear, but I
believe that third-party developers might have less incentive to
invest much time and effort in serious development if a full-blown
screen reader were built-in. The screen reader market already has a
limited margin for profit

and Microsoft would always have the edge in terms of adding new
features if

they became seriously invested in Narrator. Consumers might also have
less

incentive to purchase third-party screen readers if most of the
functionality they need were already included in Windows. Windows is
not Android. The alternatives are either very expensive or free in
the case of

NVDA. In the case of more expensive screen readers, consumers would
almost

always choose the fully functional option that is built-in and does
not cost

nearly $1000. Organizations which provide sponsorship for obtaining
computers would also have less reason to purchase screen readers like JAWS.

Of course some people might think this is a good thing, but if sales
of JAWS

were to drop significantly, eventually it might make continuing to
produce the product unviable which in turn means fewer options. It is
hard to say whether NVDA would be affected, but the development of
NVDA is supported partially by donations and partially by the
motivation of the developers, either of which could potentially be
affected by the inclusion of a full-blown screen reader in Windows.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Rajmund" <brajmund2000@gmail.com>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 2:25 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the
Windows 10

Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog


Hi Carlos,
I deleted your original post, but, know how you're saying Mac? To my
knowledge, talkBack is built into android, yet, there's another one
called ShinePlus. I wonder, if, say, MS made a fully built in screen
reader, as long as windows was opened, I can't see why something like
would NVDA died. Apple is different, as their system is not opened.

Sent from a BrailleNote

----- Original Message -----
From: "RJ Sandefur" <manbatsandefur@outlook.com
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Date sent: Sat, 2 Jul 2016 18:11:19 +0000
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the
Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

No it wouldn't. RJ


On 7/2/2016 1:53 PM, Carlos wrote:
Whether Narrator becomes a full-blown screen reader some day, it has
a long way to go. And in my opinion, making Narrator a full-blown
screen reader would only stifle development for the competition. It
is good to have options and Macs are a good example of what happens
when a full-blown screen reader is built-in to the operating system.
----- Original Message -----
From: "RJ Sandefur" <manbatsandefur@outlook.com
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 1:41 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the
Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog


I am not usually one to use this type of strong language, but really?
How do you think NVDA and Jaws got to where they are? Feedback!
Let's
all give narrator a chance. Microsoft alone won't make the
screenreader, but together, the end users,(Us the blind community)
will make Narrator a screenreader which could even beat out voice
over if we really wanted it bad enough. RJ


On 7/2/2016 1:19 PM, Marie wrote:
I find Narrator useful on occasion, but it is far from being a full
screen reader and I would hate it if they made it like the Apple
devices where it is your only choice.
Marie


-----Original Message----- From: Carlos
Sent: Saturday, July 2, 2016 5:33 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the
Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

If they are going somewhere with Narrator, then they should simply
release a major upgrade when it is ready to be used as a full-blown
screen reader. At this point it is wasted effort to introduce these
minor changes since it is still not functional enough to be used by
most on a daily basis.
Gradually
introducing features that most people probably won't use because
there is a better free alternative seems like effort that could be
more productively invested somewhere else for now.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Jeremy" <jeremy.richards7@gmail.com
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 8:00 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the
Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog


Yeah, but they might be going somewhere with it which we don't know
about just yet. Some of the features discussed in the article seem
as though they may have been influenced by general screen reader
tech.

They might first want to start with the Windows OS then ultimately
create a VoiceOver competitor for future Windows devices.

With technology advancing as it does, why not accept the help from
one of the biggest computer software developers in the world?
Furthermore,
this
development might yield discoveries which will help with other
related disabilities experienced by an aging population.

JR

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On
Behalf Of Carlos
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 4:03 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the
Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

And honestly, the focus on Narrator seems like wasted time and
somewhat excessive in my opinion. How many people really use
Narrator on a daily basis? The fact is that most users only run
Narrator in an emergency or to finish setting up Windows. It is
useful and convenient to have, but for most it does not provide
enough functionality to be used as a primary screen reader. These
days those who cannot afford one of the expensive screen readers will
most likely use NVDA. And Narrator has a long way to go before it
can compete with NVDA. That being the case, I believe their time and
effort would be better spent on improving accessibility in other
areas. If NVDA did not exist, then the efforts to improve Narrator
might seem more significant, but again in my opinion at this time,
it just seems like wasted effort.

----- Original Message -----
From: Gene <mailto:gsasner@ripco.com
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 6:23 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the
Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

I have defended Microsoft for years when I thought they deserved it.
I will
not defend them in their accessibility implementation of
accessibility in Windows 10. My thoughts on the blog entry are below






--
Facebook: m.facebook.com/aidan.maher92
Skype: andries4451
Twitter: smarttalk7
Audioboo: www.audioboo.com/DjSpotlight


Re: Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog #article

Jim Wohlgamuth
 

Well, that is my point exactly.  It is more a matter of what you are use to.  Yes Gene, I think the copy and paste feature that GW-Micro adopted was totally unnecessary and Since I have used W.E. for about 8 years now I haven't really found any real difficulties aside from there release of version 8 which wasn't all that great in my opinion.  But like I said, people use what they are most comfortable with-and W9indow-Eyes happens to be what I am most comfortable with.  For long-time users of JAWs I strongly suspect they feel the same way about what they are using.  Just My 'nonprofessional opinion>.   

On 02-Jul-16 19:52, Gene wrote:
A gross overgeneralization.  In certain specific situations, Window-eyes may be better.  They made some improvements a year or two ago that may help in certain specific situations.  They don't apply or help in most.  And the developers of Window-eyes adopted nonstandard copy and paste commands.  I consider that completely unacceptable.  You don't abandon standard Windows commands unless there is a compelling reason to do so. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 6:44 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

You using Edge lends credence to what a Window Eyes told me:

She said that JAWS was mostly a better and easier to use
screen reader, but that Window Eyes was better on the Net.

Bye for now,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jim Wohlgamuth
Sent: Saturday, July 2, 2016 7:33 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility
with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft
Accessibility Blog

Hi there


 Marie and Group! I agree with marie and yes there is a long
way to go to improve accessibility I am now using my
computer in ways that I never thought I could.  There are
still a lot of programs that need a great deal of work but
the fact that we are  able to discuss it at  all says a
great deal for just how far accessibilty has  come.  Yes I
do use Edge to a very small degree and it does work <Nothing
to write home about though>. Yes I am using Window-Eyes and
have never really used JAWs except when I am at the local
Michigan Works office.  Oh and I have used it to a smaller
degree at the local library.  Personally I still prefer W.E.
Although I think that is more a matter of what you are used
to using.  In any event, we will just have to wait and see
just what MicroSoft actually comes up with before we really
start screaming<SMILE!>  Just my thoughts.  Have A Good 1!
de
<KF8LT><Jim>.    

On 02-Jul-16 18:00, Marie wrote:


While this is true, I have upgraded 3 computers to
Win 10 with no sighted assistance only because the
improvements to Narrator allowed me to use it for the
process. And , for one think we should applaud every effort
made to increase accessibility. We have to remember that we
are a small percentage of the population and I appreciate
what we have and are able to do with the technology
provided.
Marie


-----Original Message----- From: Carlos
Sent: Saturday, July 2, 2016 5:46 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on
accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update |
Microsoft Accessibility Blog

Edge was mentioned as one of the items who's
accessibility is being
improved.  I guess my point is that when I'm reading
about improvements to
accessibility, I find it difficult to become
enthusiastic about improvements
to Narrator which I know I personally won't be
using.  And I suspect most
other users who are honest with themselves know they
generally won't be
using them either.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Rob"
<captinlogic@...> <mailto:captinlogic@...
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 8:37 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on
accessibility with the Windows 10
Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog


Carlos <carlos1106@...>
<mailto:carlos1106@...>  wrote:


Gradually introducing features that most
people probably won't use because there is a
better free alternative seems like effort
that could be more productively
invested somewhere else for now.



Shouldn't they be working on making Edge more
accessible? I am not using it,
but based on the mutterings from the natives, it's
barely usable with screen
readers. What is the deal behind that anyway?


















Re: Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog #article

Gene
 

A gross overgeneralization.  In certain specific situations, Window-eyes may be better.  They made some improvements a year or two ago that may help in certain specific situations.  They don't apply or help in most.  And the developers of Window-eyes adopted nonstandard copy and paste commands.  I consider that completely unacceptable.  You don't abandon standard Windows commands unless there is a compelling reason to do so. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 6:44 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

You using Edge lends credence to what a Window Eyes told me:

She said that JAWS was mostly a better and easier to use
screen reader, but that Window Eyes was better on the Net.

Bye for now,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jim Wohlgamuth
Sent: Saturday, July 2, 2016 7:33 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility
with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft
Accessibility Blog

Hi there


 Marie and Group! I agree with marie and yes there is a long
way to go to improve accessibility I am now using my
computer in ways that I never thought I could.  There are
still a lot of programs that need a great deal of work but
the fact that we are  able to discuss it at  all says a
great deal for just how far accessibilty has  come.  Yes I
do use Edge to a very small degree and it does work <Nothing
to write home about though>. Yes I am using Window-Eyes and
have never really used JAWs except when I am at the local
Michigan Works office.  Oh and I have used it to a smaller
degree at the local library.  Personally I still prefer W.E.
Although I think that is more a matter of what you are used
to using.  In any event, we will just have to wait and see
just what MicroSoft actually comes up with before we really
start screaming<SMILE!>  Just my thoughts.  Have A Good 1!
de
<KF8LT><Jim>.    

On 02-Jul-16 18:00, Marie wrote:


While this is true, I have upgraded 3 computers to
Win 10 with no sighted assistance only because the
improvements to Narrator allowed me to use it for the
process. And , for one think we should applaud every effort
made to increase accessibility. We have to remember that we
are a small percentage of the population and I appreciate
what we have and are able to do with the technology
provided.
Marie


-----Original Message----- From: Carlos
Sent: Saturday, July 2, 2016 5:46 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on
accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update |
Microsoft Accessibility Blog

Edge was mentioned as one of the items who's
accessibility is being
improved.  I guess my point is that when I'm reading
about improvements to
accessibility, I find it difficult to become
enthusiastic about improvements
to Narrator which I know I personally won't be
using.  And I suspect most
other users who are honest with themselves know they
generally won't be
using them either.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Rob"
<captinlogic@...> <mailto:captinlogic@...
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 8:37 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on
accessibility with the Windows 10
Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog


Carlos <carlos1106@...>
<mailto:carlos1106@...>  wrote:


Gradually introducing features that most
people probably won't use because there is a
better free alternative seems like effort
that could be more productively
invested somewhere else for now.



Shouldn't they be working on making Edge more
accessible? I am not using it,
but based on the mutterings from the natives, it's
barely usable with screen
readers. What is the deal behind that anyway?

















Re: Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog #article

Carolyn Arnold
 

You using Edge lends credence to what a Window Eyes told me:

She said that JAWS was mostly a better and easier to use
screen reader, but that Window Eyes was better on the Net.

Bye for now,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jim Wohlgamuth
Sent: Saturday, July 2, 2016 7:33 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility
with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft
Accessibility Blog

Hi there


Marie and Group! I agree with marie and yes there is a long
way to go to improve accessibility I am now using my
computer in ways that I never thought I could. There are
still a lot of programs that need a great deal of work but
the fact that we are able to discuss it at all says a
great deal for just how far accessibilty has come. Yes I
do use Edge to a very small degree and it does work <Nothing
to write home about though>. Yes I am using Window-Eyes and
have never really used JAWs except when I am at the local
Michigan Works office. Oh and I have used it to a smaller
degree at the local library. Personally I still prefer W.E.
Although I think that is more a matter of what you are used
to using. In any event, we will just have to wait and see
just what MicroSoft actually comes up with before we really
start screaming<SMILE!> Just my thoughts. Have A Good 1!
de
<KF8LT><Jim>.

On 02-Jul-16 18:00, Marie wrote:


While this is true, I have upgraded 3 computers to
Win 10 with no sighted assistance only because the
improvements to Narrator allowed me to use it for the
process. And , for one think we should applaud every effort
made to increase accessibility. We have to remember that we
are a small percentage of the population and I appreciate
what we have and are able to do with the technology
provided.
Marie


-----Original Message----- From: Carlos
Sent: Saturday, July 2, 2016 5:46 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on
accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update |
Microsoft Accessibility Blog

Edge was mentioned as one of the items who's
accessibility is being
improved. I guess my point is that when I'm reading
about improvements to
accessibility, I find it difficult to become
enthusiastic about improvements
to Narrator which I know I personally won't be
using. And I suspect most
other users who are honest with themselves know they
generally won't be
using them either.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Rob"
<captinlogic@gmail.com> <mailto:captinlogic@gmail.com>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 8:37 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on
accessibility with the Windows 10
Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog


Carlos <carlos1106@nyc.rr.com>
<mailto:carlos1106@nyc.rr.com> wrote:


Gradually introducing features that most
people probably won't use because there is a
better free alternative seems like effort
that could be more productively
invested somewhere else for now.



Shouldn't they be working on making Edge more
accessible? I am not using it,
but based on the mutterings from the natives, it's
barely usable with screen
readers. What is the deal behind that anyway?


Re: Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog #article

Jim Wohlgamuth
 

Hi there

 Marie and Group! I agree with marie and yes there is a long way to go to improve accessibility I am now using my computer in ways that I never thought I could.  There are still a lot of programs that need a great deal of work but the fact that we are  able to discuss it at  all says a great deal for just how far accessibilty has  come.  Yes I do use Edge to a very small degree and it does work <Nothing to write home about though>. Yes I am using Window-Eyes and have never really used JAWs except when I am at the local Michigan Works office.  Oh and I have used it to a smaller degree at the local library.  Personally I still prefer W.E.  Although I think that is more a matter of what you are used to using.  In any event, we will just have to wait and see just what MicroSoft actually comes up with before we really start screaming<SMILE!>  Just my thoughts.  Have A Good 1! de
<KF8LT><Jim>.    

On 02-Jul-16 18:00, Marie wrote:
While this is true, I have upgraded 3 computers to Win 10 with no sighted assistance only because the improvements to Narrator allowed me to use it for the process. And , for one think we should applaud every effort made to increase accessibility. We have to remember that we are a small percentage of the population and I appreciate what we have and are able to do with the technology provided.
Marie


-----Original Message----- From: Carlos
Sent: Saturday, July 2, 2016 5:46 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

Edge was mentioned as one of the items who's accessibility is being
improved.  I guess my point is that when I'm reading about improvements to
accessibility, I find it difficult to become enthusiastic about improvements
to Narrator which I know I personally won't be using.  And I suspect most
other users who are honest with themselves know they generally won't be
using them either.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Rob" <captinlogic@...>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 8:37 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10
Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog


Carlos <carlos1106@...> wrote:
Gradually introducing features that most people probably won't use because there is a
better free alternative seems like effort that could be more productively
invested somewhere else for now.

Shouldn't they be working on making Edge more accessible? I am not using it,
but based on the mutterings from the natives, it's barely usable with screen
readers. What is the deal behind that anyway?











Re: jaws question!

Dave Mitchel
 

thanks to both you and carlos! this one did it fine.
sound scheme to classic and I found out this can be done by shift tab while on the classic menu itself.
no matter what I will not go quite as crazy quite so fast now. lol
thanks again guys!
 

From: Mike B.
Sent: Saturday, July 2, 2016 4:05 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] jaws question!
 
Hi Dave,
 
Another thing to look at is your Speech & Sound Schemes.  Try the following.
1. Press, Insert + 6, to open the Settings Center, & press, control, shift, + D, to open Setttings Center default all applications.
2. Arrow down to, Speech & Sound Schemes, ritht arrow to open.
3. Arrow down 1 time to hear what your active speech & sound scheme is.  It should say, Classic.
4. If Jaws reports something different, arrow down to, Modify Scheme, & press the spacebar to open.
5. Classic, is #2 in the list.  With Classic highlighted, tab to, Okay, press the spacebar, you'll get a message spacebar the, yes button, tab to, Apply, press the spacebar, tab to, Okay, press enter to save & close.
Take care.
Mike
Sent from my iBarstool.  Go Dodgers!
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 3:50 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] jaws question!
 
seems like all programs. I tried Word-pad and internet exploder and WLM and all do it.
 
 
From: Mike B.
Sent: Saturday, July 2, 2016 3:46 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] jaws question!
 
Hi Dave,
 
Is Jaws doing this in all applications or just a certain 1?
Take care.
Mike
Sent from my iBarstool.  Go Dodgers!
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 3:15 PM
Subject: [TechTalk] jaws question!
 
I just got my computer back working today. I had to have a new power supply put in. now I am back and running on it, but Jaws is now telling me the font and color in messages. very irritating and I cannot find where to change the setting. help please! I really don’t care what font or background there is visible.
thanks in advance! Dave oh, jaws 17 on W8.1


Re: jaws question!

Mike B <mb69mach1@...>
 


Hi Dave,
 
Another thing to look at is your Speech & Sound Schemes.  Try the following.
1. Press, Insert + 6, to open the Settings Center, & press, control, shift, + D, to open Setttings Center default all applications.
2. Arrow down to, Speech & Sound Schemes, ritht arrow to open.
3. Arrow down 1 time to hear what your active speech & sound scheme is.  It should say, Classic. 
4. If Jaws reports something different, arrow down to, Modify Scheme, & press the spacebar to open.
5. Classic, is #2 in the list.  With Classic highlighted, tab to, Okay, press the spacebar, you'll get a message spacebar the, yes button, tab to, Apply, press the spacebar, tab to, Okay, press enter to save & close.
Take care.
Mike
Sent from my iBarstool.  Go Dodgers!

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 3:50 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] jaws question!

seems like all programs. I tried Word-pad and internet exploder and WLM and all do it.
 
 
From: Mike B.
Sent: Saturday, July 2, 2016 3:46 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] jaws question!
 
Hi Dave,
 
Is Jaws doing this in all applications or just a certain 1?
Take care.
Mike
Sent from my iBarstool.  Go Dodgers!
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 3:15 PM
Subject: [TechTalk] jaws question!
 
I just got my computer back working today. I had to have a new power supply put in. now I am back and running on it, but Jaws is now telling me the font and color in messages. very irritating and I cannot find where to change the setting. help please! I really don’t care what font or background there is visible.
thanks in advance! Dave oh, jaws 17 on W8.1


Re: How frequently do you use the Windows Narrator screen reader? #poll

David Ferrin <df7782@...>
 

No large deal, I will probably go ahead and sign up so to speak to see what there is to find up there.
 

From: Carlos
Sent: Saturday, July 2, 2016 10:15 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How frequently do you use the Windows Narrator screen reader? #poll
 
No worries.  There are really only advantages if you are subscribed to multiple groups.io lists using the same Email address or you want to access certain areas of a group's page like the files section, any sections which are not made public by the moderators, and so on.
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 10:08 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How frequently do you use the Windows Narrator screen reader? #poll
 
I noticed that in your original message that it required a login. I will have to create an account first, but since that other person responded on list I figured it wouldn’t hurt. When I get a chance I’ll go ahead and setup an account. The question is there any advantage to doing that other than replying to this survey?
 
From: Carlos
Sent: Saturday, July 2, 2016 9:49 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How frequently do you use the Windows Narrator screen reader? #poll
 
LOL click on the
link and choose an option to make it official.  This way everyone can also view the results of the poll.
----- Original Message -----
From: Loy
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 9:45 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How frequently do you use the Windows Narrator screen reader? #poll
 
I never use narrator.
----- Original Message -----
From: Carlos
Sent: Saturday, July 2, 2016 9:39 AM
Subject: [TechTalk] How frequently do you use the Windows Narrator screen reader? #poll
 

A new poll has been created:

Just for fun and because we rarely use this feature.

 

1. I only use Narrator for emergencies
2. I never use Narrator
3. I use Narrator regularly

Vote Now

David Ferrin
Life is what happens after you have already made other plans.
David Ferrin
Life is what happens after you have already made other plans.


Re: jaws question!

Dave Mitchel
 

seems like all programs. I tried Word-pad and internet exploder and WLM and all do it.
 
 

From: Mike B.
Sent: Saturday, July 2, 2016 3:46 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] jaws question!
 
Hi Dave,
 
Is Jaws doing this in all applications or just a certain 1?
Take care.
Mike
Sent from my iBarstool.  Go Dodgers!
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 3:15 PM
Subject: [TechTalk] jaws question!
 
I just got my computer back working today. I had to have a new power supply put in. now I am back and running on it, but Jaws is now telling me the font and color in messages. very irritating and I cannot find where to change the setting. help please! I really don’t care what font or background there is visible.
thanks in advance! Dave oh, jaws 17 on W8.1


Re: jaws question!

Carlos
 


For once I'm guessing since I'm not sure about this setting, but you can try the following.
 
1. Press JAWS key and 6 to open the Settings Center.
 
2. Press Control Shift D to open the default configuration file.
 
3. Tab to the treeview and arrow down to
"Text Analyzer"
 
4. Press the Right Arrow key to expand it.
 
5. Arrow down to
"Font Changes to Check"
 
6. Press the Right Arrow key to expand it.
 
7. Uncheck the items
"Name"
and
"Color"
and possibly
"Size"
and
"Attributes"
as well depending on how much unwanted feedback you are receiving.
 
8. Select the
"OK"
button to close the Settings Center and save the changes.

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 6:15 PM
Subject: [TechTalk] jaws question!

I just got my computer back working today. I had to have a new power supply put in. now I am back and running on it, but Jaws is now telling me the font and color in messages. very irritating and I cannot find where to change the setting. help please! I really don’t care what font or background there is visible.
thanks in advance! Dave oh, jaws 17 on W8.1


Re: jaws question!

Mike B <mb69mach1@...>
 


Hi Dave,
 
Is Jaws doing this in all applications or just a certain 1?
Take care.
Mike
Sent from my iBarstool.  Go Dodgers!

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 3:15 PM
Subject: [TechTalk] jaws question!

I just got my computer back working today. I had to have a new power supply put in. now I am back and running on it, but Jaws is now telling me the font and color in messages. very irritating and I cannot find where to change the setting. help please! I really don’t care what font or background there is visible.
thanks in advance! Dave oh, jaws 17 on W8.1


Re: Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog #article

Flor Lynch
 

Have you forgotten Window-Eyes, if you know it at all?

-----Original Message-----
From: Matt
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 1:05 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

Well I think MS is going somewhere but very slowly with Narrator. It is slowly becoming better and better! here is my three main screen readers in order. Jaws, NVDA and Narrator!
Yes Narrator has a long way to go will it get there ? No one really knows that answer for sure but MS!


Matt.from.florida@gmail.com


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jeremy
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 8:01 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

Yeah, but they might be going somewhere with it which we don't know about just yet. Some of the features discussed in the article seem as though they may have been influenced by general screen reader tech.

They might first want to start with the Windows OS then ultimately create a VoiceOver competitor for future Windows devices.

With technology advancing as it does, why not accept the help from one of the biggest computer software developers in the world? Furthermore, this development might yield discoveries which will help with other related disabilities experienced by an aging population.

JR

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Carlos
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 4:03 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

And honestly, the focus on Narrator seems like wasted time and somewhat excessive in my opinion. How many people really use Narrator on a daily basis? The fact is that most users only run Narrator in an emergency or to finish setting up Windows. It is useful and convenient to have, but for most it does not provide enough functionality to be used as a primary screen reader. These days those who cannot afford one of the expensive screen readers will most likely use NVDA. And Narrator has a long way to go before it can compete with NVDA. That being the case, I believe their time and effort would be better spent on improving accessibility in other areas. If NVDA did not exist, then the efforts to improve Narrator might seem more significant, but again in my opinion at this time, it just seems like wasted effort.

----- Original Message -----
From: Gene <mailto:gsasner@ripco.com>
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 6:23 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

I have defended Microsoft for years when I thought they deserved it. I will not defend them in their accessibility implementation of accessibility in Windows 10. My thoughts on the blog entry are below.

Almost a year after Windows 10 has been released and Microsoft is still dealing with some of the kinds of things discussed in its blog? Being passionate about accessibility means not waiting a year and still having significant accessibility problems. Being passionate about accessibility means having reasonable accessibility at the time of initial release.

And please stop patronizing those who provide feedback. It isn't incredible. It's useful and good feedback but incredible? You aren't accomplishing anything by heaping excessive praise on those who provide feedback but patronizing them. We don't want to be called incredible nor our feedback. We want implementation and at a much faster and better rate. And does some of this feedback really have to be given in order for you to know about it? Since the nineties, Windows screen-readers have routinely offered speech that can go faster than 430 words per minute. If your accessibility team really needs user feedback to be aware of the need for fast speech, then what else is the team unaware of that should be common knowledge to anyone working in the field of accessibility?

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Christopher Hallsworth <mailto:challsworth2@icloud.com>
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 1:06 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog


https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/07/01/making-progress-on-accessibility-with-the-windows-10-anniversary-update/ <https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/07/01/making-progress-on-accessibility-with-the-windows-10-anniversary-update/>

Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update

With more than one billion people with disabilities in the world, Microsoft is passionate about accessibility and ensuring our products work for all our customers. Today we are excited to share additional details about the Windows 10 Anniversary Update which represents a significant step forward in our effort to make Microsoft products accessible. We encourage anyone already running Windows 10 to upgrade when the update becomes available. We also recognize that we must continue to invest in accessibility and are committed to the continued improvement of built-in features like Narrator and Magnifier as well as the accessibility of experiences and apps like Cortana, Mail and setup. If you are a user of Assistive Technology and are still using Windows 7 or Windows 8.1 and want to wait to upgrade, don’t forget that you will still have the opportunity to upgrade at no cost even after the Windows 10 free upgrade period ends. We will have a page available on July 29 for people using AT to take advantage of the free upgrade offer.

We have already shared many of these details with our Windows Insider program over the last several months, so this blog post will recap those areas and share a few new things. Customer feedback through the Windows Insider program and from our users with disabilities has been essential to helping us focus our work in several key areas. These include improving the screen reading experience with Narrator, the accessibility of experiences and apps like Microsoft Edge, Mail and the Start menu, as well as better tools and resources for developers to build more accessible apps and experiences.

Improved Screen Reading with Narrator

As we’ve stated in a series of recent blog posts, a lot of changes with Narrator that you will see as a part of the Windows 10 Anniversary Update were directly influenced by your incredible feedback. Those changes include:

Faster text to speech voices

We’ve added new voices to Narrator that offer a much faster top rate of speech. Our current voices average a maximum of roughly 400 words per minute. The new voices average nearly twice that at approximately 800 words per minute.

New languages in Narrator

We continue to add new international languages for Narrator, including Arabic and several Nordic languages. The following new languages will be available either with the corresponding international version of Windows or will be available for download.

Spanish (Mexico) French (Canada) Portuguese (Brazil)
Arabic (Egypt) Catalan (Spain) Danish (Denmark)
Finnish (Finland) Norwegian (Norway) Dutch (Belgium)
Dutch (Netherlands) Portuguese (Portugal) Swedish (Sweden)
Turkish (Turkey)
More familiar keyboard navigation

Keyboard commands in Narrator are now more familiar to users of other screen readers. Some keyboard interactions have been simplified to ensure better ergonomics, making them easier to type.

Introducing scan mode

We’ve introduced a new navigation mode to Narrator called Scan mode. Scan Mode is turned on with a press of CAPS LOCK and SPACE. While you are in Scan mode you can press SPACE to activate an item of interest, such as following a link on a web page or pressing a button in an app.

Six levels of verbosity

Narrator now supports six levels of verbosity for giving you more details about the characteristics of text. You can cycle through these modes by pressing CAPS LOCK + CTRL + (PLUS). For example, at what we call Verbose mode 0 (zero), you will hear just the text. At verbose mode 1, you might hear if the text is a heading. At other verbose levels, you will get varying indications of other text properties, like text color or formatting.

Punctuation Modes

Narrator now gives you more control over how much punctuation you hear when reading text. CAPS LOCK+ALT+(PLUS) and CAPS LOCK+ALT+(MINUS) cycle through the settings for punctuation. The settings for punctuation include none, some, most, all and math along with default.

Now announcing AutoSuggest results

Many applications in Windows 10 offer automatic suggestions as you enter information. For example, when you start entering a search term in an application search box you may get suggestions based on what you are entering. With Narrator you will now get a verbal hint with an audio indication when these suggestions are available.

Feedback made easy

Pressing CAPS LOCK + E + E when running Narrator is an easy way to send us feedback. This shortcut will bring up a feedback form where you can submit comments and suggestions about your experience with Narrator.

User guides and documentation

Our documentation team has been working hard to update the resources available to those who are learning how to use Narrator. We are looking forward to providing improved and more complete documentation like an updated Narrator user guide that will be available online when the Anniversary Update is released.

Working to make apps and experiences more accessible

Along with many of these accessibility updates to Windows 10, most of our app teams have also been making regular updates. Below are a few of the notable highlights.

More accessible browsing and reading with Microsoft Edge

In a series of blog posts, the Microsoft Edge team has been providing detailed updates on their accessibility progress. For example, the team has already shared how work to support modern web accessibility standards is helping developers more easily build accessible sites. And with the introduction of Microsoft Edge’s new accessibility architecture, we are working to make Edge a more inclusive and reliable experience for everyone. The team has also been working closely with the most popular third-party assistive technology vendors to guide them through the transition to this new platform.

In addition to the work the team has already shared, we are also excited for you to try the improvements to the end user accessibility experience of the Microsoft Edge app and PDF reader. These include broad support for tagged PDF files, and a wide range of improvements to common daily browsing features such as address bar, tabs, windows, and favorites.

Mail

Since the initial release of Windows 10 last summer, there have been many improvements to the accessibility of the Mail app. The Mail team described many of these updates in a blog last February and has since that time continued to make progress on things like improving the account setup experience when using a screen reader.

Cortana

You can more reliably operate search and Cortana with the keyboard, including things like navigating using arrow keys and tab order. There are also Improvements to high contrast that make the Cortana UI more legible in all contrast modes. The team has also made a number of general fixes that improve the experience with Cortana when using accessibility tools such as Windows Speech Recognition, Narrator and other screen-readers.

Groove

The Groove team has delivered a number of key updates for low vision users like better support for high DPI scaling and better high contrast support, including better color combinations and the boxing of text when appearing on top of album art. In addition, the team has done work to make the app a better experience when using a screen reader by adding a number of new shortcut keys as well as fixing a number of bugs when using Narrator.

Making accessibility easier for developers

In addition to the progress being made with our apps and built-in accessibility features we have been making investments in the tools and reference materials that developers rely on to create accessible experiences within their apps and websites. Here are a few developer resources we have already made available or will be a part of the Windows 10 anniversary Update.

New Tools

Developer tools are essential to making accessibility just work. The Visual Studio App Analysis tool was updated to helping devs to find, triage and fix accessibility errors like flagging controls that don’t have an accessible name. We also introduced a new developer mode in Narrator. Narrator dev mode can be turned on when Narrator is already running by pressing SHIFT + CAPS LOCK + F12. When dev mode is turned on the screen will be masked and will highlight only the accessible objects and the associated text that is exposed programmatically to Narrator.

XAML Improvements

The XAML team has improved the support for Mnemonics within Universal Windows Apps (UWA’s) allowing for better Access Key customizations. For example, the developer of a shopping app can now assign a custom Access Key like P, that can be activated by pressing ALT then the letter P, in order to activate the purchase button.

Improved Documentation

And finally the team has worked hard to improve the discoverability and update the documentation we provide for developers. We recently relaunched the accessibility developer hub as well as general design guidelines and sample code for accessibility.

Most importantly, your feedback is imperative to getting accessibility right. Keep letting us know what accessibility features are important to you. If you are already running Windows 10, you can simply press CAPS LOCK + E (two times) to bring up a feedback form when using Narrator. Or, if you are technically minded, you can help us by becoming a Windows Insider and giving us feedback on the latest updates to Windows as we are building them.

Previous Blogs and Resources:

Windows

Further Details on the Coming Improvements to Narrator in Windows 10 <https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/05/09/further-details-on-the-coming-improvements-to-narrator-in-windows-10/>
Improvements to Narrator in Windows 10 <https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/04/11/improvements-to-narrator-in-windows-10/>
Making Windows 10 and Office 365 more accessible: Our path forward <https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/02/24/making-windows-10-and-office-365-more-accessible-our-path-forward/>
Accessibility Update for Windows 10 Mail <https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/02/01/accessibility-update-for-windows-10-mail/>
Accessibility and the Windows 10 Free Upgrade <https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/05/06/accessibility-and-the-windows-10-free-upgrade/>
Microsoft Edge

Ensuring high-quality browser accessibility with automation <https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/05/26/new-edge-blog-ensuring-high-quality-browser-accessibility-with-automation/>
Building a more accessible user experience with HTML5 and UIA <https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/05/13/new-edge-blog-building-a-more-accessible-user-experience-with-html5-and-uia/>
Building a More Accessible Web Platform <https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/04/21/building-a-more-accessible-web-platform/>
Developers

Accessibility Design guidelines <https://msdn.microsoft.com/windows/uwp/accessibility/accessibility-overview>
Accessibility Developer Hub <https://developer.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/accessible-apps>


Re: Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog #article

Flor Lynch
 

As NVDA is open source, who would they buy it from? MS taking over NVDA doesn’t appear to be a good idea. Look at what’s happened to Skype since MS took that over? It’s become inefficient, and you’ve got to wait sometimes for an auto-update to complete, which takes a few minutes, before you can make that all-important scheduled call!  Also, Skype has suffered some outages in recent times, something that never happened in the ‘good old days’.
 

From: Matt
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 1:18 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

Well like I say MS might have other plans for it it is nice to have a fully integrated screen reader in the OS. Now maybe they will buy NVDA and dump Narrator! That is buy NVDA and keep the NVDA team as well!

 

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Carlos
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 7:03 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

 

And honestly, the focus on Narrator seems like wasted time and somewhat excessive in my opinion.  How many people really use Narrator on a daily basis?  The fact is that most users only run Narrator in an emergency or to finish setting up Windows.  It is useful and convenient to have, but for most it does not provide enough functionality to be used as a primary screen reader.  These days those who cannot afford one of the expensive screen readers will most likely use NVDA.  And Narrator has a long way to go before it can compete with NVDA.  That being the case, I believe their time and effort would be better spent on improving accessibility in other areas.  If NVDA did not exist, then the efforts to improve Narrator might seem more significant, but again in my opinion at this time, it just seems like wasted effort.

----- Original Message -----

From: Gene

Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 6:23 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

 

I have defended Microsoft for years when I thought they deserved it.  I will not defend them in their accessibility implementation of accessibility in Windows 10.  My thoughts on the blog entry are below. 


Almost a year after Windows 10 has been released and Microsoft is still dealing with some of the kinds of things discussed in its blog?  Being passionate about accessibility means not waiting a year and still having significant accessibility problems.  Being passionate about accessibility means having reasonable accessibility at the time of initial release. 

 

And please stop patronizing those who provide feedback.  It isn't incredible.  It's useful and good feedback but incredible?  You aren't accomplishing anything by heaping excessive praise on those who provide feedback but patronizing them.  We don't want to be called incredible nor our feedback.  We want implementation and at a much faster and better rate.  And does some of this feedback really have to be given in order for you to know about it?  Since the nineties, Windows screen-readers have routinely offered speech that can go faster than 430 words per minute.  If your accessibility team really needs user feedback to be aware of the need for fast speech, then what else is the team unaware of that should be common knowledge to anyone working in the field of accessibility? 

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 1:06 AM

Subject: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

 


> https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/07/01/making-progress-on-accessibility-with-the-windows-10-anniversary-update/ <https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/07/01/making-progress-on-accessibility-with-the-windows-10-anniversary-update/>
>
> Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update
>
> With more than one billion people with disabilities in the world, Microsoft is passionate about accessibility and ensuring our products work for all our customers. Today we are excited to share additional details about the Windows 10 Anniversary Update which represents a significant step forward in our effort to make Microsoft products accessible. We encourage anyone already running Windows 10 to upgrade when the update becomes available. We also recognize that we must continue to invest in accessibility and are committed to the continued improvement of built-in features like Narrator and Magnifier as well as the accessibility of experiences and apps like Cortana, Mail and setup. If you are a user of Assistive Technology and are still using Windows 7 or Windows 8.1 and want to wait to upgrade, don’t forget that you will still have the opportunity to upgrade at no cost even after the Windows 10 free upgrade period ends. We will have a page available on July 29 for people using AT to take advantage of the free upgrade offer.
>
> We have already shared many of these details with our Windows Insider program over the last several months, so this blog post will recap those areas and share a few new things. Customer feedback through the Windows Insider program and from our users with disabilities has been essential to helping us focus our work in several key areas. These include improving the screen reading experience with Narrator, the accessibility of experiences and apps like Microsoft Edge, Mail and the Start menu, as well as better tools and resources for developers to build more accessible apps and experiences.
>
> Improved Screen Reading with Narrator
>
> As we’ve stated in a series of recent blog posts, a lot of changes with Narrator that you will see as a part of the Windows 10 Anniversary Update were directly influenced by your incredible feedback. Those changes include:
>
> Faster text to speech voices
>
> We’ve added new voices to Narrator that offer a much faster top rate of speech. Our current voices average a maximum of roughly 400 words per minute. The new voices average nearly twice that at approximately 800 words per minute.
>
> New languages in Narrator
>
> We continue to add new international languages for Narrator, including Arabic and several Nordic languages. The following new languages will be available either with the corresponding international version of Windows or will be available for download.
>
> Spanish (Mexico) French (Canada) Portuguese (Brazil)
> Arabic (Egypt) Catalan (Spain) Danish (Denmark)
> Finnish (Finland) Norwegian (Norway) Dutch (Belgium)
> Dutch (Netherlands) Portuguese (Portugal) Swedish (Sweden)
> Turkish (Turkey)
> More familiar keyboard navigation
>
> Keyboard commands in Narrator are now more familiar to users of other screen readers. Some keyboard interactions have been simplified to ensure better ergonomics, making them easier to type.
>
> Introducing scan mode
>
> We’ve introduced a new navigation mode to Narrator called Scan mode. Scan Mode is turned on with a press of CAPS LOCK and SPACE. While you are in Scan mode you can press SPACE to activate an item of interest, such as following a link on a web page or pressing a button in an app.
>
> Six levels of verbosity
>
> Narrator now supports six levels of verbosity for giving you more details about the characteristics of text. You can cycle through these modes by pressing CAPS LOCK + CTRL + (PLUS). For example, at what we call Verbose mode 0 (zero), you will hear just the text. At verbose mode 1, you might hear if the text is a heading. At other verbose levels, you will get varying indications of other text properties, like text color or formatting.
>
> Punctuation Modes
>
> Narrator now gives you more control over how much punctuation you hear when reading text. CAPS LOCK+ALT+(PLUS) and CAPS LOCK+ALT+(MINUS) cycle through the settings for punctuation. The settings for punctuation include none, some, most, all and math along with default.
>
> Now announcing AutoSuggest results
>
> Many applications in Windows 10 offer automatic suggestions as you enter information. For example, when you start entering a search term in an application search box you may get suggestions based on what you are entering. With Narrator you will now get a verbal hint with an audio indication when these suggestions are available.
>
> Feedback made easy
>
> Pressing CAPS LOCK + E + E when running Narrator is an easy way to send us feedback. This shortcut will bring up a feedback form where you can submit comments and suggestions about your experience with Narrator.
>
> User guides and documentation
>
> Our documentation team has been working hard to update the resources available to those who are learning how to use Narrator. We are looking forward to providing improved and more complete documentation like an updated Narrator user guide that will be available online when the Anniversary Update is released.
>
> Working to make apps and experiences more accessible
>
> Along with many of these accessibility updates to Windows 10, most of our app teams have also been making regular updates. Below are a few of the notable highlights.
>
> More accessible browsing and reading with Microsoft Edge
>
> In a series of blog posts, the Microsoft Edge team has been providing detailed updates on their accessibility progress. For example, the team has already shared how work to support modern web accessibility standards is helping developers more easily build accessible sites. And with the introduction of Microsoft Edge’s new accessibility architecture, we are working to make Edge a more inclusive and reliable experience for everyone. The team has also been working closely with the most popular third-party assistive technology vendors to guide them through the transition to this new platform.
>
> In addition to the work the team has already shared, we are also excited for you to try the improvements to the end user accessibility experience of the Microsoft Edge app and PDF reader. These include broad support for tagged PDF files, and a wide range of improvements to common daily browsing features such as address bar, tabs, windows, and favorites.
>
> Mail
>
> Since the initial release of Windows 10 last summer, there have been many improvements to the accessibility of the Mail app. The Mail team described many of these updates in a blog last February and has since that time continued to make progress on things like improving the account setup experience when using a screen reader.
>
> Cortana
>
> You can more reliably operate search and Cortana with the keyboard, including things like navigating using arrow keys and tab order. There are also Improvements to high contrast that make the Cortana UI more legible in all contrast modes. The team has also made a number of general fixes that improve the experience with Cortana when using accessibility tools such as Windows Speech Recognition, Narrator and other screen-readers.
>
> Groove
>
> The Groove team has delivered a number of key updates for low vision users like better support for high DPI scaling and better high contrast support, including better color combinations and the boxing of text when appearing on top of album art. In addition, the team has done work to make the app a better experience when using a screen reader by adding a number of new shortcut keys as well as fixing a number of bugs when using Narrator.
>
> Making accessibility easier for developers
>
> In addition to the progress being made with our apps and built-in accessibility features we have been making investments in the tools and reference materials that developers rely on to create accessible experiences within their apps and websites. Here are a few developer resources we have already made available or will be a part of the Windows 10 anniversary Update.
>
> New Tools
>
> Developer tools are essential to making accessibility just work. The Visual Studio App Analysis tool was updated to helping devs to find, triage and fix accessibility errors like flagging controls that don’t have an accessible name. We also introduced a new developer mode in Narrator. Narrator dev mode can be turned on when Narrator is already running by pressing SHIFT + CAPS LOCK + F12. When dev mode is turned on the screen will be masked and will highlight only the accessible objects and the associated text that is exposed programmatically to Narrator.
>
> XAML Improvements
>
> The XAML team has improved the support for Mnemonics within Universal Windows Apps (UWA’s) allowing for better Access Key customizations. For example, the developer of a shopping app can now assign a custom Access Key like P, that can be activated by pressing ALT then the letter P, in order to activate the purchase button.
>
> Improved Documentation
>
> And finally the team has worked hard to improve the discoverability and update the documentation we provide for developers. We recently relaunched the accessibility developer hub as well as general design guidelines and sample code for accessibility.
>
> Most importantly, your feedback is imperative to getting accessibility right. Keep letting us know what accessibility features are important to you. If you are already running Windows 10, you can simply press CAPS LOCK + E (two times) to bring up a feedback form when using Narrator. Or, if you are technically minded, you can help us by becoming a Windows Insider and giving us feedback on the latest updates to Windows as we are building them.
>
> Previous Blogs and Resources:
>
> Windows
>
> Further Details on the Coming Improvements to Narrator in Windows 10 <https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/05/09/further-details-on-the-coming-improvements-to-narrator-in-windows-10/>
> Improvements to Narrator in Windows 10 <https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/04/11/improvements-to-narrator-in-windows-10/>
> Making Windows 10 and Office 365 more accessible: Our path forward <https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/02/24/making-windows-10-and-office-365-more-accessible-our-path-forward/>
> Accessibility Update for Windows 10 Mail <https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/02/01/accessibility-update-for-windows-10-mail/>
> Accessibility and the Windows 10 Free Upgrade <https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/05/06/accessibility-and-the-windows-10-free-upgrade/>
> Microsoft Edge
>
> Ensuring high-quality browser accessibility with automation <https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/05/26/new-edge-blog-ensuring-high-quality-browser-accessibility-with-automation/>
> Building a more accessible user experience with HTML5 and UIA <https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/05/13/new-edge-blog-building-a-more-accessible-user-experience-with-html5-and-uia/>
> Building a More Accessible Web Platform <https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/04/21/building-a-more-accessible-web-platform/>
> Developers
>
> Accessibility Design guidelines <https://msdn.microsoft.com/windows/uwp/accessibility/accessibility-overview>
> Accessibility Developer Hub <https://developer.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/accessible-apps>



Re: Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

Brent Harding
 


As high-tech as dad and I got with the deer hunting is that we got a 6-inch letoff on the scope so that he can see through it just enough when I'm holding the rifle to guide me where to aim and shoot. We haven't missed very much, which seemed surprising with all the potential for a small tiny movement to mess things up. For quite awhile, Wisconsin didn't have it legal to use the laser, even for disabled hunters, so we have gone without it even though you could use it now. I don't know that just any guide could replace dad and be able to see through the scope with letoff like that while I hold the gun. The biggest thing one could think to improve would be a way to not make so much noise with the chairs when the shot we planned before we go out there to have that deer coming flips the opposite way. Camera scopes could probably make it easier for other guides that can't quite do what dad does, like the kind they might use on those outdoor TV shows, but I'm not even sure if they show the shot on those. .

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 1:57 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

I also totally agree.  Carlos, please keep every thing just like it is.
 
 
 
From: Matt
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 1:15 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology
 
Totally agree !


 
 
Matt.from.florida@...
Sent from my iPhone

On Jul 2, 2016, at 1:44 PM, Carlos <carlos1106@...> wrote:

I honestly can't understand why some people have such a narrow definition of the word technology.  The word technology is not a synonym for computer.  While I can understand that is usually the primary interest of discussion on such lists, I figured there were enough lists which exclusively discuss computer technology that trying to keep this list a bit more flexible wouldn't be considered unreasonable.
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 1:08 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology
 

Hi there Folks!

Wonder what this topic has to do with technology and accessibility? To my knowledge they do not make a gun with any sort of blindness technology-or do they..? I really do wish we could get this list back on topic and leave the gun talk to the chat list.  Personally I am 60 years old and have never owned a gun-and probably never will.  If I were to own a gun it would be somethihng like a shotgun so that if I actually had to shoot at someone in self defense, I might have a chance of hitting them.  We really don't need a bunch of Barney Fifes shooting themselves in the foot<SMILE!>.          I know there are folks out there who use guns responsibly and that is most of them.

  But I wonder just how many gun owners are blind or legally blind? Anyone no any stats on that?  Have A Good 1! de
<KF8LT><Jim Wohlgamuth>.
On 02-Jul-16 12:32, James Bentley wrote:
What's insane is that the general public can purchase a version of this sniper rifle that hits a very small target at over half a mile.

Yikes,  I think I will just stay in the house with the blinds drrawn.



-----Original Message----- From: Jeremy
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 11:17 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

Wow! that is freakin insane!

JR

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
James Bentley
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 9:07 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

The United States military has a computerized rifle and scope combination.
It first takes a photo of the entire target area.  Next, the shooter uses a
cursor on a touch screen to tell the computer where to put the bullet.
Next, the shooter aims at the target.  The computer fires the rifle only
when it sees that the rifle is aimed with pin point accuracy.  3 inch
Targets can be hit accurately at distances over two miles.



-----Original Message-----
From: Jeremy
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 10:56 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

Finally, a relevant informative post. Thank you for contributing to my small
pool of knowledge. :)

And while on the subject matter, I'm thinking an audio beep of some sort
might be able to alert the blind shooter than the object of interest is
within the cross hairs of scope. Key will be determining what is target
object and what is some sort of artifact.

JR

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Joe
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 8:47 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

There is now what some are calling a smart rifle, out of Texas. At $25,000,
it's beyond the reach of most enthusiasts, but it can fetch that price for
the level of precision it can automatically adjust to help the shooter
acquire a target. If technology has leaped that far, one can almost wonder
what credit, if any, the shooter gets, but my question is this: What
technology have the hunters among us used to rely a little less on sighted
assistance? I go deer hunting, but thus far I have leaned heavily on
discrete cues from sighted companions to know where and when to fire. It's
not a bad method. I've brought down three bucks in this fashion, and while
hunting can often be enjoyed with companions, it would be nice to
independently, but responsibly, engage and execute the target myself. Right
now I use a laser to help my sighted companions get a better sense of where
I am aiming. This allows me to hold and operate the rifle on my own, but
again, it feels inefficient. Any tips would be welcomed.

I'll note that while I am a member of a local shooting range, I have
hesitated to obtain a gun permit. I understand my shooting would be optimal
at very close range, but the risk of hitting someone innocent, however
small, still weighs on my conscience.

I realize for some the discussion of guns and hunting could be abhorrent. If
so, feel free to email me off list. For whatever it's worth, I eat what I
kill. I've never gone hunting for the mere sport. I've learned how to skin
my own kill, and I suppose one could argue the knife skill in doing so could
itself be viewed as a form of technology skill.

Not to stray too far off topic here, but any number of disasters could occur
in our lifetime and in our own backyard. In a scenario with no power and
extensive food shortage, that Windows machine isn't going to be worth a
whole lot except for maybe scrap metal. Our definition of "technology" just
might revert to what technology used to be. That is, the means to survive.

Best,

Joe

--
Musings of a Work in Progress:
www.JoeOrozco.com/

Twitter: @ScribblingJoe





















jaws question!

Dave Mitchel
 

I just got my computer back working today. I had to have a new power supply put in. now I am back and running on it, but Jaws is now telling me the font and color in messages. very irritating and I cannot find where to change the setting. help please! I really don’t care what font or background there is visible.
thanks in advance! Dave oh, jaws 17 on W8.1


Re: Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog #article

Carlos
 

There haven't been any improvements in Narrator which make completing the Windows setup any more or less difficult. This has been possible since Windows XP.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Marie" <magpie.mn@gmail.com>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 6:00 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog


While this is true, I have upgraded 3 computers to Win 10 with no sighted assistance only because the improvements to Narrator allowed me to use it for the process. And , for one think we should applaud every effort made to increase accessibility. We have to remember that we are a small percentage of the population and I appreciate what we have and are able to do with the technology provided.
Marie


-----Original Message-----
From: Carlos
Sent: Saturday, July 2, 2016 5:46 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

Edge was mentioned as one of the items who's accessibility is being
improved. I guess my point is that when I'm reading about improvements to
accessibility, I find it difficult to become enthusiastic about improvements
to Narrator which I know I personally won't be using. And I suspect most
other users who are honest with themselves know they generally won't be
using them either.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Rob" <captinlogic@gmail.com>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 8:37 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10
Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog


Carlos <carlos1106@nyc.rr.com> wrote:
Gradually introducing features that most people probably won't use because there is a
better free alternative seems like effort that could be more productively
invested somewhere else for now.
Shouldn't they be working on making Edge more accessible? I am not using it,
but based on the mutterings from the natives, it's barely usable with screen
readers. What is the deal behind that anyway?







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