Date   

locked Re: Amazon: Am I the only one that feels this way?

John Dowling
 

Gerald,
I'm going to have to disagree with you there.
It's very easy to set up both an Amazon echo and google home. There respected apps on both ios and android are very accessible.
May I ask, what smartphones were you referring to when you said expensive and inaccessible.
Thanks,
John.

Once you replace negative thoughts with positive ones,  you'll start having positive results. -Willie Nelson

On Oct 19, 2020, at 6:46 AM, Gerald Levy via groups.io <bwaylimited@...> wrote:




The bottom line is that both the Amazon Echo and Google Home smart speakers were never really designed with accessibility in mind in the first place.  To set up a Google Home device, you need an expensive smart phone, which, itself may not be all that accessible.  The Amazon Echo can allegedly be set up by computer, but I have not seen any rports from blind consumers successfully   setting it up this way without sighted help. Large tech companies seem to be sliding backwards when it comes to accessibility.  For instance, PayPal, which claims that they are dedicated to making their web site accessible, no longer offers telephone customer support for disabled customers who encounter problems with the site. The blindness advocacy organizations have been uncharacteristically quiet about this issue.  Despite the problems you have described, they have never demonstrated any inclination to take legal action against these companies to force them to make their products, apps and customer support more accessible and blind-friendly.  Probably because their wimpy lawyers are afraid to challenge big bad Amazon and Google and the likes of Jeff Bezos and Eric Schmidt.  They are only interested in litigation if they see a big payday for themselves.  For instace, years ago when the NFB successfully sued Target to force them to make their web site more accessible, they pocketed $250K in punitive damages, and since then have not bothered to regularly inspect the Target site to ensure that it remains accessible.  In factthe Target site, at least from my perspective, has become progressively less accessible since thesettlement.  So we blind consumers really have nobody fighting on our behalf for better accessibility.

 

Gerald



On 10/19/2020 3:58 AM, Leedy Diane Bomar wrote:
I believe in inclusion. Amazon has improved significantly over the last ten years in this area. We can now use their hardward devices, including those with screens. But, they still have a long way to go as far as their app and web site are concerned.

My issue is a mindset and culture concern. We are still considered a "special" group. In other words, they still think that a separate website is what we SHOULD prefer, though very few use it. I believe that most of you would agree the using the app and website should be designed correctly so that it is equally accessible and usable for blind and sighted users. Separation is never equal.

So, why is it that when one calls the departments that provide customer service on using their hardware devices, which include accessible features such as voice view, the reps are not trained on those modes and want to send us to the Accessibility Department? Tonight when trying to set up my new Echo Show, the rep insisted that I could only use it by visually reading the screen. She was adamant about this fact, though I knew that wasn't the case. The standard help file they send out has no reference to using the device non-visually, not even a link! The Accessibility department is a misnomer, in fact, a rep from that department referred to it as "search and rescue" which may be a more apt title. They certainly don't have the tools to allow them to use their apps with voice on either iOS or Android! At best they can give descriptions of products and put them in your cart, which is often useful.

But, am I wrong in believing that the device reps should be trained in using those devices by a blind person? Shouldn't they even know that it is possible, and research how to set it up?

I had this issue with my first Kindle Fire, three years ago, and raised quite a ruckus about it, and hoped it had been resolved. But, it obiously has not. Tonight, I spoke with a supervisor who confirmed that the reps are not trained or even told that a blind person can make the screen be accessible by voice output. 

Am I the only one that is bothered by this attitude and its results? Am I the only one who writes to the Accessibility development team with complaints and suggestions. Several years ago, I even wrote to Jeff Bezos, and was contacted by a moron from their Executive team, who was supposedly in charge of "accessibility". He said things like: "they were really lucky to find me." "Why don't you just use the special access site?" "I used to have a blind friend" and worst of all was going to hire Freedom Scientific, who he had met at CSUN, to come in and give JAWS training to a group of developers while blindfolded! I asked him why they needed to be blindfolded, instead of just turning off the screen, and his reply was "but then, they could see the keyboard!" I pointed out that the developers needed training on coding for accessibility.more than learning JAWS, but he was a know-it-all. He refused to attend consumer conventions, saying that he had no time for that. I don't know if he is still there, but, he caused more problems than fixing anything.

Anyway, I am sorry that this seems like a useless rant, but, I would like input from others, of how to address this mindset problem. Is it just me, and an unrealistic belief in full inclusion, or, is it a problem for others?

Thanks,



locked Re: Amazon: Am I the only one that feels this way?

Gene
 

More attacks on blindness advocacy organizations, making unfounded accusations and generalizations. You benefit from the work of these organizations daily, whether you know it or not.

Also, your claim about requiring a Smart phone to set up Google Home has nothing to do with accessibility. If it is required of everyone, it is not a question of accessibility if the app is accessible. We already know smart phones are.

Accessibility was never intended to set a standard limiting how things are done as you imply it should. What about all the sighted people who find it difficult to afford a smart phone or don't want one?

Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: Gerald Levy via groups.io
Sent: Monday, October 19, 2020 5:46 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Amazon: Am I the only one that feels this way?






The bottom line is that both the Amazon Echo and Google Home smart speakers were never really designed with accessibility in mind in the first place. To set up a Google Home device, you need an expensive smart phone, which, itself may not be all that accessible. The Amazon Echo can allegedly be set up by computer, but I have not seen any rports from blind consumers successfully setting it up this way without sighted help. Large tech companies seem to be sliding backwards when it comes to accessibility. For instance, PayPal, which claims that they are dedicated to making their web site accessible, no longer offers telephone customer support for disabled customers who encounter problems with the site. The blindness advocacy organizations have been uncharacteristically quiet about this issue. Despite the problems you have described, they have never demonstrated any inclination to take legal action against these companies to force them to make their products, apps and customer support more accessible and blind-friendly. Probably because their wimpy lawyers are afraid to challenge big bad Amazon and Google and the likes of Jeff Bezos and Eric Schmidt. They are only interested in litigation if they see a big payday for themselves. For instace, years ago when the NFB successfully sued Target to force them to make their web site more accessible, they pocketed $250K in punitive damages, and since then have not bothered to regularly inspect the Target site to ensure that it remains accessible. In factthe Target site, at least from my perspective, has become progressively less accessible since thesettlement. So we blind consumers really have nobody fighting on our behalf for better accessibility.



Gerald








On 10/19/2020 3:58 AM, Leedy Diane Bomar wrote:

I believe in inclusion. Amazon has improved significantly over the last ten years in this area. We can now use their hardward devices, including those with screens. But, they still have a long way to go as far as their app and web site are concerned.

My issue is a mindset and culture concern. We are still considered a "special" group. In other words, they still think that a separate website is what we SHOULD prefer, though very few use it. I believe that most of you would agree the using the app and website should be designed correctly so that it is equally accessible and usable for blind and sighted users. Separation is never equal.

So, why is it that when one calls the departments that provide customer service on using their hardware devices, which include accessible features such as voice view, the reps are not trained on those modes and want to send us to the Accessibility Department? Tonight when trying to set up my new Echo Show, the rep insisted that I could only use it by visually reading the screen. She was adamant about this fact, though I knew that wasn't the case. The standard help file they send out has no reference to using the device non-visually, not even a link! The Accessibility department is a misnomer, in fact, a rep from that department referred to it as "search and rescue" which may be a more apt title. They certainly don't have the tools to allow them to use their apps with voice on either iOS or Android! At best they can give descriptions of products and put them in your cart, which is often useful.

But, am I wrong in believing that the device reps should be trained in using those devices by a blind person? Shouldn't they even know that it is possible, and research how to set it up?

I had this issue with my first Kindle Fire, three years ago, and raised quite a ruckus about it, and hoped it had been resolved. But, it obiously has not. Tonight, I spoke with a supervisor who confirmed that the reps are not trained or even told that a blind person can make the screen be accessible by voice output.

Am I the only one that is bothered by this attitude and its results? Am I the only one who writes to the Accessibility development team with complaints and suggestions. Several years ago, I even wrote to Jeff Bezos, and was contacted by a moron from their Executive team, who was supposedly in charge of "accessibility". He said things like: "they were really lucky to find me." "Why don't you just use the special access site?" "I used to have a blind friend" and worst of all was going to hire Freedom Scientific, who he had met at CSUN, to come in and give JAWS training to a group of developers while blindfolded! I asked him why they needed to be blindfolded, instead of just turning off the screen, and his reply was "but then, they could see the keyboard!" I pointed out that the developers needed training on coding for accessibility.more than learning JAWS, but he was a know-it-all. He refused to attend consumer conventions, saying that he had no time for that. I don't know if he is still there, but, he caused more problems than fixing anything.

Anyway, I am sorry that this seems like a useless rant, but, I would like input from others, of how to address this mindset problem. Is it just me, and an unrealistic belief in full inclusion, or, is it a problem for others?

Thanks,


locked Re: Amazon: Am I the only one that feels this way?

Gerald Levy
 


The bottom line is that both the Amazon Echo and Google Home smart speakers were never really designed with accessibility in mind in the first place.  To set up a Google Home device, you need an expensive smart phone, which, itself may not be all that accessible.  The Amazon Echo can allegedly be set up by computer, but I have not seen any rports from blind consumers successfully   setting it up this way without sighted help. Large tech companies seem to be sliding backwards when it comes to accessibility.  For instance, PayPal, which claims that they are dedicated to making their web site accessible, no longer offers telephone customer support for disabled customers who encounter problems with the site. The blindness advocacy organizations have been uncharacteristically quiet about this issue.  Despite the problems you have described, they have never demonstrated any inclination to take legal action against these companies to force them to make their products, apps and customer support more accessible and blind-friendly.  Probably because their wimpy lawyers are afraid to challenge big bad Amazon and Google and the likes of Jeff Bezos and Eric Schmidt.  They are only interested in litigation if they see a big payday for themselves.  For instace, years ago when the NFB successfully sued Target to force them to make their web site more accessible, they pocketed $250K in punitive damages, and since then have not bothered to regularly inspect the Target site to ensure that it remains accessible.  In factthe Target site, at least from my perspective, has become progressively less accessible since thesettlement.  So we blind consumers really have nobody fighting on our behalf for better accessibility.

 

Gerald



On 10/19/2020 3:58 AM, Leedy Diane Bomar wrote:
I believe in inclusion. Amazon has improved significantly over the last ten years in this area. We can now use their hardward devices, including those with screens. But, they still have a long way to go as far as their app and web site are concerned.

My issue is a mindset and culture concern. We are still considered a "special" group. In other words, they still think that a separate website is what we SHOULD prefer, though very few use it. I believe that most of you would agree the using the app and website should be designed correctly so that it is equally accessible and usable for blind and sighted users. Separation is never equal.

So, why is it that when one calls the departments that provide customer service on using their hardware devices, which include accessible features such as voice view, the reps are not trained on those modes and want to send us to the Accessibility Department? Tonight when trying to set up my new Echo Show, the rep insisted that I could only use it by visually reading the screen. She was adamant about this fact, though I knew that wasn't the case. The standard help file they send out has no reference to using the device non-visually, not even a link! The Accessibility department is a misnomer, in fact, a rep from that department referred to it as "search and rescue" which may be a more apt title. They certainly don't have the tools to allow them to use their apps with voice on either iOS or Android! At best they can give descriptions of products and put them in your cart, which is often useful.

But, am I wrong in believing that the device reps should be trained in using those devices by a blind person? Shouldn't they even know that it is possible, and research how to set it up?

I had this issue with my first Kindle Fire, three years ago, and raised quite a ruckus about it, and hoped it had been resolved. But, it obiously has not. Tonight, I spoke with a supervisor who confirmed that the reps are not trained or even told that a blind person can make the screen be accessible by voice output. 

Am I the only one that is bothered by this attitude and its results? Am I the only one who writes to the Accessibility development team with complaints and suggestions. Several years ago, I even wrote to Jeff Bezos, and was contacted by a moron from their Executive team, who was supposedly in charge of "accessibility". He said things like: "they were really lucky to find me." "Why don't you just use the special access site?" "I used to have a blind friend" and worst of all was going to hire Freedom Scientific, who he had met at CSUN, to come in and give JAWS training to a group of developers while blindfolded! I asked him why they needed to be blindfolded, instead of just turning off the screen, and his reply was "but then, they could see the keyboard!" I pointed out that the developers needed training on coding for accessibility.more than learning JAWS, but he was a know-it-all. He refused to attend consumer conventions, saying that he had no time for that. I don't know if he is still there, but, he caused more problems than fixing anything.

Anyway, I am sorry that this seems like a useless rant, but, I would like input from others, of how to address this mindset problem. Is it just me, and an unrealistic belief in full inclusion, or, is it a problem for others?

Thanks,



Re: NVDA is improved!

Quentin Christensen
 

Thanks Enes!  I'll be sure to keep that in mind - sometimes it is not even necessarily about processor speech, but for instance, there was a bug which annoyed a number of Realtek users particularly - which we've tweaked a few things and I believe fixed now in 2020.3.


On Mon, Oct 19, 2020 at 6:50 PM enes sarıbaş <enes.saribas@...> wrote:

Hello Quentin,

I would like to help with this if it ever happens  because  I am extremely unlucky that I have an i5 processor from 2014, which allows me to notice performance issues.


On 10/19/2020 2:47 AM, Quentin Christensen wrote:
Thanks everyone for your lovely comments.

Ron, out of curiosity, what does NVDA not work well with in Office?  There are a couple of isolated issues in PowerPoint and I'm not sure about Access, but otherwise, most of the issues in Office are issues with Office itself.

Enes,

Most times, when an issue takes a long time to be resolved, it is either because it is hard to reproduce, or hard to fix.  In some cases, problems only occur on particular hardware, or with certain other software (or versions of software) installed.  Unless an NVDA developer has that particular setup, it can sometimes be hard to diagnose.

NVDA does a number of things differently to other screenreaders.  In some cases, the end user wouldn't notice a difference .  In some cases, it has given NVDA an advantage - NVDA worked well with Windows 10 and the original Microsoft Edge, long before any other screenreader for instance.  In some cases, it goes the other way.  Something which a user might complain "just works" with another screenreader, simply can't be done in NVDA without a large amount of work.

In any case, I'm glad to hear it has improved in NVDA 2020.3!

Kind regards

Quentin.

On Mon, Oct 19, 2020 at 5:55 AM enes sarıbaş <enes.saribas@...> wrote:
Ok what I am about to say  might make some folks angry but. Why did it
take so long  to fix NVDA and microsoft word lag issues? This has been
an issue ever since  I used Microsoft office,  with NVDA, and my tickets
that I opened about it, I was told it was just my computer and not the
fault of NVDA. Do I need a xeon or threadripper processor to run
microsoft word with NVDA?
On 10/18/2020 6:31 AM, Ann Parsons wrote:
> Hi all,
>
> NVDA works great in Zoom, announces all the buttons and menus and so on.
>
> Ann P.
>







--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager



--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager


Re: NVDA is Growing up

Quentin Christensen
 

I don't have an answer to either, but I will follow up in the morning for you Enes.

Quentin.

On Mon, Oct 19, 2020 at 6:48 PM enes sarıbaş <enes.saribas@...> wrote:

Hello Quentin,

There are also two issues I noticed that are of notable annoyance that do not occur with jaws.

1. In finereader15, but also older versions, in the main window, when arrowing through the menu, for example, alt f for file, there is a multisecond delay that is not the case with Jaws.

2. in a website that brings up results as you type into an editable field, e.g, the instacart search, NVDA causes CPU spikes in its own process as well as firefox, and causes extreme lag.

It would be very good if these two problems could be fixed.

On 10/19/2020 12:14 AM, Quentin Christensen wrote:
Thanks Dave!

Out of curiosity, what is the one program you use all the time which Jaws works better with?  Just so I can make sure we have issues captured on our issue tracker.  (If you'd like, you are most welcome to record any issues directly on https://github.com/nvaccess/nvda/issues

Kind regards

Quentin.

On Sun, Oct 18, 2020 at 6:37 AM Dave <dlh007@...> wrote:
Yes, I too now use NVDA probably 80 percent of the time.  Still have
JAWS, and probably will have since the yearly upgrades are not super
expensive.


JAWS still reads one program I use all the time better than NVDA.


But to Write emails and do other things, I find NVDA works quite well.


I use Excel, and NVDA works better for me than JAWS.


Especially if you are creating Spread Sheets and writing Formulas.


NVDA has been on my System for a number of years now, mostly used in
case Window Eyes, or then Jaws might fail.  In the last year, I started
having issues with JAWS, and their Tech people couldn't figure out the
problem, so NVDA has become my Go To Screen Reader program for the daily
stuff.


I use the voice named David.


Grumpy Dave










--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager



--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager


locked Amazon: Am I the only one that feels this way?

Leedy Diane Bomar
 

I believe in inclusion. Amazon has improved significantly over the last ten years in this area. We can now use their hardward devices, including those with screens. But, they still have a long way to go as far as their app and web site are concerned.

My issue is a mindset and culture concern. We are still considered a "special" group. In other words, they still think that a separate website is what we SHOULD prefer, though very few use it. I believe that most of you would agree the using the app and website should be designed correctly so that it is equally accessible and usable for blind and sighted users. Separation is never equal.

So, why is it that when one calls the departments that provide customer service on using their hardware devices, which include accessible features such as voice view, the reps are not trained on those modes and want to send us to the Accessibility Department? Tonight when trying to set up my new Echo Show, the rep insisted that I could only use it by visually reading the screen. She was adamant about this fact, though I knew that wasn't the case. The standard help file they send out has no reference to using the device non-visually, not even a link! The Accessibility department is a misnomer, in fact, a rep from that department referred to it as "search and rescue" which may be a more apt title. They certainly don't have the tools to allow them to use their apps with voice on either iOS or Android! At best they can give descriptions of products and put them in your cart, which is often useful.

But, am I wrong in believing that the device reps should be trained in using those devices by a blind person? Shouldn't they even know that it is possible, and research how to set it up?

I had this issue with my first Kindle Fire, three years ago, and raised quite a ruckus about it, and hoped it had been resolved. But, it obiously has not. Tonight, I spoke with a supervisor who confirmed that the reps are not trained or even told that a blind person can make the screen be accessible by voice output. 

Am I the only one that is bothered by this attitude and its results? Am I the only one who writes to the Accessibility development team with complaints and suggestions. Several years ago, I even wrote to Jeff Bezos, and was contacted by a moron from their Executive team, who was supposedly in charge of "accessibility". He said things like: "they were really lucky to find me." "Why don't you just use the special access site?" "I used to have a blind friend" and worst of all was going to hire Freedom Scientific, who he had met at CSUN, to come in and give JAWS training to a group of developers while blindfolded! I asked him why they needed to be blindfolded, instead of just turning off the screen, and his reply was "but then, they could see the keyboard!" I pointed out that the developers needed training on coding for accessibility.more than learning JAWS, but he was a know-it-all. He refused to attend consumer conventions, saying that he had no time for that. I don't know if he is still there, but, he caused more problems than fixing anything.

Anyway, I am sorry that this seems like a useless rant, but, I would like input from others, of how to address this mindset problem. Is it just me, and an unrealistic belief in full inclusion, or, is it a problem for others?

Thanks,



Re: NVDA is improved!

enes sarıbaş
 

Hello Quentin,

I would like to help with this if it ever happens  because  I am extremely unlucky that I have an i5 processor from 2014, which allows me to notice performance issues.


On 10/19/2020 2:47 AM, Quentin Christensen wrote:
Thanks everyone for your lovely comments.

Ron, out of curiosity, what does NVDA not work well with in Office?  There are a couple of isolated issues in PowerPoint and I'm not sure about Access, but otherwise, most of the issues in Office are issues with Office itself.

Enes,

Most times, when an issue takes a long time to be resolved, it is either because it is hard to reproduce, or hard to fix.  In some cases, problems only occur on particular hardware, or with certain other software (or versions of software) installed.  Unless an NVDA developer has that particular setup, it can sometimes be hard to diagnose.

NVDA does a number of things differently to other screenreaders.  In some cases, the end user wouldn't notice a difference .  In some cases, it has given NVDA an advantage - NVDA worked well with Windows 10 and the original Microsoft Edge, long before any other screenreader for instance.  In some cases, it goes the other way.  Something which a user might complain "just works" with another screenreader, simply can't be done in NVDA without a large amount of work.

In any case, I'm glad to hear it has improved in NVDA 2020.3!

Kind regards

Quentin.

On Mon, Oct 19, 2020 at 5:55 AM enes sarıbaş <enes.saribas@...> wrote:
Ok what I am about to say  might make some folks angry but. Why did it
take so long  to fix NVDA and microsoft word lag issues? This has been
an issue ever since  I used Microsoft office,  with NVDA, and my tickets
that I opened about it, I was told it was just my computer and not the
fault of NVDA. Do I need a xeon or threadripper processor to run
microsoft word with NVDA?
On 10/18/2020 6:31 AM, Ann Parsons wrote:
> Hi all,
>
> NVDA works great in Zoom, announces all the buttons and menus and so on.
>
> Ann P.
>







--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager


Re: NVDA is Growing up

enes sarıbaş
 

Hello Quentin,

There are also two issues I noticed that are of notable annoyance that do not occur with jaws.

1. In finereader15, but also older versions, in the main window, when arrowing through the menu, for example, alt f for file, there is a multisecond delay that is not the case with Jaws.

2. in a website that brings up results as you type into an editable field, e.g, the instacart search, NVDA causes CPU spikes in its own process as well as firefox, and causes extreme lag.

It would be very good if these two problems could be fixed.

On 10/19/2020 12:14 AM, Quentin Christensen wrote:
Thanks Dave!

Out of curiosity, what is the one program you use all the time which Jaws works better with?  Just so I can make sure we have issues captured on our issue tracker.  (If you'd like, you are most welcome to record any issues directly on https://github.com/nvaccess/nvda/issues

Kind regards

Quentin.

On Sun, Oct 18, 2020 at 6:37 AM Dave <dlh007@...> wrote:
Yes, I too now use NVDA probably 80 percent of the time.  Still have
JAWS, and probably will have since the yearly upgrades are not super
expensive.


JAWS still reads one program I use all the time better than NVDA.


But to Write emails and do other things, I find NVDA works quite well.


I use Excel, and NVDA works better for me than JAWS.


Especially if you are creating Spread Sheets and writing Formulas.


NVDA has been on my System for a number of years now, mostly used in
case Window Eyes, or then Jaws might fail.  In the last year, I started
having issues with JAWS, and their Tech people couldn't figure out the
problem, so NVDA has become my Go To Screen Reader program for the daily
stuff.


I use the voice named David.


Grumpy Dave










--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager


Re: NVDA is improved!

Quentin Christensen
 

Thanks everyone for your lovely comments.

Ron, out of curiosity, what does NVDA not work well with in Office?  There are a couple of isolated issues in PowerPoint and I'm not sure about Access, but otherwise, most of the issues in Office are issues with Office itself.

Enes,

Most times, when an issue takes a long time to be resolved, it is either because it is hard to reproduce, or hard to fix.  In some cases, problems only occur on particular hardware, or with certain other software (or versions of software) installed.  Unless an NVDA developer has that particular setup, it can sometimes be hard to diagnose.

NVDA does a number of things differently to other screenreaders.  In some cases, the end user wouldn't notice a difference .  In some cases, it has given NVDA an advantage - NVDA worked well with Windows 10 and the original Microsoft Edge, long before any other screenreader for instance.  In some cases, it goes the other way.  Something which a user might complain "just works" with another screenreader, simply can't be done in NVDA without a large amount of work.

In any case, I'm glad to hear it has improved in NVDA 2020.3!

Kind regards

Quentin.

On Mon, Oct 19, 2020 at 5:55 AM enes sarıbaş <enes.saribas@...> wrote:
Ok what I am about to say  might make some folks angry but. Why did it
take so long  to fix NVDA and microsoft word lag issues? This has been
an issue ever since  I used Microsoft office,  with NVDA, and my tickets
that I opened about it, I was told it was just my computer and not the
fault of NVDA. Do I need a xeon or threadripper processor to run
microsoft word with NVDA?
On 10/18/2020 6:31 AM, Ann Parsons wrote:
> Hi all,
>
> NVDA works great in Zoom, announces all the buttons and menus and so on.
>
> Ann P.
>







--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager


Re: google home number

heather albright
 

Thanks mike, I gather they no longer have that toll free number anymore! I wish I had  made sure that I still had that number along with my numbers to apple and Microsoft! Cheers Heather

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Mike B
Sent: Sunday, October 18, 2020 11:56 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] google home number

 

Their email address is:

 


 

Take care and stay safe.  Mike.  Sent from my iBarstool.  Go dodgers & Rams!
Main's Law:  For every action there is an equal and opposite government program.

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Sunday, October 18, 2020 9:39 PM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] google home number

 

Contact the Google Disability Support Team
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com

 


Re: email question

Sharon S
 

Hi, I don't know about personally running out of breath with one of these
messages. However, I have had jaws sounding like he needs to take a breath
in one of those sort of messages. It is quite funny and you can almost hear
him taking a deep breath at the end of the message.

From Shaz.
Canberra, Australia.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ann
Parsons
Sent: Monday, 19 October 2020 2:26 AM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] email question

Hi all,

Yes, Siri is notorious for this kind of debacle. The messages that make me
laugh the most are the ones where the person dictating doesn't voice any
punctuation marks and you get a long email where in order to read it you
have to take a deep breath, and then, start speaking and hope that your air
lasts through the whole message. At the end you can actually hear yourself
gasping for breath. It's a complete hoot!

Ann P.

--
Ann K. Parsons
Portal Tutoring
EMAIL: akp@...
Author of The Demmies: http://www.dldbooks.com/annparsons/
Portal Tutoring web site: http://www.portaltutoring.info
Skype: Putertutor

"All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost."


Re: email question

lance allison
 

It was forward, my cat stepped on the phone and it sent so it was what it was lol


On Sun, Oct 18, 2020, 8:59 PM Pamela Dominguez <pammygirl99@...> wrote:
Yes, I know.  But we say it over and over again, and they still don't do it!
I also read my written messages before they go out.  I won't say there has
never been a mistake in mine, because that would be untrue.  Sometimes,
something slips by and I notice it when I am reading the message on the
list.  But I do my best to make sure it doesn't happen.  But it seems that
so many people just write, or speak a message and hit send.  Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Gene
Sent: Sunday, October 18, 2020 10:38 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] email question

people should rread their messages before sending, especially if using
dictation.  This isn't just true of list mail, but in general.  Dictation
isn't fool proof and it may be embarrassing to send an unread message with a
serious error.

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: Laz
Sent: Sunday, October 18, 2020 9:33 AM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] email question

My take is that perhaps he's using dictation and the speech
recognition misheard the word forward as board?

Stay safe,

Laz

On 10/17/20, Pamela Dominguez <pammygirl99@...> wrote:
> What do you mean board them to me?  Pam.
>
> From: lance allison
> Sent: Friday, October 16, 2020 4:26 PM
> To: main@techtalk.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [TechTalk] email question
>
> I or someone could just board them to you with your current email address
> you use
>
>
>
> On Fri, Oct 16, 2020, 1:58 PM Pamela Dominguez <pammygirl99@...>
> wrote:
>
>   I’d hope that would work, but I find that whenever you contact your
> service provider, it just turns into a war about whose fault it is: the
> list
> says it’s your service provider, and your service provider blames it on
> the
> list.  I hope she has better luck.  Pam.
>
>   From: Brian Vogel
>   Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2020 11:13 AM
>   To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
>   Subject: Re: [TechTalk] email question
>
>   Ask the group owner or moderator to send you a bounce probe message,
> then
> once you get it, make sure to activate the link at the end.  It's worth a
> shot.
>
>   If that doesn't do it, I'd check with your e-mail service provider to
> see
> if they're blocking whatever the domain name groups.google.com.  This
> would
> be very odd, but it's not beyond the realm of possibility.
>
>   --
>
>   Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041
>
>   Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they
> rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.
>
>           ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>           This email has been checked for viruses by AVG antivirus
> software.
>         www.avg.com
>
>
>
>
>
> --
> This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
> https://www.avg.com
>
>
>
>
>
>


--
Affordably priced Accessible Talking MP3 Player/book Reader, Victor
Reader Stream & Trek, blindshell Classic phone, Bluetooth devices, and
accessories
http://www.talkingmp3players.com/
Email: laz@...
Phone: 727-498-0121
Personal Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/laz.mesa
Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/Talkingmp3players?_rdr















Re: NVDA is Growing up

Quentin Christensen
 

Thanks Dave!

Out of curiosity, what is the one program you use all the time which Jaws works better with?  Just so I can make sure we have issues captured on our issue tracker.  (If you'd like, you are most welcome to record any issues directly on https://github.com/nvaccess/nvda/issues

Kind regards

Quentin.

On Sun, Oct 18, 2020 at 6:37 AM Dave <dlh007@...> wrote:
Yes, I too now use NVDA probably 80 percent of the time.  Still have
JAWS, and probably will have since the yearly upgrades are not super
expensive.


JAWS still reads one program I use all the time better than NVDA.


But to Write emails and do other things, I find NVDA works quite well.


I use Excel, and NVDA works better for me than JAWS.


Especially if you are creating Spread Sheets and writing Formulas.


NVDA has been on my System for a number of years now, mostly used in
case Window Eyes, or then Jaws might fail.  In the last year, I started
having issues with JAWS, and their Tech people couldn't figure out the
problem, so NVDA has become my Go To Screen Reader program for the daily
stuff.


I use the voice named David.


Grumpy Dave










--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager


Re: google home number

Mike B
 


Their email address is:
 

 
Take care and stay safe.  Mike.  Sent from my iBarstool.  Go dodgers & Rams!
Main's Law:  For every action there is an equal and opposite government program.

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, October 18, 2020 9:39 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] google home number

Contact the Google Disability Support Team
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


Re: google home number

 

Contact the Google Disability Support Team
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


google home number

heather albright
 

Hello, I seem to remember there was an accessible line for contacting google with, does anyone happen to have it? I am having trouble setting my google home speakers up on my knew network! Thanks, cheers Heather

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


Re: email question

Pamela Dominguez
 

Yes, I know. But we say it over and over again, and they still don't do it! I also read my written messages before they go out. I won't say there has never been a mistake in mine, because that would be untrue. Sometimes, something slips by and I notice it when I am reading the message on the list. But I do my best to make sure it doesn't happen. But it seems that so many people just write, or speak a message and hit send. Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Gene
Sent: Sunday, October 18, 2020 10:38 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] email question

people should rread their messages before sending, especially if using
dictation. This isn't just true of list mail, but in general. Dictation
isn't fool proof and it may be embarrassing to send an unread message with a
serious error.

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: Laz
Sent: Sunday, October 18, 2020 9:33 AM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] email question

My take is that perhaps he's using dictation and the speech
recognition misheard the word forward as board?

Stay safe,

Laz

On 10/17/20, Pamela Dominguez <pammygirl99@...> wrote:
What do you mean board them to me? Pam.

From: lance allison
Sent: Friday, October 16, 2020 4:26 PM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] email question

I or someone could just board them to you with your current email address
you use



On Fri, Oct 16, 2020, 1:58 PM Pamela Dominguez <pammygirl99@...>
wrote:

I’d hope that would work, but I find that whenever you contact your
service provider, it just turns into a war about whose fault it is: the list
says it’s your service provider, and your service provider blames it on the
list. I hope she has better luck. Pam.

From: Brian Vogel
Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2020 11:13 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] email question

Ask the group owner or moderator to send you a bounce probe message, then
once you get it, make sure to activate the link at the end. It's worth a
shot.

If that doesn't do it, I'd check with your e-mail service provider to see
if they're blocking whatever the domain name groups.google.com. This would
be very odd, but it's not beyond the realm of possibility.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they
rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com




------------------------------------------------------------------------------
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG antivirus
software.
www.avg.com





--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com






--
Affordably priced Accessible Talking MP3 Player/book Reader, Victor
Reader Stream & Trek, blindshell Classic phone, Bluetooth devices, and
accessories
http://www.talkingmp3players.com/
Email: laz@...
Phone: 727-498-0121
Personal Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/laz.mesa
Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/Talkingmp3players?_rdr


OE classic.

Jim Rawls
 

Hi all,

If you have OE classic, I have many questions for you, and if you can get back to me about this, I would appreciate it

I tried it a few years ago, when it was free, and spell check didn't work well etc.. So, here are my questions. How much does it cost?

Does it work with windows ten and jaws 2021beta?

Does spell check work well with it?

Is it hard to installs?

Where do you get it?

Is there any down side to the program?

Thangkas for your help on this. Jim.        


Re: Help with very unusual issue with no solution thus far

Rick Alfaro
 

Dave, I think you might be right on the money. This is the only thing that actually makes sense to me. Your suggestion would probably prove this out for sure so I may try this at some point. I just occurred to me that I should probably try using the MS generic driver instead of the OEM one to see if that makes any difference. Thanks much.

 

 

 

 

 

Warmest regards

 

Rick Alfaro

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave
Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2020 11:10 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Help with very unusual issue with no solution thus far

 

Hi Rick,

 

If the only thing that changed on the system was the monitor and the Video Drivers, then looks like you've got a incompatibility issue with either Jaws and those New Drivers, or the Clipboard Software and those Drivers. 

 

JAWS does have a special ability to intercept Text information set through most Drivers.  And NVDA, I believe, does not have this ability, and so can't read this text in the normal way text sent to the screen might be read by a Screen Reader. 

 

 

Sounds like a very nice monitor, but to check this out better, uninstall those new drivers, and disconnect the New Monitor.  Install the old Video Drivers, and re-hook up the old Monitor.  If you once again can read everything you need, then looks like you've got a compatibility issues with those new Drivers.

 

Grumpy Dave

 

On 10/15/2020 12:05 PM, Rick Alfaro wrote:

Will attempt to describe this issue as best I can. I’ve brought this up with JFW support but no joy there.

 

This is on a very fast Cyber Power gaming PC running at 3.9 GHZ with 16GB of memory. The application exhibiting the issue Clipmate from ThornSoft development. ClipMate is a clipboard manager. This app has worked flawlessly for years now but things changed when I installed a 43 inch 4k monitor to replace a smaller one I had via and HDMI port provided on my video card.

 

After installing the larger monitor, JFW stopped tracking the program context menus with the window in a restored state. Maximizing the window with tracking somewhat for listviews but made no difference with the context menus. This pretty much has made the program fairly useless. I’ve tried bringing down the screen resolution from 2160 to 1080p which was what my old monitor was set to but it made no difference. I also updated the video card drivers directly from the OEM’s web site again with no difference.

 

If anyone has any other ideas, I’m all ears and will gratefully give them a try.

 

 

 

 

 

Warmest regards

 

Rick Alfaro

 


Re: NVDA is improved!

enes sarıbaş
 

Ok what I am about to say  might make some folks angry but. Why did it take so long  to fix NVDA and microsoft word lag issues? This has been an issue ever since  I used Microsoft office,  with NVDA, and my tickets that I opened about it, I was told it was just my computer and not the fault of NVDA. Do I need a xeon or threadripper processor to run microsoft word with NVDA?

On 10/18/2020 6:31 AM, Ann Parsons wrote:
Hi all,

NVDA works great in Zoom, announces all the buttons and menus and so on.

Ann P.