Date   

locked Re: New Smart Flip Phone?

Lynette
 

Please, please stop this thread.It's useful information has been stated repeatedly as has all the useless information.

-----Original Message-----
From: Penny Golden
Sent: Sunday, February 23, 2020 1:37 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

It's like hearing Illinois Duce, for Il Doochay.

Sorry; i had to spell that incorrectly for the synth to do anything like
an approximation.

But the funniest one is when you put a South Dakota card into your device.



On 2/23/2020 12:02 PM, Monte Single wrote:
Yes, I have heard "virgin islands" pop up in some very unusual contexts.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Pamela Dominguez
Sent: February-23-20 7:55 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

That's okay, I recognize those kinds of mistakes. Mine interprets the roman numeral for 6, which is v I, as Virgin Islands. I separated the v and the I so they would be pronounced. Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Monte Single
Sent: Saturday, February 22, 2020 2:43 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

Hi Gerald,
Probably my mistake, sometimes my ole voice synth which I am using with nvda says five instead of v; this is because the voice synth is interpreting the letter v as roman numeral five.
I know I neeed a more accurate synth, but I do like the voice.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gerald Levy via Groups.Io
Sent: February-22-20 1:16 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?


Okay, a little clarification. There is no such model as the Alcatel Flip Go
5. There is a model called the Alcatel Flip Go V, and perhaps somebody
assumed that the "V" was actually the Roman numeral for 5. But nowhere is
this phone referred to as the Alcatel Flip Go 5. I suspect that the "V"
actually stands for Verizon, because this phone is apparently designed for
Verizon Wireless and also works with US Cellular. It apparently does not
work with T Mobile, which uses a different technology than T Mobile. The
only Alcatel phone listed for T Mobile is the Flip Go 3. Judging from the
product description, it sounds that the Flip Go V is essentially similar in
features to the Go Flip 3, although there is no mention of the voice
guidance feature. Both models sell for about $100.


Gerald



On 2/22/2020 1:50 PM, Monte Single wrote:
Yes, this is the first I have hear of the alcatel go 5. But that's
what consumer technology is all about; the latest and the greatest.
The fact that you have a device that works fine for you is irrelevant.
The only way to generate new sales is with new products. Sometimes
it's the same old thing with a new label or costume.
Buy, buy, buy.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On
Behalf Of Pamela Dominguez
Sent: February-22-20 9:43 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

I have never heard of a go 5 before this one. I always heard of the
go 3, and I thought that was the newest one. Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Monte Single
Sent: Friday, February 21, 2020 11:02 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

What is the difference between the alcatel go 3 and go 5.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On
Behalf Of jan howells via Groups.Io
Sent: February-21-20 6:32 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

Yesterday, my brother bought me an Alcatel Go 5 cell phone nn his
plan. I will get it at Easter time.

Jan

























Re: What is a good flip phone to buy?

Abbie Taylor
 

Terry, this depends on what carrier you use. Different phones work with different carriers. I use Verizon and recently purchased an Exalt LG phone, which I really like. Calling, texting, contacts, the voice recorder, alarms, timer and stopwatch are all accessible. The only things I can't do with this phone are email and web browsing because the browser doesn't work with speech. It's over $100, but I was able to get it through Verizon on a payment plan. Your Verizon store should  be able to order it for you. I'll send you instructions on how to use it if you email me privately. I hope this helps.
--


Abbie Johnson Taylor, Author https://abbiescorner.wordpress.com

http://www.abbiejohnsontaylor.com

abbietaylor945@...

 


Re: Changing Computer Name

Carolyn Arnold
 

Only Microsoft calls their Customer Service for us
Disability, but Apple calls theirs Accessibility.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Mike B
Sent: Sunday, February 23, 2020 3:04 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Changing Computer Name

Hi Mary,

Thank you for the verification. I changed, what I thought
was the computer name, with my Microsoft account on the MS
website, and damn, it turned out to be my user name! I had
to reinstall Win10 and I don't want to go through that crap
again! LOL LOL Microsoft Accessibility couldn't get it
right again, so I just reinstalled.

Take care. Mike. Sent from my iBarstool.

----- Original Message -----
From: Mary Smith <mailto:ms0120@...>
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, February 23, 2020 11:16 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Changing Computer Name

Hi Mike, you will be able to change the computer name
without affecting any of your user accounts. Just choose a
name that is different and you should be good to go.




On 2020-02-23 2:14 p.m., Mike B wrote:
Howdy All,

I want to change the computer names on a couple of our
computers, but
if I do this will changing computer names cause any access
problems
with any of the User Name folders? Thanks mooy moocho.

Take care. Mike. Sent from my iBarstool.




locked Re: New Smart Flip Phone?

Carolyn Arnold
 

Now it is Hadley Institute for Blind and visually Impaired.

I can understand why agencies are Blind and Visually Impaired, because when I had partial sight, I did not feel like I was blind.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Pamela Dominguez
Sent: Sunday, February 23, 2020 11:25 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

Oh, it's Institute, now! I always knew of it as Hadley School for the Blind. Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Victor
Sent: Sunday, February 23, 2020 3:07 AM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

Hi David and Gerald:

There is also something called the Hadley Institute which has quite a few great instructional videos and tutorials for the iPhone and all kinds of other technology.

Victor
On Feb 23, 2020, at 12:02 AM, David Goldfield
<david.goldfield@...> wrote:

Yes, the newer iPhones do offer excellent battery life. I'm still
using an iPhone 8 and I use it with Apple's smart battery case, which
I absolutely love, as I can be at a 100% charge for an entire day,
even with streaming audio.

David Goldfield,
Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist JAWS Certified, 2019

WWW.DavidGoldfield.org

On 2/21/2020 6:46 PM, Carolyn Arnold wrote:
I had that problem with my SE. It was a super phone, and, at least,
had more battery life than any flip phone I had, but still...

The 11 is living up to what I heard about it.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On
Behalf Of Karim Lakhani
Sent: Friday, February 21, 2020 3:25 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

I love my iphone!
but the battery drains real fast.
When I'm waiting for transportation it ccan go for hours, if you
don't listen to radio and such.
do you use a charging back up?
I had a case with my 5se, but the 7 would be nice if I didn't have to
carry back ups.
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf
Of Loy
Sent: Friday, February 21, 2020 10:58 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?
I love my IPhone, if I only used the Seeing AI and Be My Eyes apps
it has been worth the investment. You don't have to buy the latest
and most expensive. You can purchase one used for under
$200.00.----- Original Message -----
From: Gene <mailto:gsasner@...>
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, February 21, 2020 12:26 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

That's right. I hadn't thought about that.

Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: chris judge <mailto:chrisjudge1967@...>
Sent: Friday, February 21, 2020 11:11 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

Actualy, he could read the screen with his smart phone. Another
reason to get one. Having an aira agent at your finger tips can solve
a lot of issues.

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
<main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io> > On Behalf
Of Gene
Sent: February 21, 2020 12:52 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

You don't know that. Interesting how someone with absolutely no
experience has so many opinions on something he chooses to know
nothing about from a standpoint of practical experience. Mix apples and oranges?
If your mother board fails, please explain how having a tactile
keyboard makes speech easier to obtain or how it is easier to diagnose the probem?
If your sound card fails and you don't have a USB sound card or a
USB headset, explain the same thing. There are certain instances
where having a physical keyboard would make solving a problem easier.
But these rare instances are no reason not to use a smart phone. And
a smart phone with a keypad can certainly fail in ways that make
having the keypad useless in trying to solve the problem.

You have followed these lists long enough to know that no matter
what you use, some problems require sighted assistance and that is no
reason not to use such products. If Windows becomes corrupted and
doesn't fully boot and displays an error message, please explain to
me how you are going to read it unless you have an optacon, which
very few blind people have. Again, begging the question just to support your bias.

Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Gerald Levy via Groups.Io
<mailto:bwaylimited=verizon.net@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, February 21, 2020 9:30 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?


The difference is that a computer has a tactile keyboard. A smart
phone doesn't, which makes it more difficult for a blind consumer to
resolve a problem without sighted help. Don't mix Apples with oraanges.
(pun intended)

Gerald


On 2/21/2020 8:41 AM, Gene wrote:
He is not saying that. Your computer's mother board can
develop a problem and the computer won't function at all. I don't
see you begging the question about your computer or implying that you
shouldn't use a computer. Sooner or later, it all comes down to
this, no matter how often you discuss such topics and ask such
questions, after a point, you are simply begging the question and
setting up straw men because you are irremediably biased against smart phones.

Your questions in the beginning of such discussions may serve
a useful purpose because there may be people who are worried about
trying such phones and people give answers that may be reassuring.
But beyond a point, you are just indulging your antismart phone bias.
No user who knows something about computers or minicomputers, which
is what smart phones are, would say that loss of speech is
impossible, A component may fail, something may become corrupted,
and that is true of any computer or minicomputer. That is no reason
not to use one. The brakes could fail when you are in a car, but do
you ride busses or cabs? assessing risk is a risk/benefit
evaluation. If the risk is low enough and the benefitsworht the risk, people constantly do activities with some risk.
Almost any activity has at least a very small amount of risk.

Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Gerald Levy via Groups.Io
<mailto:bwaylimited=verizon.net@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, February 21, 2020 6:15 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?


So you are saying that IOS is such a wonderful OS that it is
impossible for anything to go wrong and cause complete loss of speech
that simple fixes like the ones you suggest won't resolve? And is it
not true that the latest IPhone models have no physical buttons of any kind?
If so, how do you locate the volume and home keys if you have no
speech in the first place?

Gerald


On 2/21/2020 7:03 AM, chris judge wrote:
Yes, but once you learn the device you will learn that
loss of speech is usually caused by:
a. Speech being muted. Solved by a 3 finger double tap.
b. Voice over being turned off. Solved by either asking
siri to turn it on, or pressing the home key 3 times quickly. In the
case of the iPhone 10 or above, press the power button 3 times.
c. Voice over volume being turned down. Solved by invoking
a gesture, then pressing up on the volume button.
It’s like any other technology, Once you learn it, things
are much simpler than they seem when the device is new to you.

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io
<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io> <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gerald Levy via Groups.Io
Sent: February 21, 2020 7:39 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?


Okay, let's suppose you turn on your IPhone, and there is
no speech? Then what? How do you restore Voice Over without
sighted help if you have no idea what's causing the problem in the
first place? No operating system, not even IOS, is immune from
problems that could cause loss of speech.

Gerald


On 2/21/2020 5:10 AM, chris judge wrote:
That’s ridiculous. I’ve been totally blind since birth
and have used an IPhone since 2009. Give it a try.

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io
<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io> <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Alex Stone via Groups.Io
Sent: February 20, 2020 3:36 PM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
<mailto:main@techtalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

Gerald, I can assure you that I am really blind, and I
think I take exception to the suggestion that I’m not!




On 20 Feb 2020, at 15:01, Gerald Levy via
Groups.Io <bwaylimited=verizon.net@groups.io
<mailto:bwaylimited=verizon.net@groups.io> > wrote:


I suspect that many "blind" consumers who use
smart phones that are completely devoid of tactile buttons are not
really "blind" at all, but visually impaired and retain some
funtional vision to navigate around a touchscreen. Those who are
totally blind and purport to use a touchscreen smart phone probably had a lot of sighted help.
Which is why smart phones with tactile keypads like the BlindShell
and Smart Vision have been introduced. So I'm looking forward to
hearing about the experiences of a totally blind consumer using the
new Samsung smart flip phone.


Gerald


On 2/20/2020 9:41 AM, Gene wrote:
Your statement about buttons is inaccurate based
on discussions I've seen on this topic before. Most smart phones
already had very few buttons, and, as for the elimination of the home
button on the I-Phone, while I can't speak from personal experience,
I've seen enough comments on lists like this that the button's
elimination doesn't mean blind people can't use the phone.
Evidently, the screen simulates the presence of a button by
vibrating. I'm not saying I definitely understand the situation and
I await other comments but how many people have you seen say they
stopped using an I-Phone because of elimination of the home button?

You often state the worst case interpretation of
situations.

Gene
----- Origial Message -----
From: Gerald Levy via Groups.Io
<mailto:bwaylimited=verizon.net@groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2020 5:22 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
<mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?


According to Consumer Reports, this Samsung smart
flip phone employs a new touchscreen technology that allows it to be
thin and flexible enough to be folded in half like a wallet. But in
tests, it proved to be very fragile, and CR did not recommend it,
especially in view of its very high price tag. And it would probably
not be a good choice for a blind consumer because even unfolded the
touchscreen is relatively small and has no tactile buttons. This
seems to be a growing trend in smart phones: eliminating all physical
buttons, making it virtually impossible for a blind consumer to use
the phone without some sighted help or a lot of hands-on training.

Gerald


On 2/19/2020 9:20 PM, Mike B wrote:

Hi Lisa,

I heard about a phone like you're describing just
the other day and I think they said that Samsung was the company
producing it. From the way the guy was describing the way it works,
it sounds like it'll be a really cool phone, but for $1300 it damn
well otta be! LOL LOL Check out the link below for a review.


https://eur05.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fgiz
modo.com%2F24-hours-with-the-samsung-galaxy-z-flip-has-me-convince-18
41791884&amp;data=02%7C01%7C%7Cf9388eb0f88f4a82bfdd08d7b72843b8%7C84d
f9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C637179255865028410&amp;sdata=
w9tBUzmus93vFPEfk389VCauWyOMcRJek5X%2Bx%2BWi%2BgY%3D&amp;reserved=0



Take care. Mike. Sent from my iBarstool.
----- Original Message -----
From: Lisa Belville
<mailto:missktlab1217@...>
To: Tech Talk <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, February 19, 2020 5:02 PM
Subject: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

Hi, all.


My semi-techno-phobic dad is going to trade in his
old flip phone soon.
He said he saw something on TV advertising a smart
flip phone, he means
a phone with the same body style as a feature flip
phone but with the
capability of a modern iPhone or Android Smart phone.
I haven't heard
anything about this. Does anyone here have any
info about this type of
phone? Brand, Wireless carrier, etc?


TIA


Lisa


--
Lisa Belville
missktlab1217@...
<mailto:missktlab1217@...>









Re: What is a good flip phone to buy?

Carolyn Arnold
 

I like my contacts first name first, had to adjust my iPhone to do that.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Pamela Dominguez
Sent: Sunday, February 23, 2020 11:08 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] What is a good flip phone to buy?

That’s interesting. You had that problem? Mine always says the name I put in. I’ve always thought it was strange that it does it first name first. Pam.

From: Gene <mailto:gsasner@...>
Sent: Saturday, February 22, 2020 7:46 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] What is a good flip phone to buy?

If you only hear the word contact when you arrow from contact to contact, let us know. I'll tell you how to work around that problem using the Flip 3 and it is very likely to work with the V or 5 or whatever it is.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: jan howells via Groups.Io <mailto:gale7978=aol.com@groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, February 22, 2020 6:24 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] What is a good flip phone to buy?

I am hoping that contacts can be used on the Go 5. My brother is setting it up for me. He is working with it. He has it all activated and programmed already. He has it active with my number.

Jan


Re: The Blind Shell.

Carolyn Arnold
 

There is a lot of useful information here, and I copied and
will send to friend. Thanks.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of chris judge
Sent: Sunday, February 23, 2020 6:50 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] The Blind Shell.

Hey Carolyn.

Here you go.
The BlindShell Classic Accessible Feature Cell Phone, a
Smart Alternative Steve Kelley Imagine for a moment a cell
phone that combined the best features of a smartphone with
the best features of a flip phone. You know, a dial pad you
can actually feel, with widely spaced buttons, and, for
those of us with low vision, bold, large print numbers. How
about some serious large print on the display for text and
menu items? And text-to-speech everywhere, without having to
drill down through the settings to find it? While we're
creating this wish list, let's add a user guide that's built
right in, so you don't have to first complete a tutorial on
using the Web to find and read the user guide on some remote
website.now we're really dreaming big here aren't we?
Not at all! Such a phone arrived from Europe mid-November
2019. It's called BlindShell Classic, and currently works
with GSM network providers like T-Mobile andAT&T.
One of the things you'll notice very quickly about this
phone is that it functions like it was built from the ground
up with user accessibility in mind, not as a feature that
was bolted on as an afterthought. When you unbox the phone,
install the battery, and long press the Back button, the
phone starts with text-to-speech and an interactive
tutorial. The tutorial is quick and gives new users the
opportunity to learn what each button on the phone does.
While exploring the phone, you'll discover that out of the
box, the BlindShell offers 4 female voices and 3 male voices
in the Settings > Sounds > Voice Output menus. In addition
to 10 voices, there are 4 levels of speech intonation and 5
levels of voice rates, to make speech output very
customizable.
Physical Dimensions and Orientation
The phone is 5.3 by 2.3 by 0.5 inches and is what some might
call a "candy-bar style" phone, with the keypad beneath the
2.8 inch color screen.
Centered above the screen you will find the speaker. The
keyboard is a very standard layout of 4 rows of 3 numbers,
with 5 keys above the number pad. In the center of these
keysis a square directional pad that contains 5 button
functions-center, left, right, up and down. To each side of
the center directional square are two buttons, one above the
other. On the left, the top button is Volume Down with a
short press, and Voice Control and Dictation using a long
press. Beneath that is the Confirm button, also used for
answering a call. To the right, the top button is Volume Up
with a short press, and Voice Control and Dictation with a
long press. Below this is the Back button, which navigates
back through menu levels, or deletes a text entry with a
short press. If the phone is turned off, a long press on the
Back button will turn the phone on. When the phone is on, a
long press of the Back button will navigate right to the
Call menu.
The back of the phone contains a 2-megapixel camera with a
flashlight, a speaker grill and a tactile button that is a
speed dial button, called Emergency/S.O.S., that can be
associated with a contact for quick use in an emergency. At
the top edge of the phone is a standard micro USB input for
charging and file transfer and a headphone jack. On the
bottom edge you'll find the microphone and charging port for
use with the included charging cradle.
Calling Made Simple
Although the BlindShell offers a range of functions, at its
most basic the device can quickly make calls using either
the dial pad or voice control. At virtually anywhere on the
menu, a long press on either the top left Volume Down button
or the top right Volume Up button will get the Voice Control
prompt, "I listen after a beep." After the beep, you might
say, "Call xxx-xxx-xxxx," or "Call [a name listed in
contacts]." A second or two later, the phone says "Dialing,"
or requires a press of the Confirm button to start the call.
It's that simple! Of course, pressing Confirm on the Call
menu and dialing the number on the spacious dial pad is also
an option.
With a list price of $349 from A T Guys or LS&S, it's
certainly good news to know that placing a call with the
BlindShell Classic is easy enough, but what about other
functions? The BlindShell includes features you might
expect, like email, messaging, alarms, and a calendar, to
name a few. It also has some really innovative features
built in, like Internet radio and FM radio in the More
Applications > Media menu, Weather in the More Applications
Tools menu, and GPS Localization, Object Tagging, and
Color Indicator, all in the More Applications > Vision Aids
menu.
The BlindShell Menu
Before digging deeper into a couple of these applications,
let's explore the navigation on the BlindShell. Using the
Center Left and Center Right buttons will move you through
the top level menu items:
. Call
. Messages
. Contacts
. More Aplications
. Settings
. Status Information
. Manual
. Notifications
. Turn Off the Phone
Each menu item is numbered, and when it is read, you hear
both its number and the number of menu items in that level.
So, for example, the second item in the main menu is
Messages. When we get to the Messages menu item we hear,
"Messages, two of nine." As a shortucut, to jump to any menu
item,simply press its number. So, pressing 2 when you're on
the main menu will open the Messages menu item.
You can also select a menu item by pressing the Confirm
button or the Center button. Doing so will open the submenu
for that item. Like the main menu, once in a submenu, the
Left Center and Right Center buttons move through the menu
items. Continuing to press either button will move through
the menu again continuously. When in a submenu, the Back
button will move back up a menu level. So, in the submenu
for Messages, the Right Center and Left Center buttons will
move through the six Messages submenu items, and pressing
the Back button will return navigation to the main menu
item, Messages.
While this menu structure is linear, it did take some
practice to use, because many menu items had multiple
submenus. Again, a long press of the Back button returns
focus to Call in the main menu. A long press on either the
Volume Up or Volume Down button will open the Voice Control
where you can say, "Open." followed by whatever menu item
you'd like to open.
For new users, a great place to begin is with the Manual
from the main menu.
The Manual menu contains the Interactive Tutorial which the
phone automatically begins the first time it is turned on,
and other menu items including User Guide, Getting Started,
Operating the Phone, Safety Information, and more.
Navigating through these menu items and their submenus will
give you plenty of practice with menu navigation along with
comprehensive information about all the features of the
phone and the many included applications. BlindShell
Functions (menu item 4), provides detailed information about
the many applications.
Two Cents About Text Size
One observation here about the large print text on the
display. In Settings
Display > Text Size > there are only two settings, Normal
Text Size
and
Huge Text Size. With Huge Text Size selected, the text on
menu items was approximately the size of newsprint
headlines. When opening a screen full of text in the manual,
the text size remained bold, but smaller. Of course, all the
text on the screen was read as soon as it opened, but there
was no way to magnify the text. As far as the option of Huge
Text Size, I wondered, "Huge" compared to what? "Larger
Text," or "Largest Text," might be a more accurate label
here.
BlindShell Functions
For many users, having a tactile number pad and navigational
buttons will make this phone easier to use than a
conventional touchscreen smartphone, with perhaps one
notable exception: the need to type in text using the number
pad, a skill many of us have forgotten or never learned in
the first place. This issue aside, BlindShell offers a great
deal of functionality. In the More Applications menu, you'll
find a range of applications that make the BlindShell every
bit as useful as a touchscreen smartphone. In addition to
common applications like Email, Messaging, Calendar, Alarms,
Timer, Stopwatch, Voice Recorder, Calculator, Weather, and
Dictionary, there are several applications in the More
Applications > Vision Aids menu that are worth mentioning.
The Color Indicator is a handy color identifier. Hold the
camera over an item and press the Confirm button to hear the
color described. It seemed the accuracy of the Color
Indicator was about 50%, probably due to the limitations of
the 2-megapixel camera. For the casual user, having this
application built into the phone is a convenient feature,
but if you need more accurate results, a separate,
stand-alone color identifier is a better choice.
The Localization application is a very simple GPS
application that will give you the nearest address. Select
Localization from the menu and the phone responds,
"Loading." A moment later the nearest address is provided.
Using the Localization application indoors yielded poor
results beginning with the notice, "Warning the obtained
results may be inaccurate. For better results try again in
an open outdoor area." Once outside, the results were indeed
more accurate and useful.
The last Vision Aid item is Object Tagging. This application
works with QR codes printed on adhesive sheets available for
purchase from the BlindShell retailer. Peel off one of the
codes, which is about a half-inch square, stick it on the
object to be labeled, and record an associated voice label.
The voice label will be read each time you open the
application, select Read Tags, and scan the code. This is a
really handy application to have installed on the phone, and
very simple to use. Tags can be edited and reused for
different items.
Kudos on Voice Control Dictation
One of the really outstanding features of the BlindShell
Classic is the accuracy and performance of the dictation
function, both on WiFi and cellular data at 4G. With nearly
100-percent accuracy, the correct menu items were opened by
using a long press of the left or right Voice Control
buttons and speaking the selection. Anywhere an edit field
was available-for contacts, in a calendar entry, for dialing
the phone-voice dictation worked very well. In addition, in
the Note application, using WiFi, dictation was very
accurate, responded to commands such as, "new paragraph,"
and accepted relatively long dictations.
More Functions
Another function worth highlighting is the Internet Radio,
found in the More Applications > Media menu. Internet Radio
submenus included Popular Stations, Categories, Search,
Favorites, and more. Although the Categories menu contained
a total of 96 categories, including all types of music
genres, sports radio, talk radio, etc., it was a bit
disappointing not to find a category and listing for radio
reading services.
Also in the More Applications > Media submenu are Book
Reader and Camera.
The Book Reader application is somewhat limited because it
doesn't support Bookshare directly. Text files may be
transferred using a USB cable quite easily. It was easy to
download a title from Project Gutenberg then transfer and
play it using the Book Reader. The Book Reader will set
bookmarks and resume reading from where you left off. Also,
any book or podcast available as an MP3 file can be
transferred to the Music Player directory, and played with
the Music Player located in the More Applications > Media
submenu.
The camera on the BlindShell Classic is simply not one of
its strong points.
It is a 2 megapixel camera, and images may be saved, viewed,
and transferred using a USB cable. There is no way to use
the camera as a magnifier or to zoom in on pictures.
The BlindShell Classic comes with 4 GB of internal storage
so there is plenty of room for music, podcasts, and books.
The micro SD slot will hold up to an additional 32GBof
storage if you need more.
Display Options
As mentioned earlier, text-to-speech is activated at
start-up and can be controlled using the Volume Up or Down
buttons. If you have some usable vision, there are several
settings in the Settings > Display submenu that can enhance
the display, including: Brightness; Color Scheme; and Main
Menu Style, in addition to the Text Size mentioned earlier.
The menu style offers the options of Only Text, Icons Only,
or Icons and Text. If you have opted for huge text, these
menu items are bold and fill the screen. Alternative color
schemes include: White on Black; Black on White; White on
Blue; and Black on Yellow, with bold text and good contrast.
The Screen Brightness menu contains 6 levels of brightness
and the ability to fully dim the screen so it shows nothing.
The BlindShell Classic has been available in Europe for
several years and is only now coming to the US The phone is
a great option for those looking for a completely accessible
phone with tactile number pad and buttons and a consistent,
easy to use menu system. Overall accessibility and usability
are excellent on the BlindShell Classic. If you're looking
for an excellent feature phone without a touchscreen, the
BlindShell is a great option.
Product Information
Product: BlindShell Classic
Manufacturer: BlindShell
Price: $399 (from manufacturer) $349 (from A T Guys and LS&S
This article is made possible in part by generous funding
from the James H.
and Alice Teubert Charitable Trust, Huntington, West
Virginia.


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On
Behalf Of Carolyn Arnold
Sent: February 22, 2020 12:27 PM
To: Tech Talk <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: [TechTalk] The Blind Shell.

Would the person who sent that article about the Blind Shell
please send it again, either to the list or to:

4carolyna@...

I copied it to send to a friend, had her email ready, phone
rang, I hit Send, night time came, I closed computer, away
went the copy. Also, I delete everything last thing. I would
appreciate it very much, if it could be sent back.


locked Re: New Smart Flip Phone?

Carolyn Arnold
 

I can't think that mine ever crashed. Actually, it was my second one for $160 that I mentioned. My first one was a 4S in 2014, I believe, on a promotion from Verizon for a penny.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Shelly Kane
Sent: Sunday, February 23, 2020 5:06 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

I have had my SE for over 3 years and it hasn't ever crashed. I had a problem with the microphone where it got stuck a few times but all I did was hold down the power and home buttons and the problem was solved. Sorry that you have had so much trouble. I'm actually planning on getting a new iPhone when the new ones finally come out.


On 2/22/2020 6:11 AM, chris judge wrote:


And for all you iPhone users, in all seriousness, how many times have your IPhones crashed? I can state with confidence that I can count the times my Phone has crashed on 1 hand, and this is after almost 11 years of using one.



From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io> <main@TechTalk.groups.io> <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ron Canazzi
Sent: February 21, 2020 2:08 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?



Hi Gerald,

Usually I respect your cynicism, but in this case, I have to disagree. You are talking a lot about the fact that a smart phone can crash and you have major problems without speech. This of course is true, but if I had the amount f money I spent on correcting my old fashion Windows PC with the Microsoft Windows operating system, I could take a month vacation ti Tahiti.

So what is your point? All things made by human beings can crash for everyone: sighted, blind and even Yogi Bear.



On 2/21/2020 7:15 AM, Gerald Levy via Groups.Io wrote:



So you are saying that IOS is such a wonderful OS that it is impossible for anything to go wrong and cause complete loss of speech that simple fixes like the ones you suggest won't resolve? And is it not true that the latest IPhone models have no physical buttons of any kind? If so, how do you locate the volume and home keys if you have no speech in the first place?



Gerald





On 2/21/2020 7:03 AM, chris judge wrote:

Yes, but once you learn the device you will learn that loss of speech is usually caused by:

a. Speech being muted. Solved by a 3 finger double tap.
b. Voice over being turned off. Solved by either asking siri to turn it on, or pressing the home key 3 times quickly. In the case of the iPhone 10 or above, press the power button 3 times.
c. Voice over volume being turned down. Solved by invoking a gesture, then pressing up on the volume button.

It’s like any other technology, Once you learn it, things are much simpler than they seem when the device is new to you.



From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io> <main@TechTalk.groups.io> <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gerald Levy via Groups.Io
Sent: February 21, 2020 7:39 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?





Okay, let's suppose you turn on your IPhone, and there is no speech? Then what? How do you restore Voice Over without sighted help if you have no idea what's causing the problem in the first place? No operating system, not even IOS, is immune from problems that could cause loss of speech.



Gerald





On 2/21/2020 5:10 AM, chris judge wrote:

That’s ridiculous. I’ve been totally blind since birth and have used an IPhone since 2009. Give it a try.



From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io> <main@TechTalk.groups.io> <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Alex Stone via Groups.Io
Sent: February 20, 2020 3:36 PM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io <mailto:main@techtalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?



Gerald, I can assure you that I am really blind, and I think I take exception to the suggestion that I’m not!





On 20 Feb 2020, at 15:01, Gerald Levy via Groups.Io <bwaylimited=verizon.net@groups.io <mailto:bwaylimited=verizon.net@groups.io> > wrote:





I suspect that many "blind" consumers who use smart phones that are completely devoid of tactile buttons are not really "blind" at all, but visually impaired and retain some funtional vision to navigate around a touchscreen. Those who are totally blind and purport to use a touchscreen smart phone probably had a lot of sighted help. Which is why smart phones with tactile keypads like the BlindShell and Smart Vision have been introduced. So I'm looking forward to hearing about the experiences of a totally blind consumer using the new Samsung smart flip phone.





Gerald





On 2/20/2020 9:41 AM, Gene wrote:

Your statement about buttons is inaccurate based on discussions I've seen on this topic before. Most smart phones already had very few buttons, and, as for the elimination of the home button on the I-Phone, while I can't speak from personal experience, I've seen enough comments on lists like this that the button's elimination doesn't mean blind people can't use the phone. Evidently, the screen simulates the presence of a button by vibrating. I'm not saying I definitely understand the situation and I await other comments but how many people have you seen say they stopped using an I-Phone because of elimination of the home button?



You often state the worst case interpretation of situations.



Gene

----- Origial Message -----

From: Gerald Levy via Groups.Io <mailto:bwaylimited=verizon.net@groups.io>

Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2020 5:22 AM

To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?





According to Consumer Reports, this Samsung smart flip phone employs a new touchscreen technology that allows it to be thin and flexible enough to be folded in half like a wallet. But in tests, it proved to be very fragile, and CR did not recommend it, especially in view of its very high price tag. And it would probably not be a good choice for a blind consumer because even unfolded the touchscreen is relatively small and has no tactile buttons. This seems to be a growing trend in smart phones: eliminating all physical buttons, making it virtually impossible for a blind consumer to use the phone without some sighted help or a lot of hands-on training.



Gerald





On 2/19/2020 9:20 PM, Mike B wrote:



Hi Lisa,



I heard about a phone like you're describing just the other day and I think they said that Samsung was the company producing it. From the way the guy was describing the way it works, it sounds like it'll be a really cool phone, but for $1300 it damn well otta be! LOL LOL Check out the link below for a review.



https://gizmodo.com/24-hours-with-the-samsung-galaxy-z-flip-has-me-convince-1841791884






Take care. Mike. Sent from my iBarstool.

----- Original Message -----

From: Lisa Belville <mailto:missktlab1217@...>

To: Tech Talk <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>

Sent: Wednesday, February 19, 2020 5:02 PM

Subject: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?



Hi, all.


My semi-techno-phobic dad is going to trade in his old flip phone soon.
He said he saw something on TV advertising a smart flip phone, he means
a phone with the same body style as a feature flip phone but with the
capability of a modern iPhone or Android Smart phone. I haven't heard
anything about this. Does anyone here have any info about this type of
phone? Brand, Wireless carrier, etc?


TIA


Lisa


--
Lisa Belville
missktlab1217@... <mailto:missktlab1217@...>








--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


locked Re: New Smart Flip Phone?

Carolyn Arnold
 

Yes, I got my first one for $160.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of David Goldfield
Sent: Sunday, February 23, 2020 3:02 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

Yes, the newer iPhones do offer excellent battery life. I'm still using an iPhone 8 and I use it with Apple's smart battery case, which I absolutely love, as I can be at a 100% charge for an entire day, even with streaming audio.

David Goldfield,
Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist JAWS Certified, 2019

WWW.DavidGoldfield.org

On 2/21/2020 6:46 PM, Carolyn Arnold wrote:
I had that problem with my SE. It was a super phone, and, at least, had more battery life than any flip phone I had, but still...

The 11 is living up to what I heard about it.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On
Behalf Of Karim Lakhani
Sent: Friday, February 21, 2020 3:25 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

I love my iphone!
but the battery drains real fast.
When I'm waiting for transportation it ccan go for hours, if you don't listen to radio and such.
do you use a charging back up?
I had a case with my 5se, but the 7 would be nice if I didn't have to carry back ups.


From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of
Loy
Sent: Friday, February 21, 2020 10:58 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

I love my IPhone, if I only used the Seeing AI and Be My Eyes apps it has been worth the investment. You don't have to buy the latest and most expensive. You can purchase one used for under $200.00.----- Original Message -----
From: Gene <mailto:gsasner@...>
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, February 21, 2020 12:26 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

That's right. I hadn't thought about that.

Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: chris judge <mailto:chrisjudge1967@...>
Sent: Friday, February 21, 2020 11:11 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

Actualy, he could read the screen with his smart phone. Another reason to get one. Having an aira agent at your finger tips can solve a lot of issues.

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io> <main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io> > On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: February 21, 2020 12:52 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

You don't know that. Interesting how someone with absolutely no experience has so many opinions on something he chooses to know nothing about from a standpoint of practical experience. Mix apples and oranges? If your mother board fails, please explain how having a tactile keyboard makes speech easier to obtain or how it is easier to diagnose the probem?
If your sound card fails and you don't have a USB sound card or a USB headset, explain the same thing. There are certain instances where having a physical keyboard would make solving a problem easier. But these rare instances are no reason not to use a smart phone. And a smart phone with a keypad can certainly fail in ways that make having the keypad useless in trying to solve the problem.

You have followed these lists long enough to know that no matter what you use, some problems require sighted assistance and that is no reason not to use such products. If Windows becomes corrupted and doesn't fully boot and displays an error message, please explain to me how you are going to read it unless you have an optacon, which very few blind people have. Again, begging the question just to support your bias.

Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Gerald Levy via Groups.Io <mailto:bwaylimited=verizon.net@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, February 21, 2020 9:30 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?


The difference is that a computer has a tactile keyboard. A smart
phone doesn't, which makes it more difficult for a blind consumer to
resolve a problem without sighted help. Don't mix Apples with
oraanges. (pun intended)

Gerald


On 2/21/2020 8:41 AM, Gene wrote:
He is not saying that. Your computer's mother board can develop a problem and the computer won't function at all. I don't see you begging the question about your computer or implying that you shouldn't use a computer. Sooner or later, it all comes down to this, no matter how often you discuss such topics and ask such questions, after a point, you are simply begging the question and setting up straw men because you are irremediably biased against smart phones.

Your questions in the beginning of such discussions may serve a useful purpose because there may be people who are worried about trying such phones and people give answers that may be reassuring. But beyond a point, you are just indulging your antismart phone bias. No user who knows something about computers or minicomputers, which is what smart phones are, would say that loss of speech is impossible, A component may fail, something may become corrupted, and that is true of any computer or minicomputer. That is no reason not to use one. The brakes could fail when you are in a car, but do you ride busses or cabs? assessing risk is a risk/benefit evaluation. If the risk is low enough and the benefitsworht the risk, people constantly do activities with some risk. Almost any activity has at least a very small amount of risk.

Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Gerald Levy via Groups.Io <mailto:bwaylimited=verizon.net@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, February 21, 2020 6:15 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?


So you are saying that IOS is such a wonderful OS that it is impossible for anything to go wrong and cause complete loss of speech that simple fixes like the ones you suggest won't resolve? And is it not true that the latest IPhone models have no physical buttons of any kind? If so, how do you locate the volume and home keys if you have no speech in the first place?

Gerald


On 2/21/2020 7:03 AM, chris judge wrote:
Yes, but once you learn the device you will learn that loss of speech is usually caused by:
a. Speech being muted. Solved by a 3 finger double tap.
b. Voice over being turned off. Solved by either asking siri to turn it on, or pressing the home key 3 times quickly. In the case of the iPhone 10 or above, press the power button 3 times.
c. Voice over volume being turned down. Solved by invoking a gesture, then pressing up on the volume button.
It’s like any other technology, Once you learn it, things are much simpler than they seem when the device is new to you.

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io> <main@TechTalk.groups.io> <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gerald Levy via Groups.Io
Sent: February 21, 2020 7:39 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?


Okay, let's suppose you turn on your IPhone, and there is no speech? Then what? How do you restore Voice Over without sighted help if you have no idea what's causing the problem in the first place? No operating system, not even IOS, is immune from problems that could cause loss of speech.

Gerald


On 2/21/2020 5:10 AM, chris judge wrote:
That’s ridiculous. I’ve been totally blind since birth and have used an IPhone since 2009. Give it a try.

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io> <main@TechTalk.groups.io> <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Alex Stone via Groups.Io
Sent: February 20, 2020 3:36 PM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io <mailto:main@techtalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

Gerald, I can assure you that I am really blind, and I think I take exception to the suggestion that I’m not!




On 20 Feb 2020, at 15:01, Gerald Levy via Groups.Io <bwaylimited=verizon.net@groups.io <mailto:bwaylimited=verizon.net@groups.io> > wrote:


I suspect that many "blind" consumers who use smart phones that are completely devoid of tactile buttons are not really "blind" at all, but visually impaired and retain some funtional vision to navigate around a touchscreen. Those who are totally blind and purport to use a touchscreen smart phone probably had a lot of sighted help. Which is why smart phones with tactile keypads like the BlindShell and Smart Vision have been introduced. So I'm looking forward to hearing about the experiences of a totally blind consumer using the new Samsung smart flip phone.


Gerald


On 2/20/2020 9:41 AM, Gene wrote:
Your statement about buttons is inaccurate based on discussions I've seen on this topic before. Most smart phones already had very few buttons, and, as for the elimination of the home button on the I-Phone, while I can't speak from personal experience, I've seen enough comments on lists like this that the button's elimination doesn't mean blind people can't use the phone. Evidently, the screen simulates the presence of a button by vibrating. I'm not saying I definitely understand the situation and I await other comments but how many people have you seen say they stopped using an I-Phone because of elimination of the home button?

You often state the worst case interpretation of situations.

Gene
----- Origial Message -----
From: Gerald Levy via Groups.Io <mailto:bwaylimited=verizon.net@groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2020 5:22 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?


According to Consumer Reports, this Samsung smart flip phone employs a new touchscreen technology that allows it to be thin and flexible enough to be folded in half like a wallet. But in tests, it proved to be very fragile, and CR did not recommend it, especially in view of its very high price tag. And it would probably not be a good choice for a blind consumer because even unfolded the touchscreen is relatively small and has no tactile buttons. This seems to be a growing trend in smart phones: eliminating all physical buttons, making it virtually impossible for a blind consumer to use the phone without some sighted help or a lot of hands-on training.

Gerald


On 2/19/2020 9:20 PM, Mike B wrote:

Hi Lisa,

I heard about a phone like you're describing just the other day and I think they said that Samsung was the company producing it. From the way the guy was describing the way it works, it sounds like it'll be a really cool phone, but for $1300 it damn well otta be! LOL LOL Check out the link below for a review.


https://eur05.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fgizm
odo.com%2F24-hours-with-the-samsung-galaxy-z-flip-has-me-convince-1841
791884&amp;data=02%7C01%7C%7Cf9388eb0f88f4a82bfdd08d7b72843b8%7C84df9e
7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C637179255865028410&amp;sdata=w9tB
Uzmus93vFPEfk389VCauWyOMcRJek5X%2Bx%2BWi%2BgY%3D&amp;reserved=0



Take care. Mike. Sent from my iBarstool.
----- Original Message -----
From: Lisa Belville <mailto:missktlab1217@...>
To: Tech Talk <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, February 19, 2020 5:02 PM
Subject: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

Hi, all.


My semi-techno-phobic dad is going to trade in his old flip phone soon.
He said he saw something on TV advertising a smart flip phone, he means
a phone with the same body style as a feature flip phone but with the
capability of a modern iPhone or Android Smart phone. I haven't heard
anything about this. Does anyone here have any info about this type of
phone? Brand, Wireless carrier, etc?


TIA


Lisa


--
Lisa Belville
missktlab1217@... <mailto:missktlab1217@...>









locked Re: New Smart Flip Phone?

Carolyn Arnold
 

I went through the Hadley videos, some many times. They gave good instructions that grounded me pretty well with the iPhone.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of David Goldfield
Sent: Sunday, February 23, 2020 2:57 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

Gerald,

I can honestly sympathize with your skepticism. When I was beginning to hear about VoiceOver on the iPhone I could not imagine how a blind person could possibly use a flat touch screen. However, like many others on this list I have become extremely proficient in using the iPhone and I have no usable vision. I have set up many iPhones right out of the box without any sighted assistance, with only VoiceOver to tell me what is on the screen. In fact, I have done the same with Android devices, including Fire tablets from Amazon. Being a former assistive technology trainer for 25 years I have also spent the last few years in my previous role training other blind people how to use these devices. I would recommend that you find someone who is local to you who could show you an iPhone with VoiceOver to introduce you to some basic concepts. This helped me to get started as a friend came to visit me where I worked with her iPhone to give me a quick introduction. I would also recommend that you visit www.applevis.com <http://www.applevis.com> and read some of the guides on the site's section for new users. There are also many audio tutorials on that site, as well. Finally, I would recommend that you consider visiting a local Apple store. Many Apple stores hire sales reps who are knowledgeable regarding VoiceOver and accessibility, in general.


David Goldfield,
Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist JAWS Certified, 2019

WWW.DavidGoldfield.org <http://WWW.DavidGoldfield.org> On 2/23/2020 2:45 AM, Leedy Diane Bomar wrote:


Suspect all you want Gerald, but, I am a totally blind user and can use a phone perfectly well without buttons. Just the touchscreen and the Byam buttons on the side and the Sleep light button on the side.


Diane Bomar


On Feb 20, 2020, at 08:01, Gerald Levy via Groups.Io <bwaylimited=verizon.net@groups.io> <mailto:bwaylimited=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:








I suspect that many "blind" consumers who use smart phones that are completely devoid of tactile buttons are not really "blind" at all, but visually impaired and retain some funtional vision to navigate around a touchscreen. Those who are totally blind and purport to use a touchscreen smart phone probably had a lot of sighted help. Which is why smart phones with tactile keypads like the BlindShell and Smart Vision have been introduced. So I'm looking forward to hearing about the experiences of a totally blind consumer using the new Samsung smart flip phone.








Gerald








On 2/20/2020 9:41 AM, Gene wrote:


Your statement about buttons is inaccurate based on discussions I've seen on this topic before. Most smart phones already had very few buttons, and, as for the elimination of the home button on the I-Phone, while I can't speak from personal experience, I've seen enough comments on lists like this that the button's elimination doesn't mean blind people can't use the phone. Evidently, the screen simulates the presence of a button by vibrating. I'm not saying I definitely understand the situation and I await other comments but how many people have you seen say they stopped using an I-Phone because of elimination of the home button?

You often state the worst case interpretation of situations.

Gene
----- Origial Message -----

From: Gerald Levy via Groups.Io <mailto:bwaylimited=verizon.net@groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2020 5:22 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?





According to Consumer Reports, this Samsung smart flip phone employs a new touchscreen technology that allows it to be thin and flexible enough to be folded in half like a wallet. But in tests, it proved to be very fragile, and CR did not recommend it, especially in view of its very high price tag. And it would probably not be a good choice for a blind consumer because even unfolded the touchscreen is relatively small and has no tactile buttons. This seems to be a growing trend in smart phones: eliminating all physical buttons, making it virtually impossible for a blind consumer to use the phone without some sighted help or a lot of hands-on training.




Gerald








On 2/19/2020 9:20 PM, Mike B wrote:



Hi Lisa,

I heard about a phone like you're describing just the other day and I think they said that Samsung was the company producing it. From the way the guy was describing the way it works, it sounds like it'll be a really cool phone, but for $1300 it damn well otta be! LOL LOL Check out the link below for a review.

https://gizmodo.com/24-hours-with-the-samsung-galaxy-z-flip-has-me-convince-1841791884 <https://eur04.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fgizmodo.com%2F24-hours-with-the-samsung-galaxy-z-flip-has-me-convince-1841791884&data=02%7C01%7C%7Cc353209f71cc4d66ae3e08d7b834599f%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C637180407288825864&sdata=f1L4GEuP6%2BYPZLIJtNtrftA%2Fnfo2km%2FS8IV17YrAIR4%3D&reserved=0>



Take care. Mike. Sent from my iBarstool.

----- Original Message -----
From: Lisa Belville <mailto:missktlab1217@...>
To: Tech Talk <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, February 19, 2020 5:02 PM
Subject: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

Hi, all.


My semi-techno-phobic dad is going to trade in his old flip phone soon.
He said he saw something on TV advertising a smart flip phone, he means
a phone with the same body style as a feature flip phone but with the
capability of a modern iPhone or Android Smart phone. I haven't heard
anything about this. Does anyone here have any info about this type of
phone? Brand, Wireless carrier, etc?


TIA


Lisa


--
Lisa Belville
missktlab1217@... <mailto:missktlab1217@...>


locked Re: New Smart Flip Phone?

Penny Golden
 

It's like hearing Illinois Duce, for Il Doochay.

Sorry; i had to spell that incorrectly for the synth to do anything like an approximation.

But the funniest one is when you put a South Dakota card into your device.

On 2/23/2020 12:02 PM, Monte Single wrote:
Yes, I have heard "virgin islands" pop up in some very unusual contexts.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Pamela Dominguez
Sent: February-23-20 7:55 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

That's okay, I recognize those kinds of mistakes. Mine interprets the roman numeral for 6, which is v I, as Virgin Islands. I separated the v and the I so they would be pronounced. Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Monte Single
Sent: Saturday, February 22, 2020 2:43 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

Hi Gerald,
Probably my mistake, sometimes my ole voice synth which I am using with nvda says five instead of v; this is because the voice synth is interpreting the letter v as roman numeral five.
I know I neeed a more accurate synth, but I do like the voice.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gerald Levy via Groups.Io
Sent: February-22-20 1:16 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?


Okay, a little clarification. There is no such model as the Alcatel Flip Go
5. There is a model called the Alcatel Flip Go V, and perhaps somebody
assumed that the "V" was actually the Roman numeral for 5. But nowhere is
this phone referred to as the Alcatel Flip Go 5. I suspect that the "V"
actually stands for Verizon, because this phone is apparently designed for
Verizon Wireless and also works with US Cellular. It apparently does not
work with T Mobile, which uses a different technology than T Mobile. The
only Alcatel phone listed for T Mobile is the Flip Go 3. Judging from the
product description, it sounds that the Flip Go V is essentially similar in
features to the Go Flip 3, although there is no mention of the voice
guidance feature. Both models sell for about $100.


Gerald



On 2/22/2020 1:50 PM, Monte Single wrote:
Yes, this is the first I have hear of the alcatel go 5. But that's
what consumer technology is all about; the latest and the greatest.
The fact that you have a device that works fine for you is irrelevant.
The only way to generate new sales is with new products. Sometimes
it's the same old thing with a new label or costume.
Buy, buy, buy.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On
Behalf Of Pamela Dominguez
Sent: February-22-20 9:43 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

I have never heard of a go 5 before this one. I always heard of the
go 3, and I thought that was the newest one. Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Monte Single
Sent: Friday, February 21, 2020 11:02 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

What is the difference between the alcatel go 3 and go 5.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On
Behalf Of jan howells via Groups.Io
Sent: February-21-20 6:32 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

Yesterday, my brother bought me an Alcatel Go 5 cell phone nn his
plan. I will get it at Easter time.

Jan
























Re: Changing Computer Name

Mike B
 

Hi Mary,
 
Thank you for the verification.  I changed, what I thought was the computer name, with my Microsoft account on the MS website, and damn, it turned out to be my user name!  I had to reinstall Win10 and I don't want to go through that crap again!  LOL  LOL  Microsoft Accessibility couldn't get it right again, so I just reinstalled.
Take care.  Mike.  Sent from my iBarstool.

----- Original Message -----
From: Mary Smith
Sent: Sunday, February 23, 2020 11:16 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Changing Computer Name

Hi Mike, you will be able to change the computer name without affecting
any of your user accounts. Just choose a name that is different and you
should be good to go.




On 2020-02-23 2:14 p.m., Mike B wrote:
> Howdy All,
>
> I want to change the computer names on a couple of our computers, but if I
> do this will changing computer names cause any access problems with any of
> the User Name folders?  Thanks mooy moocho.
>
> Take care.  Mike.  Sent from my iBarstool.
>
>
>
>




Re: Changing Computer Name

Mary Smith
 

Hi Mike, you will be able to change the computer name without affecting any of your user accounts. Just choose a name that is different and you should be good to go.

On 2020-02-23 2:14 p.m., Mike B wrote:
Howdy All,

I want to change the computer names on a couple of our computers, but if I
do this will changing computer names cause any access problems with any of
the User Name folders? Thanks mooy moocho.

Take care. Mike. Sent from my iBarstool.



Changing Computer Name

Mike B
 

Howdy All,
 
I want to change the computer names on a couple of our computers, but if I do this will changing computer names cause any access problems with any of the User Name folders?  Thanks mooy moocho.

Take care.  Mike.  Sent from my iBarstool.


movie and vlc

Monte Single
 

Hi list,

 

I’m trying to play a dvd movie with vlc.

If you can help, please write me off list at;

 

mrsingle@...

 

Thanks,

Monte


locked Re: New Smart Flip Phone?

Monte Single
 

Yes, I have heard "virgin islands" pop up in some very unusual contexts.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Pamela Dominguez
Sent: February-23-20 7:55 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

That's okay, I recognize those kinds of mistakes. Mine interprets the roman numeral for 6, which is v I, as Virgin Islands. I separated the v and the I so they would be pronounced. Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Monte Single
Sent: Saturday, February 22, 2020 2:43 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

Hi Gerald,
Probably my mistake, sometimes my ole voice synth which I am using with nvda says five instead of v; this is because the voice synth is interpreting the letter v as roman numeral five.
I know I neeed a more accurate synth, but I do like the voice.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gerald Levy via Groups.Io
Sent: February-22-20 1:16 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?


Okay, a little clarification. There is no such model as the Alcatel Flip Go
5. There is a model called the Alcatel Flip Go V, and perhaps somebody
assumed that the "V" was actually the Roman numeral for 5. But nowhere is
this phone referred to as the Alcatel Flip Go 5. I suspect that the "V"
actually stands for Verizon, because this phone is apparently designed for
Verizon Wireless and also works with US Cellular. It apparently does not
work with T Mobile, which uses a different technology than T Mobile. The
only Alcatel phone listed for T Mobile is the Flip Go 3. Judging from the
product description, it sounds that the Flip Go V is essentially similar in
features to the Go Flip 3, although there is no mention of the voice
guidance feature. Both models sell for about $100.


Gerald



On 2/22/2020 1:50 PM, Monte Single wrote:
Yes, this is the first I have hear of the alcatel go 5. But that's
what consumer technology is all about; the latest and the greatest.
The fact that you have a device that works fine for you is irrelevant.
The only way to generate new sales is with new products. Sometimes
it's the same old thing with a new label or costume.
Buy, buy, buy.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On
Behalf Of Pamela Dominguez
Sent: February-22-20 9:43 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

I have never heard of a go 5 before this one. I always heard of the
go 3, and I thought that was the newest one. Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Monte Single
Sent: Friday, February 21, 2020 11:02 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

What is the difference between the alcatel go 3 and go 5.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On
Behalf Of jan howells via Groups.Io
Sent: February-21-20 6:32 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

Yesterday, my brother bought me an Alcatel Go 5 cell phone nn his
plan. I will get it at Easter time.

Jan













locked Re: New Smart Flip Phone?

Pamela Dominguez
 

Oh, it's Institute, now! I always knew of it as Hadley School for the Blind. Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Victor
Sent: Sunday, February 23, 2020 3:07 AM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

Hi David and Gerald:

There is also something called the Hadley Institute which has quite a few great instructional videos and tutorials for the iPhone and all kinds of other technology.

Victor
On Feb 23, 2020, at 12:02 AM, David Goldfield <david.goldfield@...> wrote:

Yes, the newer iPhones do offer excellent battery life. I'm still using an iPhone 8 and I use it with Apple's smart battery case, which I absolutely love, as I can be at a 100% charge for an entire day, even with streaming audio.

David Goldfield,
Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist
JAWS Certified, 2019

WWW.DavidGoldfield.org

On 2/21/2020 6:46 PM, Carolyn Arnold wrote:
I had that problem with my SE. It was a super phone, and, at least, had more battery life than any flip phone I had, but still...

The 11 is living up to what I heard about it.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Karim Lakhani
Sent: Friday, February 21, 2020 3:25 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

I love my iphone!
but the battery drains real fast.
When I'm waiting for transportation it ccan go for hours, if you don't listen to radio and such.
do you use a charging back up?
I had a case with my 5se, but the 7 would be nice if I didn't have to carry back ups.
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Loy
Sent: Friday, February 21, 2020 10:58 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?
I love my IPhone, if I only used the Seeing AI and Be My Eyes apps it has been worth the investment. You don't have to buy the latest and most expensive. You can purchase one used for under $200.00.----- Original Message -----
From: Gene <mailto:gsasner@...>
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, February 21, 2020 12:26 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

That's right. I hadn't thought about that.

Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: chris judge <mailto:chrisjudge1967@...>
Sent: Friday, February 21, 2020 11:11 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

Actualy, he could read the screen with his smart phone. Another reason to get one. Having an aira agent at your finger tips can solve a lot of issues.

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io> <main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io> > On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: February 21, 2020 12:52 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

You don't know that. Interesting how someone with absolutely no experience has so many opinions on something he chooses to know nothing about from a standpoint of practical experience. Mix apples and oranges? If your mother board fails, please explain how having a tactile keyboard makes speech easier to obtain or how it is easier to diagnose the probem?
If your sound card fails and you don't have a USB sound card or a USB headset, explain the same thing. There are certain instances where having a physical keyboard would make solving a problem easier. But these rare instances are no reason not to use a smart phone. And a smart phone with a keypad can certainly fail in ways that make having the keypad useless in trying to solve the problem.

You have followed these lists long enough to know that no matter what you use, some problems require sighted assistance and that is no reason not to use such products. If Windows becomes corrupted and doesn't fully boot and displays an error message, please explain to me how you are going to read it unless you have an optacon, which very few blind people have. Again, begging the question just to support your bias.

Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Gerald Levy via Groups.Io <mailto:bwaylimited=verizon.net@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, February 21, 2020 9:30 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?


The difference is that a computer has a tactile keyboard. A smart phone doesn't, which makes it more difficult for a blind consumer to resolve a problem without sighted help. Don't mix Apples with oraanges. (pun intended)

Gerald


On 2/21/2020 8:41 AM, Gene wrote:
He is not saying that. Your computer's mother board can develop a problem and the computer won't function at all. I don't see you begging the question about your computer or implying that you shouldn't use a computer. Sooner or later, it all comes down to this, no matter how often you discuss such topics and ask such questions, after a point, you are simply begging the question and setting up straw men because you are irremediably biased against smart phones.

Your questions in the beginning of such discussions may serve a useful purpose because there may be people who are worried about trying such phones and people give answers that may be reassuring. But beyond a point, you are just indulging your antismart phone bias. No user who knows something about computers or minicomputers, which is what smart phones are, would say that loss of speech is impossible, A component may fail, something may become corrupted, and that is true of any computer or minicomputer. That is no reason not to use one. The brakes could fail when you are in a car, but do you ride busses or cabs? assessing risk is a risk/benefit evaluation. If the risk is low enough and the benefitsworht the risk, people constantly do activities with some risk. Almost any activity has at least a very small amount of risk.

Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Gerald Levy via Groups.Io <mailto:bwaylimited=verizon.net@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, February 21, 2020 6:15 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?


So you are saying that IOS is such a wonderful OS that it is impossible for anything to go wrong and cause complete loss of speech that simple fixes like the ones you suggest won't resolve? And is it not true that the latest IPhone models have no physical buttons of any kind? If so, how do you locate the volume and home keys if you have no speech in the first place?

Gerald


On 2/21/2020 7:03 AM, chris judge wrote:
Yes, but once you learn the device you will learn that loss of speech is usually caused by:
a. Speech being muted. Solved by a 3 finger double tap.
b. Voice over being turned off. Solved by either asking siri to turn it on, or pressing the home key 3 times quickly. In the case of the iPhone 10 or above, press the power button 3 times.
c. Voice over volume being turned down. Solved by invoking a gesture, then pressing up on the volume button.
It’s like any other technology, Once you learn it, things are much simpler than they seem when the device is new to you.

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io> <main@TechTalk.groups.io> <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gerald Levy via Groups.Io
Sent: February 21, 2020 7:39 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?


Okay, let's suppose you turn on your IPhone, and there is no speech? Then what? How do you restore Voice Over without sighted help if you have no idea what's causing the problem in the first place? No operating system, not even IOS, is immune from problems that could cause loss of speech.

Gerald


On 2/21/2020 5:10 AM, chris judge wrote:
That’s ridiculous. I’ve been totally blind since birth and have used an IPhone since 2009. Give it a try.

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io> <main@TechTalk.groups.io> <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Alex Stone via Groups.Io
Sent: February 20, 2020 3:36 PM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io <mailto:main@techtalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

Gerald, I can assure you that I am really blind, and I think I take exception to the suggestion that I’m not!




On 20 Feb 2020, at 15:01, Gerald Levy via Groups.Io <bwaylimited=verizon.net@groups.io <mailto:bwaylimited=verizon.net@groups.io> > wrote:


I suspect that many "blind" consumers who use smart phones that are completely devoid of tactile buttons are not really "blind" at all, but visually impaired and retain some funtional vision to navigate around a touchscreen. Those who are totally blind and purport to use a touchscreen smart phone probably had a lot of sighted help. Which is why smart phones with tactile keypads like the BlindShell and Smart Vision have been introduced. So I'm looking forward to hearing about the experiences of a totally blind consumer using the new Samsung smart flip phone.


Gerald


On 2/20/2020 9:41 AM, Gene wrote:
Your statement about buttons is inaccurate based on discussions I've seen on this topic before. Most smart phones already had very few buttons, and, as for the elimination of the home button on the I-Phone, while I can't speak from personal experience, I've seen enough comments on lists like this that the button's elimination doesn't mean blind people can't use the phone. Evidently, the screen simulates the presence of a button by vibrating. I'm not saying I definitely understand the situation and I await other comments but how many people have you seen say they stopped using an I-Phone because of elimination of the home button?

You often state the worst case interpretation of situations.

Gene
----- Origial Message -----
From: Gerald Levy via Groups.Io <mailto:bwaylimited=verizon.net@groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2020 5:22 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?


According to Consumer Reports, this Samsung smart flip phone employs a new touchscreen technology that allows it to be thin and flexible enough to be folded in half like a wallet. But in tests, it proved to be very fragile, and CR did not recommend it, especially in view of its very high price tag. And it would probably not be a good choice for a blind consumer because even unfolded the touchscreen is relatively small and has no tactile buttons. This seems to be a growing trend in smart phones: eliminating all physical buttons, making it virtually impossible for a blind consumer to use the phone without some sighted help or a lot of hands-on training.

Gerald


On 2/19/2020 9:20 PM, Mike B wrote:

Hi Lisa,

I heard about a phone like you're describing just the other day and I think they said that Samsung was the company producing it. From the way the guy was describing the way it works, it sounds like it'll be a really cool phone, but for $1300 it damn well otta be! LOL LOL Check out the link below for a review.

https://eur05.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fgizmodo.com%2F24-hours-with-the-samsung-galaxy-z-flip-has-me-convince-1841791884&amp;data=02%7C01%7C%7Cf9388eb0f88f4a82bfdd08d7b72843b8%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C637179255865028410&amp;sdata=w9tBUzmus93vFPEfk389VCauWyOMcRJek5X%2Bx%2BWi%2BgY%3D&amp;reserved=0



Take care. Mike. Sent from my iBarstool.
----- Original Message -----
From: Lisa Belville <mailto:missktlab1217@...>
To: Tech Talk <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, February 19, 2020 5:02 PM
Subject: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

Hi, all.


My semi-techno-phobic dad is going to trade in his old flip phone soon.
He said he saw something on TV advertising a smart flip phone, he means
a phone with the same body style as a feature flip phone but with the
capability of a modern iPhone or Android Smart phone. I haven't heard
anything about this. Does anyone here have any info about this type of
phone? Brand, Wireless carrier, etc?


TIA


Lisa


--
Lisa Belville
missktlab1217@... <mailto:missktlab1217@...>









Re: What is a good flip phone to buy?

Pamela Dominguez
 

That’s interesting.  You had that problem?  Mine always says the name I put in.  I’ve always thought it was strange that it does it first name first.  Pam.
 

From: Gene
Sent: Saturday, February 22, 2020 7:46 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] What is a good flip phone to buy?
 
If you only hear the word contact when you arrow from contact to contact, let us know.  I'll tell you how to work around that problem using the Flip 3 and it is very likely to work with the V or 5 or whatever it is. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, February 22, 2020 6:24 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] What is a good flip phone to buy?
 
I am hoping that contacts can be used on the Go 5.  My brother is
setting it up for me.  He is working with it.  He has it all
activated and programmed already.  He has it active with my
number.

Jan



Re: What is a good flip phone to buy?

Gene
 

The flip3 says each word after you space as well.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, February 23, 2020 8:59 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] What is a good flip phone to buy?

Yes, you can hear every character, but you still, for some reason, can make mistakes.  My phone I had before this would allow me to left and right arrow and hear spoken characters.  But that was one of the first screenreaders in a phone; it was mobile speak, so it was made for the blind, and it was an extra addon that had to be purchased,not just something made so a company can say it was upholding the law.  Pam.
 
From: Gene
Sent: Saturday, February 22, 2020 3:45 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] What is a good flip phone to buy?
 
You should hear every caraqcter you enter when you type a key.  You can't read a line by left and right arrowing anywhere and that was true of my first feature phone and the current one.  But hearing every character spoken you input it eliminates the problem of not knowing if you made an error. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, February 22, 2020 2:01 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] What is a good flip phone to buy?
 
I can use contacts on my Alcatel 4044.  The only problem is, when you put contacts in, you can’t left and right arrow and have it speak through the name or the number to make sure that you did it correctly, or, if you did make a mistake, to find out where you are in order to correct the mistake.  It will just read the whole line by arrowing up and down.  Pam. 
 
From: Gene
Sent: Saturday, February 22, 2020 11:01 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] What is a good flip phone to buy?
 
I read a very little about it.  I think it is similar to the Alcotel Go Flip 3. 
I don't know what differences there may be.  I would suggest going over the phone with a sighted person, because, though I can tell you about the Go Flip3, if a procedure doesn't apply, you may not be able to do it without help in seeing how it is done. 
 
Speech is turned on on the Go Flip3 by opening settings, opening accessibility and turning on Readout.  You may well benefit from listening to my presentation to be given on the Go Flip 3 if the phone requires the same or similar work arounds for incomplete accessibility.  It might appear, for example, that contacts can't be used on the Go Flip3, but with the right workarounds, they can.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, February 22, 2020 9:06 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] What is a good flip phone to buy?
 
My brother just bought me an Alcatel Go 5.  He has Verizon.  I
know nothing about the Alcatel Go 5 yet.  Can anyone enlighten
me? I will get it on Easter Sunday.

Jan



Re: The Blind Shell.

chris judge
 

Ok thanks. Good to know.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mary Smith
Sent: February 23, 2020 11:18 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] The Blind Shell.

Hello, there are a couple of companies in the US that will ship the phone to Canada.


On 2020-02-23 10:15 a.m., chris judge wrote:
I don't know anymore about the blind shell phone than what I read in the article. I don't even think it's available here in Canada.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ron Canazzi
Sent: February 23, 2020 10:21 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] The Blind Shell.

Hi Chris,

Is there some type of limitation on this Blind Cell phone with respect to carrier access? I thought I read somewhere that it is incompatible with the newer 5 G technology. Is this true?


On 2/23/2020 6:49 AM, chris judge wrote:
Hey Carolyn.

Here you go.
The BlindShell Classic Accessible Feature Cell Phone, a Smart
Alternative Steve Kelley Imagine for a moment a cell phone that
combined the best features of a smartphone with the best features of a
flip phone. You know, a dial pad you can actually feel, with widely
spaced buttons, and, for those of us with low vision, bold, large
print numbers. How about some serious large print on the display for
text and menu items? And text-to-speech everywhere, without having to
drill down through the settings to find it? While we're creating this
wish list, let's add a user guide that's built right in, so you don't
have to first complete a tutorial on using the Web to find and read
the user guide on some remote website.now we're really dreaming big here aren't we?
Not at all! Such a phone arrived from Europe mid-November 2019. It's
called BlindShell Classic, and currently works with GSM network
providers like T-Mobile andAT&T.
One of the things you'll notice very quickly about this phone is that
it functions like it was built from the ground up with user
accessibility in mind, not as a feature that was bolted on as an
afterthought. When you unbox the phone, install the battery, and long
press the Back button, the phone starts with text-to-speech and an
interactive tutorial. The tutorial is quick and gives new users the
opportunity to learn what each button on the phone does. While
exploring the phone, you'll discover that out of the box, the
BlindShell offers 4 female voices and 3 male voices in the Settings >
Sounds > Voice Output menus. In addition to 10 voices, there are 4
levels of speech intonation and 5 levels of voice rates, to make speech output very customizable.
Physical Dimensions and Orientation
The phone is 5.3 by 2.3 by 0.5 inches and is what some might call a
"candy-bar style" phone, with the keypad beneath the 2.8 inch color screen.
Centered above the screen you will find the speaker. The keyboard is a
very standard layout of 4 rows of 3 numbers, with 5 keys above the
number pad. In the center of these keysis a square directional pad
that contains 5 button functions-center, left, right, up and down. To
each side of the center directional square are two buttons, one above
the other. On the left, the top button is Volume Down with a short
press, and Voice Control and Dictation using a long press. Beneath
that is the Confirm button, also used for answering a call. To the
right, the top button is Volume Up with a short press, and Voice
Control and Dictation with a long press. Below this is the Back
button, which navigates back through menu levels, or deletes a text
entry with a short press. If the phone is turned off, a long press on
the Back button will turn the phone on. When the phone is on, a long press of the Back button will navigate right to the Call menu.
The back of the phone contains a 2-megapixel camera with a flashlight,
a speaker grill and a tactile button that is a speed dial button,
called Emergency/S.O.S., that can be associated with a contact for
quick use in an emergency. At the top edge of the phone is a standard
micro USB input for charging and file transfer and a headphone jack.
On the bottom edge you'll find the microphone and charging port for
use with the included charging cradle.
Calling Made Simple
Although the BlindShell offers a range of functions, at its most basic
the device can quickly make calls using either the dial pad or voice
control. At virtually anywhere on the menu, a long press on either the
top left Volume Down button or the top right Volume Up button will get
the Voice Control prompt, "I listen after a beep." After the beep, you
might say, "Call xxx-xxx-xxxx," or "Call [a name listed in contacts]."
A second or two later, the phone says "Dialing," or requires a press
of the Confirm button to start the call. It's that simple! Of course,
pressing Confirm on the Call menu and dialing the number on the spacious dial pad is also an option.
With a list price of $349 from A T Guys or LS&S, it's certainly good
news to know that placing a call with the BlindShell Classic is easy
enough, but what about other functions? The BlindShell includes
features you might expect, like email, messaging, alarms, and a
calendar, to name a few. It also has some really innovative features
built in, like Internet radio and FM radio in the More Applications >
Media menu, Weather in the More Applications > Tools menu, and GPS
Localization, Object Tagging, and Color Indicator, all in the More Applications > Vision Aids menu.
The BlindShell Menu
Before digging deeper into a couple of these applications, let's
explore the navigation on the BlindShell. Using the Center Left and
Center Right buttons will move you through the top level menu items:
. Call
. Messages
. Contacts
. More Aplications
. Settings
. Status Information
. Manual
. Notifications
. Turn Off the Phone
Each menu item is numbered, and when it is read, you hear both its
number and the number of menu items in that level. So, for example,
the second item in the main menu is Messages. When we get to the
Messages menu item we hear, "Messages, two of nine." As a shortucut,
to jump to any menu item,simply press its number. So, pressing 2 when
you're on the main menu will open the Messages menu item.
You can also select a menu item by pressing the Confirm button or the
Center button. Doing so will open the submenu for that item. Like the
main menu, once in a submenu, the Left Center and Right Center buttons
move through the menu items. Continuing to press either button will
move through the menu again continuously. When in a submenu, the Back
button will move back up a menu level. So, in the submenu for
Messages, the Right Center and Left Center buttons will move through
the six Messages submenu items, and pressing the Back button will
return navigation to the main menu item, Messages.
While this menu structure is linear, it did take some practice to use,
because many menu items had multiple submenus. Again, a long press of
the Back button returns focus to Call in the main menu. A long press
on either the Volume Up or Volume Down button will open the Voice
Control where you can say, "Open." followed by whatever menu item you'd like to open.
For new users, a great place to begin is with the Manual from the main menu.
The Manual menu contains the Interactive Tutorial which the phone
automatically begins the first time it is turned on, and other menu
items including User Guide, Getting Started, Operating the Phone,
Safety Information, and more. Navigating through these menu items and
their submenus will give you plenty of practice with menu navigation
along with comprehensive information about all the features of the
phone and the many included applications. BlindShell Functions (menu
item 4), provides detailed information about the many applications.
Two Cents About Text Size
One observation here about the large print text on the display. In
Settings
Display > Text Size > there are only two settings, Normal Text Size
and
Huge Text Size. With Huge Text Size selected, the text on menu items
was approximately the size of newsprint headlines. When opening a
screen full of text in the manual, the text size remained bold, but
smaller. Of course, all the text on the screen was read as soon as it
opened, but there was no way to magnify the text. As far as the option
of Huge Text Size, I wondered, "Huge" compared to what? "Larger Text,"
or "Largest Text," might be a more accurate label here.
BlindShell Functions
For many users, having a tactile number pad and navigational buttons
will make this phone easier to use than a conventional touchscreen
smartphone, with perhaps one notable exception: the need to type in
text using the number pad, a skill many of us have forgotten or never
learned in the first place. This issue aside, BlindShell offers a
great deal of functionality. In the More Applications menu, you'll
find a range of applications that make the BlindShell every bit as
useful as a touchscreen smartphone. In addition to common applications
like Email, Messaging, Calendar, Alarms, Timer, Stopwatch, Voice
Recorder, Calculator, Weather, and Dictionary, there are several
applications in the More Applications > Vision Aids menu that are
worth mentioning. The Color Indicator is a handy color identifier.
Hold the camera over an item and press the Confirm button to hear the
color described. It seemed the accuracy of the Color Indicator was
about 50%, probably due to the limitations of the 2-megapixel camera.
For the casual user, having this application built into the phone is a
convenient feature, but if you need more accurate results, a separate, stand-alone color identifier is a better choice.
The Localization application is a very simple GPS application that
will give you the nearest address. Select Localization from the menu
and the phone responds, "Loading." A moment later the nearest address
is provided. Using the Localization application indoors yielded poor
results beginning with the notice, "Warning the obtained results may
be inaccurate. For better results try again in an open outdoor area."
Once outside, the results were indeed more accurate and useful.
The last Vision Aid item is Object Tagging. This application works
with QR codes printed on adhesive sheets available for purchase from
the BlindShell retailer. Peel off one of the codes, which is about a
half-inch square, stick it on the object to be labeled, and record an associated voice label.
The voice label will be read each time you open the application,
select Read Tags, and scan the code. This is a really handy
application to have installed on the phone, and very simple to use.
Tags can be edited and reused for different items.
Kudos on Voice Control Dictation
One of the really outstanding features of the BlindShell Classic is
the accuracy and performance of the dictation function, both on WiFi
and cellular data at 4G. With nearly 100-percent accuracy, the correct
menu items were opened by using a long press of the left or right
Voice Control buttons and speaking the selection. Anywhere an edit
field was available-for contacts, in a calendar entry, for dialing the
phone-voice dictation worked very well. In addition, in the Note
application, using WiFi, dictation was very accurate, responded to
commands such as, "new paragraph," and accepted relatively long dictations.
More Functions
Another function worth highlighting is the Internet Radio, found in
the More Applications > Media menu. Internet Radio submenus included
Popular Stations, Categories, Search, Favorites, and more. Although
the Categories menu contained a total of 96 categories, including all
types of music genres, sports radio, talk radio, etc., it was a bit
disappointing not to find a category and listing for radio reading services.
Also in the More Applications > Media submenu are Book Reader and Camera.
The Book Reader application is somewhat limited because it doesn't
support Bookshare directly. Text files may be transferred using a USB
cable quite easily. It was easy to download a title from Project
Gutenberg then transfer and play it using the Book Reader. The Book
Reader will set bookmarks and resume reading from where you left off.
Also, any book or podcast available as an MP3 file can be transferred
to the Music Player directory, and played with the Music Player located in the More Applications > Media submenu.
The camera on the BlindShell Classic is simply not one of its strong points.
It is a 2 megapixel camera, and images may be saved, viewed, and
transferred using a USB cable. There is no way to use the camera as a
magnifier or to zoom in on pictures.
The BlindShell Classic comes with 4 GB of internal storage so there is
plenty of room for music, podcasts, and books. The micro SD slot will
hold up to an additional 32GBof storage if you need more.
Display Options
As mentioned earlier, text-to-speech is activated at start-up and can
be controlled using the Volume Up or Down buttons. If you have some
usable vision, there are several settings in the Settings > Display
submenu that can enhance the display, including: Brightness; Color
Scheme; and Main Menu Style, in addition to the Text Size mentioned
earlier. The menu style offers the options of Only Text, Icons Only,
or Icons and Text. If you have opted for huge text, these menu items
are bold and fill the screen. Alternative color schemes include: White
on Black; Black on White; White on Blue; and Black on Yellow, with
bold text and good contrast. The Screen Brightness menu contains 6
levels of brightness and the ability to fully dim the screen so it shows nothing.
The BlindShell Classic has been available in Europe for several years
and is only now coming to the US The phone is a great option for those
looking for a completely accessible phone with tactile number pad and
buttons and a consistent, easy to use menu system. Overall
accessibility and usability are excellent on the BlindShell Classic.
If you're looking for an excellent feature phone without a touchscreen, the BlindShell is a great option.
Product Information
Product: BlindShell Classic
Manufacturer: BlindShell
Price: $399 (from manufacturer) $349 (from A T Guys and LS&S This
article is made possible in part by generous funding from the James H.
and Alice Teubert Charitable Trust, Huntington, West Virginia.


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of
Carolyn Arnold
Sent: February 22, 2020 12:27 PM
To: Tech Talk <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: [TechTalk] The Blind Shell.

Would the person who sent that article about the Blind Shell please
send it again, either to the list or to:

4carolyna@...

I copied it to send to a friend, had her email ready, phone rang, I
hit Send, night time came, I closed computer, away went the copy.
Also, I delete everything last thing. I would appreciate it very much,
if it could be sent back.








--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"








Re: The Blind Shell.

Gerald Levy
 

No, this is not true.  The BlindShell is a 4G phone that is compatible with 5G networks, so it should work just fine with most carriers for the foreseeable future. The Lucia, another feature phone designed especially for blind consumers, is a 3G model that is not compatible with 5G networks.  According to its web site, it is "out of stock", which is probably an euphemism that really means that it is no longer available, yet another example of an overpriced and  overhyped specialized phone for the blind whose unwary customers got screwed over big time and are now stuck with $300 paperweights. Unfortunately, this seems to be the fate of most specialized cell phones for the blind.  They start out with a lot of promise and then suddenly disappear from the market without notice.  I hate to keep beating a dead horse, but the biggest problem with all these phones is that they are not made by mainstream manufacturers that have facilities in the US, and so it is difficult to get them repaired , which greatly restricts their appeal and limits their potential sales.


Gerald

On 2/23/2020 9:20 AM, Ron Canazzi wrote:
Hi Chris,

Is there some type of limitation on this Blind Cell phone with respect to carrier access?  I thought I read somewhere that it is incompatible with the newer 5 G technology. Is this true?


On 2/23/2020 6:49 AM, chris judge wrote:
Hey Carolyn.

Here you go.
The BlindShell Classic Accessible Feature Cell Phone, a Smart Alternative
Steve Kelley
Imagine for a moment a cell phone that combined the best features of a
smartphone with the best features of a flip phone. You know, a dial pad you
can actually feel, with widely spaced buttons, and, for those of us with low
vision, bold, large print numbers. How about some serious large print on the
display for text and menu items? And text-to-speech everywhere, without
having to drill down through the settings to find it? While we're creating
this wish list, let's add a user guide that's built right in, so you don't
have to first complete a tutorial on using the Web to find and read the user
guide on some remote website.now we're really dreaming big here aren't we?
Not at all! Such a phone arrived from Europe mid-November 2019. It's called
BlindShell Classic, and currently works with GSM network providers like
T-Mobile andAT&T.
One of the things you'll notice very quickly about this phone is that it
functions like it was built from the ground up with user accessibility in
mind, not as a feature that was bolted on as an afterthought. When you unbox
the phone, install the battery, and long press the Back button, the phone
starts with text-to-speech and an interactive tutorial. The tutorial is
quick and gives new users the opportunity to learn what each button on the
phone does. While exploring the phone, you'll discover that out of the box,
the BlindShell offers 4 female voices and 3 male voices in the Settings >
Sounds > Voice Output menus. In addition to 10 voices, there are 4 levels of
speech intonation and 5 levels of voice rates, to make speech output very
customizable.
Physical Dimensions and Orientation
The phone is 5.3 by 2.3 by 0.5 inches and is what some might call a
"candy-bar style" phone, with the keypad beneath the 2.8 inch color screen.
Centered above the screen you will find the speaker. The keyboard is a very
standard layout of 4 rows of 3 numbers, with 5 keys above the number pad. In
the center of these keysis a square directional pad that contains 5 button
functions-center, left, right, up and down. To each side of the center
directional square are two buttons, one above the other. On the left, the
top button is Volume Down with a short press, and Voice Control and
Dictation using a long press. Beneath that is the Confirm button, also used
for answering a call. To the right, the top button is Volume Up with a short
press, and Voice Control and Dictation with a long press. Below this is the
Back button, which navigates back through menu levels, or deletes a text
entry with a short press. If the phone is turned off, a long press on the
Back button will turn the phone on. When the phone is on, a long press of
the Back button will navigate right to the Call menu.
The back of the phone contains a 2-megapixel camera with a flashlight, a
speaker grill and a tactile button that is a speed dial button, called
Emergency/S.O.S., that can be associated with a contact for quick use in an
emergency. At the top edge of the phone is a standard micro USB input for
charging and file transfer and a headphone jack. On the bottom edge you'll
find the microphone and charging port for use with the included charging
cradle.
Calling Made Simple
Although the BlindShell offers a range of functions, at its most basic the
device can quickly make calls using either the dial pad or voice control. At
virtually anywhere on the menu, a long press on either the top left Volume
Down button or the top right Volume Up button will get the Voice Control
prompt, "I listen after a beep." After the beep, you might say, "Call
xxx-xxx-xxxx," or "Call [a name listed in contacts]." A second or two later,
the phone says "Dialing," or requires a press of the Confirm button to start
the call. It's that simple! Of course, pressing Confirm on the Call menu and
dialing the number on the spacious dial pad is also an option.
With a list price of $349 from A T Guys or LS&S, it's certainly good news to
know that placing a call with the BlindShell Classic is easy enough, but
what about other functions? The BlindShell includes features you might
expect, like email, messaging, alarms, and a calendar, to name a few. It
also has some really innovative features built in, like Internet radio and
FM radio in the More Applications > Media menu, Weather in the More
Applications > Tools menu, and GPS Localization, Object Tagging, and Color
Indicator, all in the More Applications > Vision Aids menu.
The BlindShell Menu
Before digging deeper into a couple of these applications, let's explore the
navigation on the BlindShell. Using the Center Left and Center Right buttons
will move you through the top level menu items:
.    Call
.    Messages
.    Contacts
.    More Aplications
.    Settings
.    Status Information
.    Manual
.    Notifications
.    Turn Off the Phone
Each menu item is numbered, and when it is read, you hear both its number
and the number of menu items in that level. So, for example, the second item
in the main menu is Messages. When we get to the Messages menu item we hear,
"Messages, two of nine." As a shortucut, to jump to any menu item,simply
press its number. So, pressing 2 when you're on the main menu will open the
Messages menu item.
You can also select a menu item by pressing the Confirm button or the Center
button. Doing so will open the submenu for that item. Like the main menu,
once in a submenu, the Left Center and Right Center buttons move through the
menu items. Continuing to press either button will move through the menu
again continuously. When in a submenu, the Back button will move back up a
menu level. So, in the submenu for Messages, the Right Center and Left
Center buttons will move through the six Messages submenu items, and
pressing the Back button will return navigation to the main menu item,
Messages.
While this menu structure is linear, it did take some practice to use,
because many menu items had multiple submenus. Again, a long press of the
Back button returns focus to Call in the main menu. A long press on either
the Volume Up or Volume Down button will open the Voice Control where you
can say, "Open." followed by whatever menu item you'd like to open.
For new users, a great place to begin is with the Manual from the main menu.
The Manual menu contains the Interactive Tutorial which the phone
automatically begins the first time it is turned on, and other menu items
including User Guide, Getting Started, Operating the Phone, Safety
Information, and more. Navigating through these menu items and their
submenus will give you plenty of practice with menu navigation along with
comprehensive information about all the features of the phone and the many
included applications. BlindShell Functions (menu item 4), provides detailed
information about the many applications.
Two Cents About Text Size
One observation here about the large print text on the display. In Settings
Display > Text Size > there are only two settings, Normal Text Size and
Huge Text Size. With Huge Text Size selected, the text on menu items was
approximately the size of newsprint headlines. When opening a screen full of
text in the manual, the text size remained bold, but smaller. Of course, all
the text on the screen was read as soon as it opened, but there was no way
to magnify the text. As far as the option of Huge Text Size, I wondered,
"Huge" compared to what? "Larger Text," or "Largest Text," might be a more
accurate label here.
BlindShell Functions
For many users, having a tactile number pad and navigational buttons will
make this phone easier to use than a conventional touchscreen smartphone,
with perhaps one notable exception: the need to type in text using the
number pad, a skill many of us have forgotten or never learned in the first
place. This issue aside, BlindShell offers a great deal of functionality. In
the More Applications menu, you'll find a range of applications that make
the BlindShell every bit as useful as a touchscreen smartphone. In addition
to common applications like Email, Messaging, Calendar, Alarms, Timer,
Stopwatch, Voice Recorder, Calculator, Weather, and Dictionary, there are
several applications in the More Applications > Vision Aids menu that are
worth mentioning. The Color Indicator is a handy color identifier. Hold the
camera over an item and press the Confirm button to hear the color
described. It seemed the accuracy of the Color Indicator was about 50%,
probably due to the limitations of the 2-megapixel camera. For the casual
user, having this application built into the phone is a convenient feature,
but if you need more accurate results, a separate, stand-alone color
identifier is a better choice.
The Localization application is a very simple GPS application that will give
you the nearest address. Select Localization from the menu and the phone
responds, "Loading." A moment later the nearest address is provided. Using
the Localization application indoors yielded poor results beginning with the
notice, "Warning the obtained results may be inaccurate. For better results
try again in an open outdoor area." Once outside, the results were indeed
more accurate and useful.
The last Vision Aid item is Object Tagging. This application works with QR
codes printed on adhesive sheets available for purchase from the BlindShell
retailer. Peel off one of the codes, which is about a half-inch square,
stick it on the object to be labeled, and record an associated voice label.
The voice label will be read each time you open the application, select Read
Tags, and scan the code. This is a really handy application to have
installed on the phone, and very simple to use. Tags can be edited and
reused for different items.
Kudos on Voice Control Dictation
One of the really outstanding features of the BlindShell Classic is the
accuracy and performance of the dictation function, both on WiFi and
cellular data at 4G. With nearly 100-percent accuracy, the correct menu
items were opened by using a long press of the left or right Voice Control
buttons and speaking the selection. Anywhere an edit field was available-for
contacts, in a calendar entry, for dialing the phone-voice dictation worked
very well. In addition, in the Note application, using WiFi, dictation was
very accurate, responded to commands such as, "new paragraph," and accepted
relatively long dictations.
More Functions
Another function worth highlighting is the Internet Radio, found in the More
Applications > Media menu. Internet Radio submenus included Popular
Stations, Categories, Search, Favorites, and more. Although the Categories
menu contained a total of 96 categories, including all types of music
genres, sports radio, talk radio, etc., it was a bit disappointing not to
find a category and listing for radio reading services.
Also in the More Applications > Media submenu are Book Reader and Camera.
The Book Reader application is somewhat limited because it doesn't support
Bookshare directly. Text files may be transferred using a USB cable quite
easily. It was easy to download a title from Project Gutenberg then transfer
and play it using the Book Reader. The Book Reader will set bookmarks and
resume reading from where you left off. Also, any book or podcast available
as an MP3 file can be transferred to the Music Player directory, and played
with the Music Player located in the More Applications > Media submenu.
The camera on the BlindShell Classic is simply not one of its strong points.
It is a 2 megapixel camera, and images may be saved, viewed, and transferred
using a USB cable. There is no way to use the camera as a magnifier or to
zoom in on pictures.
The BlindShell Classic comes with 4 GB of internal storage so there is
plenty of room for music, podcasts, and books. The micro SD slot will hold
up to an additional 32GBof storage if you need more.
Display Options
As mentioned earlier, text-to-speech is activated at start-up and can be
controlled using the Volume Up or Down buttons. If you have some usable
vision, there are several settings in the Settings > Display submenu that
can enhance the display, including: Brightness; Color Scheme; and Main Menu
Style, in addition to the Text Size mentioned earlier. The menu style offers
the options of Only Text, Icons Only, or Icons and Text. If you have opted
for huge text, these menu items are bold and fill the screen. Alternative
color schemes include: White on Black; Black on White; White on Blue; and
Black on Yellow, with bold text and good contrast. The Screen Brightness
menu contains 6 levels of brightness and the ability to fully dim the screen
so it shows nothing.
The BlindShell Classic has been available in Europe for several years and is
only now coming to the US The phone is a great option for those looking for
a completely accessible phone with tactile number pad and buttons and a
consistent, easy to use menu system. Overall accessibility and usability are
excellent on the BlindShell Classic. If you're looking for an excellent
feature phone without a touchscreen, the BlindShell is a great option.
Product Information
Product: BlindShell Classic
Manufacturer: BlindShell
Price: $399 (from manufacturer) $349 (from A T Guys and LS&S
This article is made possible in part by generous funding from the James H.
and Alice Teubert Charitable Trust, Huntington, West Virginia.


-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Carolyn
Arnold
Sent: February 22, 2020 12:27 PM
To: Tech Talk <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: [TechTalk] The Blind Shell.

Would the person who sent that article about the Blind Shell please send it
again, either to the list or to:

4carolyna@...

I copied it to send to a friend, had her email ready, phone rang, I hit
Send, night time came, I closed computer, away went the copy. Also, I delete
everything last thing. I would appreciate it very much, if it could be sent
back.