These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd #article


Flor Lynch
 

[I came across this article from my ‘daily’ Twitter email summary. It’s about a prototype of a text-to-braille OCR device. The article is unfortunately too complex to reproduce here, as it’s spread over two different ‘pages’ along with all the intervening headers and ads.
 
However, the interested reader can start by heading to
 
- and is the device achievable in reality at the price point of $100, that they want? But it’s an interesting prospect that may produce some interesting results over the next few years.
 
 


Gene
 

To see the article on one page, use this link:
 
It's a Google cache of the article.  The Forbes site evidently has serious accessibility problems, at least if you haven't subscribed and this Google cache bypasses these problems.  When I am confronted by a situation like this, I do a Google search for the article and try using the cache.
 
You probably won't see the word cache below the start of the result.  You will probably see something like a button to open a menu.  Use the menu to go to the cached page.
Gene

----- Original Message -----
From: Flor Lynch
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 9:54 AM
Subject: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd

[I came across this article from my ‘daily’ Twitter email summary. It’s about a prototype of a text-to-braille OCR device. The article is unfortunately too complex to reproduce here, as it’s spread over two different ‘pages’ along with all the intervening headers and ads.
 
However, the interested reader can start by heading to
 
- and is the device achievable in reality at the price point of $100, that they want? But it’s an interesting prospect that may produce some interesting results over the next few years.
 
 


Flor Lynch
 

Gene wrote in Part:
 
The Forbes site evidently has serious accessibility problems, ...”
 
I would classify them as usability issues. The site is intentionally designed that way, at least for free users.
 
Do you have any any opinions on the substance of the article itself? The URL was linked to in a tweet by Sight and Sound, a leading UK blindness technology products reseller. Text-to-Braille OCR is a great idea, but I fear that to implement it well will cost considerably more than $100.

From: Gene
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 5:39 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd
To see the article on one page, use this link:
 
It's a Google cache of the article.  The Forbes site evidently has serious accessibility problems, at least if you haven't subscribed and this Google cache bypasses these problems.  When I am confronted by a situation like this, I do a Google search for the article and try using the cache.
 
You probably won't see the word cache below the start of the result.  You will probably see something like a button to open a menu.  Use the menu to go to the cached page.
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Flor Lynch
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 9:54 AM
Subject: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd
 
[I came across this article from my ‘daily’ Twitter email summary. It’s about a prototype of a text-to-braille OCR device. The article is unfortunately too complex to reproduce here, as it’s spread over two different ‘pages’ along with all the intervening headers and ads.
 
However, the interested reader can start by heading to
 
- and is the device achievable in reality at the price point of $100, that they want? But it’s an interesting prospect that may produce some interesting results over the next few years.
 
 


Mich Verrier
 

wile this is a good idea I am wating to pass judgement when and if this is able to get in the hands of your avrige blind user witch like so many ideas for blind people sadley seems to never happen for one reason or another. wile I aplode the women for thinking up this idea and getting a prototype reddy etc it still remainds to be seen if not only will the price be offordable to the avrige blind person since like the artickle says the majoridey of us my self in cluded are not working so money is always a ishu. and second most of these ideas never get past the stage of ideas or proto types and in to the hands of your avrige blind person anyways. sorry if I am a bit skeptickle but I will wate untill I can get my hands on this product to pass judgement. wile it is a good idea like I say right now that is all it seems to be is a idea and no working prodo type has been brought out to the different blind orgs around the world for testing etc.
 

From: Flor Lynch
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 1:35 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd
 
Gene wrote in Part:
 
The Forbes site evidently has serious accessibility problems, ...”
 
I would classify them as usability issues. The site is intentionally designed that way, at least for free users.
 
Do you have any any opinions on the substance of the article itself? The URL was linked to in a tweet by Sight and Sound, a leading UK blindness technology products reseller. Text-to-Braille OCR is a great idea, but I fear that to implement it well will cost considerably more than $100.
From: Gene
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 5:39 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd
To see the article on one page, use this link:
 
It's a Google cache of the article.  The Forbes site evidently has serious accessibility problems, at least if you haven't subscribed and this Google cache bypasses these problems.  When I am confronted by a situation like this, I do a Google search for the article and try using the cache.
 
You probably won't see the word cache below the start of the result.  You will probably see something like a button to open a menu.  Use the menu to go to the cached page.
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Flor Lynch
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 9:54 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd
 
[I came across this article from my ‘daily’ Twitter email summary. It’s about a prototype of a text-to-braille OCR device. The article is unfortunately too complex to reproduce here, as it’s spread over two different ‘pages’ along with all the intervening headers and ads.
 
However, the interested reader can start by heading to
 
- and is the device achievable in reality at the price point of $100, that they want? But it’s an interesting prospect that may produce some interesting results over the next few years.
 
 


Gene
 

I don't know if these problems vary depending on what part of the world you view the site in.  When I follow the link, in the United States, I am not placed on a page with any text except the title.  I tried with three different browsers. 
 
My thoughts about the article are that it's probably just one more gee whiz article of the type that comes along now and then.  And despite what the hypsters say, it won't change access for that many people.  Most blind people use speech.  But the media seems incapable, through its ignorance which it isn't interested in recognizing, and just following the line of least resistance in reporting hyped claims without doing any work to verify or get perspective on them.  You know who is going to benefit the most?  probably not blind people, unless the designers pull off some sort of miracle in how cheaply they can provide good Braille access for a very low price.  The main beneficiaries are going to be those on the development team, who will benefit in their careers for getting publicity about what great designers they are. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
From: Flor Lynch
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 12:35 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd

Gene wrote in Part:
 
The Forbes site evidently has serious accessibility problems, ...”
 
I would classify them as usability issues. The site is intentionally designed that way, at least for free users.
 
Do you have any any opinions on the substance of the article itself? The URL was linked to in a tweet by Sight and Sound, a leading UK blindness technology products reseller. Text-to-Braille OCR is a great idea, but I fear that to implement it well will cost considerably more than $100.
From: Gene
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 5:39 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd
To see the article on one page, use this link:
 
It's a Google cache of the article.  The Forbes site evidently has serious accessibility problems, at least if you haven't subscribed and this Google cache bypasses these problems.  When I am confronted by a situation like this, I do a Google search for the article and try using the cache.
 
You probably won't see the word cache below the start of the result.  You will probably see something like a button to open a menu.  Use the menu to go to the cached page.
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Flor Lynch
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 9:54 AM
Subject: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd
 
[I came across this article from my ‘daily’ Twitter email summary. It’s about a prototype of a text-to-braille OCR device. The article is unfortunately too complex to reproduce here, as it’s spread over two different ‘pages’ along with all the intervening headers and ads.
 
However, the interested reader can start by heading to
 
- and is the device achievable in reality at the price point of $100, that they want? But it’s an interesting prospect that may produce some interesting results over the next few years.
 
 


Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
 

Thanks to Gene and Flor for posting this article. Wow, impressive! I sure
hope it all pans out.

I wish I have their address; I'd like to send in a small donation towards
the project. An adaptive technology equipment for $100? I'm awestruck,
probably it's because I just reincarnated! Way to go gals, keep up the good
job.

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado


Flor Lynch
 

Yes, that is different from what I got, in Ireland (which would be same as the UK for this site.) So I probably had an esier time reading it than you or others in the States, in that all I needed to do was to go to top of page, then use the letter n (for next bloxk of text) –having found the usual order of tweets/.comments was not being observed - till I got to the article title, followed by the article body, etc. (Most things appear to be more accessible in their US incarnations. Not this one. Interesting.) 
 
There used to be a text-to-Braille OCR feature implemented in some Index Braille emobsser-related software; but it may not have been ready for prime time, as we have not heard of anything in that line for several years.
 
You’re probably right in your view about the prospects of anything substantial coming out of this research for a considerable time yet, if ever; but there are the beginnings of a concerted move on the part of many organisations for and of the blind to increase, and to foster the development of technological tools to increase, levels of Braille literacy and conseequently more everyday use of Braille. by blind English-language users of computer and smart devices.
 

From: Gene
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 6:51 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd
I don't know if these problems vary depending on what part of the world you view the site in.  When I follow the link, in the United States, I am not placed on a page with any text except the title.  I tried with three different browsers. 
 
My thoughts about the article are that it's probably just one more gee whiz article of the type that comes along now and then.  And despite what the hypsters say, it won't change access for that many people.  Most blind people use speech.  But the media seems incapable, through its ignorance which it isn't interested in recognizing, and just following the line of least resistance in reporting hyped claims without doing any work to verify or get perspective on them.  You know who is going to benefit the most?  probably not blind people, unless the designers pull off some sort of miracle in how cheaply they can provide good Braille access for a very low price.  The main beneficiaries are going to be those on the development team, who will benefit in their careers for getting publicity about what great designers they are. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Flor Lynch
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 12:35 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd
 
Gene wrote in Part:
 
The Forbes site evidently has serious accessibility problems, ...”
 
I would classify them as usability issues. The site is intentionally designed that way, at least for free users.
 
Do you have any any opinions on the substance of the article itself? The URL was linked to in a tweet by Sight and Sound, a leading UK blindness technology products reseller. Text-to-Braille OCR is a great idea, but I fear that to implement it well will cost considerably more than $100.
From: Gene
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 5:39 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd
To see the article on one page, use this link:
 
It's a Google cache of the article.  The Forbes site evidently has serious accessibility problems, at least if you haven't subscribed and this Google cache bypasses these problems.  When I am confronted by a situation like this, I do a Google search for the article and try using the cache.
 
You probably won't see the word cache below the start of the result.  You will probably see something like a button to open a menu.  Use the menu to go to the cached page.
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Flor Lynch
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 9:54 AM
Subject: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd
 
[I came across this article from my ‘daily’ Twitter email summary. It’s about a prototype of a text-to-braille OCR device. The article is unfortunately too complex to reproduce here, as it’s spread over two different ‘pages’ along with all the intervening headers and ads.
 
However, the interested reader can start by heading to
 
- and is the device achievable in reality at the price point of $100, that they want? But it’s an interesting prospect that may produce some interesting results over the next few years.
 
 


Carolyn Arnold
 

What is it that they have developed?

Bye for now,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Mich Verrier
Sent: Tuesday, January 3, 2017 1:42 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd

wile this is a good idea I am wating to pass judgement when and if this is able to get in the hands of your avrige blind user witch like so many ideas for blind people sadley seems to never happen for one reason or another. wile I aplode the women for thinking up this idea and getting a prototype reddy etc it still remainds to be seen if not only will the price be offordable to the avrige blind person since like the artickle says the majoridey of us my self in cluded are not working so money is always a ishu. and second most of these ideas never get past the stage of ideas or proto types and in to the hands of your avrige blind person anyways. sorry if I am a bit skeptickle but I will wate untill I can get my hands on this product to pass judgement. wile it is a good idea like I say right now that is all it seems to be is a idea and no working prodo type has been brought out to the different blind orgs around the world for testing etc.

From: Flor Lynch
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 1:35 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd

Gene wrote in Part:

“The Forbes site evidently has serious accessibility problems, ...”

I would classify them as usability issues. The site is intentionally designed that way, at least for free users.

Do you have any any opinions on the substance of the article itself? The URL was linked to in a tweet by Sight and Sound, a leading UK blindness technology products reseller. Text-to-Braille OCR is a great idea, but I fear that to implement it well will cost considerably more than $100.
From: Gene
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 5:39 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd To see the article on one page, use this link:
http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:N9W4WOTDZ0QJ:http://www.forbes.com/sites/devinthorpe/2016/12/20/these-6-women-undergrads-at-mit-invented-a-game-changer-for-the-blind/%2Bmit+gamechanger+for+blind+forbes&client=firefox-a&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&gbv=1&hl=en&ct=clnk

It's a Google cache of the article. The Forbes site evidently has serious accessibility problems, at least if you haven't subscribed and this Google cache bypasses these problems. When I am confronted by a situation like this, I do a Google search for the article and try using the cache.

You probably won't see the word cache below the start of the result. You will probably see something like a button to open a menu. Use the menu to go to the cached page.
Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Flor Lynch
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 9:54 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd

[I came across this article from my ‘daily’ Twitter email summary. It’s about a prototype of a text-to-braille OCR device. The article is unfortunately too complex to reproduce here, as it’s spread over two different ‘pages’ along with all the intervening headers and ads.

However, the interested reader can start by heading to
http://www.forbes.com/sites/devinthorpe/2016/12/20/these-6-women-undergrads-at-mit-invented-a-game-changer-for-the-blind/#6bee0cde7e96

- and is the device achievable in reality at the price point of $100, that they want? But it’s an interesting prospect that may produce some interesting results over the next few years.


Carolyn Arnold
 

Oh, I got into the link, somehow had the idea it was hard to get into. That sounds good, sounds like an Optacon type would be easier to produce.

Bye for now,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Flor Lynch
Sent: Tuesday, January 3, 2017 2:21 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd

Yes, that is different from what I got, in Ireland (which would be same as the UK for this site.) So I probably had an esier time reading it than you or others in the States, in that all I needed to do was to go to top of page, then use the letter n (for next bloxk of text) –having found the usual order of tweets/.comments was not being observed - till I got to the article title, followed by the article body, etc. (Most things appear to be more accessible in their US incarnations. Not this one. Interesting.)

There used to be a text-to-Braille OCR feature implemented in some Index Braille emobsser-related software; but it may not have been ready for prime time, as we have not heard of anything in that line for several years.

You’re probably right in your view about the prospects of anything substantial coming out of this research for a considerable time yet, if ever; but there are the beginnings of a concerted move on the part of many organisations for and of the blind to increase, and to foster the development of technological tools to increase, levels of Braille literacy and conseequently more everyday use of Braille. by blind English-language users of computer and smart devices.

From: Gene <mailto:gsasner@ripco.com>
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 6:51 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd I don't know if these problems vary depending on what part of the world you view the site in. When I follow the link, in the United States, I am not placed on a page with any text except the title. I tried with three different browsers.

My thoughts about the article are that it's probably just one more gee whiz article of the type that comes along now and then. And despite what the hypsters say, it won't change access for that many people. Most blind people use speech. But the media seems incapable, through its ignorance which it isn't interested in recognizing, and just following the line of least resistance in reporting hyped claims without doing any work to verify or get perspective on them. You know who is going to benefit the most? probably not blind people, unless the designers pull off some sort of miracle in how cheaply they can provide good Braille access for a very low price. The main beneficiaries are going to be those on the development team, who will benefit in their careers for getting publicity about what great designers they are.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Flor Lynch <mailto:florlync@iol.ie>
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 12:35 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd

Gene wrote in Part:

“The Forbes site evidently has serious accessibility problems, ...”

I would classify them as usability issues. The site is intentionally designed that way, at least for free users.

Do you have any any opinions on the substance of the article itself? The URL was linked to in a tweet by Sight and Sound, a leading UK blindness technology products reseller. Text-to-Braille OCR is a great idea, but I fear that to implement it well will cost considerably more than $100.
From: Gene <mailto:gsasner@ripco.com>
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 5:39 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd To see the article on one page, use this link:
http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:N9W4WOTDZ0QJ:http://www.forbes.com/sites/devinthorpe/2016/12/20/these-6-women-undergrads-at-mit-invented-a-game-changer-for-the-blind/%2Bmit+gamechanger+for+blind+forbes&client=firefox-a&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&gbv=1&hl=en&ct=clnk

It's a Google cache of the article. The Forbes site evidently has serious accessibility problems, at least if you haven't subscribed and this Google cache bypasses these problems. When I am confronted by a situation like this, I do a Google search for the article and try using the cache.

You probably won't see the word cache below the start of the result. You will probably see something like a button to open a menu. Use the menu to go to the cached page.
Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Flor Lynch <mailto:florlync@iol.ie>
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 9:54 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd

[I came across this article from my ‘daily’ Twitter email summary. It’s about a prototype of a text-to-braille OCR device. The article is unfortunately too complex to reproduce here, as it’s spread over two different ‘pages’ along with all the intervening headers and ads.

However, the interested reader can start by heading to
http://www.forbes.com/sites/devinthorpe/2016/12/20/these-6-women-undergrads-at-mit-invented-a-game-changer-for-the-blind/#6bee0cde7e96

- and is the device achievable in reality at the price point of $100, that they want? But it’s an interesting prospect that may produce some interesting results over the next few years.


Carlos
 


I can understand the skepticism, but keep in mind that just a couple of years ago no one would have thought a $500 braille display such as the Orbit Reader 20 would be possible.  Of course there is a significant difference between $100 and $500, but there have been several projects working on developing less expensive braille technology.  Whether they can manage to produce such a device for $100 who knows, but even if it costs 2 to 3 hundred dollars, that would still make it much more affordable than most other currently available braille technology.

----- Original Message -----
From: Flor Lynch
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 2:20 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd

Yes, that is different from what I got, in Ireland (which would be same as the UK for this site.) So I probably had an esier time reading it than you or others in the States, in that all I needed to do was to go to top of page, then use the letter n (for next bloxk of text) –having found the usual order of tweets/.comments was not being observed - till I got to the article title, followed by the article body, etc. (Most things appear to be more accessible in their US incarnations. Not this one. Interesting.) 
 
There used to be a text-to-Braille OCR feature implemented in some Index Braille emobsser-related software; but it may not have been ready for prime time, as we have not heard of anything in that line for several years.
 
You’re probably right in your view about the prospects of anything substantial coming out of this research for a considerable time yet, if ever; but there are the beginnings of a concerted move on the part of many organisations for and of the blind to increase, and to foster the development of technological tools to increase, levels of Braille literacy and conseequently more everyday use of Braille. by blind English-language users of computer and smart devices.
 
From: Gene
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 6:51 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd
I don't know if these problems vary depending on what part of the world you view the site in.  When I follow the link, in the United States, I am not placed on a page with any text except the title.  I tried with three different browsers. 
 
My thoughts about the article are that it's probably just one more gee whiz article of the type that comes along now and then.  And despite what the hypsters say, it won't change access for that many people.  Most blind people use speech.  But the media seems incapable, through its ignorance which it isn't interested in recognizing, and just following the line of least resistance in reporting hyped claims without doing any work to verify or get perspective on them.  You know who is going to benefit the most?  probably not blind people, unless the designers pull off some sort of miracle in how cheaply they can provide good Braille access for a very low price.  The main beneficiaries are going to be those on the development team, who will benefit in their careers for getting publicity about what great designers they are. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Flor Lynch
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 12:35 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd
 
Gene wrote in Part:
 
The Forbes site evidently has serious accessibility problems, ...”
 
I would classify them as usability issues. The site is intentionally designed that way, at least for free users.
 
Do you have any any opinions on the substance of the article itself? The URL was linked to in a tweet by Sight and Sound, a leading UK blindness technology products reseller. Text-to-Braille OCR is a great idea, but I fear that to implement it well will cost considerably more than $100.
From: Gene
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 5:39 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd
To see the article on one page, use this link:
 
It's a Google cache of the article.  The Forbes site evidently has serious accessibility problems, at least if you haven't subscribed and this Google cache bypasses these problems.  When I am confronted by a situation like this, I do a Google search for the article and try using the cache.
 
You probably won't see the word cache below the start of the result.  You will probably see something like a button to open a menu.  Use the menu to go to the cached page.
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Flor Lynch
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 9:54 AM
Subject: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd
 
[I came across this article from my ‘daily’ Twitter email summary. It’s about a prototype of a text-to-braille OCR device. The article is unfortunately too complex to reproduce here, as it’s spread over two different ‘pages’ along with all the intervening headers and ads.
 
However, the interested reader can start by heading to
 
- and is the device achievable in reality at the price point of $100, that they want? But it’s an interesting prospect that may produce some interesting results over the next few years.
 
 


Rob <captinlogic@...>
 

Carlos <carlos1106@nyc.rr.com> wrote:
I can understand the skepticism, but keep in mind that just a couple of years ago no one would have thought a $500 braille display such as the Orbit Reader 20 would be possible.
Yeah and where the hel is itt? It was supposed to be released last spring. Here it is half a year later and still nothing.


Carlos
 

The release date has apparently been postponed till spring of this year, but I see no indication that the project has lost support. Whether it is released this year or even next year, it doesn't change the fact that the technology has been developed.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Rob" <captinlogic@gmail.com>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 4:19 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd


Carlos <carlos1106@nyc.rr.com> wrote:
I can understand the skepticism, but keep in mind that just a couple of years ago no one would have thought a $500 braille display such as the Orbit Reader 20 would be possible.
Yeah and where the hel is itt? It was supposed to be released last spring. Here it is half a year later and still nothing.


Carolyn Arnold
 

That is a giant step, says a lot about today's technology.

Bye for now,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Carlos
Sent: Tuesday, January 3, 2017 4:15 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd

I can understand the skepticism, but keep in mind that just a couple of years ago no one would have thought a $500 braille display such as the Orbit Reader 20 would be possible. Of course there is a significant difference between $100 and $500, but there have been several projects working on developing less expensive braille technology. Whether they can manage to produce such a device for $100 who knows, but even if it costs 2 to 3 hundred dollars, that would still make it much more affordable than most other currently available braille technology.

----- Original Message -----
From: Flor Lynch <mailto:florlync@iol.ie>
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 2:20 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd

Yes, that is different from what I got, in Ireland (which would be same as the UK for this site.) So I probably had an esier time reading it than you or others in the States, in that all I needed to do was to go to top of page, then use the letter n (for next bloxk of text) –having found the usual order of tweets/.comments was not being observed - till I got to the article title, followed by the article body, etc. (Most things appear to be more accessible in their US incarnations. Not this one. Interesting.)

There used to be a text-to-Braille OCR feature implemented in some Index Braille emobsser-related software; but it may not have been ready for prime time, as we have not heard of anything in that line for several years.

You’re probably right in your view about the prospects of anything substantial coming out of this research for a considerable time yet, if ever; but there are the beginnings of a concerted move on the part of many organisations for and of the blind to increase, and to foster the development of technological tools to increase, levels of Braille literacy and conseequently more everyday use of Braille. by blind English-language users of computer and smart devices.

From: Gene <mailto:gsasner@ripco.com>
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 6:51 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd
I don't know if these problems vary depending on what part of the world you view the site in. When I follow the link, in the United States, I am not placed on a page with any text except the title. I tried with three different browsers.

My thoughts about the article are that it's probably just one more gee whiz article of the type that comes along now and then. And despite what the hypsters say, it won't change access for that many people. Most blind people use speech. But the media seems incapable, through its ignorance which it isn't interested in recognizing, and just following the line of least resistance in reporting hyped claims without doing any work to verify or get perspective on them. You know who is going to benefit the most? probably not blind people, unless the designers pull off some sort of miracle in how cheaply they can provide good Braille access for a very low price. The main beneficiaries are going to be those on the development team, who will benefit in their careers for getting publicity about what great designers they are.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Flor Lynch <mailto:florlync@iol.ie>
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 12:35 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd

Gene wrote in Part:

“The Forbes site evidently has serious accessibility problems, ...”

I would classify them as usability issues. The site is intentionally designed that way, at least for free users.

Do you have any any opinions on the substance of the article itself? The URL was linked to in a tweet by Sight and Sound, a leading UK blindness technology products reseller. Text-to-Braille OCR is a great idea, but I fear that to implement it well will cost considerably more than $100.

From: Gene <mailto:gsasner@ripco.com>
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 5:39 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd
To see the article on one page, use this link:
http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:N9W4WOTDZ0QJ:http://www.forbes.com/sites/devinthorpe/2016/12/20/these-6-women-undergrads-at-mit-invented-a-game-changer-for-the-blind/%2Bmit+gamechanger+for+blind+forbes&client=firefox-a&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&gbv=1&hl=en&ct=clnk

It's a Google cache of the article. The Forbes site evidently has serious accessibility problems, at least if you haven't subscribed and this Google cache bypasses these problems. When I am confronted by a situation like this, I do a Google search for the article and try using the cache.

You probably won't see the word cache below the start of the result. You will probably see something like a button to open a menu. Use the menu to go to the cached page.
Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Flor Lynch <mailto:florlync@iol.ie>
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 9:54 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd

[I came across this article from my ‘daily’ Twitter email summary. It’s about a prototype of a text-to-braille OCR device. The article is unfortunately too complex to reproduce here, as it’s spread over two different ‘pages’ along with all the intervening headers and ads.

However, the interested reader can start by heading to
http://www.forbes.com/sites/devinthorpe/2016/12/20/these-6-women-undergrads-at-mit-invented-a-game-changer-for-the-blind/#6bee0cde7e96

- and is the device achievable in reality at the price point of $100, that they want? But it’s an interesting prospect that may produce some interesting results over the next few years.


Flor Lynch
 

But why do braille displays seem to get delayed more often than other assistive tech? You'll recall the ElBraille, which was all the talk of last summer - that is, apart from the Orbit Reader? Well, the ElBraille ain't gonna happen. (Something to do with not being able to pull everything together.) Also, The Braille Dot Smart-watch? That's a few years on since it was supposed to have made a big splash, and ... no ripples have been observed.

I really would like to have OCR text-to-Braille, as it would go some way to restoring the primacy of what's written over what's spoken to us by our screen-readers.

-----Original Message-----
From: Carlos
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 9:27 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd

The release date has apparently been postponed till spring of this year, but
I see no indication that the project has lost support. Whether it is
released this year or even next year, it doesn't change the fact that the
technology has been developed.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Rob" <captinlogic@gmail.com>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 4:19 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game
Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd


Carlos <carlos1106@nyc.rr.com> wrote:
I can understand the skepticism, but keep in mind that just a couple of years ago no one would have thought a $500 braille display such as the Orbit Reader 20 would be possible.
Yeah and where the hel is itt? It was supposed to be released last spring.
Here it is half a year later and still nothing.


Mich Verrier
 

yes I agree. I put down my 50 deposit for that display and have herd nothing. maybe it will be like the stuff from human where where they will support it for a few years then stop celling it or anything can we say trekker breeze and trekker people? I think we can. note just incase people couldn't tell I was beaing sarcastic. from Mich.

-----Original Message-----
From: Rob
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 4:19 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd

Carlos <carlos1106@nyc.rr.com> wrote:
I can understand the skepticism, but keep in mind that just a couple of years ago no one would have thought a $500 braille display such as the Orbit Reader 20 would be possible.
Yeah and where the hel is itt? It was supposed to be released last spring. Here it is half a year later and still nothing.


Gene
 

But that's for the OCR part of the program and the Braille display, inclusive, as I understand the article. 
 
It may come about but I don't think it will be nearly as soon as the article states or implies.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
From: Carlos
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 3:15 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd

I can understand the skepticism, but keep in mind that just a couple of years ago no one would have thought a $500 braille display such as the Orbit Reader 20 would be possible.  Of course there is a significant difference between $100 and $500, but there have been several projects working on developing less expensive braille technology.  Whether they can manage to produce such a device for $100 who knows, but even if it costs 2 to 3 hundred dollars, that would still make it much more affordable than most other currently available braille technology.
----- Original Message -----
From: Flor Lynch
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 2:20 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd

Yes, that is different from what I got, in Ireland (which would be same as the UK for this site.) So I probably had an esier time reading it than you or others in the States, in that all I needed to do was to go to top of page, then use the letter n (for next bloxk of text) –having found the usual order of tweets/.comments was not being observed - till I got to the article title, followed by the article body, etc. (Most things appear to be more accessible in their US incarnations. Not this one. Interesting.) 
 
There used to be a text-to-Braille OCR feature implemented in some Index Braille emobsser-related software; but it may not have been ready for prime time, as we have not heard of anything in that line for several years.
 
You’re probably right in your view about the prospects of anything substantial coming out of this research for a considerable time yet, if ever; but there are the beginnings of a concerted move on the part of many organisations for and of the blind to increase, and to foster the development of technological tools to increase, levels of Braille literacy and conseequently more everyday use of Braille. by blind English-language users of computer and smart devices.
 
From: Gene
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 6:51 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd
I don't know if these problems vary depending on what part of the world you view the site in.  When I follow the link, in the United States, I am not placed on a page with any text except the title.  I tried with three different browsers. 
 
My thoughts about the article are that it's probably just one more gee whiz article of the type that comes along now and then.  And despite what the hypsters say, it won't change access for that many people.  Most blind people use speech.  But the media seems incapable, through its ignorance which it isn't interested in recognizing, and just following the line of least resistance in reporting hyped claims without doing any work to verify or get perspective on them.  You know who is going to benefit the most?  probably not blind people, unless the designers pull off some sort of miracle in how cheaply they can provide good Braille access for a very low price.  The main beneficiaries are going to be those on the development team, who will benefit in their careers for getting publicity about what great designers they are. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Flor Lynch
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 12:35 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd
 
Gene wrote in Part:
 
The Forbes site evidently has serious accessibility problems, ...”
 
I would classify them as usability issues. The site is intentionally designed that way, at least for free users.
 
Do you have any any opinions on the substance of the article itself? The URL was linked to in a tweet by Sight and Sound, a leading UK blindness technology products reseller. Text-to-Braille OCR is a great idea, but I fear that to implement it well will cost considerably more than $100.
From: Gene
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 5:39 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd
To see the article on one page, use this link:
 
It's a Google cache of the article.  The Forbes site evidently has serious accessibility problems, at least if you haven't subscribed and this Google cache bypasses these problems.  When I am confronted by a situation like this, I do a Google search for the article and try using the cache.
 
You probably won't see the word cache below the start of the result.  You will probably see something like a button to open a menu.  Use the menu to go to the cached page.
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Flor Lynch
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 9:54 AM
Subject: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd
 
[I came across this article from my ‘daily’ Twitter email summary. It’s about a prototype of a text-to-braille OCR device. The article is unfortunately too complex to reproduce here, as it’s spread over two different ‘pages’ along with all the intervening headers and ads.
 
However, the interested reader can start by heading to
 
- and is the device achievable in reality at the price point of $100, that they want? But it’s an interesting prospect that may produce some interesting results over the next few years.
 
 


Carlos
 

I think any assistive technology is bound to suffer to some degree from the old rule of supply and demand, but that doesn't mean progress is never made or that I'm going to simply give up hope.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Flor Lynch" <florlync@iol.ie>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 4:38 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd


But why do braille displays seem to get delayed more often than other assistive tech? You'll recall the ElBraille, which was all the talk of last summer - that is, apart from the Orbit Reader? Well, the ElBraille ain't gonna happen. (Something to do with not being able to pull everything together.) Also, The Braille Dot Smart-watch? That's a few years on since it was supposed to have made a big splash, and ... no ripples have been observed.

I really would like to have OCR text-to-Braille, as it would go some way to restoring the primacy of what's written over what's spoken to us by our screen-readers.

-----Original Message-----
From: Carlos
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 9:27 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd

The release date has apparently been postponed till spring of this year, but
I see no indication that the project has lost support. Whether it is
released this year or even next year, it doesn't change the fact that the
technology has been developed.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Rob" <captinlogic@gmail.com>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 4:19 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game
Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd


Carlos <carlos1106@nyc.rr.com> wrote:
I can understand the skepticism, but keep in mind that just a couple of years ago no one would have thought a $500 braille display such as the Orbit Reader 20 would be possible.
Yeah and where the hel is itt? It was supposed to be released last spring.
Here it is half a year later and still nothing.








Carlos
 


I think the most expensive component in such a system will be the braille display.  Scanner technology is comparatively cheap.  Although it sounds as if the software and scanning hardware may require some refinement which may delay it's release, but this was already made clear in the article.

----- Original Message -----
From: Gene
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 4:47 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd

But that's for the OCR part of the program and the Braille display, inclusive, as I understand the article. 
 
It may come about but I don't think it will be nearly as soon as the article states or implies.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Carlos
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 3:15 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd

I can understand the skepticism, but keep in mind that just a couple of years ago no one would have thought a $500 braille display such as the Orbit Reader 20 would be possible.  Of course there is a significant difference between $100 and $500, but there have been several projects working on developing less expensive braille technology.  Whether they can manage to produce such a device for $100 who knows, but even if it costs 2 to 3 hundred dollars, that would still make it much more affordable than most other currently available braille technology.
----- Original Message -----
From: Flor Lynch
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 2:20 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd

Yes, that is different from what I got, in Ireland (which would be same as the UK for this site.) So I probably had an esier time reading it than you or others in the States, in that all I needed to do was to go to top of page, then use the letter n (for next bloxk of text) –having found the usual order of tweets/.comments was not being observed - till I got to the article title, followed by the article body, etc. (Most things appear to be more accessible in their US incarnations. Not this one. Interesting.) 
 
There used to be a text-to-Braille OCR feature implemented in some Index Braille emobsser-related software; but it may not have been ready for prime time, as we have not heard of anything in that line for several years.
 
You’re probably right in your view about the prospects of anything substantial coming out of this research for a considerable time yet, if ever; but there are the beginnings of a concerted move on the part of many organisations for and of the blind to increase, and to foster the development of technological tools to increase, levels of Braille literacy and conseequently more everyday use of Braille. by blind English-language users of computer and smart devices.
 
From: Gene
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 6:51 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd
I don't know if these problems vary depending on what part of the world you view the site in.  When I follow the link, in the United States, I am not placed on a page with any text except the title.  I tried with three different browsers. 
 
My thoughts about the article are that it's probably just one more gee whiz article of the type that comes along now and then.  And despite what the hypsters say, it won't change access for that many people.  Most blind people use speech.  But the media seems incapable, through its ignorance which it isn't interested in recognizing, and just following the line of least resistance in reporting hyped claims without doing any work to verify or get perspective on them.  You know who is going to benefit the most?  probably not blind people, unless the designers pull off some sort of miracle in how cheaply they can provide good Braille access for a very low price.  The main beneficiaries are going to be those on the development team, who will benefit in their careers for getting publicity about what great designers they are. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Flor Lynch
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 12:35 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd
 
Gene wrote in Part:
 
The Forbes site evidently has serious accessibility problems, ...”
 
I would classify them as usability issues. The site is intentionally designed that way, at least for free users.
 
Do you have any any opinions on the substance of the article itself? The URL was linked to in a tweet by Sight and Sound, a leading UK blindness technology products reseller. Text-to-Braille OCR is a great idea, but I fear that to implement it well will cost considerably more than $100.
From: Gene
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 5:39 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd
To see the article on one page, use this link:
 
It's a Google cache of the article.  The Forbes site evidently has serious accessibility problems, at least if you haven't subscribed and this Google cache bypasses these problems.  When I am confronted by a situation like this, I do a Google search for the article and try using the cache.
 
You probably won't see the word cache below the start of the result.  You will probably see something like a button to open a menu.  Use the menu to go to the cached page.
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Flor Lynch
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 9:54 AM
Subject: [TechTalk] These 6 Women Undergrads At MIT Invented A Game Changer For The Blin - forbes.comd
 
[I came across this article from my ‘daily’ Twitter email summary. It’s about a prototype of a text-to-braille OCR device. The article is unfortunately too complex to reproduce here, as it’s spread over two different ‘pages’ along with all the intervening headers and ads.
 
However, the interested reader can start by heading to
 
- and is the device achievable in reality at the price point of $100, that they want? But it’s an interesting prospect that may produce some interesting results over the next few years.
 
 


Ann Parsons
 

Hi all,

Actually, if all the thing does is convert the printed image to a .brf file, that's doable, and probably $100.00 is a reasonable rate. If, on the other hand, they are talking about connecting a scanner to a Braille display, then you've got a hefty price tag. You can actually do the first thing with Kurzie. All you need to do is tell Kurzie to save the .ksi file as .brf. That's an easy do.

Ann P.

--
Ann K. Parsons
Portal Tutoring
** New EMAIL: akp@sero.email
web site: http://www.portaltutoring.info
Skype: Putertutor

"All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost."


Ann Parsons
 

Hi all,

Is the Orbit out yet?

Ann P.

--
Ann K. Parsons
Portal Tutoring
** New EMAIL: akp@sero.email
web site: http://www.portaltutoring.info
Skype: Putertutor

"All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost."