Date   

Re: accessing system volume information on Windows 7

George McCoy
 

Hello Vicki,


Were you able to get access to the system volume information folder under windows 7?

I ran windows 7 for many years and did lots of things under the hood, as it were, but I never had occasion to run the CACLS tool.

One thing you said confuses me.  You said you got an access denied message even though you were doing this as administrator.

By that, did you mean that you followed the instructions as they are listed in your email while being logged into an administrator account? if so, try the following.

It has been a long time since I had any dealings with XP, but in windows 7 there are two levels of the command prompt (cmd) regular and elevated.exe) If you haven't already done so, try the CACLS command from the elevated command prompt. Here's how.

1.  Click start.

2.  Type cmd in the search box.

3.  Right click the first result.

4.  Choose the run as administrator option.

5.  Run the CACLS tool per your XP instructions.


Hth,

George


On 2/19/2020 12:44 PM, Vicki W wrote:

Okay, since no one seems to understand that I want exactly what I asked for, access to system volume information, let me try again and show you the instructions I have which have always worked before.
 
I need access to the system volume information folder. First I show protected files and folders which works fine. Then I use the following instructions and get an access is denied message, even though I am doing it as an administrator. Here are the directions, which, as I said, have always worked before.
 
Instructions:
 
Using CACLS with Windows XP Home Edition Using the NTFS File System
In Windows XP Home Edition with the NTFS file system, you can also use the
Cacls tool, which is a command-line tool, to display or modify file or
folder
access control lists (ACLs). For more information about the Cacls tool,
including usage and switches, search the Help and Support Center for
"cacls."
List of 5 items
1. Click Start, click Run, type cmd, and then click OK.
2. Make sure that you are in the root folder of the partition for which you
want to gain access to the System Volume Information folder. For example, to
gain access the C:\System Volume Information folder, make sure that you are
in the root folder of drive C (at a "C:\" prompt). To check this, once you have typed cmd and pressed enter, then type cd\ and press enter again.
3. Type the following line, and then press ENTER:
 
cacls "driveletter:\System Volume Information" /E /G username:F
Make sure to type the quotation marks as indicated. This command adds the
specified user to the folder with Full Control permissions.
4. Double-click the System Volume Information folder in the root folder to
open it.
5. If you need to remove the permissions after troubleshooting, type the
following line at a command prompt:
 
cacls "driveletter:\System Volume Information" /E /R username
This command removes all permissions for the specified user.
list end
 
 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, February 17, 2020 8:28 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] accessing system volume information on Windows 7

Open the run dialog box with windows are.
Then type in sndvol



On Feb 17, 2020, at 9:44 PM, Vicki W <vwherry4@...> wrote:


Hi,
How can I access System Volume information on a Windows 7 computer? I have two sets of instructions and neither are working correctly.
 
Thanks.
 
Vicki
 


Kindle copy/paste question

Sandra Streeter
 

Hello,

 

 

Can a short passage be copied from a book stored in the desktop Kindle into a blank Word doc, using JAWS and Office 2019? If so, how? Thx!

 

Sandra

 

 

The Truth must dazzle gradually

Or every man be blind —

 

(Emily Dickinson)

 


locked Re: New Smart Flip Phone?

Norma A. Boge
 

Wonder if I'm understanding your message. Seems the material you read
totally missed one of the great benefits of Android: you can choose the
keyboard that suits you. I use 3 on my Pixel, Gboard is my main driver but
the others have their purposes. Actually, you can use any app you like. No
offense, but I saw a headline earlier today that said Apple is considering
allowing iPhone users to choose another app for email other than the
default. Too funny. <smile>

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Carolyn
Arnold
Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2020 11:41 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

I had an Android tablet and did read articles and a couple of books on it,
something I have not done on my iPhone other than some news articles, emails
or texts, stuff like that. I read a couple of books on that tablet, tricky,
because I was winging it without help. I might have stayed with Android, had
that tablet not had a keyboard, which I could have removed. That keyboard,
to me, was so clumsy, that I never want another one for a touch-screen
device.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Olusegun -- Victory Associates
LTD, Inc.
Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2020 11:55 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

Gerald, I was 18 months old when blindness set in due to measles. I don't
recall what anyone's face looks like; I can't blink or make any expressions
with my eyes; I can't MOVE MY EYES, look down, left or right as the
ophthalmologists at the eye clinic try to make me do when I present for
checkup. Colors are just that, I've never seen them, and so I don't make
sense of them. Yet, people talk about colors all the time.

Ok, silly child, why go through this charade? I have done so to refute your
argument that those of us who are blind using touchscreen toys do so with
sighted assistance and or help.

Sorry sir, this is NOT THE CASE with me! My touchscreen toy HAS NO PHYSICAL
BUTTONS of any kind and I use it unperturbed with NO SIGHTED ASSISTANCE AND
HELP! I took my Shiny Android Toy OUT OF THE BOX and got it going ALL ON MY
OWN sitting at my desk at work. And, yes, I'm THE ONLY EMPLOYEE here until
I fire myself!

For the records, I DO NOT CONSIDER MYSELF AN EXPERT in anything; I am
CONSTANTLY LEARNING and seeking for ways to learn. I start out by trying to
explore anything on my own; when I get stuck, I ask questions either here on
this list, or some other lists I roam on, but I don't go around looking for
sighted help until I have exhausted my channels within the blind community.


All that said, is there an area where I fall short? Sure!
I'm not too good at using my toy to scan and read printed materials; I
suppose this has to do with my spatial orientation; I'm working on it on my
own presently.
However, if I don't hatch it down within the period I have allotted, I'll
seek sighted assistance for this purpose only.

Apologies for making this post rather long; I, like several others, had to
write to dispel the notion that blind users of touchscreen toys are heavily
reliant on folks with a pair of eyes! Of course, I belong to the school
which believes that if an individual is visually impaired and has sufficient
residual vision, this should be used always to the maximum extent possible.
Any such individual should NEVER PERMIT anyone to PULL SLEEPSHADES over his
or her face for any reason. I still have LIGHT PERCEPTION which is slowly
going away. I do enjoy being able to use it and I'll never participate in
any rehabilitative training skill or program that seeks to force me to wear
sleepshades.

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado


Re: Plextalk list problems help please?

Vicky Vaughan
 

Hi Alex, Sorry, I can’t answer that right now.  It was a long time ago that I joined and so I don’t remember.

 

I may come across my original welcoming message from them and then I’d be able to answer, or perhaps, someone on the List will be able to answer that.

 

Sincerely, Vicky

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Alex Stone
Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2020 7:27 PM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Plextalk list problems help please?

 

Vicky, I can’t answer your question, but how do I join the Plextalk list?



On 20 Feb 2020, at 23:48, Vicky Vaughan <vrvaughan63@...> wrote:



Hi List, I have been receiving plextalk messages since 2009, but when I sent a message just yesterday, I received a message saying that I was not subscribed to it.

 

I haven’t yet found my original welcome message from that list. So, I am not sure what to do.

 

What I had been wanting to talk with some members about was how with the old Plextalk Recorder I could record a music lesson and then go back over sections of it bit by bit so I could memorize each part.

 

Unfortunately, that machine has finally died, and I have been trying to find a new digital replacement.  I have tried with 2 that sounded good, but both have needed to be returned as unsatisfactory for this purpose.

 

While the Milestone 112 Ace will record long sessions and will rewind, it only will rewind all the way to the beginning. 

 

I want to know that plextalk Pocket will act like the old first Plextalk Recorder and let me rewind whatever section I am working upon, so I can memorize it before going on to the next section.

 

Do any of you know the answer?

 

I would be very grateful for any help!

 

Sincerely, Vicky Vaughan

 

 


Re: Plextalk list problems help please?

Vicky Vaughan
 

Hi and thanks Penny!  Please report back after your Pocket is back up and running, if it has the same rewind capabilities as your plex talk two machine

 

I really would like to know this before I go to the trouble and expense of purchasing one.

 

Sincerely, Vicky Vaughan

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Penny Golden
Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2020 8:54 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Plextalk list problems help please?

 

We can find you the answer.

I have 3 plex talk two machines.  I love them. and when they go, why, I'll be a sad lady.

I have a plextalk pocket, but I'm so used to the plextalk 2 machines, and so unused to the pocket, I'll have to do some digging.

What I do is bookmark something, and then you can manually go back to it; or you can set the thing to play it over and over.  When I wanted to learn a song, I used that repeat feature and kept hearing it again and again, so I could familiarize myself with the words, for I was playing guitar and couldn't read them. 

I can't access the plex talk pocket just now. I have let the battery deplete, I guess, and really, I need some assistance in figuring out what is what.

I'll try to charge it and see what we can do.

But the plextalk 2 definitely had the capability of using bookmarks that would take you back to where you needed to be.  you could set the beginning marker and the end and then, as I said, replay the material between those two marks. 

Best,

Penny

pengold2@...

As for the list,

I'll see if I can figure that out, too.

 

 

 

On 2/20/2020 6:27 PM, Alex Stone wrote:

Vicky, I can’t answer your question, but how do I join the Plextalk list?



On 20 Feb 2020, at 23:48, Vicky Vaughan <vrvaughan63@...> wrote:



Hi List, I have been receiving plextalk messages since 2009, but when I sent a message just yesterday, I received a message saying that I was not subscribed to it.

 

I haven’t yet found my original welcome message from that list. So, I am not sure what to do.

 

What I had been wanting to talk with some members about was how with the old Plextalk Recorder I could record a music lesson and then go back over sections of it bit by bit so I could memorize each part.

 

Unfortunately, that machine has finally died, and I have been trying to find a new digital replacement.  I have tried with 2 that sounded good, but both have needed to be returned as unsatisfactory for this purpose.

 

While the Milestone 112 Ace will record long sessions and will rewind, it only will rewind all the way to the beginning. 

 

I want to know that plextalk Pocket will act like the old first Plextalk Recorder and let me rewind whatever section I am working upon, so I can memorize it before going on to the next section.

 

Do any of you know the answer?

 

I would be very grateful for any help!

 

Sincerely, Vicky Vaughan

 

 

 


Re: Does anyone use "Music Match" in Win 10?

Gene
 

Why not try using the versions he already has.  Of course, he may want to ask if anyone is using these old versions in Windows 10 first, but a lot of programs that worked in older versions of Windows work in Windows 10.  Drivers are another story but programs often work in newer versions of Windows.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
From: Dave
Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2020 5:07 PM
Subject: [TechTalk] Does anyone use "Music Match" in Win 10?

Hello,


A friend of mine is moving from his old XP System, to a New Win 10
unit.  He has a lot of old software he bought 15 or 20 years ago, and he
is hoping he would still be able to purchase the newer versions of the
same programs.


One he is hoping to upgrade is called, "Music Match".


Guess the latest Music Match program is available, but he would like to
know if any here could say if it works with the latest edition of Jaws?



And if no one here uses this program, are there any Music Player
programs that are Screen Reader Friendly?


And he doesn't mind purchasing a program if it will work with Jaws.


Thanks for any help with this,


Grumpy Dave






Re: Plextalk list problems help please?

Penny Golden
 

We can find you the answer.

I have 3 plex talk two machines.  I love them. and when they go, why, I'll be a sad lady.

I have a plextalk pocket, but I'm so used to the plextalk 2 machines, and so unused to the pocket, I'll have to do some digging.

What I do is bookmark something, and then you can manually go back to it; or you can set the thing to play it over and over.  When I wanted to learn a song, I used that repeat feature and kept hearing it again and again, so I could familiarize myself with the words, for I was playing guitar and couldn't read them. 

I can't access the plex talk pocket just now. I have let the battery deplete, I guess, and really, I need some assistance in figuring out what is what.

I'll try to charge it and see what we can do.

But the plextalk 2 definitely had the capability of using bookmarks that would take you back to where you needed to be.  you could set the beginning marker and the end and then, as I said, replay the material between those two marks. 

Best,

Penny

pengold2@...

As for the list,

I'll see if I can figure that out, too.

 

 


On 2/20/2020 6:27 PM, Alex Stone wrote:
Vicky, I can’t answer your question, but how do I join the Plextalk list?


On 20 Feb 2020, at 23:48, Vicky Vaughan <vrvaughan63@...> wrote:



Hi List, I have been receiving plextalk messages since 2009, but when I sent a message just yesterday, I received a message saying that I was not subscribed to it.

 

I haven’t yet found my original welcome message from that list. So, I am not sure what to do.

 

What I had been wanting to talk with some members about was how with the old Plextalk Recorder I could record a music lesson and then go back over sections of it bit by bit so I could memorize each part.

 

Unfortunately, that machine has finally died, and I have been trying to find a new digital replacement.  I have tried with 2 that sounded good, but both have needed to be returned as unsatisfactory for this purpose.

 

While the Milestone 112 Ace will record long sessions and will rewind, it only will rewind all the way to the beginning. 

 

I want to know that plextalk Pocket will act like the old first Plextalk Recorder and let me rewind whatever section I am working upon, so I can memorize it before going on to the next section.

 

Do any of you know the answer?

 

I would be very grateful for any help!

 

Sincerely, Vicky Vaughan

 

 



locked Re: New Smart Flip Phone?

Marie <magpie.mn@...>
 

I had some central vision for most of my life but have no problem with touch screens and am totally blind. Fortunately I don’t have mobility problems and my sense of touch is fine.
Marie
 
 

From: Victor
Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2020 1:57 PM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?
 
Hello again:
 
For those who have lost their eyesight later in life, I can totally understand why they might have trouble using touch screens. They may have a deck stair ready issues and finger sensitivity issues that those of us who have been blind since birth or since we were very young do not have. Therefore, I can certainly see the exceptions to what we are talking about. In these cases, maybe a flip phone would be best.
 
Victor
 

On Feb 20, 2020, at 12:37 PM, Jim Wohlgamuth via Groups.Io <wohlggie@...> wrote:



Hello Jerald!

Wonder what you base you conclusions on? I personally know quite a number of totally blind iPhone users and I personally have owned 6 or 7 touch screen phones and know of a fairly large number of other totally blind Androind users.  So wonder if you actually took any sort of poll -scientific or other wise to come up with your conclusions..? Yes, I had a small amount of sighted help in getting my first iphone setup and a bit more in getting my Android setup but using a touch screen device is far from being difficult for the folks that I know as well as don't know.

To answer your question as to how a totally blind or partially sighted person uses the touch screens, we use our fingers to navigate around the screen and locate the various items that we wish to activate and then double tap them to activate them.  Yes, my first touch screen was a bit of a challenge but now I would rather have a touch screen phone than a physical key board.  I do use blue tooth keyboards with my various touch screen devices but that is more out of convenience rather than necessity.  Of course I have always been a very inquisitive indevisual.  Just my thoughts! Catch Ya later! de

mailto:wohlggie@...<KF8LT><Jim Wohlgamuth>. 

On 20-Feb-20 10:01, Gerald Levy via Groups.Io wrote:

 

I suspect that many "blind" consumers who use smart phones that are completely devoid of tactile buttons are not really "blind" at all, but visually impaired and retain some funtional vision to navigate around a touchscreen.  Those who are totally blind and purport to use a touchscreen smart phone probably had a lot of sighted help. Which is why smart phones with tactile keypads like the BlindShell and Smart Vision have been introduced. So I'm looking forward to hearing about the experiences of a totally blind consumer using the new Samsung smart flip phone.  

 

 

Gerald

 

 

On 2/20/2020 9:41 AM, Gene wrote:
Your statement about buttons is inaccurate based on discussions I've seen on this topic before.  Most smart phones already had very few buttons, and, as for the elimination of the home button on the I-Phone, while I can't speak from personal experience, I've seen enough comments on lists like this that the button's elimination doesn't mean blind people can't use the phone.  Evidently, the screen simulates the presence of a button by vibrating.  I'm not saying I definitely understand the situation and I await other comments but how many people have you seen say they stopped using an I-Phone because of elimination of the home button? 
 
You often state the worst case interpretation of situations.
 
Gene
----- Origial Message -----
From: Gerald Levy via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2020 5:22 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?
 

 

According to Consumer Reports, this Samsung smart flip phone employs a new touchscreen technology that allows it to be thin and flexible enough to be folded in half like a wallet.  But in tests, it proved to be very fragile, and CR did not recommend it, especially in view of its very high price tag.  And it would probably not be a good choice for a blind consumer because even unfolded the touchscreen is relatively small and has no tactile buttons.  This seems to be a growing trend in smart phones: eliminating all physical buttons, making it virtually impossible for a blind consumer to use the phone without some sighted help or a lot of hands-on training.

 

Gerald

 

 

On 2/19/2020 9:20 PM, Mike B wrote:

Hi Lisa,
 
I heard about a phone like you're describing just the other day and I think they said that Samsung was the company  producing it.  From the way the guy was describing the way it works, it sounds like it'll be a really cool phone, but for $1300 it damn well otta be!  LOL  LOL  Check out the link below for a review.
 

 
 
Take care.  Mike.  Sent from my iBarstool.
----- Original Message -----
From: Lisa Belville
To: Tech Talk
Sent: Wednesday, February 19, 2020 5:02 PM
Subject: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?
 
Hi, all.


My semi-techno-phobic dad is going to trade in his old flip phone soon.
He said he saw something on TV advertising a smart flip phone, he means
a phone with the same body style as a feature flip phone but with the
capability of a modern iPhone or Android Smart phone. I haven't heard
anything about this. Does anyone here have any info about this type of
phone? Brand, Wireless carrier, etc?


TIA


Lisa


--
Lisa Belville
missktlab1217@...




locked Re: New Smart Flip Phone?

Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
 

I can't address anything iOS specifically; that said, in the Android World,
there are myriads of keyboards available. For example, there's a keyboard
that's exactly like a regular computer keyboard, only it's virtual. This
keyboard has the familiar Control, Alt, Up and Down Arrow keys.

For anyone interested, look for the Blind Accessibility Keyboard at Google's
Play Store. The most common keyboard used by the blind in Androidville is
Google's GBoard. No, it doesn't have the control, alt, up and down arrow
keys, and it is primarily a Touch & Lift keyboard. I believe I have about
five different keyboards installed on My Shiny Android toys and I switch
back and forth amongst them though I use GBoard much of the time.

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado


locked Re: New Smart Flip Phone?

Victor
 

Hi again:

I wish there were some good tutorials for learning the on screen keyboard so that more of us could type on that keyboard as easily as sighted people do. I know of an app called talking Taiper, but it has not been updated in over a year. It might not be a very good tutorial anymore and it might not be compatible with iOS 13. But if you know braille, braille screen input is a very good way to use your on screen keyboard. Especially if you have one of the larger iPhones such as the iPhone 7 Plus or later.

Victor


On Feb 20, 2020, at 4:24 PM, Jim Wohlgamuth <wohlggie@...> wrote:



Hi There Again!

When I received my first Iphone I purchased a blue tooth keyboard expecting to have issues with the onscreen keyboard.  After about a month to month and a half I found myself using the external keyboard less and less.  I do wish there was a blue tooth keyboard with a numberpad so when I wish to enter a string of numbers I could do it much easier.  Good Luck and Have A Good 1! de

<wohlggie@...><KF8LT><Jim Wohlgamuth>.

On 20-Feb-20 18:19, Victor wrote:
The one thing I have not mastered on touchscreens is using the on-screen keyboard well. However, I work around that by using braille screen input and dictation. But again, those who have dexterity issues and finger sensitivity issues may have trouble using a touchscreen.

Victor


On Feb 20, 2020, at 1:57 PM, Victor via Groups.Io <victorelawrence@...> wrote:


Hello again:

For those who have lost their eyesight later in life, I can totally understand why they might have trouble using touch screens. They may have a deck stair ready issues and finger sensitivity issues that those of us who have been blind since birth or since we were very young do not have. Therefore, I can certainly see the exceptions to what we are talking about. In these cases, maybe a flip phone would be best.

Victor


On Feb 20, 2020, at 12:37 PM, Jim Wohlgamuth via Groups.Io <wohlggie@...> wrote:



Hello Jerald!

Wonder what you base you conclusions on? I personally know quite a number of totally blind iPhone users and I personally have owned 6 or 7 touch screen phones and know of a fairly large number of other totally blind Androind users.  So wonder if you actually took any sort of poll -scientific or other wise to come up with your conclusions..? Yes, I had a small amount of sighted help in getting my first iphone setup and a bit more in getting my Android setup but using a touch screen device is far from being difficult for the folks that I know as well as don't know.

To answer your question as to how a totally blind or partially sighted person uses the touch screens, we use our fingers to navigate around the screen and locate the various items that we wish to activate and then double tap them to activate them.  Yes, my first touch screen was a bit of a challenge but now I would rather have a touch screen phone than a physical key board.  I do use blue tooth keyboards with my various touch screen devices but that is more out of convenience rather than necessity.  Of course I have always been a very inquisitive indevisual.  Just my thoughts! Catch Ya later! de

<wohlggie@...><KF8LT><Jim Wohlgamuth>. 

On 20-Feb-20 10:01, Gerald Levy via Groups.Io wrote:


I suspect that many "blind" consumers who use smart phones that are completely devoid of tactile buttons are not really "blind" at all, but visually impaired and retain some funtional vision to navigate around a touchscreen.  Those who are totally blind and purport to use a touchscreen smart phone probably had a lot of sighted help. Which is why smart phones with tactile keypads like the BlindShell and Smart Vision have been introduced. So I'm looking forward to hearing about the experiences of a totally blind consumer using the new Samsung smart flip phone.  

 


Gerald



On 2/20/2020 9:41 AM, Gene wrote:
Your statement about buttons is inaccurate based on discussions I've seen on this topic before.  Most smart phones already had very few buttons, and, as for the elimination of the home button on the I-Phone, while I can't speak from personal experience, I've seen enough comments on lists like this that the button's elimination doesn't mean blind people can't use the phone.  Evidently, the screen simulates the presence of a button by vibrating.  I'm not saying I definitely understand the situation and I await other comments but how many people have you seen say they stopped using an I-Phone because of elimination of the home button? 
 
You often state the worst case interpretation of situations.
 
Gene
----- Origial Message -----
Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2020 5:22 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?


According to Consumer Reports, this Samsung smart flip phone employs a new touchscreen technology that allows it to be thin and flexible enough to be folded in half like a wallet.  But in tests, it proved to be very fragile, and CR did not recommend it, especially in view of its very high price tag.  And it would probably not be a good choice for a blind consumer because even unfolded the touchscreen is relatively small and has no tactile buttons.  This seems to be a growing trend in smart phones: eliminating all physical buttons, making it virtually impossible for a blind consumer to use the phone without some sighted help or a lot of hands-on training.


Gerald



On 2/19/2020 9:20 PM, Mike B wrote:

Hi Lisa,
 
I heard about a phone like you're describing just the other day and I think they said that Samsung was the company  producing it.  From the way the guy was describing the way it works, it sounds like it'll be a really cool phone, but for $1300 it damn well otta be!  LOL  LOL  Check out the link below for a review.
 

 
 
Take care.  Mike.  Sent from my iBarstool.
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, February 19, 2020 5:02 PM
Subject: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

Hi, all.


My semi-techno-phobic dad is going to trade in his old flip phone soon.
He said he saw something on TV advertising a smart flip phone, he means
a phone with the same body style as a feature flip phone but with the
capability of a modern iPhone or Android Smart phone. I haven't heard
anything about this. Does anyone here have any info about this type of
phone? Brand, Wireless carrier, etc?


TIA


Lisa


--
Lisa Belville
missktlab1217@...




Re: Plextalk list problems help please?

Alex Stone
 

Vicky, I can’t answer your question, but how do I join the Plextalk list?


On 20 Feb 2020, at 23:48, Vicky Vaughan <vrvaughan63@...> wrote:



Hi List, I have been receiving plextalk messages since 2009, but when I sent a message just yesterday, I received a message saying that I was not subscribed to it.

 

I haven’t yet found my original welcome message from that list. So, I am not sure what to do.

 

What I had been wanting to talk with some members about was how with the old Plextalk Recorder I could record a music lesson and then go back over sections of it bit by bit so I could memorize each part.

 

Unfortunately, that machine has finally died, and I have been trying to find a new digital replacement.  I have tried with 2 that sounded good, but both have needed to be returned as unsatisfactory for this purpose.

 

While the Milestone 112 Ace will record long sessions and will rewind, it only will rewind all the way to the beginning. 

 

I want to know that plextalk Pocket will act like the old first Plextalk Recorder and let me rewind whatever section I am working upon, so I can memorize it before going on to the next section.

 

Do any of you know the answer?

 

I would be very grateful for any help!

 

Sincerely, Vicky Vaughan

 

 


locked Re: New Smart Flip Phone?

Jim Wohlgamuth
 

Hi There Again!

When I received my first Iphone I purchased a blue tooth keyboard expecting to have issues with the onscreen keyboard.  After about a month to month and a half I found myself using the external keyboard less and less.  I do wish there was a blue tooth keyboard with a numberpad so when I wish to enter a string of numbers I could do it much easier.  Good Luck and Have A Good 1! de

<wohlggie@...><KF8LT><Jim Wohlgamuth>.

On 20-Feb-20 18:19, Victor wrote:
The one thing I have not mastered on touchscreens is using the on-screen keyboard well. However, I work around that by using braille screen input and dictation. But again, those who have dexterity issues and finger sensitivity issues may have trouble using a touchscreen.

Victor


On Feb 20, 2020, at 1:57 PM, Victor via Groups.Io <victorelawrence@...> wrote:


Hello again:

For those who have lost their eyesight later in life, I can totally understand why they might have trouble using touch screens. They may have a deck stair ready issues and finger sensitivity issues that those of us who have been blind since birth or since we were very young do not have. Therefore, I can certainly see the exceptions to what we are talking about. In these cases, maybe a flip phone would be best.

Victor


On Feb 20, 2020, at 12:37 PM, Jim Wohlgamuth via Groups.Io <wohlggie@...> wrote:



Hello Jerald!

Wonder what you base you conclusions on? I personally know quite a number of totally blind iPhone users and I personally have owned 6 or 7 touch screen phones and know of a fairly large number of other totally blind Androind users.  So wonder if you actually took any sort of poll -scientific or other wise to come up with your conclusions..? Yes, I had a small amount of sighted help in getting my first iphone setup and a bit more in getting my Android setup but using a touch screen device is far from being difficult for the folks that I know as well as don't know.

To answer your question as to how a totally blind or partially sighted person uses the touch screens, we use our fingers to navigate around the screen and locate the various items that we wish to activate and then double tap them to activate them.  Yes, my first touch screen was a bit of a challenge but now I would rather have a touch screen phone than a physical key board.  I do use blue tooth keyboards with my various touch screen devices but that is more out of convenience rather than necessity.  Of course I have always been a very inquisitive indevisual.  Just my thoughts! Catch Ya later! de

<wohlggie@...><KF8LT><Jim Wohlgamuth>. 

On 20-Feb-20 10:01, Gerald Levy via Groups.Io wrote:


I suspect that many "blind" consumers who use smart phones that are completely devoid of tactile buttons are not really "blind" at all, but visually impaired and retain some funtional vision to navigate around a touchscreen.  Those who are totally blind and purport to use a touchscreen smart phone probably had a lot of sighted help. Which is why smart phones with tactile keypads like the BlindShell and Smart Vision have been introduced. So I'm looking forward to hearing about the experiences of a totally blind consumer using the new Samsung smart flip phone.  

 


Gerald



On 2/20/2020 9:41 AM, Gene wrote:
Your statement about buttons is inaccurate based on discussions I've seen on this topic before.  Most smart phones already had very few buttons, and, as for the elimination of the home button on the I-Phone, while I can't speak from personal experience, I've seen enough comments on lists like this that the button's elimination doesn't mean blind people can't use the phone.  Evidently, the screen simulates the presence of a button by vibrating.  I'm not saying I definitely understand the situation and I await other comments but how many people have you seen say they stopped using an I-Phone because of elimination of the home button? 
 
You often state the worst case interpretation of situations.
 
Gene
----- Origial Message -----
Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2020 5:22 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?


According to Consumer Reports, this Samsung smart flip phone employs a new touchscreen technology that allows it to be thin and flexible enough to be folded in half like a wallet.  But in tests, it proved to be very fragile, and CR did not recommend it, especially in view of its very high price tag.  And it would probably not be a good choice for a blind consumer because even unfolded the touchscreen is relatively small and has no tactile buttons.  This seems to be a growing trend in smart phones: eliminating all physical buttons, making it virtually impossible for a blind consumer to use the phone without some sighted help or a lot of hands-on training.


Gerald



On 2/19/2020 9:20 PM, Mike B wrote:

Hi Lisa,
 
I heard about a phone like you're describing just the other day and I think they said that Samsung was the company  producing it.  From the way the guy was describing the way it works, it sounds like it'll be a really cool phone, but for $1300 it damn well otta be!  LOL  LOL  Check out the link below for a review.
 

 
 
Take care.  Mike.  Sent from my iBarstool.
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, February 19, 2020 5:02 PM
Subject: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

Hi, all.


My semi-techno-phobic dad is going to trade in his old flip phone soon.
He said he saw something on TV advertising a smart flip phone, he means
a phone with the same body style as a feature flip phone but with the
capability of a modern iPhone or Android Smart phone. I haven't heard
anything about this. Does anyone here have any info about this type of
phone? Brand, Wireless carrier, etc?


TIA


Lisa


--
Lisa Belville
missktlab1217@...




Re: Pontes Media Downloaded Issue

Mike B
 


Here you go:
 
2 versions 3 & 3.5:
 
 
 
 

Take care.  Mike.  Sent from my iBarstool.

----- Original Message -----
From: Joe Orozco
Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2020 8:12 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Pontes Media Downloaded Issue

Does anyone have a link to download the older version? Thanks in advance.--Joe

On 2/19/20, Ron Canazzi <aa2vm@...> wrote:
> Hi George,
>
> I did reinstall the program and it now works fine.
>
>
> On 2/19/2020 9:57 AM, George McCoy wrote:
>> Ron,
>>
>>
>> Version 3.1.1 is, in many ways, a step backward. You get almost no
>> feedback about downloads in progress, so it's hard to know whether a
>> download is taking place or not.
>>
>> You might try the following:
>>
>> Open Pontes Media Downloader 3.1.1.
>>
>> Press ctrl plus u to update the download engine.
>>
>> Click the ok button when the update finishes and try your download again.
>>
>>
>> Hth,
>>
>> George
>>
>>
>> On 2/18/2020 4:54 PM, Ron Canazzi wrote:
>>> Hi Group,
>>>
>>> For the past day or so, I have been unable to get anything from
>>> Youtube to download using the latest version of Pontes Media
>>> Downloader. Has anyone else had this issue and if so, is there a
>>> solution?
>>>
>>> Thanks in advance for any help.
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
> --
> They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
> They ask: "How Happy are You?"
> I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"
>
>
>
>
>



Plextalk list problems help please?

Vicky Vaughan
 

Hi List, I have been receiving plextalk messages since 2009, but when I sent a message just yesterday, I received a message saying that I was not subscribed to it.

 

I haven’t yet found my original welcome message from that list. So, I am not sure what to do.

 

What I had been wanting to talk with some members about was how with the old Plextalk Recorder I could record a music lesson and then go back over sections of it bit by bit so I could memorize each part.

 

Unfortunately, that machine has finally died, and I have been trying to find a new digital replacement.  I have tried with 2 that sounded good, but both have needed to be returned as unsatisfactory for this purpose.

 

While the Milestone 112 Ace will record long sessions and will rewind, it only will rewind all the way to the beginning. 

 

I want to know that plextalk Pocket will act like the old first Plextalk Recorder and let me rewind whatever section I am working upon, so I can memorize it before going on to the next section.

 

Do any of you know the answer?

 

I would be very grateful for any help!

 

Sincerely, Vicky Vaughan

 

 


locked Re: New Smart Flip Phone?

Victor
 

The one thing I have not mastered on touchscreens is using the on-screen keyboard well. However, I work around that by using braille screen input and dictation. But again, those who have dexterity issues and finger sensitivity issues may have trouble using a touchscreen.

Victor


On Feb 20, 2020, at 1:57 PM, Victor via Groups.Io <victorelawrence@...> wrote:


Hello again:

For those who have lost their eyesight later in life, I can totally understand why they might have trouble using touch screens. They may have a deck stair ready issues and finger sensitivity issues that those of us who have been blind since birth or since we were very young do not have. Therefore, I can certainly see the exceptions to what we are talking about. In these cases, maybe a flip phone would be best.

Victor


On Feb 20, 2020, at 12:37 PM, Jim Wohlgamuth via Groups.Io <wohlggie@...> wrote:



Hello Jerald!

Wonder what you base you conclusions on? I personally know quite a number of totally blind iPhone users and I personally have owned 6 or 7 touch screen phones and know of a fairly large number of other totally blind Androind users.  So wonder if you actually took any sort of poll -scientific or other wise to come up with your conclusions..? Yes, I had a small amount of sighted help in getting my first iphone setup and a bit more in getting my Android setup but using a touch screen device is far from being difficult for the folks that I know as well as don't know.

To answer your question as to how a totally blind or partially sighted person uses the touch screens, we use our fingers to navigate around the screen and locate the various items that we wish to activate and then double tap them to activate them.  Yes, my first touch screen was a bit of a challenge but now I would rather have a touch screen phone than a physical key board.  I do use blue tooth keyboards with my various touch screen devices but that is more out of convenience rather than necessity.  Of course I have always been a very inquisitive indevisual.  Just my thoughts! Catch Ya later! de

<wohlggie@...><KF8LT><Jim Wohlgamuth>. 

On 20-Feb-20 10:01, Gerald Levy via Groups.Io wrote:


I suspect that many "blind" consumers who use smart phones that are completely devoid of tactile buttons are not really "blind" at all, but visually impaired and retain some funtional vision to navigate around a touchscreen.  Those who are totally blind and purport to use a touchscreen smart phone probably had a lot of sighted help. Which is why smart phones with tactile keypads like the BlindShell and Smart Vision have been introduced. So I'm looking forward to hearing about the experiences of a totally blind consumer using the new Samsung smart flip phone.  

 


Gerald



On 2/20/2020 9:41 AM, Gene wrote:
Your statement about buttons is inaccurate based on discussions I've seen on this topic before.  Most smart phones already had very few buttons, and, as for the elimination of the home button on the I-Phone, while I can't speak from personal experience, I've seen enough comments on lists like this that the button's elimination doesn't mean blind people can't use the phone.  Evidently, the screen simulates the presence of a button by vibrating.  I'm not saying I definitely understand the situation and I await other comments but how many people have you seen say they stopped using an I-Phone because of elimination of the home button? 
 
You often state the worst case interpretation of situations.
 
Gene
----- Origial Message -----
Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2020 5:22 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?


According to Consumer Reports, this Samsung smart flip phone employs a new touchscreen technology that allows it to be thin and flexible enough to be folded in half like a wallet.  But in tests, it proved to be very fragile, and CR did not recommend it, especially in view of its very high price tag.  And it would probably not be a good choice for a blind consumer because even unfolded the touchscreen is relatively small and has no tactile buttons.  This seems to be a growing trend in smart phones: eliminating all physical buttons, making it virtually impossible for a blind consumer to use the phone without some sighted help or a lot of hands-on training.


Gerald



On 2/19/2020 9:20 PM, Mike B wrote:

Hi Lisa,
 
I heard about a phone like you're describing just the other day and I think they said that Samsung was the company  producing it.  From the way the guy was describing the way it works, it sounds like it'll be a really cool phone, but for $1300 it damn well otta be!  LOL  LOL  Check out the link below for a review.
 

 
 
Take care.  Mike.  Sent from my iBarstool.
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, February 19, 2020 5:02 PM
Subject: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

Hi, all.


My semi-techno-phobic dad is going to trade in his old flip phone soon.
He said he saw something on TV advertising a smart flip phone, he means
a phone with the same body style as a feature flip phone but with the
capability of a modern iPhone or Android Smart phone. I haven't heard
anything about this. Does anyone here have any info about this type of
phone? Brand, Wireless carrier, etc?


TIA


Lisa


--
Lisa Belville
missktlab1217@...




Does anyone use "Music Match" in Win 10?

Dave
 

Hello,


A friend of mine is moving from his old XP System, to a New Win 10
unit.  He has a lot of old software he bought 15 or 20 years ago, and he
is hoping he would still be able to purchase the newer versions of the
same programs.


One he is hoping to upgrade is called, "Music Match".


Guess the latest Music Match program is available, but he would like to
know if any here could say if it works with the latest edition of Jaws?



And if no one here uses this program, are there any Music Player
programs that are Screen Reader Friendly?


And he doesn't mind purchasing a program if it will work with Jaws.


Thanks for any help with this,


Grumpy Dave


Re: Accessible Program for Remapping Keys on Laptop

Rich DeSteno
 

In my case, my new laptop did not have dedicated home, end, or applications keys, three keys that I use frequently.  You had to use the function key with the PageUp and PageDown keys to get the home and end actions.  It did have three music navigation keys, which I did not need.  I remapped those three keys to home, end, and applications keys.  They work perfectly and make using the computer so much easier.

Rich De Steno



On 2/20/2020 1:00 PM, Gene wrote:
Does the laptop have a numpad?  If so, you may not find a need to reassign anything.  If it doesn't have one, you can buy a USB numpad if you want to use one.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2020 11:28 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Accessible Program for Remapping Keys on Laptop

Hi.  I just got a laptop and haven't begun to fight, as it were.

But tell me, or us, if you wish, what you've renamed.   Inquiring minds
want to know.

The first thing I did was to have a friend turn off the mouse pad. 
Sorry, I did get that done by a sighted friend of mine. Could I have
done it myself?  Yes, but it was tricky for him, and he works I T day in
and day out every day.  Could I have done it on my own?  Probably; but
it would have been a time-waster.  And that is why I do sometimes have
things done for me.

I don't have to prove anything to myself. I can do many things I choose
not to do, because doing them would complicate life; and not doing them
does not make me less capable.

Sorry, but that's my take on this.

And to nail it down, I just love BeMyEyes.  It is so delightful to have
someone do a little reading or identifying. the other evening late, I
spoke to an american in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.  two nights later, I spoke
to a delightful lady in Iran.

Pen



On 2/20/2020 11:20 AM, Rich DeSteno wrote:
> I did indeed find this key-remapping program and I find it to be
> fantastic!  It is easy to use and works perfectly.
>
>
> On 2/20/2020 11:26 AM, Joe Orozco wrote:
>> I didn't see anyone respond to this email. Yes, there's a program
>> called Sharp Keys. In one column you pick the key you want to remap,
>> and in the second column you pick the key function you want to replace
>> it with. Make sure you set your screen reader to read all punctuation
>> at least temporarily so that you can hear the exact key names. Let me
>> know if you don't find it on Google.
>>
>> Joe
>>
>> On 2/7/20, Rich DeSteno <axcruncher@...> wrote:
>>> The subject says it all.  Are there any such programs?
>>>
>>> --
>>> Rich De Steno
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>



-- 
Rich De Steno


Re: using bluetooth on my laptop

Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
 

Troy, I'm not running Windows10 'cause I'm a silly nonconformist child!

Using Windows7, however, I can press the Windows-key once and I am placed in
the Search Box; there, I simply type "bluetooth" without the quotes, whack
<enter> and follow the resulting prompts. Alternately, I can launch the
Control Panel; once in there, I press the letter "b" a few times till it
lands on "Bluetooth" and I whack <enter> and go on from there.

I trust the same is possible with Windows10 but I won't find out until I get
there; G.O.K. what year that will be for me as I am a happy camper with what
I do now using the OS alluded to in this post.

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado


locked Re: New Smart Flip Phone?

Gene
 

I've never used a touch screen device but I would imagine that the same kind of muscle memory you develop when using a keyboard makes using such a device much easier than may seem at first as you continue to use it.  On my feature phone, with a keypad, I don't feel around when I want to up arrow or down arrow through apps or menu items.  I place a certain finger right on the right part of a control that functions as up arrow or another that functions as down arrow.  I am not assuming this is exactly like what a touch screen user does, but I would think it is similar to be a meaningful analogy. 
 
So, the foreign seeming nature of a touch screen may result largely from people not realizing how much more similar it is to working with a keyboard than would seem to be the case without such a framework.
 
These are my speculations, not based on working with a touch screen, but by extrapolating from a keypad to what logically seems the case regarding a touch screen.  I haven't wanted to go through the work of learning gestures and getting used to a touch screen.  I don't use a phone in a way that it would benefit me.  But I believe I have found a way to think about learning such a device that may make it less frightening to some or many people.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
From: Victor
Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2020 3:57 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

Hello again:

For those who have lost their eyesight later in life, I can totally understand why they might have trouble using touch screens. They may have a deck stair ready issues and finger sensitivity issues that those of us who have been blind since birth or since we were very young do not have. Therefore, I can certainly see the exceptions to what we are talking about. In these cases, maybe a flip phone would be best.

Victor


On Feb 20, 2020, at 12:37 PM, Jim Wohlgamuth via Groups.Io <wohlggie@...> wrote:



Hello Jerald!

Wonder what you base you conclusions on? I personally know quite a number of totally blind iPhone users and I personally have owned 6 or 7 touch screen phones and know of a fairly large number of other totally blind Androind users.  So wonder if you actually took any sort of poll -scientific or other wise to come up with your conclusions..? Yes, I had a small amount of sighted help in getting my first iphone setup and a bit more in getting my Android setup but using a touch screen device is far from being difficult for the folks that I know as well as don't know.

To answer your question as to how a totally blind or partially sighted person uses the touch screens, we use our fingers to navigate around the screen and locate the various items that we wish to activate and then double tap them to activate them.  Yes, my first touch screen was a bit of a challenge but now I would rather have a touch screen phone than a physical key board.  I do use blue tooth keyboards with my various touch screen devices but that is more out of convenience rather than necessity.  Of course I have always been a very inquisitive indevisual.  Just my thoughts! Catch Ya later! de

<wohlggie@...><KF8LT><Jim Wohlgamuth>. 

On 20-Feb-20 10:01, Gerald Levy via Groups.Io wrote:


I suspect that many "blind" consumers who use smart phones that are completely devoid of tactile buttons are not really "blind" at all, but visually impaired and retain some funtional vision to navigate around a touchscreen.  Those who are totally blind and purport to use a touchscreen smart phone probably had a lot of sighted help. Which is why smart phones with tactile keypads like the BlindShell and Smart Vision have been introduced. So I'm looking forward to hearing about the experiences of a totally blind consumer using the new Samsung smart flip phone.  



Gerald



On 2/20/2020 9:41 AM, Gene wrote:
Your statement about buttons is inaccurate based on discussions I've seen on this topic before.  Most smart phones already had very few buttons, and, as for the elimination of the home button on the I-Phone, while I can't speak from personal experience, I've seen enough comments on lists like this that the button's elimination doesn't mean blind people can't use the phone.  Evidently, the screen simulates the presence of a button by vibrating.  I'm not saying I definitely understand the situation and I await other comments but how many people have you seen say they stopped using an I-Phone because of elimination of the home button? 
 
You often state the worst case interpretation of situations.
 
Gene
----- Origial Message -----
Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2020 5:22 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?


According to Consumer Reports, this Samsung smart flip phone employs a new touchscreen technology that allows it to be thin and flexible enough to be folded in half like a wallet.  But in tests, it proved to be very fragile, and CR did not recommend it, especially in view of its very high price tag.  And it would probably not be a good choice for a blind consumer because even unfolded the touchscreen is relatively small and has no tactile buttons.  This seems to be a growing trend in smart phones: eliminating all physical buttons, making it virtually impossible for a blind consumer to use the phone without some sighted help or a lot of hands-on training.


Gerald



On 2/19/2020 9:20 PM, Mike B wrote:

Hi Lisa,
 
I heard about a phone like you're describing just the other day and I think they said that Samsung was the company  producing it.  From the way the guy was describing the way it works, it sounds like it'll be a really cool phone, but for $1300 it damn well otta be!  LOL  LOL  Check out the link below for a review.
 

 
 
Take care.  Mike.  Sent from my iBarstool.
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, February 19, 2020 5:02 PM
Subject: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

Hi, all.


My semi-techno-phobic dad is going to trade in his old flip phone soon.
He said he saw something on TV advertising a smart flip phone, he means
a phone with the same body style as a feature flip phone but with the
capability of a modern iPhone or Android Smart phone. I haven't heard
anything about this. Does anyone here have any info about this type of
phone? Brand, Wireless carrier, etc?


TIA


Lisa


--
Lisa Belville
missktlab1217@...




locked Re: New Smart Flip Phone?

Victor
 

Hello again:

For those who have lost their eyesight later in life, I can totally understand why they might have trouble using touch screens. They may have a deck stair ready issues and finger sensitivity issues that those of us who have been blind since birth or since we were very young do not have. Therefore, I can certainly see the exceptions to what we are talking about. In these cases, maybe a flip phone would be best.

Victor


On Feb 20, 2020, at 12:37 PM, Jim Wohlgamuth via Groups.Io <wohlggie@...> wrote:



Hello Jerald!

Wonder what you base you conclusions on? I personally know quite a number of totally blind iPhone users and I personally have owned 6 or 7 touch screen phones and know of a fairly large number of other totally blind Androind users.  So wonder if you actually took any sort of poll -scientific or other wise to come up with your conclusions..? Yes, I had a small amount of sighted help in getting my first iphone setup and a bit more in getting my Android setup but using a touch screen device is far from being difficult for the folks that I know as well as don't know.

To answer your question as to how a totally blind or partially sighted person uses the touch screens, we use our fingers to navigate around the screen and locate the various items that we wish to activate and then double tap them to activate them.  Yes, my first touch screen was a bit of a challenge but now I would rather have a touch screen phone than a physical key board.  I do use blue tooth keyboards with my various touch screen devices but that is more out of convenience rather than necessity.  Of course I have always been a very inquisitive indevisual.  Just my thoughts! Catch Ya later! de

<wohlggie@...><KF8LT><Jim Wohlgamuth>. 

On 20-Feb-20 10:01, Gerald Levy via Groups.Io wrote:


I suspect that many "blind" consumers who use smart phones that are completely devoid of tactile buttons are not really "blind" at all, but visually impaired and retain some funtional vision to navigate around a touchscreen.  Those who are totally blind and purport to use a touchscreen smart phone probably had a lot of sighted help. Which is why smart phones with tactile keypads like the BlindShell and Smart Vision have been introduced. So I'm looking forward to hearing about the experiences of a totally blind consumer using the new Samsung smart flip phone.  

 


Gerald



On 2/20/2020 9:41 AM, Gene wrote:
Your statement about buttons is inaccurate based on discussions I've seen on this topic before.  Most smart phones already had very few buttons, and, as for the elimination of the home button on the I-Phone, while I can't speak from personal experience, I've seen enough comments on lists like this that the button's elimination doesn't mean blind people can't use the phone.  Evidently, the screen simulates the presence of a button by vibrating.  I'm not saying I definitely understand the situation and I await other comments but how many people have you seen say they stopped using an I-Phone because of elimination of the home button? 
 
You often state the worst case interpretation of situations.
 
Gene
----- Origial Message -----
Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2020 5:22 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?


According to Consumer Reports, this Samsung smart flip phone employs a new touchscreen technology that allows it to be thin and flexible enough to be folded in half like a wallet.  But in tests, it proved to be very fragile, and CR did not recommend it, especially in view of its very high price tag.  And it would probably not be a good choice for a blind consumer because even unfolded the touchscreen is relatively small and has no tactile buttons.  This seems to be a growing trend in smart phones: eliminating all physical buttons, making it virtually impossible for a blind consumer to use the phone without some sighted help or a lot of hands-on training.


Gerald



On 2/19/2020 9:20 PM, Mike B wrote:

Hi Lisa,
 
I heard about a phone like you're describing just the other day and I think they said that Samsung was the company  producing it.  From the way the guy was describing the way it works, it sounds like it'll be a really cool phone, but for $1300 it damn well otta be!  LOL  LOL  Check out the link below for a review.
 

 
 
Take care.  Mike.  Sent from my iBarstool.
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, February 19, 2020 5:02 PM
Subject: [TechTalk] New Smart Flip Phone?

Hi, all.


My semi-techno-phobic dad is going to trade in his old flip phone soon.
He said he saw something on TV advertising a smart flip phone, he means
a phone with the same body style as a feature flip phone but with the
capability of a modern iPhone or Android Smart phone. I haven't heard
anything about this. Does anyone here have any info about this type of
phone? Brand, Wireless carrier, etc?


TIA


Lisa


--
Lisa Belville
missktlab1217@...



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