Date   

Re: A serious computer problem

John Holcomb II
 

You’re welcome Kay.

I’m not sure the hardware desktalk will work with Windows 10.

That is h hardware is it not?

Outlook (the one from Office365) works pretty good for me at least.

John

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kay Malmquist
Sent: Monday, September 20, 2021 4:54 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] A serious computer problem

 

John,

Yes, I think it does.  I'll refer back to this and check out the things you suggested.  I have outlook on this new machine, but would really rather use Outlook Express.  I know there are two versions currently out there and neither one is the true program but one is still working.  I think I want to try that out.  I also want to put my DecTalk express USB on there as well, because I still prefer Paul to any other voices.  People say I am nuts because Eloquence is great.  Even when I was training, I was so happy to get back to my computer and its voice. 

 

But again, thanks.  I really do appreciate you reaching out and helping.


Kay Malmquist
kay.malmquist@...

 

"Where focus goes, energy flows."
Bob Proctor

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Monday, September 20, 2021 2:07 PM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] A serious computer problem

 

You’re welcome Kay.

So ok think of the windows 10 notifications as something like the iOS notification center.

Think of the Windows store as something  like the app store.

The only difference is that you’ll be using tab , arrow and enter keys to get what you need  done rather than flicking and tapping like on a phone.

Just like Xp, there’s a desktop with all of your apps. Or you can get to them in the  start menu.

Although its easier to just tap the windows key and start typing to search for the app you want. In every case (by default unless you change it), any local results such as apps or app settings will show up first followed next by web results which uses Bing search.

Just like in earlier windows versions you got a taskbar and system trey with all running apps in it.

Windows 10 just calls everything an app now too.

Its got its own built in screen reader which is good enough for probably a lot of people. Not saying you can’t use NVDA or JAWS if you don’t wish too. But Narrator is there and c can be used as a first party option too.

That windows 7 computer can be upgraded to 10.

AT this point I wouldn’t bother g going to 7, since at this point its not supported either.

All of your screen reader commands as well as a lot of windows commands will work the same just like in older versions.

Power toys just came out and keys can be remapped if you have to do so.

There’s also pretty extensive list of keyboard shortcuts that you can find from MS if you do a web search in  addition to your screen reader.

You gotta remember. MS serves over 2  billion people with Windows. That’s a lot of age groups and people  (some of which have been using  Windows since day one.) so while sure they do add things, a lot stays the same too.

Like sure you can dictate in Windows 10 now just like in iOS but you don’t have to if you don’t wanna.

There’s emoji’s like iOS too but again  you only can choose to use them if you wanna.

Hope this helps some!

John

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kay Malmquist
Sent: Monday, September 20, 2021 2:49 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] A serious computer problem

 

Hi John,

Thanks for your input.  I know it is just going to take my doing things with it and I'll get it.  I actually agree with you when you said you are surprised that I am having so much trouble with 10.  Yes,I do have an iPhone and don't have trouble interacting with it.  I just need to understand it more and how it is laid out to feel more at home with it.  Thanks for getting back with me on this.


Kay Malmquist
kay.malmquist@...

 

"Where focus goes, energy flows."
Bob Proctor

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Monday, September 20, 2021 1:24 PM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] A serious computer problem

 

So once you hit the windows key and  start typing that’s how you’d search.

From there it will auto announce the results .

Move your up and down arrows to move thru them and press enter on the one you want.

This is exactly like Windows 7 , and if I’m remembering correctly (its been a long time since I used XP), like the new XP start menu.

Many of  the things are the same between XP, 7 and 10.

There are things in 10 that you can choose to use or not use.

I dunno what  programs you use in Xp but most likely they’ll work in 10 too, perhaps with updated versions.

I’m not sure if you know about smartphones and how they work or not, but one thing new to Windows 10 is this idea of notifications that you can interact with. Just like smartphones windows 10 and 11 have a store that you can get software from.

Now just because it has it doesn’t mean you have to use it, just putting it out there.

Considering you’ve done tech  installs and whatnot I’m actually a bit surprised at how lost you are with the OS stuff.

Having said that I’ll help how I can.

John

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kay Malmquist
Sent: Monday, September 20, 2021 2:20 PM
To: TechTalk <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: [TechTalk] A serious computer problem

 

Hi all,

Let me start by saying this is going to be a long one.  You might say that the computer problem is me.  At one time I was a techie and loved a challenge.  I even worked for a business as a trainer and installer of computers and  adaptive technology.  I worked all over the state of Wisconsin with all kinds of people at various levels of computer knowledge.  I enjoyed the work but moved away from there and got away from adaptive technology, but of course, still used tech.  I still have a computer that a friend of mine and myself put together.  This is the machine that I am writing on right now.  It was built in 2004 and still flies.  All parts are industrial grade and you can tell.  This machine has XP on it but can be upgraded with a bit of hardware replacement.   I did have a laptop that has Windows 7 on it but never really liked it.  In fact, I have two machines that have 7 on them.  I never really got the hang of 7, but wasn't apposed to it, just never really got it and didn't have anyone to help me figure it out.  I am not stupid and not a slow learner, but I just don't get it.  Now we come to the problem.  A couple of months ago,I received a Del laptop with Windows 10 on it.  I am so frustrated with it.  I just don't understand 10.  I don't understand the start menu, the layout, how to find things and so much more.  I get that there is a search at the top of the start menu and I can search for things, but do I hit tab, enter or what?  I want to personalize it and get things going but I can't even find my way around the thing.  Every time I try to do anything with it, I run in to road blocks. 

 

What I really need is someone to help me learn everything.  Someone who would be willing to start out from the beginning or basics and go from there.  If I know something, we can move on.  I would be willing to pay obviously for your time but otherwise I just don't know what to do.  I feel totally frustrated and don't know where to turn.  If anyone has any ideas, or knows of anyone that is good with teaching computers, could you please let me know?  I feel embarrassed coming out here on these lists, but I truly do not know what else to do.  I have to move on and learn this, but it just isn't working this way.  Thanks for any help with this. 


Kay Malmquist
kay.malmquist@...

 

"Where focus goes, energy flows."
Bob Proctor


Re: Windows 10 and Sound forge Pro 15 with JAWS

John Holcomb II
 

Its happening to Jim too.
Unlike me though Jim has Jaws 2021 o and SF 15 on a windows 7 box . Its a problem with freedom scientific as I understand it.
John

On Sep 21, 2021, at 10:37 AM, Blaster <blaster.nil8@gmail.com> wrote:

You have more then enough horsepower to run SF, it's got to be your
soundcard. The onboard sound chips were never meant to do more then
play computer sounds and to play mp3's or video.

HTH,
Blaster

On 9/19/21, John Holcomb II <jhii926@gmail.com> wrote:
Hey all,

SO I've got Sound Forge Pro 15 and the scripts from:

The Snowman <http://www.snowmanradio.com/Sound%20Forge%2015.html> 's
Scripts
for Jaws For Windows (snowmanradio.com)

With JAWS running in Sound Forge with the scripts, Sound Forge is sluggish
to the point of being nearly not responding.

If I hit space to play it takes at least one second for the audio to start.

If I hit control +R to open the recording dialog JAWS actually stops
talking, and won't do so again until I go to my desktop with WindowsKey+M.

I've tried using SF with narrator and this doesn't happen with narrator.
I've also tried using it with the default user directory loaded from JAWS
and this doesn't happen then either.

This is on Windows 10 21H1 with Jaws 2021 July update on a M.2 SSD on a
Core
I7 X processor with 64GB ram.

Anyone got any ideas?

This never happened with Windows 7 and Sound Forge Pro 9 or studio 10.

Thanks,

John












Re: How Accessible Pharmacies Cater to the Special Needs of the Blind and Those With Impaired Vision

Holly
 

I have been using script talk for about six months now.  Luckily, my husband’s prescriptions come from Express Scripts, which offer the talking labels.
 
 


Re: Windows 10 and Sound forge Pro 15 with JAWS

Blaster
 

You have more then enough horsepower to run SF, it's got to be your
soundcard. The onboard sound chips were never meant to do more then
play computer sounds and to play mp3's or video.

HTH,
Blaster

On 9/19/21, John Holcomb II <jhii926@gmail.com> wrote:
Hey all,

SO I've got Sound Forge Pro 15 and the scripts from:

The Snowman <http://www.snowmanradio.com/Sound%20Forge%2015.html> 's
Scripts
for Jaws For Windows (snowmanradio.com)

With JAWS running in Sound Forge with the scripts, Sound Forge is sluggish
to the point of being nearly not responding.

If I hit space to play it takes at least one second for the audio to start.

If I hit control +R to open the recording dialog JAWS actually stops
talking, and won't do so again until I go to my desktop with WindowsKey+M.

I've tried using SF with narrator and this doesn't happen with narrator.
I've also tried using it with the default user directory loaded from JAWS
and this doesn't happen then either.

This is on Windows 10 21H1 with Jaws 2021 July update on a M.2 SSD on a
Core
I7 X processor with 64GB ram.

Anyone got any ideas?

This never happened with Windows 7 and Sound Forge Pro 9 or studio 10.

Thanks,

John









Re: my new horse puckies computer

Laz
 

That's correct. I have a couple of desktop PCs from Kevin and they
don't contain any bloatware. If anyone wishes to subscribe to the
BlindAds list, you can do so by sending a blank email message to
BlindAds+subscribe@groups.io

Stay safe,

Laz

On 9/21/21, Monte Single <mrsingle@sasktel.net> wrote:
Hi,

I think that the hp computers that Kevin sells on the blindadds list all
have a fresh install of windows so they do not have all the hp bloatware.

I purchased a used hp on amazon a few years ago and it also had a fresh
install.

So nice to turn a machine and have to face all that garbage.



From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Howard
Traxler
Sent: September 21, 2021 6:42 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] my new horse puckies computer



Yah, I bought an Asus computer five years ago and still don't have it
working. I made the mistake of putting in a password for startup then can't
remember it. So, I bought a couple of the HPs from Kevin who sells on one
of these lists. Would like to get the Asus running but don't know how to
get past that password thing.

Howard

On 9/21/2021 2:58 AM, John Holcomb II wrote:

Yeah but Lenovo still has some stuff that just duplicates what Windows
already haz.

Its not as bad as some others though.

I’ve not used ASUS built computers and didn’t know they built them
themselves.

I’ve got one that I had custom built but didn’t know they made them to.

John



Sent from my iPod





On Sep 20, 2021, at 7:51 PM, valiant8086 <mailto:valiant8086@gmail.com>
<valiant8086@gmail.com> wrote:



Hi.



Yes, it is better for some of the other big name brands. for instance,
Lenovo doesn't usually stick you with third party antimalware, their stuff
is generally just stock windows. Asus is similar.





On 9/20/2021 4:34 PM, Monte Single wrote:

Note, this is just a grind about my new p c experience, delete at will.



Yes Friends, I lied………………………………………………

A few short months ago I said I would not get a new p c for win11.

Well, I did get a new pc but not just for win11, I just had an urgeto buy
that did not go away even after a few sleeps.

It is an hp pavilion tp01-1009 desktop.

It is fairly low down on the scale of the latest and greatest.

It has win 10 home,

A s s d 500 gig drive,

8 gig ddr4 2660 mhz ram,

A core i5 10th gen processor and all the usual onboard audio, video,
network, wifi and Bluetooth with a standard array of usb ports.

Yes, it is a fairly compact and quiet tower.

This is the first new brandname computer I have
owned in about 25 years.

Normally, I just have one put together from brand name parts at a
localshop; but in the last while, the price of parts has been increasing
so a brand name box looked like a good choice.

The hp keyboard has 4 keys to the left of the spacebar, which I did not
realize at the time and I was unable to get it narrating right out of the
box.

So far, I give h p support a big freakin fat 0.

I got a frien to help me set it up and that was a trip in itself.

I already have a windows account, but between all the hoops and hurdles I
had to go through and over before reaching the desktop, I felt like Jobe
in the midst of the tribulations.

It took 15 20 minutes to get to the desktop with all the preliminary mumbo
jumbo and I still don’t know if I have offered my firstborn and soul to the
devillllllll.

…and then there was all that free crap to get rid of like, mcaffee, virtual
v p n, office 365 trial, office trial, and a whole truck load of h p
“services.



A standard installation of m s win10 home is about 30 gigs. After removing
all that garbage, I am still using 50 gig on a brand new machine.



Even though I thought I got rid of mcaffee, they still insist on sending me
email… insidious bastards.



The only thing I kept was the 100 gig dropbox account free for a year.



I doubt the first time out of the box experience for the other big name
brands is much better.



More later, I’m sure!

Cheers,



Mont

--
cheers:
Aaron Spears AKA Valiant8086 - General Partner Valiant Galaxy Associates.
"We make *very good audiogames* for the blind comunity"
http://valiantGalaxy.com










--
Affordably priced Accessible Talking MP3 Player/book Reader, Victor
Reader Stream & Trek, blindshell Classic phone, Bluetooth devices, and
accessories
http://www.talkingmp3players.com/
Email: laz@talkingmp3players.com
Phone: 727-498-0121
Personal Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/laz.mesa
Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/Talkingmp3players?_rdr


Re: Does anyone have instructions for converting a PowerPoint to a word document?

 

Does this need to be in a PDF format first?

Ashley

On Sep 21, 2021, at 9:09 AM, Joe Orozco <jsoro824@gmail.com> wrote:

Open the PPT, use Alt+F for File, arrow down to Save As, and in this
dialogue, choose the Outline option. This should render the text in
Word format.--Joe

On 9/21/21, Ashley Breger via groups.io <ashbreger=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi guys,
Does anyone have instructions for converting a PowerPoint to a word
document?
Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks,


Ashley






--
Joe Orozco: Your Message, My Mission
https://joeorozco.com/services/





Re: Does anyone have instructions for converting a PowerPoint to a word document?

Joe Orozco
 

Open the PPT, use Alt+F for File, arrow down to Save As, and in this
dialogue, choose the Outline option. This should render the text in
Word format.--Joe

On 9/21/21, Ashley Breger via groups.io <ashbreger=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi guys,
Does anyone have instructions for converting a PowerPoint to a word
document?
Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks,


Ashley





--
Joe Orozco: Your Message, My Mission
https://joeorozco.com/services/


Re: my new horse puckies computer

Monte Single
 

Hi,

I think that the hp computers  that Kevin sells on the blindadds list all have a fresh install of windows so they do not have all  the hp bloatware.

I purchased a used hp on amazon a few years ago and it also had a fresh install.

So nice to turn a machine and have to face all that garbage.

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Howard Traxler
Sent: September 21, 2021 6:42 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] my new horse puckies computer

 

Yah, I bought an Asus computer five years ago and still don't have it working.  I made the mistake of putting in a password for startup then can't remember it.  So, I bought a couple of the HPs from Kevin who sells on one of these lists.  Would like to get the Asus running but don't know how to get past that password thing.

Howard

On 9/21/2021 2:58 AM, John Holcomb II wrote:

Yeah but Lenovo still has some stuff that just duplicates what Windows already haz.

Its not as bad as some others though.

I’ve not used ASUS built computers and didn’t know they built them themselves.

I’ve got one that I had custom built but didn’t know they made them to.

John

 

Sent from my iPod



On Sep 20, 2021, at 7:51 PM, valiant8086 <valiant8086@...> wrote:



Hi.

 

Yes, it is better for some of the other big name brands. for instance, Lenovo doesn't usually stick you with third party antimalware, their stuff is generally just stock windows. Asus is similar.

 

 

On 9/20/2021 4:34 PM, Monte Single wrote:

Note, this is just a grind about my new p c experience, delete at will.

 

Yes Friends,  I lied………………………………………………

A few short months ago I said I would not get a new p c for win11.

Well, I did get a new pc  but not just for win11,  I just had an urgeto buy that did not go away  even after a few sleeps.

It is  an hp pavilion tp01-1009 desktop.

It is fairly low down on the  scale of the latest and greatest.

It has win 10 home,

A s s d 500 gig drive,

8 gig ddr4 2660 mhz ram,

A core i5 10th gen processor and all the usual onboard audio, video, network, wifi and Bluetooth with a standard array of usb ports.

Yes, it is a fairly compact and quiet tower.

This is the first                            new brandname   computer I have owned in about   25 years.

Normally,  I just have one put together from brand name parts  at a localshop;  but in the last while, the price of parts has  been increasing so a brand name box looked like a good choice.

The hp keyboard has 4 keys to the left of the spacebar,  which I did not realize at the time and I was unable to get it narrating right out of the box.

So far, I give h p  support a big freakin fat  0.

I got a frien to help me set it up and that was a trip in itself.

I already have a windows account,  but between all the hoops and hurdles I had to go through and over before reaching the desktop,  I felt like Jobe  in the midst of the tribulations.

It took  15 20 minutes to get to the desktop with all the preliminary mumbo jumbo  and I still don’t know if I have offered my firstborn and soul to the devillllllll.

…and then there was all that free crap to get rid of like, mcaffee,  virtual v p n,  office 365 trial,  office trial,  and a whole truck load of h p “services.

 

A standard installation of m s win10 home is about 30 gigs.  After removing all that garbage, I am still using 50 gig on a brand new machine.

 

Even though I thought I got rid of mcaffee,  they still insist on sending me email…  insidious bastards.

 

The only thing I kept was the 100 gig dropbox account free for a year.

 

I doubt the first time out of the box experience for the other big name brands  is much better.

 

More later, I’m sure!

Cheers,

 

Mont

-- 
cheers:
Aaron Spears AKA Valiant8086 - General Partner Valiant Galaxy Associates. "We make *very good audiogames* for the blind comunity" http://valiantGalaxy.com

 


Re: How Accessible Pharmacies Cater to the Special Needs of the Blind and Those With Impaired Vision

Gerald Levy
 


Okay, following is the complete article about how specialty pharmacies cater to the blind and those with impaired vision.  Note that it contains a lot of extraneous links and ads and other junk, so just ignore them or skip over them:



HEALTH
|
Specialty Pharmacies Cater to the Blind and Those with Impaired Vision

The Coronavirus Pandemic
LIVECovid-19 Updates
Coronavirus Map and Cases
Hospitalizations in Southern I.C.U.s
Vaccine Mandate
A pill container with a tag on its bottom, programmed to include medication information, is synced to a smartphone. It can read the information aloud using an app called ScripTalk, used by people with limited sight.
A pill container with a tag on its bottom, programmed to include medication information, is synced to a smartphone. It can read the information aloud using an app called ScripTalk, used by people with limited sight.Credit...Benjamin Rasmussen for The New York Times
Sections
SKIP TO CONTENTSKIP TO SITE INDEX

Specialty Pharmacies Cater to the Blind and Those with Impaired Vision
The pandemic has exposed flaws in services for people who can’t easily access a drive-through window for Covid shots or testing or can’t read prescription labels.

A pill container with a tag on its bottom, programmed to include medication information, is synced to a smartphone. It can read the information aloud using an app called ScripTalk, used by people with limited sight.Credit...Benjamin Rasmussen for The New York Times


By Joshua Brockman
Sept. 21, 2021, 3:00 a.m. ET
Listen to This Article
To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

During the pandemic, Curtis Chong has avoided the 2-½ hour journey to his grocery store pharmacy — including a round-trip bus ride — to pick up his prescription.

Even though Mr. Chong, a retiree in Aurora, Colo., said he is readily identifiable as a blind person, because he uses a white cane for mobility, his pharmacist never suggested he could have his medications labeled in an accessible way.

Through a Zoom meeting, Mr. Chong learned about Accessible Pharmacy Services, a start-up, that now delivers his medication with labels that convert text to speech. Mr. Chong said the new specialty pharmacy provided an array of products and assistance “so that the blind can identify their medications privately and independently.”

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Continue reading the main story

Unlike most other pharmacies, Accessible Pharmacy does not cater to walk-in customers or, for that matter, people who can see. The company offers service to blind people and those with low vision, including assistance from those who can see and free home delivery for prescriptions, medical devices and over-the-counter medications.

The pandemic has cast a spotlight on inequalities at pharmacies, where precautions and new programs have further limited access to health care for people with intellectual, developmental and physical disabilities.

Critical services like drive-through coronavirus testing, vaccination and pharmacy pickup windows have failed in many instances because they were rolled out in ways that were inaccessible. How can a blind person drive through a pharmacy? Why isn’t walk-through an option?

In addition, labeling and packaging have been a longstanding problem for older adults and for anyone who cannot read or understand the tiny type that appears on most prescription bottles and the accompanying pamphlets listing side effects and drug interactions.

There is no national standard that specifically addresses accessible labeling or packaging, despite the potential needs of more than 85 million — approximately 1 in 4 — people in the United States who, according to the Census Bureau, have a disability, and more than 12 million people who have serious difficulty seeing.

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The Food and Drug Administration is responsible for regulating prescription drug labels, and under a 2012 law, required a U.S. agency to develop guidelines for accessible labels for those who are blind or visually impaired. In 2016, the Government Accountability Office found that blind and low-vision patients “continue to face barriers accessing drug label information, including identifying pharmacies that can provide accessible labels.”


ImageCurtis Chong, a retiree in Aurora, Colo. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s still like the Wild West for us in terms of reliably and consistently finding solutions at the national level,&rdquo; he said.
Curtis Chong, a retiree in Aurora, Colo. “It’s still like the Wild West for us in terms of reliably and consistently finding solutions at the national level,” he said.Credit...Benjamin Rasmussen for The New York Times
Some improvements have been made, and states have taken the lead on pharmacy oversight. A few, including Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, and Maine, are exploring legislation that would require pharmacies to provide prescription labels in Braille, large print, high-contrast and with audio. In 2018, Nevada passed a law requiring pharmacies to provide a prescription reader or to help patients obtain one, and Oregon passed a similar law in 2019.

Nestled in a nondescript mini-mall, next to a Pizza Hut and a partially vacant building, Accessible Pharmacy operates in Fairless Hills, Penn. Concierge agents speak with each patient on the phone, coordinate refills and drug interaction questions with their doctors and consult resident pharmacists. A packaging and labeling menu for prescriptions includes Braille, large print, and audio — all free of charge.

“We decided to create a company where accessibility and reduction of barriers would be our primary focus with an incredibly welcoming sense of hospitality,” said Alex Cohen, 45, company co-founder and professor of marketing at West Chester University outside of Philadelphia, and one-time general manager of a hotel. He became blind after being diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa, a genetic degenerative disease, when he was 20.

Accessible Pharmacy, which launched in May 2020, resulted from collaboration between Mr. Cohen, the chief marketing and accessibility officer, and Andy Burstein, the chief executive.

“It’s still like the Wild West for us in terms of reliably and consistently finding solutions at the national level,” said Mr. Chong, 67. He gets his prescriptions from Accessible Pharmacy with ScripTalk. A tag is placed on the bottom of each pill container that is programmed to include medication information. It can be read aloud using the ScripTalk app on his iPhone or with a free-standing device. (En-Vision America, the manufacturer, said ScripTalk is available in 25 languages and is used by over 20,000 people.)

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Mr. Chong pays more for his medications because Accessible Pharmacy isn’t a preferred pharmacy with his Medicare plan, but said he is willing to pay extra so that his medication labels are tailored to his needs.

He also said he found the websites of major drugstore chains problematic because of unlabeled graphics, requests for the prescription number and a “general lack of efficiency” when ordering refills.

Accessible Pharmacy employees respond to video calls via Be My Eyes, a free app that provides assistance for blind and low-vision people using a network of sighted volunteers. Users requiring help with prescriptions or devices receive sighted assistance from the pharmacy. It can also set up and send out talking medical devices including blood pressure cuffs, thermometers, blood glucose meters and continuous glucose monitors and troubleshoot through the app, once patients have a device in hand.

The pharmacy also fills orders using specialized equipment and can provide enhanced packaging with tactile differentiations for morning and night doses.


Image
Scott Jenca, the director of operations at Accessible Pharmacy Services in Fairless Hills, Pa., used the multi-dose packaging machine to dispense medication.
Scott Jenca, the director of operations at Accessible Pharmacy Services in Fairless Hills, Pa., used the multi-dose packaging machine to dispense medication.Credit...Hannah Yoon for The New York Times
Lynn Heitz, 63, a community training specialist for the blind who lives in Phoenixville, Pa., said she preferred the company’s disposable pill organizer so that she doesn’t have to figure out what’s in every bottle, and the pharmacy sends her the next month’s supply one week before she runs out. After she and her husband were diagnosed with Covid-19, the pharmacy sent an overnight package with prednisone and cough syrup that her doctor prescribed.

The Coronavirus Pandemic ›
Latest Updates
Updated
Sept. 21, 2021, 6:49 a.m. ET29 minutes ago
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Construction workers in Melbourne protest mandatory vaccinations.
This summer, the American Foundation for the Blind expanded its research on the effects of the pandemic to learn more about service interruptions as well as the short- and long-term issues encountered by those who are blind, deaf and blind or have low vision.

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In an Op-Ed last fall, Penny Rosenblum, the former director of research at the foundation, described one such obstacle: “‘Drive-thru’ and ‘curbside pickup’ discriminate,” she wrote. “This doesn’t work for those with vision loss. Communities must have alternative plans, be it porch delivery, walk-up or bike-thru.”

DeAnna Quietwater Noriega, a writer and a full-time caregiver for her husband, Curtis, gets the couple’s prescriptions and any other pharmacy items they need hand-delivered to their front door by D&H Drugstore in Columbia, Mo. Ms. Noriega, 73, was born with glaucoma and has been blind since she was 8.

“They know us by name and always treat us with respect and friendliness,” she said of her independent pharmacy. “They go the extra mile to be sure our medications are compatible with each other and argue on our behalf if our insurance company balks at the drug our doctors prescribed.”

Ms. Noriega’s medications come with ScripTalk labels that she reads with her iPhone. Previously, she filled their prescriptions through Walmart. But the problem, she said, was the couple was never told when the refills had run out until they showed up at the pharmacy. “We were expected to read the very small print on the label,” she said.

Many independent pharmacies offer personalized services including home delivery to meet customers’ needs. Major drugstore chains also offer home delivery in many places. Over the last several years, chain pharmacies have become somewhat more accessible, in part, because of lawsuits and negotiations led by advocacy organizations like the American Council of the Blind.

But finding a pharmacy with a full menu of accessible solutions under one roof has been elusive. Last summer, CVS Health, which offers ScripTalk via its website, added a feature to its app called SpokenRx that can scan labels and read the prescription aloud, which the company said is now available in 10,000 stores.

Walmart also provides ScripTalk in nearly 1,800 Walmart and Sam’s Clubs locations. And there have been other agreements reached with Walgreens to offer its Talking Pill Reminder free of charge. Eric Bridges, executive director of the council, said they have yet to engage with Amazon Pharmacy.

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Dr. Steven Erickson, a pharmacist and professor at the University of Michigan College of Pharmacy, teaches a class where guest speakers with various disabilities share their experiences with pharmacists so that students can demonstrate “disability cultural competence,” he said.

“Without that education there is a greater risk of patients stopping the medicine, or not taking it as intended by their physician,” he said.


Image
Alex Cohen, a co-founder of Accessible Pharmacy. He said the company meets monthly with a packaging advisory committee of blind adults to help improve service.
Alex Cohen, a co-founder of Accessible Pharmacy. He said the company meets monthly with a packaging advisory committee of blind adults to help improve service.Credit...Hannah Yoon for The New York Times
Getting one-on-one time with a busy pharmacist can also be daunting, so people often settle for printed instructions. The small font size can be an impediment for people with low vision. In addition, those with cognitive issues or limited health literacy may have difficulty understanding the material. Lack of access can also affect deaf patients when the pharmacist doesn’t know sign language or when video relay service or a translator are not provided.

Disposable pill organizers and sealed packets provide a “user-friendly” solution, Dr. Erickson said, but some large chains do not provide them. (CVS offers presorted packets that can be delivered to one’s home or pharmacy for pickup.) And refilling medications at the same time — so-called med-syncing — also helps patients by reducing trips to the pharmacy.

“Both customized patient medication packaging and med-syncing are especially beneficial for people with disabilities who may face transportation barriers or difficulty manipulating traditional medication vials,” Dr. Erickson said.

Mr. Cohen said the company meets monthly with a packaging advisory committee of blind adults. Customer feedback led to the addition of pet and guide-dog medications to the delivery menu and over-the-counter sundries like aspirin and toothpaste.

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What’s more, Dr. Erickson said it’s common for some people — especially those with intellectual and developmental disabilities — to have other medical conditions that require five or more prescriptions, a scenario known as polypharmacy.

For a few years, Hayden Shock, 28, who is deaf and had a kidney transplant, took several drugs for his condition. During the pandemic, Mr. Shock, a program analyst for the General Services Administration, who lives in Arlington, Va., used either an app that provides speech-to-text, called LiveCaption, or pen and paper when he went to Walgreens.

Masks posed another difficulty because they blocked the visual clues of pharmacy staff. (Safe’N’Clear makes an F.D.A.-approved mask with a window.) “I would not call myself a lip reader,” he said. “But I like to see people’s facial expression and lip movement when I communicate with them.”

When his insurance changed to Inova Pharmacy Services, which is affiliated with the regional nonprofit health care provider, it delivered his prescriptions. Through his video phone number, which is connected to apps like Convo, Purple or Sorenson, he can talk to the pharmacy staff with the aid of a sign language interpreter.

So far, Accessible Pharmacy has made inroads largely in the Northeast and mid-Atlantic regions of the country. Mr. Cohen said the company is licensed in 31 states and hopes to expand to all states.

The pandemic, Mr. Cohen notes, has given pharmacies and retailers reasons to rethink their customer service, because many “overestimated the role technology could play in assuaging” the fears of people with disabilities. The assumption that these communities of people with differing needs are tech savvy is “perilous,” he added, noting that some people still only have a landline.

“We always welcome a phone conversation,” Mr. Cohen said.

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Gerald



On 9/21/2021 9:33 AM, Mich Verrier wrote:

Hi can you coppy the boddy of the artickle and post it in the e mail? It wants me to subscribe and I am not going to do that just to read one artickle. From Mich Verrier from New Liskeard Ontario Canada.

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gerald Levy via groups.io
Sent: September 21, 2021 8:43 AM
To: Tech Talk <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: [TechTalk] How Accessible Pharmacies Cater to the Special Needs of the Blind and Those With Impaired Vision

 


Hi gang.  The following article was published in the Science section of today's New York Times, and is of such vital importance to list members who take
prescriptions medications, that I am providing the link to read it.  It is a pretty long article that contains extraneous links and advertisements, , but
many of you will find it extremely imformative and helpful:

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/09/21/health/blind-pharmacies-access.html

Gerald


Re: How Accessible Pharmacies Cater to the Special Needs of the Blind and Those With Impaired Vision

Mich Verrier
 

Hi can you coppy the boddy of the artickle and post it in the e mail? It wants me to subscribe and I am not going to do that just to read one artickle. From Mich Verrier from New Liskeard Ontario Canada.

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gerald Levy via groups.io
Sent: September 21, 2021 8:43 AM
To: Tech Talk <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: [TechTalk] How Accessible Pharmacies Cater to the Special Needs of the Blind and Those With Impaired Vision

 


Hi gang.  The following article was published in the Science section of today's New York Times, and is of such vital importance to list members who take
prescriptions medications, that I am providing the link to read it.  It is a pretty long article that contains extraneous links and advertisements, , but
many of you will find it extremely imformative and helpful:

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/09/21/health/blind-pharmacies-access.html

Gerald


Re: my new horse puckies computer

Howard Traxler
 

Yah, I bought an Asus computer five years ago and still don't have it working.  I made the mistake of putting in a password for startup then can't remember it.  So, I bought a couple of the HPs from Kevin who sells on one of these lists.  Would like to get the Asus running but don't know how to get past that password thing.

Howard

On 9/21/2021 2:58 AM, John Holcomb II wrote:
Yeah but Lenovo still has some stuff that just duplicates what Windows already haz.
Its not as bad as some others though.
I’ve not used ASUS built computers and didn’t know they built them themselves.
I’ve got one that I had custom built but didn’t know they made them to.
John


Sent from my iPod

On Sep 20, 2021, at 7:51 PM, valiant8086 <valiant8086@...> wrote:



Hi.


Yes, it is better for some of the other big name brands. for instance, Lenovo doesn't usually stick you with third party antimalware, their stuff is generally just stock windows. Asus is similar.



On 9/20/2021 4:34 PM, Monte Single wrote:

Note, this is just a grind about my new p c experience, delete at will.

 

Yes Friends,  I lied………………………………………………

A few short months ago I said I would not get a new p c for win11.

Well, I did get a new pc  but not just for win11,  I just had an urgeto buy that did not go away  even after a few sleeps.

It is  an hp pavilion tp01-1009 desktop.

It is fairly low down on the  scale of the latest and greatest.

It has win 10 home,

A s s d 500 gig drive,

8 gig ddr4 2660 mhz ram,

A core i5 10th gen processor and all the usual onboard audio, video, network, wifi and Bluetooth with a standard array of usb ports.

Yes, it is a fairly compact and quiet tower.

This is the first                            new brandname   computer I have owned in about   25 years.

Normally,  I just have one put together from brand name parts  at a localshop;  but in the last while, the price of parts has  been increasing so a brand name box looked like a good choice.

The hp keyboard has 4 keys to the left of the spacebar,  which I did not realize at the time and I was unable to get it narrating right out of the box.

So far, I give h p  support a big freakin fat  0.

I got a frien to help me set it up and that was a trip in itself.

I already have a windows account,  but between all the hoops and hurdles I had to go through and over before reaching the desktop,  I felt like Jobe  in the midst of the tribulations.

It took  15 20 minutes to get to the desktop with all the preliminary mumbo jumbo  and I still don’t know if I have offered my firstborn and soul to the devillllllll.

…and then there was all that free crap to get rid of like, mcaffee,  virtual v p n,  office 365 trial,  office trial,  and a whole truck load of h p “services.

 

A standard installation of m s win10 home is about 30 gigs.  After removing all that garbage, I am still using 50 gig on a brand new machine.

 

Even though I thought I got rid of mcaffee,  they still insist on sending me email…  insidious bastards.

 

The only thing I kept was the 100 gig dropbox account free for a year.

 

I doubt the first time out of the box experience for the other big name brands  is much better.

 

More later, I’m sure!

Cheers,

 

Mont

-- 
cheers:
Aaron Spears AKA Valiant8086 - General Partner Valiant Galaxy Associates. "We make *very good audiogames* for the blind comunity" http://valiantGalaxy.com


How Accessible Pharmacies Cater to the Special Needs of the Blind and Those With Impaired Vision

Gerald Levy
 


Hi gang.  The following article was published in the Science section of today's New York Times, and is of such vital importance to list members who take
prescriptions medications, that I am providing the link to read it.  It is a pretty long article that contains extraneous links and advertisements, , but
many of you will find it extremely imformative and helpful:

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/09/21/health/blind-pharmacies-access.html

Gerald


Re: A serious computer problem

Howard Traxler
 

They changed the name to winaccess but it's still on groups.io

On 9/20/2021 11:04 PM, Madison Martin wrote:
Hi John,
I just tried to subscribe and got an error message saying that this group doesn't exist, just thought I'd let everyone know.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Holcomb II
Sent: September 20, 2021 8:52 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] A serious computer problem

There's also a windows 10 list out there which is very high traffic too.
That could help you too.
win10+subscribe@win10.groups.io
John
-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Carolyn Arnold
Sent: Monday, September 20, 2021 5:23 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] A serious computer problem

As my husband says, we just have to learn new ways to do old things.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Monday, September 20, 2021 3:30 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] A serious computer problem

I haven’t used Windows 10 but I know two people who take time to learn major changes. When they transitioned from Windows 7 to Windows 10, neither one complained to me about having difficulties learning major changes. I’m not saying there is nothing to learn, but as I found in the transition from XP to Windows 7, I expect that once you learn a small number of things, you will find that you can do a lot in the same or similar ways as you did before and that learning a little about this or that change may help a great deal.
For example, if you are used to opening the run dialog by pressing and releasing the Windows key in XP, in Windows 7 and Windows 10, if you hold the Windows key and type r, the same run dialog will open. But, different than XP, if you press and release the Windows key in Windows 7 and 10, the start menu will open.
Others may want to comment, but I strongly suspect that after you learn some differences, you will find a lot to be the same or similar.
You may have more choices in how you do some things, the old way or a very similar way to the old way, and one or more new ways.
Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: John Holcomb II <mailto:jhii926@gmail.com>
Sent: Monday, September 20, 2021 2:07 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] A serious computer problem

You’re welcome Kay.

So ok think of the windows 10 notifications as something like the iOS notification center.

Think of the Windows store as something like the app store.

The only difference is that you’ll be using tab , arrow and enter keys to get what you need done rather than flicking and tapping like on a phone.

Just like Xp, there’s a desktop with all of your apps. Or you can get to them in the start menu.

Although its easier to just tap the windows key and start typing to search for the app you want. In every case (by default unless you change it), any local results such as apps or app settings will show up first followed next by web results which uses Bing search.

Just like in earlier windows versions you got a taskbar and system trey with all running apps in it.

Windows 10 just calls everything an app now too.

Its got its own built in screen reader which is good enough for probably a lot of people. Not saying you can’t use NVDA or JAWS if you don’t wish too. But Narrator is there and c can be used as a first party option too.

That windows 7 computer can be upgraded to 10.

AT this point I wouldn’t bother g going to 7, since at this point its not supported either.

All of your screen reader commands as well as a lot of windows commands will work the same just like in older versions.

Power toys just came out and keys can be remapped if you have to do so.

There’s also pretty extensive list of keyboard shortcuts that you can find from MS if you do a web search in addition to your screen reader.

You gotta remember. MS serves over 2 billion people with Windows. That’s a lot of age groups and people (some of which have been using Windows since day one.) so while sure they do add things, a lot stays the same too.

Like sure you can dictate in Windows 10 now just like in iOS but you don’t have to if you don’t wanna.

There’s emoji’s like iOS too but again you only can choose to use them if you wanna.

Hope this helps some!

John



From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kay Malmquist
Sent: Monday, September 20, 2021 2:49 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] A serious computer problem


Hi John,

Thanks for your input. I know it is just going to take my doing things with it and I'll get it. I actually agree with you when you said you are surprised that I am having so much trouble with 10. Yes,I do have an iPhone and don't have trouble interacting with it. I just need to understand it more and how it is laid out to feel more at home with it. Thanks for getting back with me on this.


Kay Malmquist
kay.malmquist@gmail.com <mailto:kay.malmquist@gmail.com>


"Where focus goes, energy flows."
Bob Proctor

----- Original Message -----

From: John Holcomb II <mailto:jhii926@gmail.com>

To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>

Sent: Monday, September 20, 2021 1:24 PM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] A serious computer problem



So once you hit the windows key and start typing that’s how you’d search.

From there it will auto announce the results .

Move your up and down arrows to move thru them and press enter on the one you want.

This is exactly like Windows 7 , and if I’m remembering correctly (its been a long time since I used XP), like the new XP start menu.

Many of the things are the same between XP, 7 and 10.

There are things in 10 that you can choose to use or not use.

I dunno what programs you use in Xp but most likely they’ll work in 10 too, perhaps with updated versions.

I’m not sure if you know about smartphones and how they work or not, but one thing new to Windows 10 is this idea of notifications that you can interact with. Just like smartphones windows 10 and 11 have a store that you can get software from.

Now just because it has it doesn’t mean you have to use it, just putting it out there.

Considering you’ve done tech installs and whatnot I’m actually a bit surprised at how lost you are with the OS stuff.

Having said that I’ll help how I can.

John



From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io> <main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io> > On Behalf Of Kay Malmquist
Sent: Monday, September 20, 2021 2:20 PM
To: TechTalk <main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io> >
Subject: [TechTalk] A serious computer problem



Hi all,

Let me start by saying this is going to be a long one. You might say that the computer problem is me. At one time I was a techie and loved a challenge. I even worked for a business as a trainer and installer of computers and adaptive technology. I worked all over the state of Wisconsin with all kinds of people at various levels of computer knowledge. I enjoyed the work but moved away from there and got away from adaptive technology, but of course, still used tech. I still have a computer that a friend of mine and myself put together. This is the machine that I am writing on right now. It was built in 2004 and still flies. All parts are industrial grade and you can tell. This machine has XP on it but can be upgraded with a bit of hardware replacement. I did have a laptop that has Windows 7 on it but never really liked it. In fact, I have two machines that have 7 on them. I never really got the hang of 7, but wasn't apposed to it, just never really got it and didn't have anyone to help me figure it out. I am not stupid and not a slow learner, but I just don't get it. Now we come to the problem. A couple of months ago,I received a Del laptop with Windows 10 on it. I am so frustrated with it. I just don't understand 10. I don't understand the start menu, the layout, how to find things and so much more. I get that there is a search at the top of the start menu and I can search for things, but do I hit tab, enter or what? I want to personalize it and get things going but I can't even find my way around the thing. Every time I try to do anything with it, I run in to road blocks.



What I really need is someone to help me learn everything. Someone who would be willing to start out from the beginning or basics and go from there. If I know something, we can move on. I would be willing to pay obviously for your time but otherwise I just don't know what to do. I feel totally frustrated and don't know where to turn. If anyone has any ideas, or knows of anyone that is good with teaching computers, could you please let me know? I feel embarrassed coming out here on these lists, but I truly do not know what else to do. I have to move on and learn this, but it just isn't working this way. Thanks for any help with this.


Kay Malmquist
kay.malmquist@gmail.com <mailto:kay.malmquist@gmail.com>



"Where focus goes, energy flows."
Bob Proctor



















Re: how do I uninstall jaws from my windows 10 laptop?

John Holcomb II
 

Have you checked to see what apps are running in the background?

With that little ram any extra app running that doesn’t need to be should be turned off at startup unless it needs to run for some reason.

An SSD could help you too.

John

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: John Holcomb II via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, September 21, 2021 7:01 AM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] how do I uninstall jaws from my windows 10 laptop?

 

By a few apps, I mean a few browser tabs, the mail app, the weather app and Messenger. You look at the task manager and you can  just see the system is taxed to above 80% or more in ram usage.

4 gigs isn’t really enough these days.

John

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: John Holcomb II via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, September 21, 2021 6:56 AM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] how do I uninstall jaws from my windows 10 laptop?

 

I hope you meant gHZ and not mHGZ processor lol.

Your 4GB of ram is probably the problem.

I have a Surface Pro first generation (which I’m writing on  to you right now),  and it really can’t handle more than a few apps running at a time with JAWS running.

It’s fine for basic tasks, but anything complex would not work well on this particular PC.

If your ram isn’t soldered onto the board, you might be able to upgrade the ram. However, knowing your processor speed would help. One other question. Do you have any idea if it’s a 64 bit or 32 bit of windows?

If I were you, and I did absolutely nothing else, I would  upgrade that ram past 4 gigabytes. Because 4 gig is a very small amount for Windows 10 with screen readers running. Unless you’re doing just very basic tasks.

John

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Keith S
Sent: Tuesday, September 21, 2021 6:38 AM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] how do I uninstall jaws from my windows 10 laptop?

 

Not off hand.  It's an HP, 4 Megahertz processor, with 4 gig of ram, not quite sure what exact type of ram it contains, origintally came with windows 8.0

 

Keith

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Tuesday, September 14, 2021 4:02 PM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] how do I uninstall jaws from my windows 10 laptop?

 

Hmmm.

Do you know the specs of the laptop?

John

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Keith S
Sent: Tuesday, September 14, 2021 9:04 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] how do I uninstall jaws from my windows 10 laptop?

 

No, my sighted cousin said that it was not this slow before he handed it over to me after the upgrade from 8.1 to windows 10.

 

Keith

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Monday, September 13, 2021 3:41 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] how do I uninstall jaws from my windows 10 laptop?

 

I have a  question..

, was it always this slow?

Is it slow for others without the screen reader running?

 

John

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Keith S
Sent: Monday, September 13, 2021 4:24 AM
To: tech talk for the blind
Subject: [TechTalk] how do I uninstall jaws from my windows 10 laptop?

 

I have a laptop that originally came with windows 8.1 and that my cousin upgraded to windows 10 when windows offered the free upgrade.

 

I have jaws and NVDA installed on the computer and I have had one member of this list remotely enter my system to help me configure thunderbird to be used as my email client.

 

I noticed after my cousin gave me my computer back, with the upgraded version of windows 10 on it  that it was slow, like someone reading braille by letter by letter, but after they read the first letter, they have to check their learning braille books for the next letter one by one, on and on until they have the complete word spelled out and then they move on to the next letter.  I can click con a link  or option in the various windows or what not and walk away from the computer for about 2 to 3 minutes and  I will hear the computer just starting to do what I want it to do.

 

even the person who helped me remotely said "man, your computer is exceedingly slow"  have you degragged the hard drive.  my answer:  yes, several times.

 

I have removed apps, programs, ect and to no avail.

 

so, I  have asked here on the list and have had some luck from gene and perhaps 2 or 3 other people with helpful suggestions or websites to look at.

 

my cousin who upgraded the computer from windows 8 to windows 10

 said that it was probably the screen reading program that was slowing my system down.  So, I wish to do a test.  I wish to remove jaws  and run NVDA on it to test to see if jaws is the issue.  yes, I know, I know, why would the premier screen reading software company cause such a slow down on a system, but the whole "resetting" the computer to a "fresh copy of windows 10" did nothing to fix the issue, if I did it correctly via a webpage from the virge that gene had posted to the group. 

 

I do not wish to start a debate between members regarding resetting in windows 10 and restetting iin earlier versions as the word has ddifferent meanings in different versions of windows.

 

So, bottom of the line,  how do I remove a program from a windows 10 computer?

 

Thank you.

 

Regards,

 

Keith Steinbach

 

 

 

 


Re: how do I uninstall jaws from my windows 10 laptop?

John Holcomb II
 

By a few apps, I mean a few browser tabs, the mail app, the weather app and Messenger. You look at the task manager and you can  just see the system is taxed to above 80% or more in ram usage.

4 gigs isn’t really enough these days.

John

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: John Holcomb II via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, September 21, 2021 6:56 AM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] how do I uninstall jaws from my windows 10 laptop?

 

I hope you meant gHZ and not mHGZ processor lol.

Your 4GB of ram is probably the problem.

I have a Surface Pro first generation (which I’m writing on  to you right now),  and it really can’t handle more than a few apps running at a time with JAWS running.

It’s fine for basic tasks, but anything complex would not work well on this particular PC.

If your ram isn’t soldered onto the board, you might be able to upgrade the ram. However, knowing your processor speed would help. One other question. Do you have any idea if it’s a 64 bit or 32 bit of windows?

If I were you, and I did absolutely nothing else, I would  upgrade that ram past 4 gigabytes. Because 4 gig is a very small amount for Windows 10 with screen readers running. Unless you’re doing just very basic tasks.

John

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Keith S
Sent: Tuesday, September 21, 2021 6:38 AM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] how do I uninstall jaws from my windows 10 laptop?

 

Not off hand.  It's an HP, 4 Megahertz processor, with 4 gig of ram, not quite sure what exact type of ram it contains, origintally came with windows 8.0

 

Keith

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Tuesday, September 14, 2021 4:02 PM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] how do I uninstall jaws from my windows 10 laptop?

 

Hmmm.

Do you know the specs of the laptop?

John

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Keith S
Sent: Tuesday, September 14, 2021 9:04 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] how do I uninstall jaws from my windows 10 laptop?

 

No, my sighted cousin said that it was not this slow before he handed it over to me after the upgrade from 8.1 to windows 10.

 

Keith

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Monday, September 13, 2021 3:41 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] how do I uninstall jaws from my windows 10 laptop?

 

I have a  question..

, was it always this slow?

Is it slow for others without the screen reader running?

 

John

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Keith S
Sent: Monday, September 13, 2021 4:24 AM
To: tech talk for the blind
Subject: [TechTalk] how do I uninstall jaws from my windows 10 laptop?

 

I have a laptop that originally came with windows 8.1 and that my cousin upgraded to windows 10 when windows offered the free upgrade.

 

I have jaws and NVDA installed on the computer and I have had one member of this list remotely enter my system to help me configure thunderbird to be used as my email client.

 

I noticed after my cousin gave me my computer back, with the upgraded version of windows 10 on it  that it was slow, like someone reading braille by letter by letter, but after they read the first letter, they have to check their learning braille books for the next letter one by one, on and on until they have the complete word spelled out and then they move on to the next letter.  I can click con a link  or option in the various windows or what not and walk away from the computer for about 2 to 3 minutes and  I will hear the computer just starting to do what I want it to do.

 

even the person who helped me remotely said "man, your computer is exceedingly slow"  have you degragged the hard drive.  my answer:  yes, several times.

 

I have removed apps, programs, ect and to no avail.

 

so, I  have asked here on the list and have had some luck from gene and perhaps 2 or 3 other people with helpful suggestions or websites to look at.

 

my cousin who upgraded the computer from windows 8 to windows 10

 said that it was probably the screen reading program that was slowing my system down.  So, I wish to do a test.  I wish to remove jaws  and run NVDA on it to test to see if jaws is the issue.  yes, I know, I know, why would the premier screen reading software company cause such a slow down on a system, but the whole "resetting" the computer to a "fresh copy of windows 10" did nothing to fix the issue, if I did it correctly via a webpage from the virge that gene had posted to the group. 

 

I do not wish to start a debate between members regarding resetting in windows 10 and restetting iin earlier versions as the word has ddifferent meanings in different versions of windows.

 

So, bottom of the line,  how do I remove a program from a windows 10 computer?

 

Thank you.

 

Regards,

 

Keith Steinbach

 

 

 


Re: how do I uninstall jaws from my windows 10 laptop?

John Holcomb II
 

I hope you meant gHZ and not mHGZ processor lol.

Your 4GB of ram is probably the problem.

I have a Surface Pro first generation (which I’m writing on  to you right now),  and it really can’t handle more than a few apps running at a time with JAWS running.

It’s fine for basic tasks, but anything complex would not work well on this particular PC.

If your ram isn’t soldered onto the board, you might be able to upgrade the ram. However, knowing your processor speed would help. One other question. Do you have any idea if it’s a 64 bit or 32 bit of windows?

If I were you, and I did absolutely nothing else, I would  upgrade that ram past 4 gigabytes. Because 4 gig is a very small amount for Windows 10 with screen readers running. Unless you’re doing just very basic tasks.

John

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Keith S
Sent: Tuesday, September 21, 2021 6:38 AM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] how do I uninstall jaws from my windows 10 laptop?

 

Not off hand.  It's an HP, 4 Megahertz processor, with 4 gig of ram, not quite sure what exact type of ram it contains, origintally came with windows 8.0

 

Keith

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Tuesday, September 14, 2021 4:02 PM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] how do I uninstall jaws from my windows 10 laptop?

 

Hmmm.

Do you know the specs of the laptop?

John

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Keith S
Sent: Tuesday, September 14, 2021 9:04 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] how do I uninstall jaws from my windows 10 laptop?

 

No, my sighted cousin said that it was not this slow before he handed it over to me after the upgrade from 8.1 to windows 10.

 

Keith

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Monday, September 13, 2021 3:41 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] how do I uninstall jaws from my windows 10 laptop?

 

I have a  question..

, was it always this slow?

Is it slow for others without the screen reader running?

 

John

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Keith S
Sent: Monday, September 13, 2021 4:24 AM
To: tech talk for the blind
Subject: [TechTalk] how do I uninstall jaws from my windows 10 laptop?

 

I have a laptop that originally came with windows 8.1 and that my cousin upgraded to windows 10 when windows offered the free upgrade.

 

I have jaws and NVDA installed on the computer and I have had one member of this list remotely enter my system to help me configure thunderbird to be used as my email client.

 

I noticed after my cousin gave me my computer back, with the upgraded version of windows 10 on it  that it was slow, like someone reading braille by letter by letter, but after they read the first letter, they have to check their learning braille books for the next letter one by one, on and on until they have the complete word spelled out and then they move on to the next letter.  I can click con a link  or option in the various windows or what not and walk away from the computer for about 2 to 3 minutes and  I will hear the computer just starting to do what I want it to do.

 

even the person who helped me remotely said "man, your computer is exceedingly slow"  have you degragged the hard drive.  my answer:  yes, several times.

 

I have removed apps, programs, ect and to no avail.

 

so, I  have asked here on the list and have had some luck from gene and perhaps 2 or 3 other people with helpful suggestions or websites to look at.

 

my cousin who upgraded the computer from windows 8 to windows 10

 said that it was probably the screen reading program that was slowing my system down.  So, I wish to do a test.  I wish to remove jaws  and run NVDA on it to test to see if jaws is the issue.  yes, I know, I know, why would the premier screen reading software company cause such a slow down on a system, but the whole "resetting" the computer to a "fresh copy of windows 10" did nothing to fix the issue, if I did it correctly via a webpage from the virge that gene had posted to the group. 

 

I do not wish to start a debate between members regarding resetting in windows 10 and restetting iin earlier versions as the word has ddifferent meanings in different versions of windows.

 

So, bottom of the line,  how do I remove a program from a windows 10 computer?

 

Thank you.

 

Regards,

 

Keith Steinbach

 

 


Re: how do I uninstall jaws from my windows 10 laptop?

Keith S
 


Not off hand.  It's an HP, 4 Megahertz processor, with 4 gig of ram, not quite sure what exact type of ram it contains, origintally came with windows 8.0
 
Keith

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, September 14, 2021 4:02 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] how do I uninstall jaws from my windows 10 laptop?

Hmmm.

Do you know the specs of the laptop?

John

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Keith S
Sent: Tuesday, September 14, 2021 9:04 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] how do I uninstall jaws from my windows 10 laptop?

 

No, my sighted cousin said that it was not this slow before he handed it over to me after the upgrade from 8.1 to windows 10.

 

Keith

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Monday, September 13, 2021 3:41 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] how do I uninstall jaws from my windows 10 laptop?

 

I have a  question..

, was it always this slow?

Is it slow for others without the screen reader running?

 

John

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Keith S
Sent: Monday, September 13, 2021 4:24 AM
To: tech talk for the blind
Subject: [TechTalk] how do I uninstall jaws from my windows 10 laptop?

 

I have a laptop that originally came with windows 8.1 and that my cousin upgraded to windows 10 when windows offered the free upgrade.

 

I have jaws and NVDA installed on the computer and I have had one member of this list remotely enter my system to help me configure thunderbird to be used as my email client.

 

I noticed after my cousin gave me my computer back, with the upgraded version of windows 10 on it  that it was slow, like someone reading braille by letter by letter, but after they read the first letter, they have to check their learning braille books for the next letter one by one, on and on until they have the complete word spelled out and then they move on to the next letter.  I can click con a link  or option in the various windows or what not and walk away from the computer for about 2 to 3 minutes and  I will hear the computer just starting to do what I want it to do.

 

even the person who helped me remotely said "man, your computer is exceedingly slow"  have you degragged the hard drive.  my answer:  yes, several times.

 

I have removed apps, programs, ect and to no avail.

 

so, I  have asked here on the list and have had some luck from gene and perhaps 2 or 3 other people with helpful suggestions or websites to look at.

 

my cousin who upgraded the computer from windows 8 to windows 10

 said that it was probably the screen reading program that was slowing my system down.  So, I wish to do a test.  I wish to remove jaws  and run NVDA on it to test to see if jaws is the issue.  yes, I know, I know, why would the premier screen reading software company cause such a slow down on a system, but the whole "resetting" the computer to a "fresh copy of windows 10" did nothing to fix the issue, if I did it correctly via a webpage from the virge that gene had posted to the group. 

 

I do not wish to start a debate between members regarding resetting in windows 10 and restetting iin earlier versions as the word has ddifferent meanings in different versions of windows.

 

So, bottom of the line,  how do I remove a program from a windows 10 computer?

 

Thank you.

 

Regards,

 

Keith Steinbach

 


Re: my new horse puckies computer

John Holcomb II
 

Yeah but Lenovo still has some stuff that just duplicates what Windows already haz.
Its not as bad as some others though.
I’ve not used ASUS built computers and didn’t know they built them themselves.
I’ve got one that I had custom built but didn’t know they made them to.
John


Sent from my iPod

On Sep 20, 2021, at 7:51 PM, valiant8086 <valiant8086@...> wrote:



Hi.


Yes, it is better for some of the other big name brands. for instance, Lenovo doesn't usually stick you with third party antimalware, their stuff is generally just stock windows. Asus is similar.



On 9/20/2021 4:34 PM, Monte Single wrote:

Note, this is just a grind about my new p c experience, delete at will.

 

Yes Friends,  I lied………………………………………………

A few short months ago I said I would not get a new p c for win11.

Well, I did get a new pc  but not just for win11,  I just had an urgeto buy that did not go away  even after a few sleeps.

It is  an hp pavilion tp01-1009 desktop.

It is fairly low down on the  scale of the latest and greatest.

It has win 10 home,

A s s d 500 gig drive,

8 gig ddr4 2660 mhz ram,

A core i5 10th gen processor and all the usual onboard audio, video, network, wifi and Bluetooth with a standard array of usb ports.

Yes, it is a fairly compact and quiet tower.

This is the first                            new brandname   computer I have owned in about   25 years.

Normally,  I just have one put together from brand name parts  at a localshop;  but in the last while, the price of parts has  been increasing so a brand name box looked like a good choice.

The hp keyboard has 4 keys to the left of the spacebar,  which I did not realize at the time and I was unable to get it narrating right out of the box.

So far, I give h p  support a big freakin fat  0.

I got a frien to help me set it up and that was a trip in itself.

I already have a windows account,  but between all the hoops and hurdles I had to go through and over before reaching the desktop,  I felt like Jobe  in the midst of the tribulations.

It took  15 20 minutes to get to the desktop with all the preliminary mumbo jumbo  and I still don’t know if I have offered my firstborn and soul to the devillllllll.

…and then there was all that free crap to get rid of like, mcaffee,  virtual v p n,  office 365 trial,  office trial,  and a whole truck load of h p “services.

 

A standard installation of m s win10 home is about 30 gigs.  After removing all that garbage, I am still using 50 gig on a brand new machine.

 

Even though I thought I got rid of mcaffee,  they still insist on sending me email…  insidious bastards.

 

The only thing I kept was the 100 gig dropbox account free for a year.

 

I doubt the first time out of the box experience for the other big name brands  is much better.

 

More later, I’m sure!

Cheers,

 

Mont

-- 
cheers:
Aaron Spears AKA Valiant8086 - General Partner Valiant Galaxy Associates. "We make *very good audiogames* for the blind comunity" http://valiantGalaxy.com


Re: A serious computer problem

Ron Canazzi
 

Hi Kay,

and if you have NVDA, there is actually a weather app that is an add on to NVDA itself written by Adriano Barbieri which is excellent.


On 9/20/2021 5:11 PM, Kay Malmquist wrote:

You guys are making me feel better already.  I didn't know there was a weather app on the computer.  Sounds totally great as I love keeping tabs on the weather.  I'll get it figured out.  Especially with you all to kick my butt when I need it.  Thanks again.

Kay Malmquist
kay.malmquist@...
 
"Where focus goes, energy flows."
Bob Proctor
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, September 20, 2021 2:38 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] A serious computer problem

I second Gene here.

Its really not a lot different between versions.

I’ve used XP,7 and now 10.

And while you can do things in different ways or get at information in  different ways if you want to, you can do it the same way you’ve always done also.

Now having said that the wording may be a little different but MS isn’t gonna mess with a thing that already works.

Take something as simple as looking up weather. I absolutely love the weather app in Windows 10. Messenger works well too. ]

You can get to these things in other ways such as on your phone or thru a  browser, but I like how tightly windows store apps integrate things.

And yes. That’s   how they differentiate them.

App or windows store app.

A app is a regular  program, and  a Windows store app is an app gotten from the Microsoft store.

I really have no complains for Windows 10.

You could even get something like classic shell to change the look of Windows 10 back to what you’re used to if you need to but I think you’ll be fine as it is.

But hold up its not called classic shell anymore. I forget what they open  sourced it too now but yeah, you get the idea.

John

 

John

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Monday, September 20, 2021 3:30 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] A serious computer problem

 

I haven’t used Windows 10 but I know two people who take time to learn major changes.  When they transitioned from Windows 7 to Windows 10, neither one complained to me about having difficulties learning major changes.  I’m not saying there is nothing to learn, but as I found in the transition from XP to Windows 7, I expect that once you learn a small number of things, you will find that you can do a lot in the same or similar ways as you did before and that learning a little about this or that change may help a great deal.

 

For example, if you are used to opening the run dialog by pressing and releasing the Windows key in XP, in Windows 7 and Windows 10, if you hold the Windows key and type r, the same run dialog will open.  But, different than XP, if  you press and release the Windows key in Windows 7 and 10, the start menu will open. 

 

Others may want to comment, but I strongly suspect that after you learn some differences, you will find a lot to be the same or similar. 

 

You may have more choices in how you do some things, the old way or a very similar way to the old way, and one or more new ways. 

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

Sent: Monday, September 20, 2021 2:07 PM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] A serious computer problem

 

You’re welcome Kay.

So ok think of the windows 10 notifications as something like the iOS notification center.

Think of the Windows store as something  like the app store.

The only difference is that you’ll be using tab , arrow and enter keys to get what you need  done rather than flicking and tapping like on a phone.

Just like Xp, there’s a desktop with all of your apps. Or you can get to them in the  start menu.

Although its easier to just tap the windows key and start typing to search for the app you want. In every case (by default unless you change it), any local results such as apps or app settings will show up first followed next by web results which uses Bing search.

Just like in earlier windows versions you got a taskbar and system trey with all running apps in it.

Windows 10 just calls everything an app now too.

Its got its own built in screen reader which is good enough for probably a lot of people. Not saying you can’t use NVDA or JAWS if you don’t wish too. But Narrator is there and c can be used as a first party option too.

That windows 7 computer can be upgraded to 10.

AT this point I wouldn’t bother g going to 7, since at this point its not supported either.

All of your screen reader commands as well as a lot of windows commands will work the same just like in older versions.

Power toys just came out and keys can be remapped if you have to do so.

There’s also pretty extensive list of keyboard shortcuts that you can find from MS if you do a web search in  addition to your screen reader.

You gotta remember. MS serves over 2  billion people with Windows. That’s a lot of age groups and people  (some of which have been using  Windows since day one.) so while sure they do add things, a lot stays the same too.

Like sure you can dictate in Windows 10 now just like in iOS but you don’t have to if you don’t wanna.

There’s emoji’s like iOS too but again  you only can choose to use them if you wanna.

Hope this helps some!

John

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kay Malmquist
Sent: Monday, September 20, 2021 2:49 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] A serious computer problem

 

Hi John,

Thanks for your input.  I know it is just going to take my doing things with it and I'll get it.  I actually agree with you when you said you are surprised that I am having so much trouble with 10.  Yes,I do have an iPhone and don't have trouble interacting with it.  I just need to understand it more and how it is laid out to feel more at home with it.  Thanks for getting back with me on this.


Kay Malmquist
kay.malmquist@...

 

"Where focus goes, energy flows."
Bob Proctor

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Monday, September 20, 2021 1:24 PM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] A serious computer problem

 

So once you hit the windows key and  start typing that’s how you’d search.

From there it will auto announce the results .

Move your up and down arrows to move thru them and press enter on the one you want.

This is exactly like Windows 7 , and if I’m remembering correctly (its been a long time since I used XP), like the new XP start menu.

Many of  the things are the same between XP, 7 and 10.

There are things in 10 that you can choose to use or not use.

I dunno what  programs you use in Xp but most likely they’ll work in 10 too, perhaps with updated versions.

I’m not sure if you know about smartphones and how they work or not, but one thing new to Windows 10 is this idea of notifications that you can interact with. Just like smartphones windows 10 and 11 have a store that you can get software from.

Now just because it has it doesn’t mean you have to use it, just putting it out there.

Considering you’ve done tech  installs and whatnot I’m actually a bit surprised at how lost you are with the OS stuff.

Having said that I’ll help how I can.

John

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kay Malmquist
Sent: Monday, September 20, 2021 2:20 PM
To: TechTalk <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: [TechTalk] A serious computer problem

 

Hi all,

Let me start by saying this is going to be a long one.  You might say that the computer problem is me.  At one time I was a techie and loved a challenge.  I even worked for a business as a trainer and installer of computers and  adaptive technology.  I worked all over the state of Wisconsin with all kinds of people at various levels of computer knowledge.  I enjoyed the work but moved away from there and got away from adaptive technology, but of course, still used tech.  I still have a computer that a friend of mine and myself put together.  This is the machine that I am writing on right now.  It was built in 2004 and still flies.  All parts are industrial grade and you can tell.  This machine has XP on it but can be upgraded with a bit of hardware replacement.   I did have a laptop that has Windows 7 on it but never really liked it.  In fact, I have two machines that have 7 on them.  I never really got the hang of 7, but wasn't apposed to it, just never really got it and didn't have anyone to help me figure it out.  I am not stupid and not a slow learner, but I just don't get it.  Now we come to the problem.  A couple of months ago,I received a Del laptop with Windows 10 on it.  I am so frustrated with it.  I just don't understand 10.  I don't understand the start menu, the layout, how to find things and so much more.  I get that there is a search at the top of the start menu and I can search for things, but do I hit tab, enter or what?  I want to personalize it and get things going but I can't even find my way around the thing.  Every time I try to do anything with it, I run in to road blocks. 

 

What I really need is someone to help me learn everything.  Someone who would be willing to start out from the beginning or basics and go from there.  If I know something, we can move on.  I would be willing to pay obviously for your time but otherwise I just don't know what to do.  I feel totally frustrated and don't know where to turn.  If anyone has any ideas, or knows of anyone that is good with teaching computers, could you please let me know?  I feel embarrassed coming out here on these lists, but I truly do not know what else to do.  I have to move on and learn this, but it just isn't working this way.  Thanks for any help with this.


Kay Malmquist
kay.malmquist@...

 

"Where focus goes, energy flows."
Bob Proctor


-- 
Signature:
For a nation to admit it has done grevous wrongs and will strive to correct them for the betterment of all is no vice;
For a nation to claim it has always been great, needs no improvement  and to cling to its past achievements is no virtue!


Does anyone have instructions for converting a PowerPoint to a word document?

 

Hi guys,
Does anyone have instructions for converting a PowerPoint to a word document?
Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks,


Ashley

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