Date   

Re: Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog #article

RJ Sandefur <manbatsandefur@...>
 

We could help make narrator a full screen reader if we really wanted it
bad enough. RJ

On 7/2/2016 1:19 PM, Marie wrote:
I find Narrator useful on occasion, but it is far from being a full
screen reader and I would hate it if they made it like the Apple
devices where it is your only choice.
Marie


-----Original Message----- From: Carlos
Sent: Saturday, July 2, 2016 5:33 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the
Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

If they are going somewhere with Narrator, then they should simply
release a
major upgrade when it is ready to be used as a full-blown screen
reader. At
this point it is wasted effort to introduce these minor changes since
it is
still not functional enough to be used by most on a daily basis.
Gradually
introducing features that most people probably won't use because there
is a
better free alternative seems like effort that could be more productively
invested somewhere else for now.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Jeremy" <jeremy.richards7@gmail.com>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 8:00 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the
Windows 10
Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog


Yeah, but they might be going somewhere with it which we don't know about
just yet. Some of the features discussed in the article seem as though
they
may have been influenced by general screen reader tech.

They might first want to start with the Windows OS then ultimately
create a
VoiceOver competitor for future Windows devices.

With technology advancing as it does, why not accept the help from one of
the biggest computer software developers in the world? Furthermore, this
development might yield discoveries which will help with other related
disabilities experienced by an aging population.

JR

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On
Behalf Of
Carlos
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 4:03 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the
Windows 10
Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

And honestly, the focus on Narrator seems like wasted time and somewhat
excessive in my opinion. How many people really use Narrator on a daily
basis? The fact is that most users only run Narrator in an emergency
or to
finish setting up Windows. It is useful and convenient to have, but for
most it does not provide enough functionality to be used as a primary
screen
reader. These days those who cannot afford one of the expensive screen
readers will most likely use NVDA. And Narrator has a long way to go
before
it can compete with NVDA. That being the case, I believe their time and
effort would be better spent on improving accessibility in other
areas. If
NVDA did not exist, then the efforts to improve Narrator might seem more
significant, but again in my opinion at this time, it just seems like
wasted
effort.

----- Original Message -----
From: Gene <mailto:gsasner@ripco.com>
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 6:23 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the
Windows 10
Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

I have defended Microsoft for years when I thought they deserved it.
I will
not defend them in their accessibility implementation of accessibility in
Windows 10. My thoughts on the blog entry are below.

Almost a year after Windows 10 has been released and Microsoft is still
dealing with some of the kinds of things discussed in its blog? Being
passionate about accessibility means not waiting a year and still having
significant accessibility problems. Being passionate about accessibility
means having reasonable accessibility at the time of initial release.

And please stop patronizing those who provide feedback. It isn't
incredible. It's useful and good feedback but incredible? You aren't
accomplishing anything by heaping excessive praise on those who provide
feedback but patronizing them. We don't want to be called incredible nor
our feedback. We want implementation and at a much faster and better
rate.
And does some of this feedback really have to be given in order for
you to
know about it? Since the nineties, Windows screen-readers have routinely
offered speech that can go faster than 430 words per minute. If your
accessibility team really needs user feedback to be aware of the need for
fast speech, then what else is the team unaware of that should be common
knowledge to anyone working in the field of accessibility?

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Christopher Hallsworth <mailto:challsworth2@icloud.com>
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 1:06 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10
Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog


https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/07/01/making-progress-on-accessibility-with-the-windows-10-anniversary-update/

<https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/07/01/making-progress-on-accessibility-with-the-windows-10-anniversary-update/>


Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update

With more than one billion people with disabilities in the world,
Microsoft is passionate about accessibility and ensuring our products
work
for all our customers. Today we are excited to share additional details
about the Windows 10 Anniversary Update which represents a significant
step forward in our effort to make Microsoft products accessible. We
encourage anyone already running Windows 10 to upgrade when the update
becomes available. We also recognize that we must continue to invest in
accessibility and are committed to the continued improvement of built-in
features like Narrator and Magnifier as well as the accessibility of
experiences and apps like Cortana, Mail and setup. If you are a user of
Assistive Technology and are still using Windows 7 or Windows 8.1 and
want
to wait to upgrade, don’t forget that you will still have the
opportunity
to upgrade at no cost even after the Windows 10 free upgrade period
ends.
We will have a page available on July 29 for people using AT to take
advantage of the free upgrade offer.

We have already shared many of these details with our Windows Insider
program over the last several months, so this blog post will recap those
areas and share a few new things. Customer feedback through the Windows
Insider program and from our users with disabilities has been
essential to
helping us focus our work in several key areas. These include improving
the screen reading experience with Narrator, the accessibility of
experiences and apps like Microsoft Edge, Mail and the Start menu, as
well
as better tools and resources for developers to build more accessible
apps
and experiences.

Improved Screen Reading with Narrator

As we’ve stated in a series of recent blog posts, a lot of changes with
Narrator that you will see as a part of the Windows 10 Anniversary
Update
were directly influenced by your incredible feedback. Those changes
include:

Faster text to speech voices

We’ve added new voices to Narrator that offer a much faster top rate of
speech. Our current voices average a maximum of roughly 400 words per
minute. The new voices average nearly twice that at approximately 800
words per minute.

New languages in Narrator

We continue to add new international languages for Narrator, including
Arabic and several Nordic languages. The following new languages will be
available either with the corresponding international version of Windows
or will be available for download.

Spanish (Mexico) French (Canada) Portuguese (Brazil)
Arabic (Egypt) Catalan (Spain) Danish (Denmark)
Finnish (Finland) Norwegian (Norway) Dutch (Belgium)
Dutch (Netherlands) Portuguese (Portugal) Swedish (Sweden)
Turkish (Turkey)
More familiar keyboard navigation

Keyboard commands in Narrator are now more familiar to users of other
screen readers. Some keyboard interactions have been simplified to
ensure
better ergonomics, making them easier to type.

Introducing scan mode

We’ve introduced a new navigation mode to Narrator called Scan mode.
Scan
Mode is turned on with a press of CAPS LOCK and SPACE. While you are in
Scan mode you can press SPACE to activate an item of interest, such as
following a link on a web page or pressing a button in an app.

Six levels of verbosity

Narrator now supports six levels of verbosity for giving you more
details
about the characteristics of text. You can cycle through these modes by
pressing CAPS LOCK + CTRL + (PLUS). For example, at what we call Verbose
mode 0 (zero), you will hear just the text. At verbose mode 1, you might
hear if the text is a heading. At other verbose levels, you will get
varying indications of other text properties, like text color or
formatting.

Punctuation Modes

Narrator now gives you more control over how much punctuation you hear
when reading text. CAPS LOCK+ALT+(PLUS) and CAPS LOCK+ALT+(MINUS) cycle
through the settings for punctuation. The settings for punctuation
include
none, some, most, all and math along with default.

Now announcing AutoSuggest results

Many applications in Windows 10 offer automatic suggestions as you enter
information. For example, when you start entering a search term in an
application search box you may get suggestions based on what you are
entering. With Narrator you will now get a verbal hint with an audio
indication when these suggestions are available.

Feedback made easy

Pressing CAPS LOCK + E + E when running Narrator is an easy way to
send us
feedback. This shortcut will bring up a feedback form where you can
submit
comments and suggestions about your experience with Narrator.

User guides and documentation

Our documentation team has been working hard to update the resources
available to those who are learning how to use Narrator. We are looking
forward to providing improved and more complete documentation like an
updated Narrator user guide that will be available online when the
Anniversary Update is released.

Working to make apps and experiences more accessible

Along with many of these accessibility updates to Windows 10, most of
our
app teams have also been making regular updates. Below are a few of the
notable highlights.

More accessible browsing and reading with Microsoft Edge

In a series of blog posts, the Microsoft Edge team has been providing
detailed updates on their accessibility progress. For example, the team
has already shared how work to support modern web accessibility
standards
is helping developers more easily build accessible sites. And with the
introduction of Microsoft Edge’s new accessibility architecture, we are
working to make Edge a more inclusive and reliable experience for
everyone. The team has also been working closely with the most popular
third-party assistive technology vendors to guide them through the
transition to this new platform.

In addition to the work the team has already shared, we are also excited
for you to try the improvements to the end user accessibility experience
of the Microsoft Edge app and PDF reader. These include broad support
for
tagged PDF files, and a wide range of improvements to common daily
browsing features such as address bar, tabs, windows, and favorites.

Mail

Since the initial release of Windows 10 last summer, there have been
many
improvements to the accessibility of the Mail app. The Mail team
described
many of these updates in a blog last February and has since that time
continued to make progress on things like improving the account setup
experience when using a screen reader.

Cortana

You can more reliably operate search and Cortana with the keyboard,
including things like navigating using arrow keys and tab order.
There are
also Improvements to high contrast that make the Cortana UI more legible
in all contrast modes. The team has also made a number of general fixes
that improve the experience with Cortana when using accessibility tools
such as Windows Speech Recognition, Narrator and other screen-readers.

Groove

The Groove team has delivered a number of key updates for low vision
users
like better support for high DPI scaling and better high contrast
support,
including better color combinations and the boxing of text when
appearing
on top of album art. In addition, the team has done work to make the
app a
better experience when using a screen reader by adding a number of new
shortcut keys as well as fixing a number of bugs when using Narrator.

Making accessibility easier for developers

In addition to the progress being made with our apps and built-in
accessibility features we have been making investments in the tools and
reference materials that developers rely on to create accessible
experiences within their apps and websites. Here are a few developer
resources we have already made available or will be a part of the
Windows
10 anniversary Update.

New Tools

Developer tools are essential to making accessibility just work. The
Visual Studio App Analysis tool was updated to helping devs to find,
triage and fix accessibility errors like flagging controls that don’t
have
an accessible name. We also introduced a new developer mode in Narrator.
Narrator dev mode can be turned on when Narrator is already running by
pressing SHIFT + CAPS LOCK + F12. When dev mode is turned on the screen
will be masked and will highlight only the accessible objects and the
associated text that is exposed programmatically to Narrator.

XAML Improvements

The XAML team has improved the support for Mnemonics within Universal
Windows Apps (UWA’s) allowing for better Access Key customizations. For
example, the developer of a shopping app can now assign a custom Access
Key like P, that can be activated by pressing ALT then the letter P, in
order to activate the purchase button.

Improved Documentation

And finally the team has worked hard to improve the discoverability and
update the documentation we provide for developers. We recently
relaunched
the accessibility developer hub as well as general design guidelines and
sample code for accessibility.

Most importantly, your feedback is imperative to getting accessibility
right. Keep letting us know what accessibility features are important to
you. If you are already running Windows 10, you can simply press CAPS
LOCK
+ E (two times) to bring up a feedback form when using Narrator. Or, if
you are technically minded, you can help us by becoming a Windows
Insider
and giving us feedback on the latest updates to Windows as we are
building
them.

Previous Blogs and Resources:

Windows

Further Details on the Coming Improvements to Narrator in Windows 10
<https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/05/09/further-details-on-the-coming-improvements-to-narrator-in-windows-10/>

Improvements to Narrator in Windows 10
<https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/04/11/improvements-to-narrator-in-windows-10/>

Making Windows 10 and Office 365 more accessible: Our path forward
<https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/02/24/making-windows-10-and-office-365-more-accessible-our-path-forward/>

Accessibility Update for Windows 10 Mail
<https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/02/01/accessibility-update-for-windows-10-mail/>

Accessibility and the Windows 10 Free Upgrade
<https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/05/06/accessibility-and-the-windows-10-free-upgrade/>

Microsoft Edge

Ensuring high-quality browser accessibility with automation
<https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/05/26/new-edge-blog-ensuring-high-quality-browser-accessibility-with-automation/>

Building a more accessible user experience with HTML5 and UIA
<https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/05/13/new-edge-blog-building-a-more-accessible-user-experience-with-html5-and-uia/>

Building a More Accessible Web Platform
<https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/04/21/building-a-more-accessible-web-platform/>

Developers

Accessibility Design guidelines
<https://msdn.microsoft.com/windows/uwp/accessibility/accessibility-overview>

Accessibility Developer Hub
<https://developer.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/accessible-apps>















Re: Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog #article

RJ Sandefur <manbatsandefur@...>
 

I am not usually one to use this type of strong language, but really?
How do you think NVDA and Jaws got to where they are? Feedback! Let's
all give narrator a chance. Microsoft alone won't make the screenreader,
but together, the end users,(Us the blind community) will make Narrator
a screenreader which could even beat out voice over if we really wanted
it bad enough. RJ

On 7/2/2016 1:19 PM, Marie wrote:
I find Narrator useful on occasion, but it is far from being a full
screen reader and I would hate it if they made it like the Apple
devices where it is your only choice.
Marie


-----Original Message----- From: Carlos
Sent: Saturday, July 2, 2016 5:33 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the
Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

If they are going somewhere with Narrator, then they should simply
release a
major upgrade when it is ready to be used as a full-blown screen
reader. At
this point it is wasted effort to introduce these minor changes since
it is
still not functional enough to be used by most on a daily basis.
Gradually
introducing features that most people probably won't use because there
is a
better free alternative seems like effort that could be more productively
invested somewhere else for now.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Jeremy" <jeremy.richards7@gmail.com>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 8:00 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the
Windows 10
Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog


Yeah, but they might be going somewhere with it which we don't know about
just yet. Some of the features discussed in the article seem as though
they
may have been influenced by general screen reader tech.

They might first want to start with the Windows OS then ultimately
create a
VoiceOver competitor for future Windows devices.

With technology advancing as it does, why not accept the help from one of
the biggest computer software developers in the world? Furthermore, this
development might yield discoveries which will help with other related
disabilities experienced by an aging population.

JR

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On
Behalf Of
Carlos
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 4:03 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the
Windows 10
Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

And honestly, the focus on Narrator seems like wasted time and somewhat
excessive in my opinion. How many people really use Narrator on a daily
basis? The fact is that most users only run Narrator in an emergency
or to
finish setting up Windows. It is useful and convenient to have, but for
most it does not provide enough functionality to be used as a primary
screen
reader. These days those who cannot afford one of the expensive screen
readers will most likely use NVDA. And Narrator has a long way to go
before
it can compete with NVDA. That being the case, I believe their time and
effort would be better spent on improving accessibility in other
areas. If
NVDA did not exist, then the efforts to improve Narrator might seem more
significant, but again in my opinion at this time, it just seems like
wasted
effort.

----- Original Message -----
From: Gene <mailto:gsasner@ripco.com>
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 6:23 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the
Windows 10
Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

I have defended Microsoft for years when I thought they deserved it.
I will
not defend them in their accessibility implementation of accessibility in
Windows 10. My thoughts on the blog entry are below.

Almost a year after Windows 10 has been released and Microsoft is still
dealing with some of the kinds of things discussed in its blog? Being
passionate about accessibility means not waiting a year and still having
significant accessibility problems. Being passionate about accessibility
means having reasonable accessibility at the time of initial release.

And please stop patronizing those who provide feedback. It isn't
incredible. It's useful and good feedback but incredible? You aren't
accomplishing anything by heaping excessive praise on those who provide
feedback but patronizing them. We don't want to be called incredible nor
our feedback. We want implementation and at a much faster and better
rate.
And does some of this feedback really have to be given in order for
you to
know about it? Since the nineties, Windows screen-readers have routinely
offered speech that can go faster than 430 words per minute. If your
accessibility team really needs user feedback to be aware of the need for
fast speech, then what else is the team unaware of that should be common
knowledge to anyone working in the field of accessibility?

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Christopher Hallsworth <mailto:challsworth2@icloud.com>
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 1:06 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10
Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog


https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/07/01/making-progress-on-accessibility-with-the-windows-10-anniversary-update/

<https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/07/01/making-progress-on-accessibility-with-the-windows-10-anniversary-update/>


Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update

With more than one billion people with disabilities in the world,
Microsoft is passionate about accessibility and ensuring our products
work
for all our customers. Today we are excited to share additional details
about the Windows 10 Anniversary Update which represents a significant
step forward in our effort to make Microsoft products accessible. We
encourage anyone already running Windows 10 to upgrade when the update
becomes available. We also recognize that we must continue to invest in
accessibility and are committed to the continued improvement of built-in
features like Narrator and Magnifier as well as the accessibility of
experiences and apps like Cortana, Mail and setup. If you are a user of
Assistive Technology and are still using Windows 7 or Windows 8.1 and
want
to wait to upgrade, don’t forget that you will still have the
opportunity
to upgrade at no cost even after the Windows 10 free upgrade period
ends.
We will have a page available on July 29 for people using AT to take
advantage of the free upgrade offer.

We have already shared many of these details with our Windows Insider
program over the last several months, so this blog post will recap those
areas and share a few new things. Customer feedback through the Windows
Insider program and from our users with disabilities has been
essential to
helping us focus our work in several key areas. These include improving
the screen reading experience with Narrator, the accessibility of
experiences and apps like Microsoft Edge, Mail and the Start menu, as
well
as better tools and resources for developers to build more accessible
apps
and experiences.

Improved Screen Reading with Narrator

As we’ve stated in a series of recent blog posts, a lot of changes with
Narrator that you will see as a part of the Windows 10 Anniversary
Update
were directly influenced by your incredible feedback. Those changes
include:

Faster text to speech voices

We’ve added new voices to Narrator that offer a much faster top rate of
speech. Our current voices average a maximum of roughly 400 words per
minute. The new voices average nearly twice that at approximately 800
words per minute.

New languages in Narrator

We continue to add new international languages for Narrator, including
Arabic and several Nordic languages. The following new languages will be
available either with the corresponding international version of Windows
or will be available for download.

Spanish (Mexico) French (Canada) Portuguese (Brazil)
Arabic (Egypt) Catalan (Spain) Danish (Denmark)
Finnish (Finland) Norwegian (Norway) Dutch (Belgium)
Dutch (Netherlands) Portuguese (Portugal) Swedish (Sweden)
Turkish (Turkey)
More familiar keyboard navigation

Keyboard commands in Narrator are now more familiar to users of other
screen readers. Some keyboard interactions have been simplified to
ensure
better ergonomics, making them easier to type.

Introducing scan mode

We’ve introduced a new navigation mode to Narrator called Scan mode.
Scan
Mode is turned on with a press of CAPS LOCK and SPACE. While you are in
Scan mode you can press SPACE to activate an item of interest, such as
following a link on a web page or pressing a button in an app.

Six levels of verbosity

Narrator now supports six levels of verbosity for giving you more
details
about the characteristics of text. You can cycle through these modes by
pressing CAPS LOCK + CTRL + (PLUS). For example, at what we call Verbose
mode 0 (zero), you will hear just the text. At verbose mode 1, you might
hear if the text is a heading. At other verbose levels, you will get
varying indications of other text properties, like text color or
formatting.

Punctuation Modes

Narrator now gives you more control over how much punctuation you hear
when reading text. CAPS LOCK+ALT+(PLUS) and CAPS LOCK+ALT+(MINUS) cycle
through the settings for punctuation. The settings for punctuation
include
none, some, most, all and math along with default.

Now announcing AutoSuggest results

Many applications in Windows 10 offer automatic suggestions as you enter
information. For example, when you start entering a search term in an
application search box you may get suggestions based on what you are
entering. With Narrator you will now get a verbal hint with an audio
indication when these suggestions are available.

Feedback made easy

Pressing CAPS LOCK + E + E when running Narrator is an easy way to
send us
feedback. This shortcut will bring up a feedback form where you can
submit
comments and suggestions about your experience with Narrator.

User guides and documentation

Our documentation team has been working hard to update the resources
available to those who are learning how to use Narrator. We are looking
forward to providing improved and more complete documentation like an
updated Narrator user guide that will be available online when the
Anniversary Update is released.

Working to make apps and experiences more accessible

Along with many of these accessibility updates to Windows 10, most of
our
app teams have also been making regular updates. Below are a few of the
notable highlights.

More accessible browsing and reading with Microsoft Edge

In a series of blog posts, the Microsoft Edge team has been providing
detailed updates on their accessibility progress. For example, the team
has already shared how work to support modern web accessibility
standards
is helping developers more easily build accessible sites. And with the
introduction of Microsoft Edge’s new accessibility architecture, we are
working to make Edge a more inclusive and reliable experience for
everyone. The team has also been working closely with the most popular
third-party assistive technology vendors to guide them through the
transition to this new platform.

In addition to the work the team has already shared, we are also excited
for you to try the improvements to the end user accessibility experience
of the Microsoft Edge app and PDF reader. These include broad support
for
tagged PDF files, and a wide range of improvements to common daily
browsing features such as address bar, tabs, windows, and favorites.

Mail

Since the initial release of Windows 10 last summer, there have been
many
improvements to the accessibility of the Mail app. The Mail team
described
many of these updates in a blog last February and has since that time
continued to make progress on things like improving the account setup
experience when using a screen reader.

Cortana

You can more reliably operate search and Cortana with the keyboard,
including things like navigating using arrow keys and tab order.
There are
also Improvements to high contrast that make the Cortana UI more legible
in all contrast modes. The team has also made a number of general fixes
that improve the experience with Cortana when using accessibility tools
such as Windows Speech Recognition, Narrator and other screen-readers.

Groove

The Groove team has delivered a number of key updates for low vision
users
like better support for high DPI scaling and better high contrast
support,
including better color combinations and the boxing of text when
appearing
on top of album art. In addition, the team has done work to make the
app a
better experience when using a screen reader by adding a number of new
shortcut keys as well as fixing a number of bugs when using Narrator.

Making accessibility easier for developers

In addition to the progress being made with our apps and built-in
accessibility features we have been making investments in the tools and
reference materials that developers rely on to create accessible
experiences within their apps and websites. Here are a few developer
resources we have already made available or will be a part of the
Windows
10 anniversary Update.

New Tools

Developer tools are essential to making accessibility just work. The
Visual Studio App Analysis tool was updated to helping devs to find,
triage and fix accessibility errors like flagging controls that don’t
have
an accessible name. We also introduced a new developer mode in Narrator.
Narrator dev mode can be turned on when Narrator is already running by
pressing SHIFT + CAPS LOCK + F12. When dev mode is turned on the screen
will be masked and will highlight only the accessible objects and the
associated text that is exposed programmatically to Narrator.

XAML Improvements

The XAML team has improved the support for Mnemonics within Universal
Windows Apps (UWA’s) allowing for better Access Key customizations. For
example, the developer of a shopping app can now assign a custom Access
Key like P, that can be activated by pressing ALT then the letter P, in
order to activate the purchase button.

Improved Documentation

And finally the team has worked hard to improve the discoverability and
update the documentation we provide for developers. We recently
relaunched
the accessibility developer hub as well as general design guidelines and
sample code for accessibility.

Most importantly, your feedback is imperative to getting accessibility
right. Keep letting us know what accessibility features are important to
you. If you are already running Windows 10, you can simply press CAPS
LOCK
+ E (two times) to bring up a feedback form when using Narrator. Or, if
you are technically minded, you can help us by becoming a Windows
Insider
and giving us feedback on the latest updates to Windows as we are
building
them.

Previous Blogs and Resources:

Windows

Further Details on the Coming Improvements to Narrator in Windows 10
<https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/05/09/further-details-on-the-coming-improvements-to-narrator-in-windows-10/>

Improvements to Narrator in Windows 10
<https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/04/11/improvements-to-narrator-in-windows-10/>

Making Windows 10 and Office 365 more accessible: Our path forward
<https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/02/24/making-windows-10-and-office-365-more-accessible-our-path-forward/>

Accessibility Update for Windows 10 Mail
<https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/02/01/accessibility-update-for-windows-10-mail/>

Accessibility and the Windows 10 Free Upgrade
<https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/05/06/accessibility-and-the-windows-10-free-upgrade/>

Microsoft Edge

Ensuring high-quality browser accessibility with automation
<https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/05/26/new-edge-blog-ensuring-high-quality-browser-accessibility-with-automation/>

Building a more accessible user experience with HTML5 and UIA
<https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/05/13/new-edge-blog-building-a-more-accessible-user-experience-with-html5-and-uia/>

Building a More Accessible Web Platform
<https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/04/21/building-a-more-accessible-web-platform/>

Developers

Accessibility Design guidelines
<https://msdn.microsoft.com/windows/uwp/accessibility/accessibility-overview>

Accessibility Developer Hub
<https://developer.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/accessible-apps>















Re: How frequently do you use the Windows Narrator screen reader? #poll

Carlos
 


Hi Joseph,
 
Indeed I should have taken this into account, but as I said I unfortunately forgot about the need to log in to vote in polls.

----- Original Message -----
From: Joseph Lee
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 12:32 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How frequently do you use the Windows Narrator screen reader? #poll

Hi Carlos,

Usually when I posta poll, I prepare myself to receive votes from polls and emails (as a direct email or as a reply).

As for my vote: : I chose option 3 in the poll. I tend to use it if there are new Insider builds that include features or fixes for it.

As for Edge: will give you a backstage tour upon request.

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Carlos
Sent: Saturday, July 2, 2016 7:22 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How frequently do you use the Windows Narrator screen reader? #poll

 

Sigh I give up.  LOL everyone can just post their vote in a reply if it is more convenient.

----- Original Message -----

From: Loy

Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 10:17 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How frequently do you use the Windows Narrator screen reader? #poll

 

It takes me to the Tech Talk group main page, no options to vote.

----- Original Message -----

From: Carlos

Sent: Saturday, July 2, 2016 10:02 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How frequently do you use the Windows Narrator screen reader? #poll

 

Interesting.  There should be several radio buttons which are the choices and a

"Vote"

link.

----- Original Message -----

From: Loy

Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 10:00 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How frequently do you use the Windows Narrator screen reader? #poll

 

I clicked on vote now but did not see any option to vote.

 

----- Original Message -----

From: Carlos

Sent: Saturday, July 2, 2016 9:49 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How frequently do you use the Windows Narrator screen reader? #poll

 

LOL click on the

link and choose an option to make it official.  This way everyone can also view the results of the poll.

----- Original Message -----

From: Loy

Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 9:45 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How frequently do you use the Windows Narrator screen reader? #poll

 

I never use narrator.

----- Original Message -----

From: Carlos

Sent: Saturday, July 2, 2016 9:39 AM

Subject: [TechTalk] How frequently do you use the Windows Narrator screen reader? #poll

 

A new poll has been created:

Just for fun and because we rarely use this feature.

 

1. I only use Narrator for emergencies
2. I never use Narrator
3. I use Narrator regularly

Vote Now


Re: Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog #article

RJ Sandefur <manbatsandefur@...>
 

Come on guys! I say give narrator a chance, and quit the bitching!

On 7/2/2016 1:19 PM, Marie wrote:
I find Narrator useful on occasion, but it is far from being a full
screen reader and I would hate it if they made it like the Apple
devices where it is your only choice.
Marie


-----Original Message----- From: Carlos
Sent: Saturday, July 2, 2016 5:33 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the
Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

If they are going somewhere with Narrator, then they should simply
release a
major upgrade when it is ready to be used as a full-blown screen
reader. At
this point it is wasted effort to introduce these minor changes since
it is
still not functional enough to be used by most on a daily basis.
Gradually
introducing features that most people probably won't use because there
is a
better free alternative seems like effort that could be more productively
invested somewhere else for now.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Jeremy" <jeremy.richards7@gmail.com>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 8:00 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the
Windows 10
Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog


Yeah, but they might be going somewhere with it which we don't know about
just yet. Some of the features discussed in the article seem as though
they
may have been influenced by general screen reader tech.

They might first want to start with the Windows OS then ultimately
create a
VoiceOver competitor for future Windows devices.

With technology advancing as it does, why not accept the help from one of
the biggest computer software developers in the world? Furthermore, this
development might yield discoveries which will help with other related
disabilities experienced by an aging population.

JR

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On
Behalf Of
Carlos
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 4:03 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the
Windows 10
Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

And honestly, the focus on Narrator seems like wasted time and somewhat
excessive in my opinion. How many people really use Narrator on a daily
basis? The fact is that most users only run Narrator in an emergency
or to
finish setting up Windows. It is useful and convenient to have, but for
most it does not provide enough functionality to be used as a primary
screen
reader. These days those who cannot afford one of the expensive screen
readers will most likely use NVDA. And Narrator has a long way to go
before
it can compete with NVDA. That being the case, I believe their time and
effort would be better spent on improving accessibility in other
areas. If
NVDA did not exist, then the efforts to improve Narrator might seem more
significant, but again in my opinion at this time, it just seems like
wasted
effort.

----- Original Message -----
From: Gene <mailto:gsasner@ripco.com>
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 6:23 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the
Windows 10
Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

I have defended Microsoft for years when I thought they deserved it.
I will
not defend them in their accessibility implementation of accessibility in
Windows 10. My thoughts on the blog entry are below.

Almost a year after Windows 10 has been released and Microsoft is still
dealing with some of the kinds of things discussed in its blog? Being
passionate about accessibility means not waiting a year and still having
significant accessibility problems. Being passionate about accessibility
means having reasonable accessibility at the time of initial release.

And please stop patronizing those who provide feedback. It isn't
incredible. It's useful and good feedback but incredible? You aren't
accomplishing anything by heaping excessive praise on those who provide
feedback but patronizing them. We don't want to be called incredible nor
our feedback. We want implementation and at a much faster and better
rate.
And does some of this feedback really have to be given in order for
you to
know about it? Since the nineties, Windows screen-readers have routinely
offered speech that can go faster than 430 words per minute. If your
accessibility team really needs user feedback to be aware of the need for
fast speech, then what else is the team unaware of that should be common
knowledge to anyone working in the field of accessibility?

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Christopher Hallsworth <mailto:challsworth2@icloud.com>
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 1:06 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10
Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog


https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/07/01/making-progress-on-accessibility-with-the-windows-10-anniversary-update/

<https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/07/01/making-progress-on-accessibility-with-the-windows-10-anniversary-update/>


Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update

With more than one billion people with disabilities in the world,
Microsoft is passionate about accessibility and ensuring our products
work
for all our customers. Today we are excited to share additional details
about the Windows 10 Anniversary Update which represents a significant
step forward in our effort to make Microsoft products accessible. We
encourage anyone already running Windows 10 to upgrade when the update
becomes available. We also recognize that we must continue to invest in
accessibility and are committed to the continued improvement of built-in
features like Narrator and Magnifier as well as the accessibility of
experiences and apps like Cortana, Mail and setup. If you are a user of
Assistive Technology and are still using Windows 7 or Windows 8.1 and
want
to wait to upgrade, don’t forget that you will still have the
opportunity
to upgrade at no cost even after the Windows 10 free upgrade period
ends.
We will have a page available on July 29 for people using AT to take
advantage of the free upgrade offer.

We have already shared many of these details with our Windows Insider
program over the last several months, so this blog post will recap those
areas and share a few new things. Customer feedback through the Windows
Insider program and from our users with disabilities has been
essential to
helping us focus our work in several key areas. These include improving
the screen reading experience with Narrator, the accessibility of
experiences and apps like Microsoft Edge, Mail and the Start menu, as
well
as better tools and resources for developers to build more accessible
apps
and experiences.

Improved Screen Reading with Narrator

As we’ve stated in a series of recent blog posts, a lot of changes with
Narrator that you will see as a part of the Windows 10 Anniversary
Update
were directly influenced by your incredible feedback. Those changes
include:

Faster text to speech voices

We’ve added new voices to Narrator that offer a much faster top rate of
speech. Our current voices average a maximum of roughly 400 words per
minute. The new voices average nearly twice that at approximately 800
words per minute.

New languages in Narrator

We continue to add new international languages for Narrator, including
Arabic and several Nordic languages. The following new languages will be
available either with the corresponding international version of Windows
or will be available for download.

Spanish (Mexico) French (Canada) Portuguese (Brazil)
Arabic (Egypt) Catalan (Spain) Danish (Denmark)
Finnish (Finland) Norwegian (Norway) Dutch (Belgium)
Dutch (Netherlands) Portuguese (Portugal) Swedish (Sweden)
Turkish (Turkey)
More familiar keyboard navigation

Keyboard commands in Narrator are now more familiar to users of other
screen readers. Some keyboard interactions have been simplified to
ensure
better ergonomics, making them easier to type.

Introducing scan mode

We’ve introduced a new navigation mode to Narrator called Scan mode.
Scan
Mode is turned on with a press of CAPS LOCK and SPACE. While you are in
Scan mode you can press SPACE to activate an item of interest, such as
following a link on a web page or pressing a button in an app.

Six levels of verbosity

Narrator now supports six levels of verbosity for giving you more
details
about the characteristics of text. You can cycle through these modes by
pressing CAPS LOCK + CTRL + (PLUS). For example, at what we call Verbose
mode 0 (zero), you will hear just the text. At verbose mode 1, you might
hear if the text is a heading. At other verbose levels, you will get
varying indications of other text properties, like text color or
formatting.

Punctuation Modes

Narrator now gives you more control over how much punctuation you hear
when reading text. CAPS LOCK+ALT+(PLUS) and CAPS LOCK+ALT+(MINUS) cycle
through the settings for punctuation. The settings for punctuation
include
none, some, most, all and math along with default.

Now announcing AutoSuggest results

Many applications in Windows 10 offer automatic suggestions as you enter
information. For example, when you start entering a search term in an
application search box you may get suggestions based on what you are
entering. With Narrator you will now get a verbal hint with an audio
indication when these suggestions are available.

Feedback made easy

Pressing CAPS LOCK + E + E when running Narrator is an easy way to
send us
feedback. This shortcut will bring up a feedback form where you can
submit
comments and suggestions about your experience with Narrator.

User guides and documentation

Our documentation team has been working hard to update the resources
available to those who are learning how to use Narrator. We are looking
forward to providing improved and more complete documentation like an
updated Narrator user guide that will be available online when the
Anniversary Update is released.

Working to make apps and experiences more accessible

Along with many of these accessibility updates to Windows 10, most of
our
app teams have also been making regular updates. Below are a few of the
notable highlights.

More accessible browsing and reading with Microsoft Edge

In a series of blog posts, the Microsoft Edge team has been providing
detailed updates on their accessibility progress. For example, the team
has already shared how work to support modern web accessibility
standards
is helping developers more easily build accessible sites. And with the
introduction of Microsoft Edge’s new accessibility architecture, we are
working to make Edge a more inclusive and reliable experience for
everyone. The team has also been working closely with the most popular
third-party assistive technology vendors to guide them through the
transition to this new platform.

In addition to the work the team has already shared, we are also excited
for you to try the improvements to the end user accessibility experience
of the Microsoft Edge app and PDF reader. These include broad support
for
tagged PDF files, and a wide range of improvements to common daily
browsing features such as address bar, tabs, windows, and favorites.

Mail

Since the initial release of Windows 10 last summer, there have been
many
improvements to the accessibility of the Mail app. The Mail team
described
many of these updates in a blog last February and has since that time
continued to make progress on things like improving the account setup
experience when using a screen reader.

Cortana

You can more reliably operate search and Cortana with the keyboard,
including things like navigating using arrow keys and tab order.
There are
also Improvements to high contrast that make the Cortana UI more legible
in all contrast modes. The team has also made a number of general fixes
that improve the experience with Cortana when using accessibility tools
such as Windows Speech Recognition, Narrator and other screen-readers.

Groove

The Groove team has delivered a number of key updates for low vision
users
like better support for high DPI scaling and better high contrast
support,
including better color combinations and the boxing of text when
appearing
on top of album art. In addition, the team has done work to make the
app a
better experience when using a screen reader by adding a number of new
shortcut keys as well as fixing a number of bugs when using Narrator.

Making accessibility easier for developers

In addition to the progress being made with our apps and built-in
accessibility features we have been making investments in the tools and
reference materials that developers rely on to create accessible
experiences within their apps and websites. Here are a few developer
resources we have already made available or will be a part of the
Windows
10 anniversary Update.

New Tools

Developer tools are essential to making accessibility just work. The
Visual Studio App Analysis tool was updated to helping devs to find,
triage and fix accessibility errors like flagging controls that don’t
have
an accessible name. We also introduced a new developer mode in Narrator.
Narrator dev mode can be turned on when Narrator is already running by
pressing SHIFT + CAPS LOCK + F12. When dev mode is turned on the screen
will be masked and will highlight only the accessible objects and the
associated text that is exposed programmatically to Narrator.

XAML Improvements

The XAML team has improved the support for Mnemonics within Universal
Windows Apps (UWA’s) allowing for better Access Key customizations. For
example, the developer of a shopping app can now assign a custom Access
Key like P, that can be activated by pressing ALT then the letter P, in
order to activate the purchase button.

Improved Documentation

And finally the team has worked hard to improve the discoverability and
update the documentation we provide for developers. We recently
relaunched
the accessibility developer hub as well as general design guidelines and
sample code for accessibility.

Most importantly, your feedback is imperative to getting accessibility
right. Keep letting us know what accessibility features are important to
you. If you are already running Windows 10, you can simply press CAPS
LOCK
+ E (two times) to bring up a feedback form when using Narrator. Or, if
you are technically minded, you can help us by becoming a Windows
Insider
and giving us feedback on the latest updates to Windows as we are
building
them.

Previous Blogs and Resources:

Windows

Further Details on the Coming Improvements to Narrator in Windows 10
<https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/05/09/further-details-on-the-coming-improvements-to-narrator-in-windows-10/>

Improvements to Narrator in Windows 10
<https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/04/11/improvements-to-narrator-in-windows-10/>

Making Windows 10 and Office 365 more accessible: Our path forward
<https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/02/24/making-windows-10-and-office-365-more-accessible-our-path-forward/>

Accessibility Update for Windows 10 Mail
<https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/02/01/accessibility-update-for-windows-10-mail/>

Accessibility and the Windows 10 Free Upgrade
<https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/05/06/accessibility-and-the-windows-10-free-upgrade/>

Microsoft Edge

Ensuring high-quality browser accessibility with automation
<https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/05/26/new-edge-blog-ensuring-high-quality-browser-accessibility-with-automation/>

Building a more accessible user experience with HTML5 and UIA
<https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/05/13/new-edge-blog-building-a-more-accessible-user-experience-with-html5-and-uia/>

Building a More Accessible Web Platform
<https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/04/21/building-a-more-accessible-web-platform/>

Developers

Accessibility Design guidelines
<https://msdn.microsoft.com/windows/uwp/accessibility/accessibility-overview>

Accessibility Developer Hub
<https://developer.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/accessible-apps>















Re: Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog #article

RJ Sandefur <manbatsandefur@...>
 

I think instead of complaining, when the update comes out, we should all give narater a try, and as we're using it, give microsoft our feedback using the alt E command and using the feedback form. At least they're allowing us to give them feedback, and not saying the heck with the blind userbase! I provided my feedback, and suggested microsoft should build braille support into future builds of windows so we won't have to look for this or that driver. Apple does this already so why can't microsoft? RJ


On 7/2/2016 1:17 PM, Marie wrote:
while Apple has integrated voiceover with their devices, in my opinion it is still not fully functional. Why else would we have so many apps which are not accessible using voiceover. and the use of several keys needed to accomplished tasks with voiceover is the primary reason I refuse to consider switching from the PC to the Mac. I have been using “windows and Jaws for many years and always seem to find a workaround in the few cases when there is a problem. I am ot sure I would continue to be such an avid computer user without Windows and Jaws. JMO
Marie
 
 
From: Matt
Sent: Saturday, July 2, 2016 5:23 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog
 

Yes I think it is very poor that their flag ship browser is not accessible to us! I also think they could have and should have made Narrator a full blown integrated screen reader just like Apple did with VO on all it products!

 

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 6:23 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

 

I have defended Microsoft for years when I thought they deserved it.  I will not defend them in their accessibility implementation of accessibility in Windows 10.  My thoughts on the blog entry are below. 


Almost a year after Windows 10 has been released and Microsoft is still dealing with some of the kinds of things discussed in its blog?  Being passionate about accessibility means not waiting a year and still having significant accessibility problems.  Being passionate about accessibility means having reasonable accessibility at the time of initial release. 

 

And please stop patronizing those who provide feedback.  It isn't incredible.  It's useful and good feedback but incredible?  You aren't accomplishing anything by heaping excessive praise on those who provide feedback but patronizing them.  We don't want to be called incredible nor our feedback.  We want implementation and at a much faster and better rate.  And does some of this feedback really have to be given in order for you to know about it?  Since the nineties, Windows screen-readers have routinely offered speech that can go faster than 430 words per minute.  If your accessibility team really needs user feedback to be aware of the need for fast speech, then what else is the team unaware of that should be common knowledge to anyone working in the field of accessibility? 

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 1:06 AM

Subject: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

 


> https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/07/01/making-progress-on-accessibility-with-the-windows-10-anniversary-update/ <https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/07/01/making-progress-on-accessibility-with-the-windows-10-anniversary-update/>
>
> Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update
>
> With more than one billion people with disabilities in the world, Microsoft is passionate about accessibility and ensuring our products work for all our customers. Today we are excited to share additional details about the Windows 10 Anniversary Update which represents a significant step forward in our effort to make Microsoft products accessible. We encourage anyone already running Windows 10 to upgrade when the update becomes available. We also recognize that we must continue to invest in accessibility and are committed to the continued improvement of built-in features like Narrator and Magnifier as well as the accessibility of experiences and apps like Cortana, Mail and setup. If you are a user of Assistive Technology and are still using Windows 7 or Windows 8.1 and want to wait to upgrade, don’t forget that you will still have the opportunity to upgrade at no cost even after the Windows 10 free upgrade period ends. We will have a page available on July 29 for people using AT to take advantage of the free upgrade offer.
>
> We have already shared many of these details with our Windows Insider program over the last several months, so this blog post will recap those areas and share a few new things. Customer feedback through the Windows Insider program and from our users with disabilities has been essential to helping us focus our work in several key areas. These include improving the screen reading experience with Narrator, the accessibility of experiences and apps like Microsoft Edge, Mail and the Start menu, as well as better tools and resources for developers to build more accessible apps and experiences.
>
> Improved Screen Reading with Narrator
>
> As we’ve stated in a series of recent blog posts, a lot of changes with Narrator that you will see as a part of the Windows 10 Anniversary Update were directly influenced by your incredible feedback. Those changes include:
>
> Faster text to speech voices
>
> We’ve added new voices to Narrator that offer a much faster top rate of speech. Our current voices average a maximum of roughly 400 words per minute. The new voices average nearly twice that at approximately 800 words per minute.
>
> New languages in Narrator
>
> We continue to add new international languages for Narrator, including Arabic and several Nordic languages. The following new languages will be available either with the corresponding international version of Windows or will be available for download.
>
> Spanish (Mexico) French (Canada) Portuguese (Brazil)
> Arabic (Egypt) Catalan (Spain) Danish (Denmark)
> Finnish (Finland) Norwegian (Norway) Dutch (Belgium)
> Dutch (Netherlands) Portuguese (Portugal) Swedish (Sweden)
> Turkish (Turkey)
> More familiar keyboard navigation
>
> Keyboard commands in Narrator are now more familiar to users of other screen readers. Some keyboard interactions have been simplified to ensure better ergonomics, making them easier to type.
>
> Introducing scan mode
>
> We’ve introduced a new navigation mode to Narrator called Scan mode. Scan Mode is turned on with a press of CAPS LOCK and SPACE. While you are in Scan mode you can press SPACE to activate an item of interest, such as following a link on a web page or pressing a button in an app.
>
> Six levels of verbosity
>
> Narrator now supports six levels of verbosity for giving you more details about the characteristics of text. You can cycle through these modes by pressing CAPS LOCK + CTRL + (PLUS). For example, at what we call Verbose mode 0 (zero), you will hear just the text. At verbose mode 1, you might hear if the text is a heading. At other verbose levels, you will get varying indications of other text properties, like text color or formatting.
>
> Punctuation Modes
>
> Narrator now gives you more control over how much punctuation you hear when reading text. CAPS LOCK+ALT+(PLUS) and CAPS LOCK+ALT+(MINUS) cycle through the settings for punctuation. The settings for punctuation include none, some, most, all and math along with default.
>
> Now announcing AutoSuggest results
>
> Many applications in Windows 10 offer automatic suggestions as you enter information. For example, when you start entering a search term in an application search box you may get suggestions based on what you are entering. With Narrator you will now get a verbal hint with an audio indication when these suggestions are available.
>
> Feedback made easy
>
> Pressing CAPS LOCK + E + E when running Narrator is an easy way to send us feedback. This shortcut will bring up a feedback form where you can submit comments and suggestions about your experience with Narrator.
>
> User guides and documentation
>
> Our documentation team has been working hard to update the resources available to those who are learning how to use Narrator. We are looking forward to providing improved and more complete documentation like an updated Narrator user guide that will be available online when the Anniversary Update is released.
>
> Working to make apps and experiences more accessible
>
> Along with many of these accessibility updates to Windows 10, most of our app teams have also been making regular updates. Below are a few of the notable highlights.
>
> More accessible browsing and reading with Microsoft Edge
>
> In a series of blog posts, the Microsoft Edge team has been providing detailed updates on their accessibility progress. For example, the team has already shared how work to support modern web accessibility standards is helping developers more easily build accessible sites. And with the introduction of Microsoft Edge’s new accessibility architecture, we are working to make Edge a more inclusive and reliable experience for everyone. The team has also been working closely with the most popular third-party assistive technology vendors to guide them through the transition to this new platform.
>
> In addition to the work the team has already shared, we are also excited for you to try the improvements to the end user accessibility experience of the Microsoft Edge app and PDF reader. These include broad support for tagged PDF files, and a wide range of improvements to common daily browsing features such as address bar, tabs, windows, and favorites.
>
> Mail
>
> Since the initial release of Windows 10 last summer, there have been many improvements to the accessibility of the Mail app. The Mail team described many of these updates in a blog last February and has since that time continued to make progress on things like improving the account setup experience when using a screen reader.
>
> Cortana
>
> You can more reliably operate search and Cortana with the keyboard, including things like navigating using arrow keys and tab order. There are also Improvements to high contrast that make the Cortana UI more legible in all contrast modes. The team has also made a number of general fixes that improve the experience with Cortana when using accessibility tools such as Windows Speech Recognition, Narrator and other screen-readers.
>
> Groove
>
> The Groove team has delivered a number of key updates for low vision users like better support for high DPI scaling and better high contrast support, including better color combinations and the boxing of text when appearing on top of album art. In addition, the team has done work to make the app a better experience when using a screen reader by adding a number of new shortcut keys as well as fixing a number of bugs when using Narrator.
>
> Making accessibility easier for developers
>
> In addition to the progress being made with our apps and built-in accessibility features we have been making investments in the tools and reference materials that developers rely on to create accessible experiences within their apps and websites. Here are a few developer resources we have already made available or will be a part of the Windows 10 anniversary Update.
>
> New Tools
>
> Developer tools are essential to making accessibility just work. The Visual Studio App Analysis tool was updated to helping devs to find, triage and fix accessibility errors like flagging controls that don’t have an accessible name. We also introduced a new developer mode in Narrator. Narrator dev mode can be turned on when Narrator is already running by pressing SHIFT + CAPS LOCK + F12. When dev mode is turned on the screen will be masked and will highlight only the accessible objects and the associated text that is exposed programmatically to Narrator.
>
> XAML Improvements
>
> The XAML team has improved the support for Mnemonics within Universal Windows Apps (UWA’s) allowing for better Access Key customizations. For example, the developer of a shopping app can now assign a custom Access Key like P, that can be activated by pressing ALT then the letter P, in order to activate the purchase button.
>
> Improved Documentation
>
> And finally the team has worked hard to improve the discoverability and update the documentation we provide for developers. We recently relaunched the accessibility developer hub as well as general design guidelines and sample code for accessibility.
>
> Most importantly, your feedback is imperative to getting accessibility right. Keep letting us know what accessibility features are important to you. If you are already running Windows 10, you can simply press CAPS LOCK + E (two times) to bring up a feedback form when using Narrator. Or, if you are technically minded, you can help us by becoming a Windows Insider and giving us feedback on the latest updates to Windows as we are building them.
>
> Previous Blogs and Resources:
>
> Windows
>
> Further Details on the Coming Improvements to Narrator in Windows 10 <https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/05/09/further-details-on-the-coming-improvements-to-narrator-in-windows-10/>
> Improvements to Narrator in Windows 10 <https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/04/11/improvements-to-narrator-in-windows-10/>
> Making Windows 10 and Office 365 more accessible: Our path forward <https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/02/24/making-windows-10-and-office-365-more-accessible-our-path-forward/>
> Accessibility Update for Windows 10 Mail <https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/02/01/accessibility-update-for-windows-10-mail/>
> Accessibility and the Windows 10 Free Upgrade <https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/05/06/accessibility-and-the-windows-10-free-upgrade/>
> Microsoft Edge
>
> Ensuring high-quality browser accessibility with automation <https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/05/26/new-edge-blog-ensuring-high-quality-browser-accessibility-with-automation/>
> Building a more accessible user experience with HTML5 and UIA <https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/05/13/new-edge-blog-building-a-more-accessible-user-experience-with-html5-and-uia/>
> Building a More Accessible Web Platform <https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/04/21/building-a-more-accessible-web-platform/>
> Developers
>
> Accessibility Design guidelines <https://msdn.microsoft.com/windows/uwp/accessibility/accessibility-overview>
> Accessibility Developer Hub <https://developer.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/accessible-apps>




Re: Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

Matt
 

Well you could also say how many blind drivers do we have out here as well ! or a lot of things that some blind users is interested in but others is not!

 

 

 

From: Matt [mailto:matt.from.florida@...]
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 1:15 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: RE: [TechTalk] Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

 

More than you think! But if this bothers the list too much I willing to move to the chat room if others is willing to follow.

 

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jim Wohlgamuth
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 1:09 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

 

Hi there Folks!

Wonder what this topic has to do with technology and accessibility? To my knowledge they do not make a gun with any sort of blindness technology-or do they..? I really do wish we could get this list back on topic and leave the gun talk to the chat list.  Personally I am 60 years old and have never owned a gun-and probably never will.  If I were to own a gun it would be somethihng like a shotgun so that if I actually had to shoot at someone in self defense, I might have a chance of hitting them.  We really don't need a bunch of Barney Fifes shooting themselves in the foot<SMILE!>.          I know there are folks out there who use guns responsibly and that is most of them.

  But I wonder just how many gun owners are blind or legally blind? Anyone no any stats on that?  Have A Good 1! de
<KF8LT><Jim Wohlgamuth>.

On 02-Jul-16 12:32, James Bentley wrote:

What's insane is that the general public can purchase a version of this sniper rifle that hits a very small target at over half a mile.

Yikes,  I think I will just stay in the house with the blinds drrawn.



-----Original Message----- From: Jeremy
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 11:17 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

Wow! that is freakin insane!

JR

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
James Bentley
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 9:07 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

The United States military has a computerized rifle and scope combination.
It first takes a photo of the entire target area.  Next, the shooter uses a
cursor on a touch screen to tell the computer where to put the bullet.
Next, the shooter aims at the target.  The computer fires the rifle only
when it sees that the rifle is aimed with pin point accuracy.  3 inch
Targets can be hit accurately at distances over two miles.



-----Original Message-----
From: Jeremy
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 10:56 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

Finally, a relevant informative post. Thank you for contributing to my small
pool of knowledge. :)

And while on the subject matter, I'm thinking an audio beep of some sort
might be able to alert the blind shooter than the object of interest is
within the cross hairs of scope. Key will be determining what is target
object and what is some sort of artifact.

JR

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Joe
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 8:47 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

There is now what some are calling a smart rifle, out of Texas. At $25,000,
it's beyond the reach of most enthusiasts, but it can fetch that price for
the level of precision it can automatically adjust to help the shooter
acquire a target. If technology has leaped that far, one can almost wonder
what credit, if any, the shooter gets, but my question is this: What
technology have the hunters among us used to rely a little less on sighted
assistance? I go deer hunting, but thus far I have leaned heavily on
discrete cues from sighted companions to know where and when to fire. It's
not a bad method. I've brought down three bucks in this fashion, and while
hunting can often be enjoyed with companions, it would be nice to
independently, but responsibly, engage and execute the target myself. Right
now I use a laser to help my sighted companions get a better sense of where
I am aiming. This allows me to hold and operate the rifle on my own, but
again, it feels inefficient. Any tips would be welcomed.

I'll note that while I am a member of a local shooting range, I have
hesitated to obtain a gun permit. I understand my shooting would be optimal
at very close range, but the risk of hitting someone innocent, however
small, still weighs on my conscience.

I realize for some the discussion of guns and hunting could be abhorrent. If
so, feel free to email me off list. For whatever it's worth, I eat what I
kill. I've never gone hunting for the mere sport. I've learned how to skin
my own kill, and I suppose one could argue the knife skill in doing so could
itself be viewed as a form of technology skill.

Not to stray too far off topic here, but any number of disasters could occur
in our lifetime and in our own backyard. In a scenario with no power and
extensive food shortage, that Windows machine isn't going to be worth a
whole lot except for maybe scrap metal. Our definition of "technology" just
might revert to what technology used to be. That is, the means to survive.

Best,

Joe

--
Musings of a Work in Progress:
www.JoeOrozco.com/

Twitter: @ScribblingJoe

















 


Re: Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog #article

Marie <magpie.mn@...>
 

I find Narrator useful on occasion, but it is far from being a full screen reader and I would hate it if they made it like the Apple devices where it is your only choice.
Marie

-----Original Message-----
From: Carlos
Sent: Saturday, July 2, 2016 5:33 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

If they are going somewhere with Narrator, then they should simply release a
major upgrade when it is ready to be used as a full-blown screen reader. At
this point it is wasted effort to introduce these minor changes since it is
still not functional enough to be used by most on a daily basis. Gradually
introducing features that most people probably won't use because there is a
better free alternative seems like effort that could be more productively
invested somewhere else for now.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Jeremy" <jeremy.richards7@gmail.com>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 8:00 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10
Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog


Yeah, but they might be going somewhere with it which we don't know about
just yet. Some of the features discussed in the article seem as though they
may have been influenced by general screen reader tech.

They might first want to start with the Windows OS then ultimately create a
VoiceOver competitor for future Windows devices.

With technology advancing as it does, why not accept the help from one of
the biggest computer software developers in the world? Furthermore, this
development might yield discoveries which will help with other related
disabilities experienced by an aging population.

JR

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Carlos
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 4:03 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10
Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

And honestly, the focus on Narrator seems like wasted time and somewhat
excessive in my opinion. How many people really use Narrator on a daily
basis? The fact is that most users only run Narrator in an emergency or to
finish setting up Windows. It is useful and convenient to have, but for
most it does not provide enough functionality to be used as a primary screen
reader. These days those who cannot afford one of the expensive screen
readers will most likely use NVDA. And Narrator has a long way to go before
it can compete with NVDA. That being the case, I believe their time and
effort would be better spent on improving accessibility in other areas. If
NVDA did not exist, then the efforts to improve Narrator might seem more
significant, but again in my opinion at this time, it just seems like wasted
effort.

----- Original Message -----
From: Gene <mailto:gsasner@ripco.com>
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 6:23 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10
Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

I have defended Microsoft for years when I thought they deserved it. I will
not defend them in their accessibility implementation of accessibility in
Windows 10. My thoughts on the blog entry are below.

Almost a year after Windows 10 has been released and Microsoft is still
dealing with some of the kinds of things discussed in its blog? Being
passionate about accessibility means not waiting a year and still having
significant accessibility problems. Being passionate about accessibility
means having reasonable accessibility at the time of initial release.

And please stop patronizing those who provide feedback. It isn't
incredible. It's useful and good feedback but incredible? You aren't
accomplishing anything by heaping excessive praise on those who provide
feedback but patronizing them. We don't want to be called incredible nor
our feedback. We want implementation and at a much faster and better rate.
And does some of this feedback really have to be given in order for you to
know about it? Since the nineties, Windows screen-readers have routinely
offered speech that can go faster than 430 words per minute. If your
accessibility team really needs user feedback to be aware of the need for
fast speech, then what else is the team unaware of that should be common
knowledge to anyone working in the field of accessibility?

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Christopher Hallsworth <mailto:challsworth2@icloud.com>
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 1:06 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10
Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog


https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/07/01/making-progress-on-accessibility-with-the-windows-10-anniversary-update/
<https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/07/01/making-progress-on-accessibility-with-the-windows-10-anniversary-update/>

Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update

With more than one billion people with disabilities in the world,
Microsoft is passionate about accessibility and ensuring our products work
for all our customers. Today we are excited to share additional details
about the Windows 10 Anniversary Update which represents a significant
step forward in our effort to make Microsoft products accessible. We
encourage anyone already running Windows 10 to upgrade when the update
becomes available. We also recognize that we must continue to invest in
accessibility and are committed to the continued improvement of built-in
features like Narrator and Magnifier as well as the accessibility of
experiences and apps like Cortana, Mail and setup. If you are a user of
Assistive Technology and are still using Windows 7 or Windows 8.1 and want
to wait to upgrade, don’t forget that you will still have the opportunity
to upgrade at no cost even after the Windows 10 free upgrade period ends.
We will have a page available on July 29 for people using AT to take
advantage of the free upgrade offer.

We have already shared many of these details with our Windows Insider
program over the last several months, so this blog post will recap those
areas and share a few new things. Customer feedback through the Windows
Insider program and from our users with disabilities has been essential to
helping us focus our work in several key areas. These include improving
the screen reading experience with Narrator, the accessibility of
experiences and apps like Microsoft Edge, Mail and the Start menu, as well
as better tools and resources for developers to build more accessible apps
and experiences.

Improved Screen Reading with Narrator

As we’ve stated in a series of recent blog posts, a lot of changes with
Narrator that you will see as a part of the Windows 10 Anniversary Update
were directly influenced by your incredible feedback. Those changes
include:

Faster text to speech voices

We’ve added new voices to Narrator that offer a much faster top rate of
speech. Our current voices average a maximum of roughly 400 words per
minute. The new voices average nearly twice that at approximately 800
words per minute.

New languages in Narrator

We continue to add new international languages for Narrator, including
Arabic and several Nordic languages. The following new languages will be
available either with the corresponding international version of Windows
or will be available for download.

Spanish (Mexico) French (Canada) Portuguese (Brazil)
Arabic (Egypt) Catalan (Spain) Danish (Denmark)
Finnish (Finland) Norwegian (Norway) Dutch (Belgium)
Dutch (Netherlands) Portuguese (Portugal) Swedish (Sweden)
Turkish (Turkey)
More familiar keyboard navigation

Keyboard commands in Narrator are now more familiar to users of other
screen readers. Some keyboard interactions have been simplified to ensure
better ergonomics, making them easier to type.

Introducing scan mode

We’ve introduced a new navigation mode to Narrator called Scan mode. Scan
Mode is turned on with a press of CAPS LOCK and SPACE. While you are in
Scan mode you can press SPACE to activate an item of interest, such as
following a link on a web page or pressing a button in an app.

Six levels of verbosity

Narrator now supports six levels of verbosity for giving you more details
about the characteristics of text. You can cycle through these modes by
pressing CAPS LOCK + CTRL + (PLUS). For example, at what we call Verbose
mode 0 (zero), you will hear just the text. At verbose mode 1, you might
hear if the text is a heading. At other verbose levels, you will get
varying indications of other text properties, like text color or
formatting.

Punctuation Modes

Narrator now gives you more control over how much punctuation you hear
when reading text. CAPS LOCK+ALT+(PLUS) and CAPS LOCK+ALT+(MINUS) cycle
through the settings for punctuation. The settings for punctuation include
none, some, most, all and math along with default.

Now announcing AutoSuggest results

Many applications in Windows 10 offer automatic suggestions as you enter
information. For example, when you start entering a search term in an
application search box you may get suggestions based on what you are
entering. With Narrator you will now get a verbal hint with an audio
indication when these suggestions are available.

Feedback made easy

Pressing CAPS LOCK + E + E when running Narrator is an easy way to send us
feedback. This shortcut will bring up a feedback form where you can submit
comments and suggestions about your experience with Narrator.

User guides and documentation

Our documentation team has been working hard to update the resources
available to those who are learning how to use Narrator. We are looking
forward to providing improved and more complete documentation like an
updated Narrator user guide that will be available online when the
Anniversary Update is released.

Working to make apps and experiences more accessible

Along with many of these accessibility updates to Windows 10, most of our
app teams have also been making regular updates. Below are a few of the
notable highlights.

More accessible browsing and reading with Microsoft Edge

In a series of blog posts, the Microsoft Edge team has been providing
detailed updates on their accessibility progress. For example, the team
has already shared how work to support modern web accessibility standards
is helping developers more easily build accessible sites. And with the
introduction of Microsoft Edge’s new accessibility architecture, we are
working to make Edge a more inclusive and reliable experience for
everyone. The team has also been working closely with the most popular
third-party assistive technology vendors to guide them through the
transition to this new platform.

In addition to the work the team has already shared, we are also excited
for you to try the improvements to the end user accessibility experience
of the Microsoft Edge app and PDF reader. These include broad support for
tagged PDF files, and a wide range of improvements to common daily
browsing features such as address bar, tabs, windows, and favorites.

Mail

Since the initial release of Windows 10 last summer, there have been many
improvements to the accessibility of the Mail app. The Mail team described
many of these updates in a blog last February and has since that time
continued to make progress on things like improving the account setup
experience when using a screen reader.

Cortana

You can more reliably operate search and Cortana with the keyboard,
including things like navigating using arrow keys and tab order. There are
also Improvements to high contrast that make the Cortana UI more legible
in all contrast modes. The team has also made a number of general fixes
that improve the experience with Cortana when using accessibility tools
such as Windows Speech Recognition, Narrator and other screen-readers.

Groove

The Groove team has delivered a number of key updates for low vision users
like better support for high DPI scaling and better high contrast support,
including better color combinations and the boxing of text when appearing
on top of album art. In addition, the team has done work to make the app a
better experience when using a screen reader by adding a number of new
shortcut keys as well as fixing a number of bugs when using Narrator.

Making accessibility easier for developers

In addition to the progress being made with our apps and built-in
accessibility features we have been making investments in the tools and
reference materials that developers rely on to create accessible
experiences within their apps and websites. Here are a few developer
resources we have already made available or will be a part of the Windows
10 anniversary Update.

New Tools

Developer tools are essential to making accessibility just work. The
Visual Studio App Analysis tool was updated to helping devs to find,
triage and fix accessibility errors like flagging controls that don’t have
an accessible name. We also introduced a new developer mode in Narrator.
Narrator dev mode can be turned on when Narrator is already running by
pressing SHIFT + CAPS LOCK + F12. When dev mode is turned on the screen
will be masked and will highlight only the accessible objects and the
associated text that is exposed programmatically to Narrator.

XAML Improvements

The XAML team has improved the support for Mnemonics within Universal
Windows Apps (UWA’s) allowing for better Access Key customizations. For
example, the developer of a shopping app can now assign a custom Access
Key like P, that can be activated by pressing ALT then the letter P, in
order to activate the purchase button.

Improved Documentation

And finally the team has worked hard to improve the discoverability and
update the documentation we provide for developers. We recently relaunched
the accessibility developer hub as well as general design guidelines and
sample code for accessibility.

Most importantly, your feedback is imperative to getting accessibility
right. Keep letting us know what accessibility features are important to
you. If you are already running Windows 10, you can simply press CAPS LOCK
+ E (two times) to bring up a feedback form when using Narrator. Or, if
you are technically minded, you can help us by becoming a Windows Insider
and giving us feedback on the latest updates to Windows as we are building
them.

Previous Blogs and Resources:

Windows

Further Details on the Coming Improvements to Narrator in Windows 10
<https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/05/09/further-details-on-the-coming-improvements-to-narrator-in-windows-10/>
Improvements to Narrator in Windows 10
<https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/04/11/improvements-to-narrator-in-windows-10/>
Making Windows 10 and Office 365 more accessible: Our path forward
<https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/02/24/making-windows-10-and-office-365-more-accessible-our-path-forward/>
Accessibility Update for Windows 10 Mail
<https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/02/01/accessibility-update-for-windows-10-mail/>
Accessibility and the Windows 10 Free Upgrade
<https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/05/06/accessibility-and-the-windows-10-free-upgrade/>
Microsoft Edge

Ensuring high-quality browser accessibility with automation
<https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/05/26/new-edge-blog-ensuring-high-quality-browser-accessibility-with-automation/>
Building a more accessible user experience with HTML5 and UIA
<https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/05/13/new-edge-blog-building-a-more-accessible-user-experience-with-html5-and-uia/>
Building a More Accessible Web Platform
<https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/04/21/building-a-more-accessible-web-platform/>
Developers

Accessibility Design guidelines
<https://msdn.microsoft.com/windows/uwp/accessibility/accessibility-overview>
Accessibility Developer Hub
<https://developer.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/accessible-apps>


Re: Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog #article

Marie <magpie.mn@...>
 

while Apple has integrated voiceover with their devices, in my opinion it is still not fully functional. Why else would we have so many apps which are not accessible using voiceover. and the use of several keys needed to accomplished tasks with voiceover is the primary reason I refuse to consider switching from the PC to the Mac. I have been using “windows and Jaws for many years and always seem to find a workaround in the few cases when there is a problem. I am ot sure I would continue to be such an avid computer user without Windows and Jaws. JMO
Marie
 
 

From: Matt
Sent: Saturday, July 2, 2016 5:23 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog
 

Yes I think it is very poor that their flag ship browser is not accessible to us! I also think they could have and should have made Narrator a full blown integrated screen reader just like Apple did with VO on all it products!

 

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 6:23 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

 

I have defended Microsoft for years when I thought they deserved it.  I will not defend them in their accessibility implementation of accessibility in Windows 10.  My thoughts on the blog entry are below. 


Almost a year after Windows 10 has been released and Microsoft is still dealing with some of the kinds of things discussed in its blog?  Being passionate about accessibility means not waiting a year and still having significant accessibility problems.  Being passionate about accessibility means having reasonable accessibility at the time of initial release. 

 

And please stop patronizing those who provide feedback.  It isn't incredible.  It's useful and good feedback but incredible?  You aren't accomplishing anything by heaping excessive praise on those who provide feedback but patronizing them.  We don't want to be called incredible nor our feedback.  We want implementation and at a much faster and better rate.  And does some of this feedback really have to be given in order for you to know about it?  Since the nineties, Windows screen-readers have routinely offered speech that can go faster than 430 words per minute.  If your accessibility team really needs user feedback to be aware of the need for fast speech, then what else is the team unaware of that should be common knowledge to anyone working in the field of accessibility? 

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 1:06 AM

Subject: [TechTalk] Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update | Microsoft Accessibility Blog

 


> https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/07/01/making-progress-on-accessibility-with-the-windows-10-anniversary-update/ <https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/07/01/making-progress-on-accessibility-with-the-windows-10-anniversary-update/>
>
> Making progress on accessibility with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update
>
> With more than one billion people with disabilities in the world, Microsoft is passionate about accessibility and ensuring our products work for all our customers. Today we are excited to share additional details about the Windows 10 Anniversary Update which represents a significant step forward in our effort to make Microsoft products accessible. We encourage anyone already running Windows 10 to upgrade when the update becomes available. We also recognize that we must continue to invest in accessibility and are committed to the continued improvement of built-in features like Narrator and Magnifier as well as the accessibility of experiences and apps like Cortana, Mail and setup. If you are a user of Assistive Technology and are still using Windows 7 or Windows 8.1 and want to wait to upgrade, don’t forget that you will still have the opportunity to upgrade at no cost even after the Windows 10 free upgrade period ends. We will have a page available on July 29 for people using AT to take advantage of the free upgrade offer.
>
> We have already shared many of these details with our Windows Insider program over the last several months, so this blog post will recap those areas and share a few new things. Customer feedback through the Windows Insider program and from our users with disabilities has been essential to helping us focus our work in several key areas. These include improving the screen reading experience with Narrator, the accessibility of experiences and apps like Microsoft Edge, Mail and the Start menu, as well as better tools and resources for developers to build more accessible apps and experiences.
>
> Improved Screen Reading with Narrator
>
> As we’ve stated in a series of recent blog posts, a lot of changes with Narrator that you will see as a part of the Windows 10 Anniversary Update were directly influenced by your incredible feedback. Those changes include:
>
> Faster text to speech voices
>
> We’ve added new voices to Narrator that offer a much faster top rate of speech. Our current voices average a maximum of roughly 400 words per minute. The new voices average nearly twice that at approximately 800 words per minute.
>
> New languages in Narrator
>
> We continue to add new international languages for Narrator, including Arabic and several Nordic languages. The following new languages will be available either with the corresponding international version of Windows or will be available for download.
>
> Spanish (Mexico) French (Canada) Portuguese (Brazil)
> Arabic (Egypt) Catalan (Spain) Danish (Denmark)
> Finnish (Finland) Norwegian (Norway) Dutch (Belgium)
> Dutch (Netherlands) Portuguese (Portugal) Swedish (Sweden)
> Turkish (Turkey)
> More familiar keyboard navigation
>
> Keyboard commands in Narrator are now more familiar to users of other screen readers. Some keyboard interactions have been simplified to ensure better ergonomics, making them easier to type.
>
> Introducing scan mode
>
> We’ve introduced a new navigation mode to Narrator called Scan mode. Scan Mode is turned on with a press of CAPS LOCK and SPACE. While you are in Scan mode you can press SPACE to activate an item of interest, such as following a link on a web page or pressing a button in an app.
>
> Six levels of verbosity
>
> Narrator now supports six levels of verbosity for giving you more details about the characteristics of text. You can cycle through these modes by pressing CAPS LOCK + CTRL + (PLUS). For example, at what we call Verbose mode 0 (zero), you will hear just the text. At verbose mode 1, you might hear if the text is a heading. At other verbose levels, you will get varying indications of other text properties, like text color or formatting.
>
> Punctuation Modes
>
> Narrator now gives you more control over how much punctuation you hear when reading text. CAPS LOCK+ALT+(PLUS) and CAPS LOCK+ALT+(MINUS) cycle through the settings for punctuation. The settings for punctuation include none, some, most, all and math along with default.
>
> Now announcing AutoSuggest results
>
> Many applications in Windows 10 offer automatic suggestions as you enter information. For example, when you start entering a search term in an application search box you may get suggestions based on what you are entering. With Narrator you will now get a verbal hint with an audio indication when these suggestions are available.
>
> Feedback made easy
>
> Pressing CAPS LOCK + E + E when running Narrator is an easy way to send us feedback. This shortcut will bring up a feedback form where you can submit comments and suggestions about your experience with Narrator.
>
> User guides and documentation
>
> Our documentation team has been working hard to update the resources available to those who are learning how to use Narrator. We are looking forward to providing improved and more complete documentation like an updated Narrator user guide that will be available online when the Anniversary Update is released.
>
> Working to make apps and experiences more accessible
>
> Along with many of these accessibility updates to Windows 10, most of our app teams have also been making regular updates. Below are a few of the notable highlights.
>
> More accessible browsing and reading with Microsoft Edge
>
> In a series of blog posts, the Microsoft Edge team has been providing detailed updates on their accessibility progress. For example, the team has already shared how work to support modern web accessibility standards is helping developers more easily build accessible sites. And with the introduction of Microsoft Edge’s new accessibility architecture, we are working to make Edge a more inclusive and reliable experience for everyone. The team has also been working closely with the most popular third-party assistive technology vendors to guide them through the transition to this new platform.
>
> In addition to the work the team has already shared, we are also excited for you to try the improvements to the end user accessibility experience of the Microsoft Edge app and PDF reader. These include broad support for tagged PDF files, and a wide range of improvements to common daily browsing features such as address bar, tabs, windows, and favorites.
>
> Mail
>
> Since the initial release of Windows 10 last summer, there have been many improvements to the accessibility of the Mail app. The Mail team described many of these updates in a blog last February and has since that time continued to make progress on things like improving the account setup experience when using a screen reader.
>
> Cortana
>
> You can more reliably operate search and Cortana with the keyboard, including things like navigating using arrow keys and tab order. There are also Improvements to high contrast that make the Cortana UI more legible in all contrast modes. The team has also made a number of general fixes that improve the experience with Cortana when using accessibility tools such as Windows Speech Recognition, Narrator and other screen-readers.
>
> Groove
>
> The Groove team has delivered a number of key updates for low vision users like better support for high DPI scaling and better high contrast support, including better color combinations and the boxing of text when appearing on top of album art. In addition, the team has done work to make the app a better experience when using a screen reader by adding a number of new shortcut keys as well as fixing a number of bugs when using Narrator.
>
> Making accessibility easier for developers
>
> In addition to the progress being made with our apps and built-in accessibility features we have been making investments in the tools and reference materials that developers rely on to create accessible experiences within their apps and websites. Here are a few developer resources we have already made available or will be a part of the Windows 10 anniversary Update.
>
> New Tools
>
> Developer tools are essential to making accessibility just work. The Visual Studio App Analysis tool was updated to helping devs to find, triage and fix accessibility errors like flagging controls that don’t have an accessible name. We also introduced a new developer mode in Narrator. Narrator dev mode can be turned on when Narrator is already running by pressing SHIFT + CAPS LOCK + F12. When dev mode is turned on the screen will be masked and will highlight only the accessible objects and the associated text that is exposed programmatically to Narrator.
>
> XAML Improvements
>
> The XAML team has improved the support for Mnemonics within Universal Windows Apps (UWA’s) allowing for better Access Key customizations. For example, the developer of a shopping app can now assign a custom Access Key like P, that can be activated by pressing ALT then the letter P, in order to activate the purchase button.
>
> Improved Documentation
>
> And finally the team has worked hard to improve the discoverability and update the documentation we provide for developers. We recently relaunched the accessibility developer hub as well as general design guidelines and sample code for accessibility.
>
> Most importantly, your feedback is imperative to getting accessibility right. Keep letting us know what accessibility features are important to you. If you are already running Windows 10, you can simply press CAPS LOCK + E (two times) to bring up a feedback form when using Narrator. Or, if you are technically minded, you can help us by becoming a Windows Insider and giving us feedback on the latest updates to Windows as we are building them.
>
> Previous Blogs and Resources:
>
> Windows
>
> Further Details on the Coming Improvements to Narrator in Windows 10 <https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/05/09/further-details-on-the-coming-improvements-to-narrator-in-windows-10/>
> Improvements to Narrator in Windows 10 <https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/04/11/improvements-to-narrator-in-windows-10/>
> Making Windows 10 and Office 365 more accessible: Our path forward <https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/02/24/making-windows-10-and-office-365-more-accessible-our-path-forward/>
> Accessibility Update for Windows 10 Mail <https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/02/01/accessibility-update-for-windows-10-mail/>
> Accessibility and the Windows 10 Free Upgrade <https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/05/06/accessibility-and-the-windows-10-free-upgrade/>
> Microsoft Edge
>
> Ensuring high-quality browser accessibility with automation <https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/05/26/new-edge-blog-ensuring-high-quality-browser-accessibility-with-automation/>
> Building a more accessible user experience with HTML5 and UIA <https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/05/13/new-edge-blog-building-a-more-accessible-user-experience-with-html5-and-uia/>
> Building a More Accessible Web Platform <https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/accessibility/2016/04/21/building-a-more-accessible-web-platform/>
> Developers
>
> Accessibility Design guidelines <https://msdn.microsoft.com/windows/uwp/accessibility/accessibility-overview>
> Accessibility Developer Hub <https://developer.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/accessible-apps>



Re: Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

Matt
 

More than you think! But if this bothers the list too much I willing to move to the chat room if others is willing to follow.

 

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jim Wohlgamuth
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 1:09 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

 

Hi there Folks!

Wonder what this topic has to do with technology and accessibility? To my knowledge they do not make a gun with any sort of blindness technology-or do they..? I really do wish we could get this list back on topic and leave the gun talk to the chat list.  Personally I am 60 years old and have never owned a gun-and probably never will.  If I were to own a gun it would be somethihng like a shotgun so that if I actually had to shoot at someone in self defense, I might have a chance of hitting them.  We really don't need a bunch of Barney Fifes shooting themselves in the foot<SMILE!>.          I know there are folks out there who use guns responsibly and that is most of them.

  But I wonder just how many gun owners are blind or legally blind? Anyone no any stats on that?  Have A Good 1! de
<KF8LT><Jim Wohlgamuth>.

On 02-Jul-16 12:32, James Bentley wrote:

What's insane is that the general public can purchase a version of this sniper rifle that hits a very small target at over half a mile.

Yikes,  I think I will just stay in the house with the blinds drrawn.



-----Original Message----- From: Jeremy
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 11:17 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

Wow! that is freakin insane!

JR

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
James Bentley
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 9:07 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

The United States military has a computerized rifle and scope combination.
It first takes a photo of the entire target area.  Next, the shooter uses a
cursor on a touch screen to tell the computer where to put the bullet.
Next, the shooter aims at the target.  The computer fires the rifle only
when it sees that the rifle is aimed with pin point accuracy.  3 inch
Targets can be hit accurately at distances over two miles.



-----Original Message-----
From: Jeremy
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 10:56 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

Finally, a relevant informative post. Thank you for contributing to my small
pool of knowledge. :)

And while on the subject matter, I'm thinking an audio beep of some sort
might be able to alert the blind shooter than the object of interest is
within the cross hairs of scope. Key will be determining what is target
object and what is some sort of artifact.

JR

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Joe
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 8:47 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

There is now what some are calling a smart rifle, out of Texas. At $25,000,
it's beyond the reach of most enthusiasts, but it can fetch that price for
the level of precision it can automatically adjust to help the shooter
acquire a target. If technology has leaped that far, one can almost wonder
what credit, if any, the shooter gets, but my question is this: What
technology have the hunters among us used to rely a little less on sighted
assistance? I go deer hunting, but thus far I have leaned heavily on
discrete cues from sighted companions to know where and when to fire. It's
not a bad method. I've brought down three bucks in this fashion, and while
hunting can often be enjoyed with companions, it would be nice to
independently, but responsibly, engage and execute the target myself. Right
now I use a laser to help my sighted companions get a better sense of where
I am aiming. This allows me to hold and operate the rifle on my own, but
again, it feels inefficient. Any tips would be welcomed.

I'll note that while I am a member of a local shooting range, I have
hesitated to obtain a gun permit. I understand my shooting would be optimal
at very close range, but the risk of hitting someone innocent, however
small, still weighs on my conscience.

I realize for some the discussion of guns and hunting could be abhorrent. If
so, feel free to email me off list. For whatever it's worth, I eat what I
kill. I've never gone hunting for the mere sport. I've learned how to skin
my own kill, and I suppose one could argue the knife skill in doing so could
itself be viewed as a form of technology skill.

Not to stray too far off topic here, but any number of disasters could occur
in our lifetime and in our own backyard. In a scenario with no power and
extensive food shortage, that Windows machine isn't going to be worth a
whole lot except for maybe scrap metal. Our definition of "technology" just
might revert to what technology used to be. That is, the means to survive.

Best,

Joe

--
Musings of a Work in Progress:
www.JoeOrozco.com/

Twitter: @ScribblingJoe


















 


Re: dropbox

Jeremy <jeremy.richards7@...>
 

Try looking for your Dropbox folder within c:\user\your name or look within the documents folder.

JR

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 10:02 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] dropbox

Go to Drop Box using what? The Drop Box desktop application? The Drop Box web site? Assuming you have an old enough account, you should see the public links folder using the desktop application. If you don't, I don't know why. We don't even know if this is a Windows 10 problem. Have you tried with other versions of Windows to be sure that the problem only occurs in Windows 10? I suspect this is some odd problem you are having since I don't recall ever seeing this discussed before. With all the people using Windows 10, if this were a general problem, I expect we would have seen a lot of discussion before this. You may have to contact Drop Box support.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Gary Greico <mailto:pianotuner3@optimum.net>
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 11:53 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] dropbox

When I go to dropbox on windows 10, I don't see the public folder or thedropbox folder, please advise.


Re: Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

Matt
 

Yes that would maybe solve it . just don't know if you could get scope
companies to impement something like this and then the cost. They might come
up with something like this one day! Most of the people using a scope is
visuall no matter what kind of scope it is . So don't know if audio tone
would be in the mix ever.


Matt.from.florida@gmail.com

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Jeremy
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 1:09 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

Audio via Bluetooth headset should solve that problem. You can blow away an
innocent harmless animal, and in the same breath answer your iPhone.

JR

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Matt
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 9:55 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

Yes but don't know that would work in hunting as the animals has super
hearing most of them . they can hear what most of us could never hear. So it
would scare them off. Now this would work for a self-defense mode. That is
unless you was shooting a heck of a long way off at the animal out of his or
her hearing range and that would be fairly far! The other thing would be to
find a manufacture that would be willing to implement something like this in
a scope and then the cost of it would be out the range of most people.


Matt.from.florida@gmail.com


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Jeremy
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 11:57 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

Finally, a relevant informative post. Thank you for contributing to my small
pool of knowledge. :)

And while on the subject matter, I'm thinking an audio beep of some sort
might be able to alert the blind shooter than the object of interest is
within the cross hairs of scope. Key will be determining what is target
object and what is some sort of artifact.

JR

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Joe
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 8:47 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

There is now what some are calling a smart rifle, out of Texas. At $25,000,
it's beyond the reach of most enthusiasts, but it can fetch that price for
the level of precision it can automatically adjust to help the shooter
acquire a target. If technology has leaped that far, one can almost wonder
what credit, if any, the shooter gets, but my question is this: What
technology have the hunters among us used to rely a little less on sighted
assistance? I go deer hunting, but thus far I have leaned heavily on
discrete cues from sighted companions to know where and when to fire. It's
not a bad method. I've brought down three bucks in this fashion, and while
hunting can often be enjoyed with companions, it would be nice to
independently, but responsibly, engage and execute the target myself. Right
now I use a laser to help my sighted companions get a better sense of where
I am aiming. This allows me to hold and operate the rifle on my own, but
again, it feels inefficient. Any tips would be welcomed.

I'll note that while I am a member of a local shooting range, I have
hesitated to obtain a gun permit. I understand my shooting would be optimal
at very close range, but the risk of hitting someone innocent, however
small, still weighs on my conscience.

I realize for some the discussion of guns and hunting could be abhorrent. If
so, feel free to email me off list. For whatever it's worth, I eat what I
kill. I've never gone hunting for the mere sport. I've learned how to skin
my own kill, and I suppose one could argue the knife skill in doing so could
itself be viewed as a form of technology skill.

Not to stray too far off topic here, but any number of disasters could occur
in our lifetime and in our own backyard. In a scenario with no power and
extensive food shortage, that Windows machine isn't going to be worth a
whole lot except for maybe scrap metal. Our definition of "technology" just
might revert to what technology used to be. That is, the means to survive.

Best,

Joe

--
Musings of a Work in Progress:
www.JoeOrozco.com/

Twitter: @ScribblingJoe


Re: Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

Jeremy <jeremy.richards7@...>
 

Audio via Bluetooth headset should solve that problem. You can blow away an
innocent harmless animal, and in the same breath answer your iPhone.

JR

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Matt
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 9:55 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

Yes but don't know that would work in hunting as the animals has super
hearing most of them . they can hear what most of us could never hear. So it
would scare them off. Now this would work for a self-defense mode. That is
unless you was shooting a heck of a long way off at the animal out of his or
her hearing range and that would be fairly far! The other thing would be to
find a manufacture that would be willing to implement something like this in
a scope and then the cost of it would be out the range of most people.


Matt.from.florida@gmail.com


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Jeremy
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 11:57 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

Finally, a relevant informative post. Thank you for contributing to my small
pool of knowledge. :)

And while on the subject matter, I'm thinking an audio beep of some sort
might be able to alert the blind shooter than the object of interest is
within the cross hairs of scope. Key will be determining what is target
object and what is some sort of artifact.

JR

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Joe
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 8:47 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

There is now what some are calling a smart rifle, out of Texas. At $25,000,
it's beyond the reach of most enthusiasts, but it can fetch that price for
the level of precision it can automatically adjust to help the shooter
acquire a target. If technology has leaped that far, one can almost wonder
what credit, if any, the shooter gets, but my question is this: What
technology have the hunters among us used to rely a little less on sighted
assistance? I go deer hunting, but thus far I have leaned heavily on
discrete cues from sighted companions to know where and when to fire. It's
not a bad method. I've brought down three bucks in this fashion, and while
hunting can often be enjoyed with companions, it would be nice to
independently, but responsibly, engage and execute the target myself. Right
now I use a laser to help my sighted companions get a better sense of where
I am aiming. This allows me to hold and operate the rifle on my own, but
again, it feels inefficient. Any tips would be welcomed.

I'll note that while I am a member of a local shooting range, I have
hesitated to obtain a gun permit. I understand my shooting would be optimal
at very close range, but the risk of hitting someone innocent, however
small, still weighs on my conscience.

I realize for some the discussion of guns and hunting could be abhorrent. If
so, feel free to email me off list. For whatever it's worth, I eat what I
kill. I've never gone hunting for the mere sport. I've learned how to skin
my own kill, and I suppose one could argue the knife skill in doing so could
itself be viewed as a form of technology skill.

Not to stray too far off topic here, but any number of disasters could occur
in our lifetime and in our own backyard. In a scenario with no power and
extensive food shortage, that Windows machine isn't going to be worth a
whole lot except for maybe scrap metal. Our definition of "technology" just
might revert to what technology used to be. That is, the means to survive.

Best,

Joe

--
Musings of a Work in Progress:
www.JoeOrozco.com/

Twitter: @ScribblingJoe


Re: Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

Jim Wohlgamuth
 

Hi there Folks!

Wonder what this topic has to do with technology and accessibility? To my knowledge they do not make a gun with any sort of blindness technology-or do they..? I really do wish we could get this list back on topic and leave the gun talk to the chat list.  Personally I am 60 years old and have never owned a gun-and probably never will.  If I were to own a gun it would be somethihng like a shotgun so that if I actually had to shoot at someone in self defense, I might have a chance of hitting them.  We really don't need a bunch of Barney Fifes shooting themselves in the foot<SMILE!>.          I know there are folks out there who use guns responsibly and that is most of them.

  But I wonder just how many gun owners are blind or legally blind? Anyone no any stats on that?  Have A Good 1! de
<KF8LT><Jim Wohlgamuth>.

On 02-Jul-16 12:32, James Bentley wrote:
What's insane is that the general public can purchase a version of this sniper rifle that hits a very small target at over half a mile.

Yikes,  I think I will just stay in the house with the blinds drrawn.



-----Original Message----- From: Jeremy
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 11:17 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

Wow! that is freakin insane!

JR

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
James Bentley
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 9:07 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

The United States military has a computerized rifle and scope combination.
It first takes a photo of the entire target area.  Next, the shooter uses a
cursor on a touch screen to tell the computer where to put the bullet.
Next, the shooter aims at the target.  The computer fires the rifle only
when it sees that the rifle is aimed with pin point accuracy.  3 inch
Targets can be hit accurately at distances over two miles.



-----Original Message-----
From: Jeremy
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 10:56 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

Finally, a relevant informative post. Thank you for contributing to my small
pool of knowledge. :)

And while on the subject matter, I'm thinking an audio beep of some sort
might be able to alert the blind shooter than the object of interest is
within the cross hairs of scope. Key will be determining what is target
object and what is some sort of artifact.

JR

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Joe
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 8:47 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

There is now what some are calling a smart rifle, out of Texas. At $25,000,
it's beyond the reach of most enthusiasts, but it can fetch that price for
the level of precision it can automatically adjust to help the shooter
acquire a target. If technology has leaped that far, one can almost wonder
what credit, if any, the shooter gets, but my question is this: What
technology have the hunters among us used to rely a little less on sighted
assistance? I go deer hunting, but thus far I have leaned heavily on
discrete cues from sighted companions to know where and when to fire. It's
not a bad method. I've brought down three bucks in this fashion, and while
hunting can often be enjoyed with companions, it would be nice to
independently, but responsibly, engage and execute the target myself. Right
now I use a laser to help my sighted companions get a better sense of where
I am aiming. This allows me to hold and operate the rifle on my own, but
again, it feels inefficient. Any tips would be welcomed.

I'll note that while I am a member of a local shooting range, I have
hesitated to obtain a gun permit. I understand my shooting would be optimal
at very close range, but the risk of hitting someone innocent, however
small, still weighs on my conscience.

I realize for some the discussion of guns and hunting could be abhorrent. If
so, feel free to email me off list. For whatever it's worth, I eat what I
kill. I've never gone hunting for the mere sport. I've learned how to skin
my own kill, and I suppose one could argue the knife skill in doing so could
itself be viewed as a form of technology skill.

Not to stray too far off topic here, but any number of disasters could occur
in our lifetime and in our own backyard. In a scenario with no power and
extensive food shortage, that Windows machine isn't going to be worth a
whole lot except for maybe scrap metal. Our definition of "technology" just
might revert to what technology used to be. That is, the means to survive.

Best,

Joe

--
Musings of a Work in Progress:
www.JoeOrozco.com/

Twitter: @ScribblingJoe





















IPod gestures

James Bentley
 

When I read Apple news, sometimes, there are over 50 pages of data.
 
Does any one know if there is a gesture that will take me from let’s just say page 50 all the way back to the top of page 1?
 
Thanks,
 
James
 
 
**No one is totally worthless, they can always be used as a bad example.





Re: dropbox

Gene
 

Go to Drop Box using what?  The Drop Box desktop application?  The Drop Box web site?  Assuming you have an old enough account, you should see the public links folder using the desktop application.  If you don't, I don't know why.  We don't even know if this is a Windows 10 problem.  Have you tried with other versions of Windows to be sure that the problem only occurs in Windows 10?  I suspect this is some odd problem you are having since I don't recall ever seeing this discussed before.  With all the people using Windows 10, if this were a general problem, I expect we would have seen a lot of discussion before this.  You may have to contact Drop Box support.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 11:53 AM
Subject: [TechTalk] dropbox

When I go to dropbox on windows 10, I don't see the public folder or
thedropbox folder, please advise.




Re: Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

Matt
 

Yes but don't know that would work in hunting as the animals has super
hearing most of them . they can hear what most of us could never hear. So it
would scare them off. Now this would work for a self-defense mode. That is
unless you was shooting a heck of a long way off at the animal out of his or
her hearing range and that would be fairly far! The other thing would be to
find a manufacture that would be willing to implement something like this in
a scope and then the cost of it would be out the range of most people.


Matt.from.florida@gmail.com

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Jeremy
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 11:57 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

Finally, a relevant informative post. Thank you for contributing to my small
pool of knowledge. :)

And while on the subject matter, I'm thinking an audio beep of some sort
might be able to alert the blind shooter than the object of interest is
within the cross hairs of scope. Key will be determining what is target
object and what is some sort of artifact.

JR

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Joe
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 8:47 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

There is now what some are calling a smart rifle, out of Texas. At $25,000,
it's beyond the reach of most enthusiasts, but it can fetch that price for
the level of precision it can automatically adjust to help the shooter
acquire a target. If technology has leaped that far, one can almost wonder
what credit, if any, the shooter gets, but my question is this: What
technology have the hunters among us used to rely a little less on sighted
assistance? I go deer hunting, but thus far I have leaned heavily on
discrete cues from sighted companions to know where and when to fire. It's
not a bad method. I've brought down three bucks in this fashion, and while
hunting can often be enjoyed with companions, it would be nice to
independently, but responsibly, engage and execute the target myself. Right
now I use a laser to help my sighted companions get a better sense of where
I am aiming. This allows me to hold and operate the rifle on my own, but
again, it feels inefficient. Any tips would be welcomed.

I'll note that while I am a member of a local shooting range, I have
hesitated to obtain a gun permit. I understand my shooting would be optimal
at very close range, but the risk of hitting someone innocent, however
small, still weighs on my conscience.

I realize for some the discussion of guns and hunting could be abhorrent. If
so, feel free to email me off list. For whatever it's worth, I eat what I
kill. I've never gone hunting for the mere sport. I've learned how to skin
my own kill, and I suppose one could argue the knife skill in doing so could
itself be viewed as a form of technology skill.

Not to stray too far off topic here, but any number of disasters could occur
in our lifetime and in our own backyard. In a scenario with no power and
extensive food shortage, that Windows machine isn't going to be worth a
whole lot except for maybe scrap metal. Our definition of "technology" just
might revert to what technology used to be. That is, the means to survive.

Best,

Joe

--
Musings of a Work in Progress:
www.JoeOrozco.com/

Twitter: @ScribblingJoe


dropbox

Gary Greico
 

When I go to dropbox on windows 10, I don't see the public folder or thedropbox folder, please advise.


Re: Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

Matt
 

Hi, well I have a CCW and only would use it is the last resort of defense in
public. Then it would be at point blank range. Where the chance would be
very slim. But another thing is to have a laser on the weapon as a sited
person if you have one can easily say when the laser is on the target say
you got him. Then fire. I am talking self-defense here.
Now for a rifle with this computerize scope it will put you on the target to
kill it or should I say the spot. But you have to get it on the target as it
still don't know what the target is you are looking for. It can be program I
understand to know the difference in say a deer or bear or so on but you
have to get it on the target and just how the feedback is related to the
shooter I think is visual thru the scope. So you can get the cross hairs on
the target. The same for using it in self-defense mode on humans I think
you still have no way to get the feedback as it is thru the scope. So I
think we will still need some sited help with hunting. Here again a laser on
the rifle might be a better solution. I personally gave up shooting with a
rifle all together now such as hunting and such. Only self-defense in my
home. Which by the way I live way out in the country on 9 acres of land. I
do have a shooting range on it but it needs some work on it so I don't use
it as of now. But plan on fixing it back up at some point in time!
For self-defense I use a Rugar LCR .38 as I can shoot right thru my coat or
vest pocket and also since I would only use it in a point blank thing in
public as my last choice the chance of jamming or getting cought on clothes
and such is much less. I like and have a Glock 17 for home protection that
carries a17 round clip for it . in fact it came with 3 17 round clips. So
there is a place for semi Auto loader hand guns in my tool box. I just have
been always a revolver man as I really like them.
But I like to carry usually myself a knife, stun gun, pepper spray and then
a couple of hand guns one being a revolver and the other a small auto
loader. I also usually but not always carry a good heavy duty hickory cane
with a good hook to it. If you know how to use a cane correctly it is a
great self-defense weapon.
I also have a sword cane as well I sometimes use! So I myself try to build a
tool box of self-defense things to use. I pretty good at hand to hand combat
as well. Most two legged things usually humans really don't scare me . Or
should I say I will stand my ground with them. Because if it comes down to
me and my family I will do whatever it takes to protect them!


Matt.from.florida@gmail.com

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Joe
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 11:47 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

There is now what some are calling a smart rifle, out of Texas. At $25,000,
it's beyond the reach of most enthusiasts, but it can fetch that price for
the level of precision it can automatically adjust to help the shooter
acquire a target. If technology has leaped that far, one can almost wonder
what credit, if any, the shooter gets, but my question is this: What
technology have the hunters among us used to rely a little less on sighted
assistance? I go deer hunting, but thus far I have leaned heavily on
discrete cues from sighted companions to know where and when to fire. It's
not a bad method. I've brought down three bucks in this fashion, and while
hunting can often be enjoyed with companions, it would be nice to
independently, but responsibly, engage and execute the target myself. Right
now I use a laser to help my sighted companions get a better sense of where
I am aiming. This allows me to hold and operate the rifle on my own, but
again, it feels inefficient. Any tips would be welcomed.

I'll note that while I am a member of a local shooting range, I have
hesitated to obtain a gun permit. I understand my shooting would be optimal
at very close range, but the risk of hitting someone innocent, however
small, still weighs on my conscience.

I realize for some the discussion of guns and hunting could be abhorrent. If
so, feel free to email me off list. For whatever it's worth, I eat what I
kill. I've never gone hunting for the mere sport. I've learned how to skin
my own kill, and I suppose one could argue the knife skill in doing so could
itself be viewed as a form of technology skill.

Not to stray too far off topic here, but any number of disasters could occur
in our lifetime and in our own backyard. In a scenario with no power and
extensive food shortage, that Windows machine isn't going to be worth a
whole lot except for maybe scrap metal. Our definition of "technology" just
might revert to what technology used to be. That is, the means to survive.

Best,

Joe

--
Musings of a Work in Progress:
www.JoeOrozco.com/

Twitter: @ScribblingJoe


Re: Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

James Bentley
 

What's insane is that the general public can purchase a version of this sniper rifle that hits a very small target at over half a mile.

Yikes, I think I will just stay in the house with the blinds drrawn.

-----Original Message-----
From: Jeremy
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 11:17 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

Wow! that is freakin insane!

JR

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
James Bentley
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 9:07 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

The United States military has a computerized rifle and scope combination.
It first takes a photo of the entire target area. Next, the shooter uses a
cursor on a touch screen to tell the computer where to put the bullet.
Next, the shooter aims at the target. The computer fires the rifle only
when it sees that the rifle is aimed with pin point accuracy. 3 inch
Targets can be hit accurately at distances over two miles.



-----Original Message-----
From: Jeremy
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 10:56 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

Finally, a relevant informative post. Thank you for contributing to my small
pool of knowledge. :)

And while on the subject matter, I'm thinking an audio beep of some sort
might be able to alert the blind shooter than the object of interest is
within the cross hairs of scope. Key will be determining what is target
object and what is some sort of artifact.

JR

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Joe
Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 8:47 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Gun Technique, Hunting and Technology

There is now what some are calling a smart rifle, out of Texas. At $25,000,
it's beyond the reach of most enthusiasts, but it can fetch that price for
the level of precision it can automatically adjust to help the shooter
acquire a target. If technology has leaped that far, one can almost wonder
what credit, if any, the shooter gets, but my question is this: What
technology have the hunters among us used to rely a little less on sighted
assistance? I go deer hunting, but thus far I have leaned heavily on
discrete cues from sighted companions to know where and when to fire. It's
not a bad method. I've brought down three bucks in this fashion, and while
hunting can often be enjoyed with companions, it would be nice to
independently, but responsibly, engage and execute the target myself. Right
now I use a laser to help my sighted companions get a better sense of where
I am aiming. This allows me to hold and operate the rifle on my own, but
again, it feels inefficient. Any tips would be welcomed.

I'll note that while I am a member of a local shooting range, I have
hesitated to obtain a gun permit. I understand my shooting would be optimal
at very close range, but the risk of hitting someone innocent, however
small, still weighs on my conscience.

I realize for some the discussion of guns and hunting could be abhorrent. If
so, feel free to email me off list. For whatever it's worth, I eat what I
kill. I've never gone hunting for the mere sport. I've learned how to skin
my own kill, and I suppose one could argue the knife skill in doing so could
itself be viewed as a form of technology skill.

Not to stray too far off topic here, but any number of disasters could occur
in our lifetime and in our own backyard. In a scenario with no power and
extensive food shortage, that Windows machine isn't going to be worth a
whole lot except for maybe scrap metal. Our definition of "technology" just
might revert to what technology used to be. That is, the means to survive.

Best,

Joe

--
Musings of a Work in Progress:
www.JoeOrozco.com/

Twitter: @ScribblingJoe


Re: How frequently do you use the Windows Narrator screen reader? #poll

Joseph Lee <joseph.lee22590@...>
 

Hi Carlos,

Usually when I posta poll, I prepare myself to receive votes from polls and emails (as a direct email or as a reply).

As for my vote: : I chose option 3 in the poll. I tend to use it if there are new Insider builds that include features or fixes for it.

As for Edge: will give you a backstage tour upon request.

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Carlos
Sent: Saturday, July 2, 2016 7:22 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How frequently do you use the Windows Narrator screen reader? #poll

 

Sigh I give up.  LOL everyone can just post their vote in a reply if it is more convenient.

----- Original Message -----

From: Loy

Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 10:17 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How frequently do you use the Windows Narrator screen reader? #poll

 

It takes me to the Tech Talk group main page, no options to vote.

----- Original Message -----

From: Carlos

Sent: Saturday, July 2, 2016 10:02 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How frequently do you use the Windows Narrator screen reader? #poll

 

Interesting.  There should be several radio buttons which are the choices and a

"Vote"

link.

----- Original Message -----

From: Loy

Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 10:00 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How frequently do you use the Windows Narrator screen reader? #poll

 

I clicked on vote now but did not see any option to vote.

 

----- Original Message -----

From: Carlos

Sent: Saturday, July 2, 2016 9:49 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How frequently do you use the Windows Narrator screen reader? #poll

 

LOL click on the

link and choose an option to make it official.  This way everyone can also view the results of the poll.

----- Original Message -----

From: Loy

Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2016 9:45 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] How frequently do you use the Windows Narrator screen reader? #poll

 

I never use narrator.

----- Original Message -----

From: Carlos

Sent: Saturday, July 2, 2016 9:39 AM

Subject: [TechTalk] How frequently do you use the Windows Narrator screen reader? #poll

 

A new poll has been created:

Just for fun and because we rarely use this feature.

 

1. I only use Narrator for emergencies
2. I never use Narrator
3. I use Narrator regularly

Vote Now

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