Topics

FreedomScientific Vs. NvAccess


Armando <armando.l.vias@...>
 

Hi. I really like NvAccess. They have a fre screen reader. You can update the screen reader to the latest version for free. On the other hand, why does FreedomScientific make blind people to pay thousands of dollars on JAWS? It is so high and so expensive. I still like Freedom Scientific, but I wish JAWS was free.

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Gene
 

Screen-readers you pay for are expensive because the customer base is so small.  If it were a large customer base, they would cost what you would expect complex programs to sell for in the general market.  As far as NVDA goes, NVDA gets grants from various companies and donations from users.  But one of the main reasons NVDA is free is because the main developer doesn't pay himself anywhere near what he would earn if he worked for an employer.  I've seen it stated on the NVDA users' list that he pays himself somewhere around minimum wage.  So one way or another, the price is high.  It's just that when it comes to NVDA, you don't see the price.  But those who work on NVDA for pay and those who do so as volunteers pay the price one way or another, in low wages or in donating time.  People love to castigate companies that charge for such products.  It doesn't seem to bother them that NVDA is free because people pay the price voluntarily.  That's there choice but it shouldn't be the case, as a matter of principle, that the people who work for pay on NVDA are paid so little. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, November 18, 2015 8:36 PM
Subject: [TechTalk] FreedomScientific Vs. NvAccess

Hi.  I really like NvAccess.  They have a fre screen reader.  You
can update the screen reader to the latest version for free.  On
the other hand, why does FreedomScientific make blind people to
pay thousands of dollars on JAWS? It is so high and so expensive. 
I still like Freedom Scientific, but I wish JAWS was free.

--
Armando Vias: Admin/owner of the TechTips Mailing List
To join the list, send an email to
techtips+subscribe@groups.io with the subject "Subscribe."
You can talk about anything technology on this list.



Ron Canazzi
 

Hi Group,

Of course there is truth in what Gene says, which is why everyone using NVDA should at least try to make a small contribution every year. Even 10 or 20 dollars a year from each user (at last report there are several hundred thousand users worldwide) would bring in an additional 20 or 30 million dollars. I know many blind people (myself included) don't have a huge amount of money, but even 10 or 20 dollars yearly helps a little bit.

On 11/18/2015 10:33 PM, Gene wrote:
Screen-readers you pay for are expensive because the customer base is so small. If it were a large customer base, they would cost what you would expect complex programs to sell for in the general market. As far as NVDA goes, NVDA gets grants from various companies and donations from users. But one of the main reasons NVDA is free is because the main developer doesn't pay himself anywhere near what he would earn if he worked for an employer. I've seen it stated on the NVDA users' list that he pays himself somewhere around minimum wage. So one way or another, the price is high. It's just that when it comes to NVDA, you don't see the price. But those who work on NVDA for pay and those who do so as volunteers pay the price one way or another, in low wages or in donating time. People love to castigate companies that charge for such products. It doesn't seem to bother them that NVDA is free because people pay the price voluntarily. That's there choice but it shouldn't be the case, as a matter of principle, that the people who work for pay on NVDA are paid so little.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Armando Vias
Sent: Wednesday, November 18, 2015 8:36 PM
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] FreedomScientific Vs. NvAccess


Hi. I really like NvAccess. They have a fre screen reader. You
can update the screen reader to the latest version for free. On
the other hand, why does FreedomScientific make blind people to
pay thousands of dollars on JAWS? It is so high and so expensive.
I still like Freedom Scientific, but I wish JAWS was free.

--
Armando Vias: Admin/owner of the TechTips Mailing List
To join the list, send an email to
techtips+subscribe@groups.io with the subject "Subscribe."
You can talk about anything technology on this list.



Victor
 

Hi all:

I agree that more people should donate to NVDA. Every little bit helps.

I definitely believe that Freedom Scientific is at least a little
greedy. My Vocational Rehabilitation agency bought JAWS 11 for me
just a month before JAWS 12 was released. I developed a kind of
friendship with one of the sales representatives at Freedom
Scientific. He told me he was surprised that the company didn't just
sell my VR agency JAWS 12 since the release was only a month away. If
I heard him right, the employees at Freedom Scientific don't even get
a discount on company's products. Even they have to pay full price if
they want their products for personal use.

Go with NVDA or, install Linux or buy a Mac. That's my advice. I
love JAWS, but it's very expensive.

VictorOn 11/18/15, Ron Canazzi <aa2vm@roadrunner.com> wrote:

Hi Group,

Of course there is truth in what Gene says, which is why everyone using
NVDA should at least try to make a small contribution every year. Even
10 or 20 dollars a year from each user (at last report there are several
hundred thousand users worldwide) would bring in an additional 20 or 30
million dollars. I know many blind people (myself included) don't have
a huge amount of money, but even 10 or 20 dollars yearly helps a little
bit.


On 11/18/2015 10:33 PM, Gene wrote:
Screen-readers you pay for are expensive because the customer base is so
small. If it were a large customer base, they would cost what you would
expect complex programs to sell for in the general market. As far as NVDA
goes, NVDA gets grants from various companies and donations from users.
But one of the main reasons NVDA is free is because the main developer
doesn't pay himself anywhere near what he would earn if he worked for an
employer. I've seen it stated on the NVDA users' list that he pays
himself somewhere around minimum wage. So one way or another, the price
is high. It's just that when it comes to NVDA, you don't see the price.
But those who work on NVDA for pay and those who do so as volunteers pay
the price one way or another, in low wages or in donating time. People
love to castigate companies that charge for such products. It doesn't
seem to bother them that NVDA is free because people pay the price
voluntarily. That's there choice but it shouldn't be the case, as a
matter of principle, that the people who work for pay on NVDA are paid so
little.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Armando Vias
Sent: Wednesday, November 18, 2015 8:36 PM
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] FreedomScientific Vs. NvAccess


Hi. I really like NvAccess. They have a fre screen reader. You
can update the screen reader to the latest version for free. On
the other hand, why does FreedomScientific make blind people to
pay thousands of dollars on JAWS? It is so high and so expensive.
I still like Freedom Scientific, but I wish JAWS was free.

--
Armando Vias: Admin/owner of the TechTips Mailing List
To join the list, send an email to
techtips+subscribe@groups.io with the subject "Subscribe."
You can talk about anything technology on this list.







Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
 

Hello Everyone:

 

I believe in what the Bible says—that is, every laborer deserves a wage and I just paraphrased so I don’t get in trouble.  No, I’m not a preacher or into religion, but I’m not an atheist!

 

For this reason, I do not want Jaws to be a FREE product!  However, I think it’s about time to have it sold in the open market so I can go to WalMart or Bestbuy to pick one up if I so desire.  With Freedom Scientific now owned by venture capitalists, there are enough injection of capital for its product to become available in the mainstream market.  I’ve always believed that if developers of screen readers COULD MAKE THEIR COMPANIES go public and sell stocks like Facebook and Google do, they’ll raise enough capital to enable them place their products on other public shelves.  It has never been tried, so the notion that the market is small is, in my view, a tongue-in-cheek attempt to keep on defrauding the blind since Uncle Sam or his cousins elsewhere lift the burden of providing this product on their shoulders!

 

Screen readers are not only the priciest software in the marketplace.  Try embroidery software and you’ll kill more mocking birds with a sling!  In my business, the price of software needed to run the business range from $5,000 to about $10,000 and these are NOT even accessible.  Like those of screen readers, the developers of these software DO NOT sell stocks in the open market to raise capital for continued development; so they keep on milking us!

 

 

I salute the courage and candour of NVDA developers!  Without their active devotion to opening new worlds of opportunities to the blind, our brothers and sisters who are similarly situated in the proverbial developing nation states will be left far, far behind.  It is for this reason that I’ll see if my company can begin contributing a few pennies to help support and encourage the continued development of NVDA starting in 2016 or as soon as is possible. 

 

Sincerely,

Olusegun

Denver, Colorado    




Ron Canazzi
 

Hi Group,

At the risk of turning this into a discussion about economics, I must ask: What would the incentive be for massive investment in stocks for companies which have a limited market? Even if the price were to drop significantly, what would the over all market worldwide be: maybe 25 or 30 million? Any software company marketing to a general audience of non disabled people might have a market of billions. Where would you put your money: into a market which maxes out at millions or a market that maxes out at billions?

On 11/18/2015 11:35 PM, Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc. wrote:
Hello Everyone:


I believe in what the Bible says-that is, every laborer deserves a wage and
I just paraphrased so I don't get in trouble. No, I'm not a preacher or
into religion, but I'm not an atheist!


For this reason, I do not want Jaws to be a FREE product! However, I think
it's about time to have it sold in the open market so I can go to WalMart or
Bestbuy to pick one up if I so desire. With Freedom Scientific now owned by
venture capitalists, there are enough injection of capital for its product
to become available in the mainstream market. I've always believed that if
developers of screen readers COULD MAKE THEIR COMPANIES go public and sell
stocks like Facebook and Google do, they'll raise enough capital to enable
them place their products on other public shelves. It has never been tried,
so the notion that the market is small is, in my view, a tongue-in-cheek
attempt to keep on defrauding the blind since Uncle Sam or his cousins
elsewhere lift the burden of providing this product on their shoulders!


Screen readers are not only the priciest software in the marketplace. Try
embroidery software and you'll kill more mocking birds with a sling! In my
business, the price of software needed to run the business range from $5,000
to about $10,000 and these are NOT even accessible. Like those of screen
readers, the developers of these software DO NOT sell stocks in the open
market to raise capital for continued development; so they keep on milking
us!



I salute the courage and candour of NVDA developers! Without their active
devotion to opening new worlds of opportunities to the blind, our brothers
and sisters who are similarly situated in the proverbial developing nation
states will be left far, far behind. It is for this reason that I'll see if
my company can begin contributing a few pennies to help support and
encourage the continued development of NVDA starting in 2016 or as soon as
is possible.


Sincerely,

Olusegun

Denver, Colorado




Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
 

Hi Ron:

I don't consider myself an expert on these matters. But I paucit that one
reason why there's gross underemployment amongst the blind worldwide is
because of the cost of making that which needs to be used in the workplace
accessible--example--software, etc.

PC America is a company that develops Cash Register Express which is a point
of sale software for retailers, video renters, delis, and such. Suppose the
developers want to consider making their software more accessible and the
company could purchase a screen reader at a reasonable price from, say,
Microcenter, do you not think that it will make some effort at doing just
that? Would the company not feel comfortable hiring blind folks to help
them test their software for accessibility?

When ten nondisabled folks can be hired for the cost of one screen reader,
it is the would-be blind employee that loses in the long run.

I think you underestimated the potential profit that the screen reader
developer could garner from selling worldwide; if the focus is solely on the
U.S. market, that to me is not very fair! I don't know what the exact
population of the blind is worldwide let alone here in the U.S. The goal is
to constantly keep trying to find a way to help blind folks become
truthfully gainfully employed and I think that being able to keep down the
cost of a screen reader by making it available in the mainstream market is
worth exploring. Right now, there's no data to work with and the general
argument that I have read have been based solely on speculation and
assumption. I wish I were smart enough to cobble together some useful data,
but alas, I'm not quite there! Whilst that which I postulate may be pure
conjecture on my part, it may be a thought process worth giving wings to see
how far it can fly!

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado


Carlos
 

I'm not going to turn this into a debate, but I agree.  As much as we might bemoan the cost of products like JAWS, it always has and always will come down to supply and demand.  JAWS is not free because if it were no one would get paid.  It is difficult for a product which requires specialized skills to develop to survive on donations alone.  NVDA manages in part because of the dedication of it's developer, but very few programmers or anyone for that matter, will be willing to work forever for almost nothing.

----- Original Message -----
From: Gene
Sent: Wednesday, November 18, 2015 10:33 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] FreedomScientific Vs. NvAccess

Screen-readers you pay for are expensive because the customer base is so small.  If it were a large customer base, they would cost what you would expect complex programs to sell for in the general market.  As far as NVDA goes, NVDA gets grants from various companies and donations from users.  But one of the main reasons NVDA is free is because the main developer doesn't pay himself anywhere near what he would earn if he worked for an employer.  I've seen it stated on the NVDA users' list that he pays himself somewhere around minimum wage.  So one way or another, the price is high.  It's just that when it comes to NVDA, you don't see the price.  But those who work on NVDA for pay and those who do so as volunteers pay the price one way or another, in low wages or in donating time.  People love to castigate companies that charge for such products.  It doesn't seem to bother them that NVDA is free because people pay the price voluntarily.  That's there choice but it shouldn't be the case, as a matter of principle, that the people who work for pay on NVDA are paid so little. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, November 18, 2015 8:36 PM
Subject: [TechTalk] FreedomScientific Vs. NvAccess

Hi.  I really like NvAccess.  They have a fre screen reader.  You
can update the screen reader to the latest version for free.  On
the other hand, why does FreedomScientific make blind people to
pay thousands of dollars on JAWS? It is so high and so expensive. 
I still like Freedom Scientific, but I wish JAWS was free.

--
Armando Vias: Admin/owner of the TechTips Mailing List
To join the list, send an email to
techtips+subscribe@groups.io with the subject "Subscribe."
You can talk about anything technology on this list.



Monica Jones
 

Jaws will never be free, but I wish they had an option to purchase it like AISquared has for WindowEyes. If you get Microsoft Office, you can get WindowEyes free that way. You can get Office for as little as nine dollars. I like all the screen readers. They all bring something to the table.

-----Original Message-----
From: Armando Vias
Sent: Wednesday, November 18, 2015 8:36 PM
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] FreedomScientific Vs. NvAccess

Hi. I really like NvAccess. They have a fre screen reader. You
can update the screen reader to the latest version for free. On
the other hand, why does FreedomScientific make blind people to
pay thousands of dollars on JAWS? It is so high and so expensive.
I still like Freedom Scientific, but I wish JAWS was free.

--
Armando Vias: Admin/owner of the TechTips Mailing List
To join the list, send an email to
techtips+subscribe@groups.io with the subject "Subscribe."
You can talk about anything technology on this list.



Monni, the coffee gal
Twitter, @Monni52

Facebook, Monica Rose Jones


Pamela Dominguez
 

How do you get office for that low price? Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Monica Jones
Sent: Thursday, November 19, 2015 10:54 AM
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] FreedomScientific Vs. NvAccess

Jaws will never be free, but I wish they had an option to purchase it like
AISquared has for WindowEyes. If you get Microsoft Office, you can get
WindowEyes free that way. You can get Office for as little as nine dollars.
I like all the screen readers. They all bring something to the table.


-----Original Message-----
From: Armando Vias
Sent: Wednesday, November 18, 2015 8:36 PM
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] FreedomScientific Vs. NvAccess

Hi. I really like NvAccess. They have a fre screen reader. You
can update the screen reader to the latest version for free. On
the other hand, why does FreedomScientific make blind people to
pay thousands of dollars on JAWS? It is so high and so expensive.
I still like Freedom Scientific, but I wish JAWS was free.

--
Armando Vias: Admin/owner of the TechTips Mailing List
To join the list, send an email to
techtips+subscribe@groups.io with the subject "Subscribe."
You can talk about anything technology on this list.



Monni, the coffee gal
Twitter, @Monni52

Facebook, Monica Rose Jones


Carolyn Arnold
 

Maybe, if they built screen readers in China, they'd be cheaper. I just
bought several headsets with mikes for $1.99 - work with phone with
computer with talking book.

Bye for now,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: Armando Vias [mailto:armando.l.vias@gmail.com]
Sent: Wednesday, November 18, 2015 9:37 PM
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] FreedomScientific Vs. NvAccess

Hi. I really like NvAccess. They have a fre screen reader. You can
update the screen reader to the latest version for free. On the other
hand, why does FreedomScientific make blind people to pay thousands of
dollars on JAWS? It is so high and so expensive.
I still like Freedom Scientific, but I wish JAWS was free.

--
Armando Vias: Admin/owner of the TechTips Mailing List
To join the list, send an email to
techtips+subscribe@groups.io with the subject "Subscribe."
You can talk about anything technology on this list.


Carolyn Arnold
 

Exactly, Gene.

Bye for now,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: Gene [mailto:gsasner@ripco.com]
Sent: Wednesday, November 18, 2015 10:33 PM
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] FreedomScientific Vs. NvAccess

Screen-readers you pay for are expensive because the customer base is so
small. If it were a large customer base, they would cost what you would
expect complex programs to sell for in the general market. As far as
NVDA goes, NVDA gets grants from various companies and donations from
users. But one of the main reasons NVDA is free is because the main
developer doesn't pay himself anywhere near what he would earn if he
worked for an employer. I've seen it stated on the NVDA users' list that
he pays himself somewhere around minimum wage. So one way or another,
the price is high. It's just that when it comes to NVDA, you don't see
the price. But those who work on NVDA for pay and those who do so as
volunteers pay the price one way or another, in low wages or in donating
time. People love to castigate companies that charge for such products.
It doesn't seem to bother them that NVDA is free because people pay the
price voluntarily. That's there choice but it shouldn't be the case, as
a matter of principle, that the people who work for pay on NVDA are paid
so little.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Armando Vias <mailto:armando.l.vias@gmail.com>
Sent: Wednesday, November 18, 2015 8:36 PM
To: TechTalk@groups.io <mailto:TechTalk@groups.io>
Subject: [TechTalk] FreedomScientific Vs. NvAccess

Hi. I really like NvAccess. They have a fre screen reader. You can
update the screen reader to the latest version for free. On the other
hand, why does FreedomScientific make blind people to pay thousands of
dollars on JAWS? It is so high and so expensive.
I still like Freedom Scientific, but I wish JAWS was free.

--
Armando Vias: Admin/owner of the TechTips Mailing List
To join the list, send an email to
techtips+subscribe@groups.io <mailto:techtips+subscribe@groups.io> with
the subject "Subscribe."
You can talk about anything technology on this list.


Gerald Levy
 

Well, if the Chinese made screen readers, they would probably speak with a Chinese accent, like the talking clocks, talking scales and other talking products they make. ESpeak's Australian accent is bad enough, but could you imagine a screen reader with a Chinese accent?

Gerald

-----Original Message-----
From: Carolyn Arnold
Sent: Thursday, November 19, 2015 1:43 PM
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] FreedomScientific Vs. NvAccess

Maybe, if they built screen readers in China, they'd be cheaper. I just
bought several headsets with mikes for $1.99 - work with phone with
computer with talking book.

Bye for now,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: Armando Vias [mailto:armando.l.vias@gmail.com]
Sent: Wednesday, November 18, 2015 9:37 PM
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] FreedomScientific Vs. NvAccess

Hi. I really like NvAccess. They have a fre screen reader. You can
update the screen reader to the latest version for free. On the other
hand, why does FreedomScientific make blind people to pay thousands of
dollars on JAWS? It is so high and so expensive.
I still like Freedom Scientific, but I wish JAWS was free.

--
Armando Vias: Admin/owner of the TechTips Mailing List
To join the list, send an email to
techtips+subscribe@groups.io with the subject "Subscribe."
You can talk about anything technology on this list.


christopher hallsworth <challsworth2@...>
 

Hi I donate $AUS10 monthly to show my support for NVDA.

On 19 Nov 2015, at 04:26, Victor <victorelawrence@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi all:

I agree that more people should donate to NVDA. Every little bit helps.

I definitely believe that Freedom Scientific is at least a little
greedy. My Vocational Rehabilitation agency bought JAWS 11 for me
just a month before JAWS 12 was released. I developed a kind of
friendship with one of the sales representatives at Freedom
Scientific. He told me he was surprised that the company didn't just
sell my VR agency JAWS 12 since the release was only a month away. If
I heard him right, the employees at Freedom Scientific don't even get
a discount on company's products. Even they have to pay full price if
they want their products for personal use.

Go with NVDA or, install Linux or buy a Mac. That's my advice. I
love JAWS, but it's very expensive.

VictorOn 11/18/15, Ron Canazzi <aa2vm@roadrunner.com> wrote:
Hi Group,

Of course there is truth in what Gene says, which is why everyone using
NVDA should at least try to make a small contribution every year. Even
10 or 20 dollars a year from each user (at last report there are several
hundred thousand users worldwide) would bring in an additional 20 or 30
million dollars. I know many blind people (myself included) don't have
a huge amount of money, but even 10 or 20 dollars yearly helps a little
bit.


On 11/18/2015 10:33 PM, Gene wrote:
Screen-readers you pay for are expensive because the customer base is so
small. If it were a large customer base, they would cost what you would
expect complex programs to sell for in the general market. As far as NVDA
goes, NVDA gets grants from various companies and donations from users.
But one of the main reasons NVDA is free is because the main developer
doesn't pay himself anywhere near what he would earn if he worked for an
employer. I've seen it stated on the NVDA users' list that he pays
himself somewhere around minimum wage. So one way or another, the price
is high. It's just that when it comes to NVDA, you don't see the price.
But those who work on NVDA for pay and those who do so as volunteers pay
the price one way or another, in low wages or in donating time. People
love to castigate companies that charge for such products. It doesn't
seem to bother them that NVDA is free because people pay the price
voluntarily. That's there choice but it shouldn't be the case, as a
matter of principle, that the people who work for pay on NVDA are paid so
little.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Armando Vias
Sent: Wednesday, November 18, 2015 8:36 PM
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] FreedomScientific Vs. NvAccess


Hi. I really like NvAccess. They have a fre screen reader. You
can update the screen reader to the latest version for free. On
the other hand, why does FreedomScientific make blind people to
pay thousands of dollars on JAWS? It is so high and so expensive.
I still like Freedom Scientific, but I wish JAWS was free.

--
Armando Vias: Admin/owner of the TechTips Mailing List
To join the list, send an email to
techtips+subscribe@groups.io with the subject "Subscribe."
You can talk about anything technology on this list.








Rajmund <brajmund2000@...>
 

Hello,
LOL, I actually got the Chinese voice over to speak English. I think she's called TingTing. Surprisingly, I could understand it, so its not actually that ridiculous.

----- Original Message -----
From: Gerald Levy <bwaylimited@verizon.net>
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Date: Thursday, November 19, 2015 6:47 pm
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] FreedomScientific Vs. NvAccess



Well, if the Chinese made screen readers, they would probably speak with a
Chinese accent, like the talking clocks, talking scales and other talking
products they make. ESpeak's Australian accent is bad enough, but could you
imagine a screen reader with a Chinese accent?

Gerald



-----Original Message-----
From: Carolyn Arnold
Sent: Thursday, November 19, 2015 1:43 PM
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] FreedomScientific Vs. NvAccess

Maybe, if they built screen readers in China, they'd be cheaper. I just
bought several headsets with mikes for $1.99 - work with phone with
computer with talking book.

Bye for now,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: Armando Vias [mailto:armando.l.vias@gmail.com]
Sent: Wednesday, November 18, 2015 9:37 PM
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] FreedomScientific Vs. NvAccess

Hi. I really like NvAccess. They have a fre screen reader. You can
update the screen reader to the latest version for free. On the other
hand, why does FreedomScientific make blind people to pay thousands of
dollars on JAWS? It is so high and so expensive.
I still like Freedom Scientific, but I wish JAWS was free.

--
Armando Vias: Admin/owner of the TechTips Mailing List
To join the list, send an email to
techtips+subscribe@groups.io with the subject "Subscribe."
You can talk about anything technology on this list.









Sent from a Braille Sense


Carolyn Arnold
 

I would be guessing that NVDA might not be in the bidding for government
business? It would seem they'd be the lowest bidder.

Bye for now,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: Christopher Hallsworth [mailto:challsworth2@icloud.com]
Sent: Thursday, November 19, 2015 3:14 PM
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] FreedomScientific Vs. NvAccess

Hi I donate $AUS10 monthly to show my support for NVDA.
On 19 Nov 2015, at 04:26, Victor <victorelawrence@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi all:

I agree that more people should donate to NVDA. Every little bit
helps.

I definitely believe that Freedom Scientific is at least a little
greedy. My Vocational Rehabilitation agency bought JAWS 11 for me
just a month before JAWS 12 was released. I developed a kind of
friendship with one of the sales representatives at Freedom
Scientific. He told me he was surprised that the company didn't just
sell my VR agency JAWS 12 since the release was only a month away. If
I heard him right, the employees at Freedom Scientific don't even get
a discount on company's products. Even they have to pay full price if
they want their products for personal use.

Go with NVDA or, install Linux or buy a Mac. That's my advice. I
love JAWS, but it's very expensive.

VictorOn 11/18/15, Ron Canazzi <aa2vm@roadrunner.com> wrote:
Hi Group,

Of course there is truth in what Gene says, which is why everyone
using NVDA should at least try to make a small contribution every
year. Even
10 or 20 dollars a year from each user (at last report there are
several hundred thousand users worldwide) would bring in an
additional 20 or 30 million dollars. I know many blind people
(myself included) don't have a huge amount of money, but even 10 or
20 dollars yearly helps a little bit.


On 11/18/2015 10:33 PM, Gene wrote:
Screen-readers you pay for are expensive because the customer base
is so small. If it were a large customer base, they would cost what
you would expect complex programs to sell for in the general market.
As far as NVDA goes, NVDA gets grants from various companies and
donations from users.
But one of the main reasons NVDA is free is because the main
developer doesn't pay himself anywhere near what he would earn if he
worked for an employer. I've seen it stated on the NVDA users' list
that he pays himself somewhere around minimum wage. So one way or
another, the price is high. It's just that when it comes to NVDA,
you don't see the price.
But those who work on NVDA for pay and those who do so as volunteers
pay the price one way or another, in low wages or in donating time.
People love to castigate companies that charge for such products.
It doesn't seem to bother them that NVDA is free because people pay
the price voluntarily. That's there choice but it shouldn't be the
case, as a matter of principle, that the people who work for pay on
NVDA are paid so little.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Armando Vias
Sent: Wednesday, November 18, 2015 8:36 PM
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] FreedomScientific Vs. NvAccess


Hi. I really like NvAccess. They have a fre screen reader. You
can update the screen reader to the latest version for free. On the
other hand, why does FreedomScientific make blind people to pay
thousands of dollars on JAWS? It is so high and so expensive.
I still like Freedom Scientific, but I wish JAWS was free.

--
Armando Vias: Admin/owner of the TechTips Mailing List To join the
list, send an email to
techtips+subscribe@groups.io with the subject "Subscribe."
You can talk about anything technology on this list.








Michael Babcock
 

You pay for what you get! And honestly I feel the freedom scientific is appropriately priced. Yes, for the most individuals it's a bit expensive, however because of the quality of the product they can justify selling at that particular price. Think about Apple, everyone said they were crazy about selling personal computers at the price level but they sell them, when other vendor sell them at a quarter of the price.

Sent from my iPhone

On Nov 19, 2015, at 4:23 PM, Carolyn Arnold <4carolyna@windstream.net> wrote:

I would be guessing that NVDA might not be in the bidding for government
business? It would seem they'd be the lowest bidder.

Bye for now,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: Christopher Hallsworth [mailto:challsworth2@icloud.com]
Sent: Thursday, November 19, 2015 3:14 PM
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] FreedomScientific Vs. NvAccess

Hi I donate $AUS10 monthly to show my support for NVDA.
On 19 Nov 2015, at 04:26, Victor <victorelawrence@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi all:

I agree that more people should donate to NVDA. Every little bit
helps.

I definitely believe that Freedom Scientific is at least a little
greedy. My Vocational Rehabilitation agency bought JAWS 11 for me
just a month before JAWS 12 was released. I developed a kind of
friendship with one of the sales representatives at Freedom
Scientific. He told me he was surprised that the company didn't just
sell my VR agency JAWS 12 since the release was only a month away. If
I heard him right, the employees at Freedom Scientific don't even get
a discount on company's products. Even they have to pay full price if
they want their products for personal use.

Go with NVDA or, install Linux or buy a Mac. That's my advice. I
love JAWS, but it's very expensive.

VictorOn 11/18/15, Ron Canazzi <aa2vm@roadrunner.com> wrote:
Hi Group,

Of course there is truth in what Gene says, which is why everyone
using NVDA should at least try to make a small contribution every
year. Even
10 or 20 dollars a year from each user (at last report there are
several hundred thousand users worldwide) would bring in an
additional 20 or 30 million dollars. I know many blind people
(myself included) don't have a huge amount of money, but even 10 or
20 dollars yearly helps a little bit.


On 11/18/2015 10:33 PM, Gene wrote:
Screen-readers you pay for are expensive because the customer base
is so small. If it were a large customer base, they would cost what
you would expect complex programs to sell for in the general market.
As far as NVDA goes, NVDA gets grants from various companies and
donations from users.
But one of the main reasons NVDA is free is because the main
developer doesn't pay himself anywhere near what he would earn if he
worked for an employer. I've seen it stated on the NVDA users' list
that he pays himself somewhere around minimum wage. So one way or
another, the price is high. It's just that when it comes to NVDA,
you don't see the price.
But those who work on NVDA for pay and those who do so as volunteers
pay the price one way or another, in low wages or in donating time.
People love to castigate companies that charge for such products.
It doesn't seem to bother them that NVDA is free because people pay
the price voluntarily. That's there choice but it shouldn't be the
case, as a matter of principle, that the people who work for pay on
NVDA are paid so little.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Armando Vias
Sent: Wednesday, November 18, 2015 8:36 PM
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] FreedomScientific Vs. NvAccess


Hi. I really like NvAccess. They have a fre screen reader. You
can update the screen reader to the latest version for free. On the
other hand, why does FreedomScientific make blind people to pay
thousands of dollars on JAWS? It is so high and so expensive.
I still like Freedom Scientific, but I wish JAWS was free.

--
Armando Vias: Admin/owner of the TechTips Mailing List To join the
list, send an email to
techtips+subscribe@groups.io with the subject "Subscribe."
You can talk about anything technology on this list.







Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
 

Carolyn, I think the only big bidders, at least here in the United States,
are Jaws and Window-Eyes. I hear the former has most of these contracts
etched in stone though I can't prove or attest to that.

I do know though that both have a federal government assigned contract
number.

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado


Carolyn Arnold
 

Interesting. I was being facetious, although if NVDA was researched, they
might be surprised by what it could offer. I never heard of it until I
got on the lists, but I am glad it's out there.

Bye for now,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
[mailto:ukekearuaro@valtdnet.com]
Sent: Thursday, November 19, 2015 11:38 PM
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] FreedomScientific Vs. NvAccess

Carolyn, I think the only big bidders, at least here in the United
States, are Jaws and Window-Eyes. I hear the former has most of these
contracts etched in stone though I can't prove or attest to that.

I do know though that both have a federal government assigned contract
number.

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado


Monica Jones
 

You do it from the Microsoft web site to get it. It's a subscription. You can pay for it by the month or the year. I did it monthly because it's what I could afford.

-----Original Message-----
From: Pamela Dominguez
Sent: Thursday, November 19, 2015 11:26 AM
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] FreedomScientific Vs. NvAccess

How do you get office for that low price? Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Monica Jones
Sent: Thursday, November 19, 2015 10:54 AM
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] FreedomScientific Vs. NvAccess

Jaws will never be free, but I wish they had an option to purchase it like
AISquared has for WindowEyes. If you get Microsoft Office, you can get
WindowEyes free that way. You can get Office for as little as nine dollars.
I like all the screen readers. They all bring something to the table.


-----Original Message-----
From: Armando Vias
Sent: Wednesday, November 18, 2015 8:36 PM
To: TechTalk@groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] FreedomScientific Vs. NvAccess

Hi. I really like NvAccess. They have a fre screen reader. You
can update the screen reader to the latest version for free. On
the other hand, why does FreedomScientific make blind people to
pay thousands of dollars on JAWS? It is so high and so expensive.
I still like Freedom Scientific, but I wish JAWS was free.

--
Armando Vias: Admin/owner of the TechTips Mailing List
To join the list, send an email to
techtips+subscribe@groups.io with the subject "Subscribe."
You can talk about anything technology on this list.



Monni, the coffee gal
Twitter, @Monni52

Facebook, Monica Rose Jones







Monni, the coffee gal
Twitter, @Monni52

Facebook, Monica Rose Jones