Accessible Program for Remapping Keys on Laptop


Rich DeSteno
 

The subject says it all.  Are there any such programs?

--
Rich De Steno


Mike B <mb69mach1@...>
 


Hi Rich,
 
Yes there is.  Below is a link to the program, tips and steps, but I kind of threw it all together so just read all the way through.
 

----- Original Message -----
From: Rose Combs 
No problems here in my  keyboards that have the applications key.
Unfortunately my laptop and cordless keyboards do not have that particular
key and I often have to search to remember how I did this before I had a
keyboard with an app key. 
Rose Combs
Gary Jackson
Hi Rose,
 
My wireless keyboard doesn't have the application key either. I use a sweet
little key mapping application called sharp keys to map another key I don't use
to the application key. It's very easy to use and free.
http://www.randyrants.com/2008/12/sharpkeys_30.html
 
 
Gary
 
Navigation Tips For Sharp Keys
Setting the punctuation level to read all punctuation will make it much easier to find certain keys.  If you don't set the punctuation to read all you
will need to use the Jaws cursor to read all info for each key.
 
1. To use this utility you must press enter on the file:
"E:\Downloads\sharpkeys3\SharpKeys.exe." There is no installer and no entry
placed on All Programs menu or Desktop.
2. If it pops up, hit Alt + letter R when the "Open File Security Warning"
pops up. SharpKeys will then present it's user interface.
3. Tab to the Add button" and press enter.
4. You will be placed in a list box containing some 235 items representing
your keyboard's individual keys. Down arrow through this list until you
select the key you want to remap. Since I want to remap my Windows
applications key I will down arrow and select the following key: Special:
Application (E0_5D).
5. Tab about 3 times or until you reach the second list box. you can now
down arrow to select what you would like the new key to be. Since I want to
change the default Windows applications key to a second Windows key to the
right of the spacebar, I will select the following key: Special: Right
Windows (E0_5C)
6. Tab to Ok and hit enter.
7. Tab to "Write to Registry" and press enter.
8. You will receive a prompt informing you that you will need to either
reboot or log off for the changes to take effect.
9. I rebooted and now I have a second windows key to the right of the
spacebar.
 
Homepage:
http://sharpkeys.codeplex.com/
 
Download page:
http://sharpkeys.codeplex.com/releases/view/20569
 
Note: not necessarily intended for Windows7 but it worked on Windows7 64 bit
and windows 7 starter 32 bit.
 
JR
From:
Jeremy Richards
For those of you using laptops you might want to take the following info for
a test drive. I've successfully remapped my windows applications key to be a
second windows key. Normally laptops and netbooks don't have a second
windows key on the right of the spacebar, and because it is so useful to me,
I thought I would find a way of remapping my netbook's keyboard. I tried
KeyTweak but it was presenting me with the actual scancodes rather than
names of keys on my keyboard. I found a neat little utility called SharpKey
which does all the work for you. Definitely helps with windows key + E for
explorer, windows key + r for run dialogue, windows key + F, windows key + T
for task bar and such. You will not be without a context menu key since
shift F10 does the very same thing as the windows applications key.
 
1. To use this utility you must press enter on the file:
"E:\Downloads\sharpkeys3\SharpKeys.exe." There is no installer and no entry
placed on All Programs menu or Desktop.
2. If it pops up, hit Alt + letter R when the "Open File Security Warning"
pops up. SharpKeys will then present it's user interface.
3. Tab to the Add button" and press enter.
4. You will be placed in a list box containing some 235 items representing
your keyboard's individual keys. Down arrow through this list until you
select the key you want to remap. Since I want to remap my Windows
applications key I will down arrow and select the following key: Special:
Application (E0_5D).
5. Tab about 3 times or until you reach the second list box. you can now
down arrow to select what you would like the new key to be. Since I want to
change the default Windows applications key to a second Windows key to the
right of the spacebar, I will select the following key: Special: Right
Windows (E0_5C)
6. Tab to Ok and hit enter.
7. Tab to "Write to Registry" and press enter.
8. You will receive a prompt informing you that you will need to either
reboot or log off for the changes to take effect.
9. I rebooted and now I have a second windows key to the right of the
spacebar.
 
 
 
Note: not necessarily intended for Windows7 but it worked on Windows7 64 bit
and windows 7 starter 32 bit.
 
JR

Take care.  Mike.  Sent from my iBarstool.
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, February 07, 2020 5:05 AM
Subject: [TechTalk] Accessible Program for Remapping Keys on Laptop

The subject says it all. Are there any such programs?

--
Rich De Steno




Joe Orozco
 

I didn't see anyone respond to this email. Yes, there's a program
called Sharp Keys. In one column you pick the key you want to remap,
and in the second column you pick the key function you want to replace
it with. Make sure you set your screen reader to read all punctuation
at least temporarily so that you can hear the exact key names. Let me
know if you don't find it on Google.

Joe

On 2/7/20, Rich DeSteno <axcruncher@gmail.com> wrote:
The subject says it all.  Are there any such programs?

--
Rich De Steno





Rich DeSteno
 

I did indeed find this key-remapping program and I find it to be fantastic!  It is easy to use and works perfectly.

On 2/20/2020 11:26 AM, Joe Orozco wrote:
I didn't see anyone respond to this email. Yes, there's a program
called Sharp Keys. In one column you pick the key you want to remap,
and in the second column you pick the key function you want to replace
it with. Make sure you set your screen reader to read all punctuation
at least temporarily so that you can hear the exact key names. Let me
know if you don't find it on Google.

Joe

On 2/7/20, Rich DeSteno <axcruncher@gmail.com> wrote:
The subject says it all.  Are there any such programs?

--
Rich De Steno




--
Rich De Steno


Penny Golden
 

Hi.  I just got a laptop and haven't begun to fight, as it were.

But tell me, or us, if you wish, what you've renamed.   Inquiring minds want to know.

The first thing I did was to have a friend turn off the mouse pad.  Sorry, I did get that done by a sighted friend of mine. Could I have done it myself?  Yes, but it was tricky for him, and he works I T day in and day out every day.  Could I have done it on my own?  Probably; but it would have been a time-waster.  And that is why I do sometimes have things done for me.

I don't have to prove anything to myself. I can do many things I choose not to do, because doing them would complicate life; and not doing them does not make me less capable.

Sorry, but that's my take on this.

And to nail it down, I just love BeMyEyes.  It is so delightful to have someone do a little reading or identifying. the other evening late, I spoke to an american in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.  two nights later, I spoke to a delightful lady in Iran.

Pen

On 2/20/2020 11:20 AM, Rich DeSteno wrote:
I did indeed find this key-remapping program and I find it to be fantastic!  It is easy to use and works perfectly.


On 2/20/2020 11:26 AM, Joe Orozco wrote:
I didn't see anyone respond to this email. Yes, there's a program
called Sharp Keys. In one column you pick the key you want to remap,
and in the second column you pick the key function you want to replace
it with. Make sure you set your screen reader to read all punctuation
at least temporarily so that you can hear the exact key names. Let me
know if you don't find it on Google.

Joe

On 2/7/20, Rich DeSteno <axcruncher@gmail.com> wrote:
The subject says it all.  Are there any such programs?

--
Rich De Steno





Gene
 

Does the laptop have a numpad?  If so, you may not find a need to reassign anything.  If it doesn't have one, you can buy a USB numpad if you want to use one.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2020 11:28 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Accessible Program for Remapping Keys on Laptop

Hi.  I just got a laptop and haven't begun to fight, as it were.

But tell me, or us, if you wish, what you've renamed.   Inquiring minds
want to know.

The first thing I did was to have a friend turn off the mouse pad. 
Sorry, I did get that done by a sighted friend of mine. Could I have
done it myself?  Yes, but it was tricky for him, and he works I T day in
and day out every day.  Could I have done it on my own?  Probably; but
it would have been a time-waster.  And that is why I do sometimes have
things done for me.

I don't have to prove anything to myself. I can do many things I choose
not to do, because doing them would complicate life; and not doing them
does not make me less capable.

Sorry, but that's my take on this.

And to nail it down, I just love BeMyEyes.  It is so delightful to have
someone do a little reading or identifying. the other evening late, I
spoke to an american in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.  two nights later, I spoke
to a delightful lady in Iran.

Pen



On 2/20/2020 11:20 AM, Rich DeSteno wrote:
> I did indeed find this key-remapping program and I find it to be
> fantastic!  It is easy to use and works perfectly.
>
>
> On 2/20/2020 11:26 AM, Joe Orozco wrote:
>> I didn't see anyone respond to this email. Yes, there's a program
>> called Sharp Keys. In one column you pick the key you want to remap,
>> and in the second column you pick the key function you want to replace
>> it with. Make sure you set your screen reader to read all punctuation
>> at least temporarily so that you can hear the exact key names. Let me
>> know if you don't find it on Google.
>>
>> Joe
>>
>> On 2/7/20, Rich DeSteno <axcruncher@...> wrote:
>>> The subject says it all.  Are there any such programs?
>>>
>>> --
>>> Rich De Steno
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>




Penny Golden
 

Hi, Gene, yes, the laptop has the num-pad. 

I rather thought that often I would use the laptop with an external keyboard like the one on my pc, to just cut down on my possible frustrations. but there would be times that I would want to just drop an email, or write something brief.

In any event, I'm sure my upcoming fun with a laptop will require help from the list.

Thanks so much.

Penny



On 2/20/2020 12:00 PM, Gene wrote:
Does the laptop have a numpad?  If so, you may not find a need to reassign anything.  If it doesn't have one, you can buy a USB numpad if you want to use one.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2020 11:28 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Accessible Program for Remapping Keys on Laptop

Hi.  I just got a laptop and haven't begun to fight, as it were.

But tell me, or us, if you wish, what you've renamed.   Inquiring minds
want to know.

The first thing I did was to have a friend turn off the mouse pad. 
Sorry, I did get that done by a sighted friend of mine. Could I have
done it myself?  Yes, but it was tricky for him, and he works I T day in
and day out every day.  Could I have done it on my own?  Probably; but
it would have been a time-waster.  And that is why I do sometimes have
things done for me.

I don't have to prove anything to myself. I can do many things I choose
not to do, because doing them would complicate life; and not doing them
does not make me less capable.

Sorry, but that's my take on this.

And to nail it down, I just love BeMyEyes.  It is so delightful to have
someone do a little reading or identifying. the other evening late, I
spoke to an american in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.  two nights later, I spoke
to a delightful lady in Iran.

Pen



On 2/20/2020 11:20 AM, Rich DeSteno wrote:
> I did indeed find this key-remapping program and I find it to be
> fantastic!  It is easy to use and works perfectly.
>
>
> On 2/20/2020 11:26 AM, Joe Orozco wrote:
>> I didn't see anyone respond to this email. Yes, there's a program
>> called Sharp Keys. In one column you pick the key you want to remap,
>> and in the second column you pick the key function you want to replace
>> it with. Make sure you set your screen reader to read all punctuation
>> at least temporarily so that you can hear the exact key names. Let me
>> know if you don't find it on Google.
>>
>> Joe
>>
>> On 2/7/20, Rich DeSteno <axcruncher@...> wrote:
>>> The subject says it all.  Are there any such programs?
>>>
>>> --
>>> Rich De Steno
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>





Gene
 

I think the real thing to get used to will be the keyboard itself, with its smaller keys and different action than a desktop keyboard. 
 
My laptop only has one Windows key and I suspect that is common.  I can see where you might want a right Windows key but I never changed anything because I don't want to lose any key function that is already available.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2020 12:05 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Accessible Program for Remapping Keys on Laptop

Hi, Gene, yes, the laptop has the num-pad. 

I rather thought that often I would use the laptop with an external keyboard like the one on my pc, to just cut down on my possible frustrations. but there would be times that I would want to just drop an email, or write something brief.

In any event, I'm sure my upcoming fun with a laptop will require help from the list.

Thanks so much.

Penny



On 2/20/2020 12:00 PM, Gene wrote:
Does the laptop have a numpad?  If so, you may not find a need to reassign anything.  If it doesn't have one, you can buy a USB numpad if you want to use one.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2020 11:28 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Accessible Program for Remapping Keys on Laptop

Hi.  I just got a laptop and haven't begun to fight, as it were.

But tell me, or us, if you wish, what you've renamed.   Inquiring minds
want to know.

The first thing I did was to have a friend turn off the mouse pad. 
Sorry, I did get that done by a sighted friend of mine. Could I have
done it myself?  Yes, but it was tricky for him, and he works I T day in
and day out every day.  Could I have done it on my own?  Probably; but
it would have been a time-waster.  And that is why I do sometimes have
things done for me.

I don't have to prove anything to myself. I can do many things I choose
not to do, because doing them would complicate life; and not doing them
does not make me less capable.

Sorry, but that's my take on this.

And to nail it down, I just love BeMyEyes.  It is so delightful to have
someone do a little reading or identifying. the other evening late, I
spoke to an american in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.  two nights later, I spoke
to a delightful lady in Iran.

Pen



On 2/20/2020 11:20 AM, Rich DeSteno wrote:
> I did indeed find this key-remapping program and I find it to be
> fantastic!  It is easy to use and works perfectly.
>
>
> On 2/20/2020 11:26 AM, Joe Orozco wrote:
>> I didn't see anyone respond to this email. Yes, there's a program
>> called Sharp Keys. In one column you pick the key you want to remap,
>> and in the second column you pick the key function you want to replace
>> it with. Make sure you set your screen reader to read all punctuation
>> at least temporarily so that you can hear the exact key names. Let me
>> know if you don't find it on Google.
>>
>> Joe
>>
>> On 2/7/20, Rich DeSteno <axcruncher@...> wrote:
>>> The subject says it all.  Are there any such programs?
>>>
>>> --
>>> Rich De Steno
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>





Rich DeSteno
 

In my case, my new laptop did not have dedicated home, end, or applications keys, three keys that I use frequently.  You had to use the function key with the PageUp and PageDown keys to get the home and end actions.  It did have three music navigation keys, which I did not need.  I remapped those three keys to home, end, and applications keys.  They work perfectly and make using the computer so much easier.

Rich De Steno



On 2/20/2020 1:00 PM, Gene wrote:
Does the laptop have a numpad?  If so, you may not find a need to reassign anything.  If it doesn't have one, you can buy a USB numpad if you want to use one.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2020 11:28 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Accessible Program for Remapping Keys on Laptop

Hi.  I just got a laptop and haven't begun to fight, as it were.

But tell me, or us, if you wish, what you've renamed.   Inquiring minds
want to know.

The first thing I did was to have a friend turn off the mouse pad. 
Sorry, I did get that done by a sighted friend of mine. Could I have
done it myself?  Yes, but it was tricky for him, and he works I T day in
and day out every day.  Could I have done it on my own?  Probably; but
it would have been a time-waster.  And that is why I do sometimes have
things done for me.

I don't have to prove anything to myself. I can do many things I choose
not to do, because doing them would complicate life; and not doing them
does not make me less capable.

Sorry, but that's my take on this.

And to nail it down, I just love BeMyEyes.  It is so delightful to have
someone do a little reading or identifying. the other evening late, I
spoke to an american in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.  two nights later, I spoke
to a delightful lady in Iran.

Pen



On 2/20/2020 11:20 AM, Rich DeSteno wrote:
> I did indeed find this key-remapping program and I find it to be
> fantastic!  It is easy to use and works perfectly.
>
>
> On 2/20/2020 11:26 AM, Joe Orozco wrote:
>> I didn't see anyone respond to this email. Yes, there's a program
>> called Sharp Keys. In one column you pick the key you want to remap,
>> and in the second column you pick the key function you want to replace
>> it with. Make sure you set your screen reader to read all punctuation
>> at least temporarily so that you can hear the exact key names. Let me
>> know if you don't find it on Google.
>>
>> Joe
>>
>> On 2/7/20, Rich DeSteno <axcruncher@...> wrote:
>>> The subject says it all.  Are there any such programs?
>>>
>>> --
>>> Rich De Steno
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>



-- 
Rich De Steno