Question about Android phones.


Carolyn Arnold
 

Crazy question, but I am wondering of all of the Android phones, which is the most blind friendly?

 

 

 


Michael Boyd <mike122061@...>
 

 

Well Carolyn,

 

It surely isn’t the Motorola Moto E 4Plus that I had decided to try. I finally got the phone activated and setup, but the Android was the most user unfriendly phone that I have ever used. I have returned it to my carrier for a full refund and now have my trusty old iPhone up and running again.

 

Michael

 

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Carolyn Arnold
Sent: Friday, April 27, 2018 4:16 PM
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Question about Android phones.

 

Crazy question, but I am wondering of all of the Android phones, which is the most blind friendly?

 

 

 


The Blind Computer Users Group
 

Samsung Galaxy phones. The physical home key adds some advantages.

Thanks

-------- Original message --------
From: Carolyn Arnold <4carolyna@...>
Date: 27/04/2018 10:16 p.m. (GMT+01:00)
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Question about Android phones.

Crazy question, but I am wondering of all of the Android phones, which is the most blind friendly?

 

 

 


Carolyn Arnold
 

Thank you, Michael, I had wondered about a Motorola. Lord,
they cost more, but I might end up going back to an iPhone.

I am having a problem with the flip phone that I have in
that I miss calls. I had it in my pocket all day yesterday.
I had an important family call at 11:30, when visiting with
lunch friends, never heard it ring or announce caller, nor
did I feel it vibrate in my pocket. Last night I checked the
settings, and it still was set to ring and vibrate. It has
happened before that I have missed some calls, but they
weren't important. So now, for that reason, I know that I do
need to do something about the phone. I don't know of any
other feature phone for GSM carriers. So, I am thinking
smart phone it has to be.

Best regards,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Michael Boyd
Sent: Friday, April 27, 2018 8:51 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Question about Android phones.



Well Carolyn,



It surely isn't the Motorola Moto E 4Plus that I had decided
to try. I finally got the phone activated and setup, but the
Android was the most user unfriendly phone that I have ever
used. I have returned it to my carrier for a full refund and
now have my trusty old iPhone up and running again.



Michael







From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On
Behalf Of Carolyn Arnold
Sent: Friday, April 27, 2018 4:16 PM
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Question about Android phones.



Crazy question, but I am wondering of all of the Android
phones, which is the most blind friendly?


Carolyn Arnold
 

Oh, thank you. I feel like this is a step forward to actually get an opinion with a reason behind it. That makes sense about the home button.

I have another question. When I had my tablet, I never was able to make OK Google work. It was real quiet, and we couldn't hear it for TalkBack; this was with Marshmallow. OK Google is something that I really want.

Best regards,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of The Blind Computer Users Group via Groups.Io
Sent: Saturday, April 28, 2018 7:39 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io; TechTalk@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Question about Android phones.

Samsung Galaxy phones. The physical home key adds some advantages.

Thanks

-------- Original message --------
From: Carolyn Arnold <4carolyna@windstream.net>
Date: 27/04/2018 10:16 p.m. (GMT+01:00)
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Question about Android phones.


Crazy question, but I am wondering of all of the Android phones, which is the most blind friendly?


Jim Wohlgamuth
 

Hi Carolyn!

This is a very subjective question although I certainly would agree the the Galaxy phones are good phones.  But, the best phone is still up to the individual  phone users.  Good Luck & Have A Good 1! de

<KF8LT><Jim>.


On 28-Apr-18 07:38, The Blind Computer Users Group via Groups.Io wrote:
Samsung Galaxy phones. The physical home key adds some advantages.

Thanks

-------- Original message --------
From: Carolyn Arnold <4carolyna@...>
Date: 27/04/2018 10:16 p.m. (GMT+01:00)
Subject: [TechTalk] Question about Android phones.

Crazy question, but I am wondering of all of the Android phones, which is the most blind friendly?

 

 

 



Carolyn Arnold
 

Thanks. I've been talking to a blind friend who has a newer iPhone than I had. She is saying she will help me. I might just spend more money and get one, not the newest. My son and cousin have Galaxies and both like them. They always sound good too.

Best regards,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jim Wohlgamuth
Sent: Saturday, April 28, 2018 8:58 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Question about Android phones.

Hi Carolyn!

This is a very subjective question although I certainly would agree the the Galaxy phones are good phones. But, the best phone is still up to the individual phone users. Good Luck & Have A Good 1! de

<KF8LT><Jim>.



On 28-Apr-18 07:38, The Blind Computer Users Group via Groups.Io wrote:


Samsung Galaxy phones. The physical home key adds some advantages.

Thanks

-------- Original message --------
From: Carolyn Arnold <4carolyna@windstream.net> <mailto:4carolyna@windstream.net>
Date: 27/04/2018 10:16 p.m. (GMT+01:00)
To: TechTalk@groups.io <mailto:TechTalk@groups.io>
Subject: [TechTalk] Question about Android phones.


Crazy question, but I am wondering of all of the Android phones, which is the most blind friendly?


Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
 

Sis Carolyn wrote in part:

"but I am wondering of all of the Android phones, which is the most blind
friendly?"

Opinions will be subjective! Whether it be Android or the iPhone, if it
fits snugly in your hands, I contend that that's your phone! These devices
ARE NOT DEVELOPED with the blind in mind; nevertheless, we learn to use them
for whatever catches our fancies. Your best bet, in my view, is to visit a
typical phone store and play with as many Android phones as you can lay your
pretty hands on and go home with the one you fall in love with. That's what
I did and that's why I'm making this recommendation.

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado


Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
 

The Blind Computer Users Group wrote:

"Samsung Galaxy phones. The physical home key adds some advantages."

Hmm, please be careful with that statement! The latest incarnation of the
Samsung S series NO LONGER have physical home keys. Example: The S8,
S8Plus, S9 and S9Plus DO NOT have PHYSICAL HOME KEYS!

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado


Nimer Jaber
 

Hello,

The best phone for each person is going to be different. I am a technology trainer, and find that it is best if an individual makes an informed decision about what works better for their individual needs. For some, that choice is neither an Android phone nor an iPhone. I worked with an individual who struggled to use the iPhone. The reason that he purchased the iPhone is because some individuals told him that it was the best thing ever, that it would allow him to do so much with it, and that everyone was getting one. While the arena of smart phones has allowed many individuals to do more than ever before thanks to apps and cameras and sensors, for some they just add a lot of confusion and unnecessary clutter and a definite unneeded monthly expense. This individual struggled, and was unable to check his voicemail. I then recommended that he check his voicemail using a landline phone that he already was using before. Because, for this individual, this was what worked for him.

Anyway, getting off my tangent, the best Android phone may not be an Android phone at all. Then again, it might be. Android is not a good fit for everyone, neither is iOS. In Android land, a person has to be adventurous. They have to be willing to explore, to discover, to try, and to experience frustration at times. Android is a very open platform, which is great for some, because it means that it is very customizeable and configurable and allows a person to do much more than is even possible on an iPhone. That same level of configurability means that Android phones tend to come in all kinds of flavors. Some are cheap, low-end devices, that may meet the needs of some because of budgetary reasons. Others are high-end, and contain every feature under the sun, but they may be too expensive, or they may be too confusing for an individual who just needs some basic options. Some are rugged and pretty much waterproof, and others are pretty and beautiful. Many are made in an inferior way in China or wherever with substandard parts. Accessibility varies, too. On Samsung devices, you get a different screen reader, with its own gestures, and some find it to be more similar to using an iPhone, because of the available gestures. Most Android devices use Talkback, although some modify parts of the system, like the Text-to-speech, so that only a few speech rate options are available. There is then a diferente between a device that gets updates directly from Google, and a device that gets updates very, very slowly. Some devices have fingerprint readers on the front, others on the back, and some don't have them at all. Some have Wireless charging, some have fast charging, some have both. Some have much faster LTE speeds than others. In Android land, it is really important to do research on points that are important to you. What would you like to do with a phone? How would these tasks be impacted by a different phone? Where do you use your phone? Are stereo speakers important to you? Do you need your device to support device-based encryption in an accessible way? Would you like your phone to get updates quickly?

On the other hand, many of these issues are removed when considering an iPhone. About the biggest thing to consider is whechen you want a physical home button, what features do you want out of your camera, and how much do you have to spend. This is because most iPhones are much more similar than different.

if you have additional questions about Android or anything else, please don't hesitate to ask or to reach out. Just know that there are many, many opinions out there, and none of them are the right one for you. What is right for you will be up to you to figure out, based on priorities that are important to you.

Thanks.

On Sat, Apr 28, 2018 at 8:41 PM Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc. <ukekearuaro@...> wrote:
The Blind Computer Users Group wrote:

"Samsung Galaxy phones. The physical home key adds some advantages."

Hmm, please be careful with that statement!  The latest incarnation of the
Samsung S series NO LONGER have physical home keys.  Example:  The S8,
S8Plus, S9 and S9Plus DO NOT have PHYSICAL HOME KEYS! 

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado





--
Cordially,

Nimer Jaber

My mission is to bring love and peace to everyone around me with all tools available to me.
My core values are integrity, innovation, loyalty, excellence, and 100% personal responsibility.

The message above is intended for the recipient to whom it was
addressed. If you believe that you are not the intended recipient,
please notify me via reply email and destroy all copies of this
correspondence. Action taken as a result of this email or its contents
by anyone other than the intended recipient(s) may result in civil or
criminal charges. I have checked this email and all corresponding
attachments for security threats. However, security of your machine is
up to you. Thanks.

Registered Linux User 529141.
This is a test of typing on this.http://counter.li.org/

To find out about a free and versatile screen reader for windows XP
and above, please click here:
http://www.nvda-project.org

You can follow @nimerjaber on Twitter for the latest technology news.

To contact me, you can reply to this email or you may call me at (218-606-0475) and I will do my best to respond to you promptly. Thank
you, and have a great day!


Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
 

It looks like the Voice Search Option is about to pass through the eye of
another needle. From the look of things, Google will be making greater use
of the Google Assistant for such functionality. As such, on some devices,
just issuing the command "OK Google" may not necessarily work as advertised
like before.


If you want a Samsung phone with a physical home button, your choices will
be the S5 through the S7 series; these are gone in newer incarnations of the
S Series! Also, be ready to tinker with having to use a touchscreen,
although you can always use a Bluetooth keyboard as well if desired.

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado


Pamela Dominguez
 

As far as fitting snugly in your hand, the iphones I've seen, you would have to have a monster-sized hand. And yes, they were iPhones, not ipads. Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
Sent: Saturday, April 28, 2018 10:37 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Question about Android phones.

Sis Carolyn wrote in part:

"but I am wondering of all of the Android phones, which is the most blind
friendly?"

Opinions will be subjective! Whether it be Android or the iPhone, if it
fits snugly in your hands, I contend that that's your phone! These devices
ARE NOT DEVELOPED with the blind in mind; nevertheless, we learn to use them
for whatever catches our fancies. Your best bet, in my view, is to visit a
typical phone store and play with as many Android phones as you can lay your
pretty hands on and go home with the one you fall in love with. That's what
I did and that's why I'm making this recommendation.

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado


Laz
 

There's also the iPhone SE which is human hand sized. The larger
phones are also common in Android land and are normally referred to as
phablets, a combination of the words phone and tablet as described
here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phablet

Laz

On 4/29/18, Pamela Dominguez <geodom@optonline.net> wrote:
As far as fitting snugly in your hand, the iphones I've seen, you would have

to have a monster-sized hand. And yes, they were iPhones, not ipads. Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
Sent: Saturday, April 28, 2018 10:37 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Question about Android phones.

Sis Carolyn wrote in part:

"but I am wondering of all of the Android phones, which is the most blind
friendly?"

Opinions will be subjective! Whether it be Android or the iPhone, if it
fits snugly in your hands, I contend that that's your phone! These devices
ARE NOT DEVELOPED with the blind in mind; nevertheless, we learn to use
them
for whatever catches our fancies. Your best bet, in my view, is to visit a
typical phone store and play with as many Android phones as you can lay
your
pretty hands on and go home with the one you fall in love with. That's
what
I did and that's why I'm making this recommendation.

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado














--
Affordably priced Accessible Talking MP3 Players, Accessible phones,
Bluetooth devices, and accessories
http://www.talkingmp3players.com/
Email: laz@talkingmp3players.com
Phone: 727-498-0121
Skype: lazmesa
Personal Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/laz.mesa
Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/Talkingmp3players?_rdr


Marie <magpie.mn@...>
 

Pam,
I think you are mistaken on this. I use an IPhone every day, have small hands and no problem holding the phone. when I very first put my hands on the larger phone after using a 5S, I thought it too large. But I very quickly got used to it and when I tried to go to an SE, I found that I was able to use the larger phone much easier and it felt comfortable in my hand.
Marie

-----Original Message-----
From: Pamela Dominguez
Sent: Sunday, April 29, 2018 6:12 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Question about Android phones.

As far as fitting snugly in your hand, the iphones I've seen, you would have
to have a monster-sized hand. And yes, they were iPhones, not ipads. Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
Sent: Saturday, April 28, 2018 10:37 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Question about Android phones.

Sis Carolyn wrote in part:

"but I am wondering of all of the Android phones, which is the most blind
friendly?"

Opinions will be subjective! Whether it be Android or the iPhone, if it
fits snugly in your hands, I contend that that's your phone! These devices
ARE NOT DEVELOPED with the blind in mind; nevertheless, we learn to use them
for whatever catches our fancies. Your best bet, in my view, is to visit a
typical phone store and play with as many Android phones as you can lay your
pretty hands on and go home with the one you fall in love with. That's what
I did and that's why I'm making this recommendation.

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado


Pamela Dominguez
 

Well, all I know is, my real estate broker told me to hold her iphone to talk to somebody on it. I took it and it felt like a package of four by six index cards. And she said it was an iphone. I couldn't get my hands around it. Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Marie
Sent: Sunday, April 29, 2018 11:32 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Question about Android phones.

Pam,
I think you are mistaken on this. I use an IPhone every day, have small
hands and no problem holding the phone. when I very first put my hands on
the larger phone after using a 5S, I thought it too large. But I very
quickly got used to it and when I tried to go to an SE, I found that I was
able to use the larger phone much easier and it felt comfortable in my hand.
Marie


-----Original Message-----
From: Pamela Dominguez
Sent: Sunday, April 29, 2018 6:12 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Question about Android phones.

As far as fitting snugly in your hand, the iphones I've seen, you would have
to have a monster-sized hand. And yes, they were iPhones, not ipads. Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
Sent: Saturday, April 28, 2018 10:37 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Question about Android phones.

Sis Carolyn wrote in part:

"but I am wondering of all of the Android phones, which is the most blind
friendly?"

Opinions will be subjective! Whether it be Android or the iPhone, if it
fits snugly in your hands, I contend that that's your phone! These devices
ARE NOT DEVELOPED with the blind in mind; nevertheless, we learn to use them
for whatever catches our fancies. Your best bet, in my view, is to visit a
typical phone store and play with as many Android phones as you can lay your
pretty hands on and go home with the one you fall in love with. That's what
I did and that's why I'm making this recommendation.

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado


Carolyn Arnold
 

Going to the phone store does sound like a good idea. I am
kind of leaning toward an iPhone SE. What do you all think
of it in comparison to a 7?

Best regards,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Olusegun --
Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
Sent: Saturday, April 28, 2018 10:38 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Question about Android phones.

Sis Carolyn wrote in part:

"but I am wondering of all of the Android phones, which is
the most blind friendly?"

Opinions will be subjective! Whether it be Android or the
iPhone, if it fits snugly in your hands, I contend that
that's your phone! These devices ARE NOT DEVELOPED with the
blind in mind; nevertheless, we learn to use them for
whatever catches our fancies. Your best bet, in my view, is
to visit a typical phone store and play with as many Android
phones as you can lay your pretty hands on and go home with
the one you fall in love with. That's what I did and that's
why I'm making this recommendation.

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado


Carolyn Arnold
 

Thanks. Phone priorities to me are:

1. Phone, of course. Easy accessibility to contacts.
2. Access to time, battery level and signal status.
3.Siri or OK Google to find out information.
4. Easy texting.
5Reminder function.
6. Clock/alarm.
7. Calendar.
8. Sync with my email.

Best regards,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Nimer Jaber
Sent: Saturday, April 28, 2018 11:08 PM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Question about Android phones.

Hello,

The best phone for each person is going to be different. I am a technology trainer, and find that it is best if an individual makes an informed decision about what works better for their individual needs. For some, that choice is neither an Android phone nor an iPhone. I worked with an individual who struggled to use the iPhone. The reason that he purchased the iPhone is because some individuals told him that it was the best thing ever, that it would allow him to do so much with it, and that everyone was getting one. While the arena of smart phones has allowed many individuals to do more than ever before thanks to apps and cameras and sensors, for some they just add a lot of confusion and unnecessary clutter and a definite unneeded monthly expense. This individual struggled, and was unable to check his voicemail. I then recommended that he check his voicemail using a landline phone that he already was using before. Because, for this individual, this was what worked for him.

Anyway, getting off my tangent, the best Android phone may not be an Android phone at all. Then again, it might be. Android is not a good fit for everyone, neither is iOS. In Android land, a person has to be adventurous. They have to be willing to explore, to discover, to try, and to experience frustration at times. Android is a very open platform, which is great for some, because it means that it is very customizeable and configurable and allows a person to do much more than is even possible on an iPhone. That same level of configurability means that Android phones tend to come in all kinds of flavors. Some are cheap, low-end devices, that may meet the needs of some because of budgetary reasons. Others are high-end, and contain every feature under the sun, but they may be too expensive, or they may be too confusing for an individual who just needs some basic options. Some are rugged and pretty much waterproof, and others are pretty and beautiful. Many are made in an inferior way in China or wherever with substandard parts. Accessibility varies, too. On Samsung devices, you get a different screen reader, with its own gestures, and some find it to be more similar to using an iPhone, because of the available gestures. Most Android devices use Talkback, although some modify parts of the system, like the Text-to-speech, so that only a few speech rate options are available. There is then a diferente between a device that gets updates directly from Google, and a device that gets updates very, very slowly. Some devices have fingerprint readers on the front, others on the back, and some don't have them at all. Some have Wireless charging, some have fast charging, some have both. Some have much faster LTE speeds than others. In Android land, it is really important to do research on points that are important to you. What would you like to do with a phone? How would these tasks be impacted by a different phone? Where do you use your phone? Are stereo speakers important to you? Do you need your device to support device-based encryption in an accessible way? Would you like your phone to get updates quickly?

On the other hand, many of these issues are removed when considering an iPhone. About the biggest thing to consider is whechen you want a physical home button, what features do you want out of your camera, and how much do you have to spend. This is because most iPhones are much more similar than different.

if you have additional questions about Android or anything else, please don't hesitate to ask or to reach out. Just know that there are many, many opinions out there, and none of them are the right one for you. What is right for you will be up to you to figure out, based on priorities that are important to you.

Thanks.

On Sat, Apr 28, 2018 at 8:41 PM Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc. <ukekearuaro@valtdnet.com <mailto:ukekearuaro@valtdnet.com> > wrote:


The Blind Computer Users Group wrote:

"Samsung Galaxy phones. The physical home key adds some advantages."

Hmm, please be careful with that statement! The latest incarnation of the
Samsung S series NO LONGER have physical home keys. Example: The S8,
S8Plus, S9 and S9Plus DO NOT have PHYSICAL HOME KEYS!

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado







--

Cordially,

Nimer Jaber

My mission is to bring love and peace to everyone around me with all tools available to me.
My core values are integrity, innovation, loyalty, excellence, and 100% personal responsibility.

The message above is intended for the recipient to whom it was addressed. If you believe that you are not the intended recipient, please notify me via reply email and destroy all copies of this correspondence. Action taken as a result of this email or its contents by anyone other than the intended recipient(s) may result in civil or criminal charges. I have checked this email and all corresponding attachments for security threats. However, security of your machine is up to you. Thanks.

Registered Linux User 529141.
This is a test of typing on this.http://counter.li.org/ <http://counter.li.org/>

To find out about a free and versatile screen reader for windows XP and above, please click here:
http://www.nvda-project.org

You can follow @nimerjaber on Twitter for the latest technology news.

To contact me, you can reply to this email or you may call me at (218-606-0475) and I will do my best to respond to you promptly. Thank you, and have a great day!


Carolyn Arnold
 

We had a hard enough time with OK Google on my tablet.
Neither Jim nor I could hear him. I believe he was a he.

Best regards,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Olusegun --
Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
Sent: Saturday, April 28, 2018 11:10 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Question about Android phones.

It looks like the Voice Search Option is about to pass
through the eye of another needle. From the look of things,
Google will be making greater use of the Google Assistant
for such functionality. As such, on some devices, just
issuing the command "OK Google" may not necessarily work as
advertised like before.


If you want a Samsung phone with a physical home button,
your choices will be the S5 through the S7 series; these are
gone in newer incarnations of the S Series! Also, be ready
to tinker with having to use a touchscreen, although you can
always use a Bluetooth keyboard as well if desired.

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado


Carolyn Arnold
 

Right now, the SE is sounding interesting.

Best regards,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Laz
Sent: Sunday, April 29, 2018 10:20 AM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Question about Android phones.

There's also the iPhone SE which is human hand sized. The larger phones are also common in Android land and are normally referred to as phablets, a combination of the words phone and tablet as described
here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phablet

Laz

On 4/29/18, Pamela Dominguez <geodom@optonline.net> wrote:
As far as fitting snugly in your hand, the iphones I've seen, you
would have

to have a monster-sized hand. And yes, they were iPhones, not ipads. Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
Sent: Saturday, April 28, 2018 10:37 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Question about Android phones.

Sis Carolyn wrote in part:

"but I am wondering of all of the Android phones, which is the most
blind friendly?"

Opinions will be subjective! Whether it be Android or the iPhone, if
it fits snugly in your hands, I contend that that's your phone! These
devices ARE NOT DEVELOPED with the blind in mind; nevertheless, we
learn to use them for whatever catches our fancies. Your best bet, in
my view, is to visit a typical phone store and play with as many
Android phones as you can lay your pretty hands on and go home with
the one you fall in love with. That's what I did and that's why I'm
making this recommendation.

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado















--
Affordably priced Accessible Talking MP3 Players, Accessible phones, Bluetooth devices, and accessories http://www.talkingmp3players.com/
Email: laz@talkingmp3players.com
Phone: 727-498-0121
Skype: lazmesa
Personal Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/laz.mesa
Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/Talkingmp3players?_rdr


Janet
 

Hi Carolyn,
It is really just so hard to pick a smart phone today, as they have so many out there. I went with the Apple phone for the simple reason is Apple does work with voiceover to make it as accessible for all blind people, and It works just fine for me. I think you might be better off if you join an iPhone list, as maybe an Android list so you can ask all the questions you need to know. I don't know anything about Android phones, so I can't even comment on them, but I can comment on the iPhone and voice over in which is one hundred percent accessible for blind people, although, Android might be just as accessible, I don't know. My older brother has the SE iPhone, and he absolutely loves that phone, and he won't part with it for nothing! According to him, this SE phone is the best phone that has ever came out. He doesn't have much patients to work with the phone, but he has Siri to do everything he wants the phone to do. For example, he tells Siri who to call, he tells Siri to text a message, he tells Siri to send an email, he tells Siri to set his alarm, He tells Siri open Safari which is the browser, he tells Siri to add appointment to his calendar, he tells Siri to create a reminder, he tells Siri to create a note, he tells Siri to open his play list, he tells Siri to open the news app, etc. I could go on and on. Although, I also know several people who have the iPhone 7, and they say it is the best, and they wouldn't part with it for nothing! I did at one time seriously considered buying the iPhone SE because I liked the size though. Some of my older Nieces have the Android phones, and they say they wouldn't pay the price for the Apple phones, so they stay with the Android, but they are also happy with them. A lot of people say you have to really hold the phone in your hands to get the snugly feeling though. I still have my iPhone 6, and I have a love hate relationship with it meaning I love it when it works, and I hate it when it doesn't work, but it is like a computer, meaning somethings happen for no rhyme or reason! I call my phone carrier a few days ago, and they had a special if one bought an iPhone 8, one would also get a free one, aw damn, I should have jumped at the chance! So there is a lot for you to think about before buying either phone, because they all cost money. It also depends a lot on what you will be doing with your phone. I will soon be buying another phone myself, and I am considering either 7 or 8 iPhone, as well as maybe the new iPad second generation. I might just replace my batteries in my old iPhone 6, and keep it as a backup, so a lot to think about myself! I do know of a good Apple list you could join if you are interested, you could let me know. This list I would refer you to is just all about Apple devices, and they can answer all your questions, and they are very nice and tech savvy, and they have a wonderful owner to that list.
Happy searching, Smile! !

Janet

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Carolyn Arnold
Sent: Sunday, April 29, 2018 3:16 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Question about Android phones.

Going to the phone store does sound like a good idea. I am
kind of leaning toward an iPhone SE. What do you all think
of it in comparison to a 7?

Best regards,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Olusegun --
Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
Sent: Saturday, April 28, 2018 10:38 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Question about Android phones.

Sis Carolyn wrote in part:

"but I am wondering of all of the Android phones, which is
the most blind friendly?"

Opinions will be subjective! Whether it be Android or the
iPhone, if it fits snugly in your hands, I contend that
that's your phone! These devices ARE NOT DEVELOPED with the
blind in mind; nevertheless, we learn to use them for
whatever catches our fancies. Your best bet, in my view, is
to visit a typical phone store and play with as many Android
phones as you can lay your pretty hands on and go home with
the one you fall in love with. That's what I did and that's
why I'm making this recommendation.

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado