locked fake out!!


Ann Parsons
 

Hi all,

With all the discussion today, I thought I would share the story of a friend of mine. I won't share his name because that would not be wise. However, I tell this story to emphasize the fact that everyone should be encouraged to do his or her best!

This friend of mine is fully sighted. He was labeled as having severe learning differences. When he was in Middle School, the head of the special Ed dept. of his school told his parents that "I'm so sorry, but we just don't think your son will amount to much because of his learning difficulties.".

Needless to say, his parents took him out of that particular school and enrolled him elsewhere. They also employed me to tutor him. I worked with him for a couple of years.

My student and friend graduated from high school, Community College with honors, Rochester Institute of Technology with honors. He is currently working in a managerial position in a company here in Rochester, earning six figures! He is happily married and his wife is expecting! They own a house!

I would just love to stand in front of that Special Education twit of an administrator and just say, "Fake out, you bastard!!" That would give me extreme pleasure!! My friend is soccessful, in whatever way you measure success!

So if somebody tells you that you won't amount to much, thank them and then prove them wrong!!

Ann P.

--
Ann K. Parsons
Portal Tutoring
EMAIL: akp@sero.email
Author of The Demmies: http://www.dldbooks.com/annparsons/
Portal Tutoring web site: http://www.portaltutoring.info
Skype: Putertutor

"All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost."


Ron Canazzi
 

Hi Group,

As long as we're into this intense discussion about the nature and purpose of education/life/existence, I thought I would add a little levity to the discussion.

My very Catholic family knew a number of clergy when I was a little boy.  When I went blind at around twelve years old, I overheard my mother being counseled by a nun.  One of the things she said was: "Well, I know this must be very difficult to deal with (having a blind child) but think of it Ann, you won't have to worry about his teenage years--you know--maturity--having sex before marriage--and so on.

This nun must have thought in her relatively restricted environment that blind people wouldn't be sexual or involved in all that evils stuff.

(SOLID CAPS) IF SHE ONLY KNEW...!

On 3/8/2020 4:04 PM, Ann Parsons wrote:
Hi all,

With all the discussion today, I thought I would share the story of a friend of mine.  I won't share his name because that would not be wise. However, I tell this story to emphasize the fact that everyone should be encouraged to do his or her best!

This friend of mine is fully sighted.  He was labeled as having severe learning differences.  When he was in Middle School, the head of the special Ed dept. of his school told his parents that "I'm so sorry, but we just don't think your son will amount to much because of his learning difficulties.".

Needless to say, his parents took him out of that particular school and enrolled him elsewhere.  They also employed me to tutor him.   I worked with him for a couple of years.

My student and friend graduated from high school, Community College with honors, Rochester Institute of Technology with honors.  He is currently working in a managerial position in a company here in Rochester, earning six figures!  He is happily married and his  wife is expecting!  They own a house!

I would just love to stand in front of that Special Education twit of an administrator and just say, "Fake out, you bastard!!"  That would give me extreme pleasure!!  My friend is soccessful, in whatever way you measure success!

So if somebody tells you that you won't amount to much, thank them and then prove them wrong!!

Ann P.
--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


Pamela Dominguez
 

Good for your friend! I don't blame you for wanting to do that. I'm glad he is a success and happily married. Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Ann Parsons
Sent: Sunday, March 08, 2020 4:04 PM
To: techtalk@groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] fake out!!

Hi all,

With all the discussion today, I thought I would share the story of a
friend of mine. I won't share his name because that would not be wise.
However, I tell this story to emphasize the fact that everyone should
be encouraged to do his or her best!

This friend of mine is fully sighted. He was labeled as having severe
learning differences. When he was in Middle School, the head of the
special Ed dept. of his school told his parents that "I'm so sorry, but
we just don't think your son will amount to much because of his
learning difficulties.".

Needless to say, his parents took him out of that particular school and
enrolled him elsewhere. They also employed me to tutor him. I worked
with him for a couple of years.

My student and friend graduated from high school, Community College
with honors, Rochester Institute of Technology with honors. He is
currently working in a managerial position in a company here in
Rochester, earning six figures! He is happily married and his wife is
expecting! They own a house!

I would just love to stand in front of that Special Education twit of
an administrator and just say, "Fake out, you bastard!!" That would
give me extreme pleasure!! My friend is soccessful, in whatever way
you measure success!

So if somebody tells you that you won't amount to much, thank them and
then prove them wrong!!

Ann P.

--
Ann K. Parsons
Portal Tutoring
EMAIL: akp@sero.email
Author of The Demmies: http://www.dldbooks.com/annparsons/
Portal Tutoring web site: http://www.portaltutoring.info
Skype: Putertutor

"All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost."




--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


Pamela Dominguez
 

Yeah! She was sure living under a rock! (smile) Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Ron Canazzi
Sent: Sunday, March 08, 2020 5:14 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] fake out!!

Hi Group,

As long as we're into this intense discussion about the nature and
purpose of education/life/existence, I thought I would add a little
levity to the discussion.

My very Catholic family knew a number of clergy when I was a little
boy. When I went blind at around twelve years old, I overheard my
mother being counseled by a nun. One of the things she said was: "Well,
I know this must be very difficult to deal with (having a blind child)
but think of it Ann, you won't have to worry about his teenage
years--you know--maturity--having sex before marriage--and so on.

This nun must have thought in her relatively restricted environment that
blind people wouldn't be sexual or involved in all that evils stuff.

(SOLID CAPS) IF SHE ONLY KNEW...!


On 3/8/2020 4:04 PM, Ann Parsons wrote:
Hi all,

With all the discussion today, I thought I would share the story of a friend of mine. I won't share his name because that would not be wise. However, I tell this story to emphasize the fact that everyone should be encouraged to do his or her best!

This friend of mine is fully sighted. He was labeled as having severe learning differences. When he was in Middle School, the head of the special Ed dept. of his school told his parents that "I'm so sorry, but we just don't think your son will amount to much because of his learning difficulties.".

Needless to say, his parents took him out of that particular school and enrolled him elsewhere. They also employed me to tutor him. I worked with him for a couple of years.

My student and friend graduated from high school, Community College with honors, Rochester Institute of Technology with honors. He is currently working in a managerial position in a company here in Rochester, earning six figures! He is happily married and his wife is expecting! They own a house!

I would just love to stand in front of that Special Education twit of an administrator and just say, "Fake out, you bastard!!" That would give me extreme pleasure!! My friend is soccessful, in whatever way you measure success!

So if somebody tells you that you won't amount to much, thank them and then prove them wrong!!

Ann P.
--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"





--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


Victor
 

Hi everyone:

I can’t tell you how many sided people I have encountered over the years who have mistakenly assumed and believed that a blind person could never be physically attracted to a member of the opposite sex because we can’t see. They assume that physical attraction only comes through eyesight. How wrong they are! I have to tell them that we can become physically attracted to someone through the sound of their voice, their smell and their touch. That nun your parents spoke with was only thinking what most cited people think. It really had nothing to do with her religious restriction. It’s a common misconception held by the sighted world.

As for learning differences/disabilities, there was a nun by the name of mother Angelica. As a child, she had a learning difference/disability which educators helped her overcome. She went on to found the eternal word television network which is the largest Christian media ministry. EWTN produces television programs, radio programs websites and publishing. Mother Angelica was recently given a posthumous honor in Alabama alongside Rosa Parks and other notable women from Alabama. I wouldn’t be surprised if the Catholic Church canonized her someday. She is just more proof that people with learning challenges can go on to do great things. She always said that she appreciated dumb people and dumb Saints because she knew they could do great things. She said that the secret is to trust in God and surround yourself with people who are smarter than you. If you ever get a chance, look up mother Angelica on YouTube. She’s one of the best Christian evangelists ever. Just my opinion.

Blessings,

Victor

On Mar 8, 2020, at 2:14 PM, Ron Canazzi <aa2vm@roadrunner.com> wrote:

Hi Group,

As long as we're into this intense discussion about the nature and purpose of education/life/existence, I thought I would add a little levity to the discussion.

My very Catholic family knew a number of clergy when I was a little boy. When I went blind at around twelve years old, I overheard my mother being counseled by a nun. One of the things she said was: "Well, I know this must be very difficult to deal with (having a blind child) but think of it Ann, you won't have to worry about his teenage years--you know--maturity--having sex before marriage--and so on.

This nun must have thought in her relatively restricted environment that blind people wouldn't be sexual or involved in all that evils stuff.

(SOLID CAPS) IF SHE ONLY KNEW...!


On 3/8/2020 4:04 PM, Ann Parsons wrote:
Hi all,

With all the discussion today, I thought I would share the story of a friend of mine. I won't share his name because that would not be wise. However, I tell this story to emphasize the fact that everyone should be encouraged to do his or her best!

This friend of mine is fully sighted. He was labeled as having severe learning differences. When he was in Middle School, the head of the special Ed dept. of his school told his parents that "I'm so sorry, but we just don't think your son will amount to much because of his learning difficulties.".

Needless to say, his parents took him out of that particular school and enrolled him elsewhere. They also employed me to tutor him. I worked with him for a couple of years.

My student and friend graduated from high school, Community College with honors, Rochester Institute of Technology with honors. He is currently working in a managerial position in a company here in Rochester, earning six figures! He is happily married and his wife is expecting! They own a house!

I would just love to stand in front of that Special Education twit of an administrator and just say, "Fake out, you bastard!!" That would give me extreme pleasure!! My friend is soccessful, in whatever way you measure success!

So if somebody tells you that you won't amount to much, thank them and then prove them wrong!!

Ann P.
--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"




Shelly Kane
 

Thanks for sharing that story about your friend.  That is awesome for him to be in a job and happily married and living a normal life.  People put labels on the disabled and think we can't do normal things and it really frustrates me.  I had a rehabilitation counselor tell my mom when I was 18 years old that I couldn't go to college and I belonged in a sheltered workshop.  He wouldn't pay for school for me so I went out and paid myself and took some secretarial classes and I had A's in all of them and I got one B. I felt like throwing my transcript in his face.  I will also admit that it's very hard finding  employment and dating.  Those are the things that I have struggled with.

Shelly

On 3/8/2020 3:37 PM, Pamela Dominguez wrote:
Yeah!  She was sure living under a rock!  (smile)  Pam.

-----Original Message----- From: Ron Canazzi
Sent: Sunday, March 08, 2020 5:14 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] fake out!!

Hi Group,

As long as we're into this intense discussion about the nature and
purpose of education/life/existence, I thought I would add a little
levity to the discussion.

My very Catholic family knew a number of clergy when I was a little
boy.  When I went blind at around twelve years old, I overheard my
mother being counseled by a nun.  One of the things she said was: "Well,
I know this must be very difficult to deal with (having a blind child)
but think of it Ann, you won't have to worry about his teenage
years--you know--maturity--having sex before marriage--and so on.

This nun must have thought in her relatively restricted environment that
blind people wouldn't be sexual or involved in all that evils stuff.

(SOLID CAPS) IF SHE ONLY KNEW...!


On 3/8/2020 4:04 PM, Ann Parsons wrote:
Hi all,

With all the discussion today, I thought I would share the story of a friend of mine.  I won't share his name because that would not be wise. However, I tell this story to emphasize the fact that everyone should be encouraged to do his or her best!

This friend of mine is fully sighted.  He was labeled as having severe learning differences.  When he was in Middle School, the head of the special Ed dept. of his school told his parents that "I'm so sorry, but we just don't think your son will amount to much because of his learning difficulties.".

Needless to say, his parents took him out of that particular school and enrolled him elsewhere.  They also employed me to tutor him.   I worked with him for a couple of years.

My student and friend graduated from high school, Community College with honors, Rochester Institute of Technology with honors.  He is currently working in a managerial position in a company here in Rochester, earning six figures!  He is happily married and his  wife is expecting!  They own a house!

I would just love to stand in front of that Special Education twit of an administrator and just say, "Fake out, you bastard!!"  That would give me extreme pleasure!!  My friend is soccessful, in whatever way you measure success!

So if somebody tells you that you won't amount to much, thank them and then prove them wrong!!

Ann P.


chris judge
 

Yes, one day I fully hope the student I mentioned gets the same chance to
confront the person who told her she would just be wasting everyones time
and money if she went to university. I've been blind since birth. I'm lucky
because my parents were supportive and encouraging. They always believed
blindness wouldn't hold me back. I know not all kids are so lucky.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ann
Parsons
Sent: March 8, 2020 5:04 PM
To: techtalk@groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] fake out!!

Hi all,

With all the discussion today, I thought I would share the story of a friend
of mine. I won't share his name because that would not be wise.
However, I tell this story to emphasize the fact that everyone should be
encouraged to do his or her best!

This friend of mine is fully sighted. He was labeled as having severe
learning differences. When he was in Middle School, the head of the special
Ed dept. of his school told his parents that "I'm so sorry, but we just
don't think your son will amount to much because of his learning
difficulties.".

Needless to say, his parents took him out of that particular school and
enrolled him elsewhere. They also employed me to tutor him. I worked
with him for a couple of years.

My student and friend graduated from high school, Community College with
honors, Rochester Institute of Technology with honors. He is currently
working in a managerial position in a company here in Rochester, earning six
figures! He is happily married and his wife is expecting! They own a
house!

I would just love to stand in front of that Special Education twit of an
administrator and just say, "Fake out, you bastard!!" That would give me
extreme pleasure!! My friend is soccessful, in whatever way you measure
success!

So if somebody tells you that you won't amount to much, thank them and then
prove them wrong!!

Ann P.

--
Ann K. Parsons
Portal Tutoring
EMAIL: akp@sero.email
Author of The Demmies: http://www.dldbooks.com/annparsons/
Portal Tutoring web site: http://www.portaltutoring.info
Skype: Putertutor

"All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost."


chris judge
 

Smile, yes if she only knew. A couple of years ago an older gentlemen, who was a Catholic priest, became blind. The catholic diasis treated him like a lepper. They couldn't wait to get him out of the church and were not the least bit interested in working with us to help find solutions so the poor guy could continue doing gods work, which was his passion. Great Christian message there.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ron Canazzi
Sent: March 8, 2020 6:14 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] fake out!!

Hi Group,

As long as we're into this intense discussion about the nature and purpose of education/life/existence, I thought I would add a little levity to the discussion.

My very Catholic family knew a number of clergy when I was a little boy. When I went blind at around twelve years old, I overheard my mother being counseled by a nun. One of the things she said was: "Well, I know this must be very difficult to deal with (having a blind child) but think of it Ann, you won't have to worry about his teenage years--you know--maturity--having sex before marriage--and so on.

This nun must have thought in her relatively restricted environment that blind people wouldn't be sexual or involved in all that evils stuff.

(SOLID CAPS) IF SHE ONLY KNEW...!


On 3/8/2020 4:04 PM, Ann Parsons wrote:
Hi all,

With all the discussion today, I thought I would share the story of a
friend of mine. I won't share his name because that would not be
wise. However, I tell this story to emphasize the fact that everyone
should be encouraged to do his or her best!

This friend of mine is fully sighted. He was labeled as having severe
learning differences. When he was in Middle School, the head of the
special Ed dept. of his school told his parents that "I'm so sorry,
but we just don't think your son will amount to much because of his
learning difficulties.".

Needless to say, his parents took him out of that particular school
and enrolled him elsewhere. They also employed me to tutor him. I
worked with him for a couple of years.

My student and friend graduated from high school, Community College
with honors, Rochester Institute of Technology with honors. He is
currently working in a managerial position in a company here in
Rochester, earning six figures! He is happily married and his wife
is expecting! They own a house!

I would just love to stand in front of that Special Education twit of
an administrator and just say, "Fake out, you bastard!!" That would
give me extreme pleasure!! My friend is soccessful, in whatever way
you measure success!

So if somebody tells you that you won't amount to much, thank them and
then prove them wrong!!

Ann P.
--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


Michael Mote
 

I have been following this thread of messages, and wasn't sure if I
should post or not, but I decided to do so after reading the story of
the man who was told he wouldn't amount to much. That mentality is so
unbelievable to me. I know it exists in many people. I have had
countless opportunities to see that side of people, but also the other
side, when I was given a chance to prove what I could do. I was very
fortunate to be given a wonderful education from K-12. Then, I went to
college, and wanted to major in communications. I was told by the
department head that I would not be able to do that, since the video
classes that I could not take were indeed required courses. He was not
willing to make any adjustments, and I did not ask him to do so.
Somehow though, in just two years, they did make changes, and those
curriculum adjustments allowed me to graduate with a degree in my
chosen field. I will never forget the awkward conversation I had with
the same department on the day before I walked across that stage to
receive my diploma. I must say, it was a satisfying moment in my
career. thankfully, I have gone on to enjoy more success, and have
proven the doubters wrong along the way. I have had my share of
disappointments as well. I have been told on many occasions that I
would get a call back for a job opportunity, and I'm still waiting on
those people to call me back. They never will, so I move on. I am
currently happily employes now, and as far as I am concerned, I'm glad
those people who lied about a call back never did call. It turned out
better for me anyway. I will close by saying this. Success depends on
the person. If you want something bad enough, you can have it. Lists
like these help those of us who use technology every day learn more
about how to do things to help us be more independent, and ultimately
more successful. I think discussions like these are helpful. You get
to hear a lot of different perspectives, from a lot of blind and
visually impaired people. Thanks all for sharing.

On 3/9/20, chris judge <chrisjudge1967@gmail.com> wrote:
Smile, yes if she only knew. A couple of years ago an older gentlemen, who
was a Catholic priest, became blind. The catholic diasis treated him like a
lepper. They couldn't wait to get him out of the church and were not the
least bit interested in working with us to help find solutions so the poor
guy could continue doing gods work, which was his passion. Great Christian
message there.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ron
Canazzi
Sent: March 8, 2020 6:14 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] fake out!!

Hi Group,

As long as we're into this intense discussion about the nature and purpose
of education/life/existence, I thought I would add a little levity to the
discussion.

My very Catholic family knew a number of clergy when I was a little boy.
When I went blind at around twelve years old, I overheard my mother being
counseled by a nun. One of the things she said was: "Well, I know this must
be very difficult to deal with (having a blind child) but think of it Ann,
you won't have to worry about his teenage years--you know--maturity--having
sex before marriage--and so on.

This nun must have thought in her relatively restricted environment that
blind people wouldn't be sexual or involved in all that evils stuff.

(SOLID CAPS) IF SHE ONLY KNEW...!


On 3/8/2020 4:04 PM, Ann Parsons wrote:
Hi all,

With all the discussion today, I thought I would share the story of a
friend of mine. I won't share his name because that would not be
wise. However, I tell this story to emphasize the fact that everyone
should be encouraged to do his or her best!

This friend of mine is fully sighted. He was labeled as having severe
learning differences. When he was in Middle School, the head of the
special Ed dept. of his school told his parents that "I'm so sorry,
but we just don't think your son will amount to much because of his
learning difficulties.".

Needless to say, his parents took him out of that particular school
and enrolled him elsewhere. They also employed me to tutor him. I
worked with him for a couple of years.

My student and friend graduated from high school, Community College
with honors, Rochester Institute of Technology with honors. He is
currently working in a managerial position in a company here in
Rochester, earning six figures! He is happily married and his wife
is expecting! They own a house!

I would just love to stand in front of that Special Education twit of
an administrator and just say, "Fake out, you bastard!!" That would
give me extreme pleasure!! My friend is soccessful, in whatever way
you measure success!

So if somebody tells you that you won't amount to much, thank them and
then prove them wrong!!

Ann P.
--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"









Pamela Dominguez
 

Oh, and it's just so wonderful, (not), when a stranger outside offers to help you, say, find a store, and when you get there, they expect that this stranger, who has kindly offered to help, is thought to be your caregiver. It is so embarrassing, because you have to nip that in the bud before the person starts thinking: "Oh no! What did I get myself into?" Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Shelly Kane
Sent: Monday, March 09, 2020 3:36 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] fake out!!

Thanks for sharing that story about your friend. That is awesome for
him to be in a job and happily married and living a normal life. People
put labels on the disabled and think we can't do normal things and it
really frustrates me. I had a rehabilitation counselor tell my mom when
I was 18 years old that I couldn't go to college and I belonged in a
sheltered workshop. He wouldn't pay for school for me so I went out and
paid myself and took some secretarial classes and I had A's in all of
them and I got one B. I felt like throwing my transcript in his face. I
will also admit that it's very hard finding employment and dating.
Those are the things that I have struggled with.

Shelly

On 3/8/2020 3:37 PM, Pamela Dominguez wrote:
Yeah! She was sure living under a rock! (smile) Pam.

-----Original Message----- From: Ron Canazzi
Sent: Sunday, March 08, 2020 5:14 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] fake out!!

Hi Group,

As long as we're into this intense discussion about the nature and
purpose of education/life/existence, I thought I would add a little
levity to the discussion.

My very Catholic family knew a number of clergy when I was a little
boy. When I went blind at around twelve years old, I overheard my
mother being counseled by a nun. One of the things she said was: "Well,
I know this must be very difficult to deal with (having a blind child)
but think of it Ann, you won't have to worry about his teenage
years--you know--maturity--having sex before marriage--and so on.

This nun must have thought in her relatively restricted environment that
blind people wouldn't be sexual or involved in all that evils stuff.

(SOLID CAPS) IF SHE ONLY KNEW...!


On 3/8/2020 4:04 PM, Ann Parsons wrote:
Hi all,

With all the discussion today, I thought I would share the story of a friend of mine. I won't share his name because that would not be wise. However, I tell this story to emphasize the fact that everyone should be encouraged to do his or her best!

This friend of mine is fully sighted. He was labeled as having severe learning differences. When he was in Middle School, the head of the special Ed dept. of his school told his parents that "I'm so sorry, but we just don't think your son will amount to much because of his learning difficulties.".

Needless to say, his parents took him out of that particular school and enrolled him elsewhere. They also employed me to tutor him. I worked with him for a couple of years.

My student and friend graduated from high school, Community College with honors, Rochester Institute of Technology with honors. He is currently working in a managerial position in a company here in Rochester, earning six figures! He is happily married and his wife is expecting! They own a house!

I would just love to stand in front of that Special Education twit of an administrator and just say, "Fake out, you bastard!!" That would give me extreme pleasure!! My friend is soccessful, in whatever way you measure success!

So if somebody tells you that you won't amount to much, thank them and then prove them wrong!!

Ann P.



--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


chris judge
 

My friend Travis was telling me about a year ago that one of his colleagues approached him at work and said:
"Hey Travis, that was a nice thing you were doing on Saturday." Travis asked, "what nice thing was that?" His colleague responded, "Helping that blind man around the store." Travis said, "I wasn't helping him around, that's my best friend."
Some people can't fathem why a sighted person would want to be friends with a blind person, lol.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Pamela Dominguez
Sent: March 9, 2020 1:04 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] fake out!!

Oh, and it's just so wonderful, (not), when a stranger outside offers to help you, say, find a store, and when you get there, they expect that this stranger, who has kindly offered to help, is thought to be your caregiver.
It is so embarrassing, because you have to nip that in the bud before the person starts thinking: "Oh no! What did I get myself into?" Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Shelly Kane
Sent: Monday, March 09, 2020 3:36 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] fake out!!

Thanks for sharing that story about your friend. That is awesome for him to be in a job and happily married and living a normal life. People put labels on the disabled and think we can't do normal things and it really frustrates me. I had a rehabilitation counselor tell my mom when I was 18 years old that I couldn't go to college and I belonged in a sheltered workshop. He wouldn't pay for school for me so I went out and paid myself and took some secretarial classes and I had A's in all of them and I got one B. I felt like throwing my transcript in his face. I will also admit that it's very hard finding employment and dating.
Those are the things that I have struggled with.

Shelly

On 3/8/2020 3:37 PM, Pamela Dominguez wrote:
Yeah! She was sure living under a rock! (smile) Pam.

-----Original Message----- From: Ron Canazzi
Sent: Sunday, March 08, 2020 5:14 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] fake out!!

Hi Group,

As long as we're into this intense discussion about the nature and
purpose of education/life/existence, I thought I would add a little
levity to the discussion.

My very Catholic family knew a number of clergy when I was a little
boy. When I went blind at around twelve years old, I overheard my
mother being counseled by a nun. One of the things she said was:
"Well, I know this must be very difficult to deal with (having a blind
child) but think of it Ann, you won't have to worry about his teenage
years--you know--maturity--having sex before marriage--and so on.

This nun must have thought in her relatively restricted environment
that blind people wouldn't be sexual or involved in all that evils stuff.

(SOLID CAPS) IF SHE ONLY KNEW...!


On 3/8/2020 4:04 PM, Ann Parsons wrote:
Hi all,

With all the discussion today, I thought I would share the story of a
friend of mine. I won't share his name because that would not be wise.
However, I tell this story to emphasize the fact that everyone should
be encouraged to do his or her best!

This friend of mine is fully sighted. He was labeled as having
severe learning differences. When he was in Middle School, the head
of the special Ed dept. of his school told his parents that "I'm so
sorry, but we just don't think your son will amount to much because
of his learning difficulties.".

Needless to say, his parents took him out of that particular school and
enrolled him elsewhere. They also employed me to tutor him. I worked
with him for a couple of years.

My student and friend graduated from high school, Community College
with honors, Rochester Institute of Technology with honors. He is
currently working in a managerial position in a company here in
Rochester, earning six figures! He is happily married and his wife
is expecting! They own a house!

I would just love to stand in front of that Special Education twit of
an administrator and just say, "Fake out, you bastard!!" That would
give me extreme pleasure!! My friend is soccessful, in whatever way
you measure success!

So if somebody tells you that you won't amount to much, thank them
and then prove them wrong!!

Ann P.



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Mich Verrier
 

I had a friend of mine who passed away in 2012 and he said to me once the following. I was struck with this sentence
Everyone who reads Dr. Jacob Bolotin's story will learn that blindness is no barrier to a full life and great accomplishments," said Dr. Marc Maurer, President
of the National Federation of the Blind.
In fact, I wouldn't be at all surprised if after I've gone, and someone mentions my name, another person will say, "Oh yeah!, wasn't that the old doc who
was a friend of Mich's?"
An epitaph I would treasure
I have the strong feeling that Ray would agree.
Cleaver
Cleaver was my friend and he and I struck up a friendship that lasted for 7 yars. I still think of him offen and miss him still. We got to know one another through him fixing my pc. He was one of the only people who I can think of apart from family of korce who didn't just see me as just that blind guy I was Mich and not just that blind guy. From Mich.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of chris judge
Sent: March 9, 2020 1:37 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] fake out!!

My friend Travis was telling me about a year ago that one of his colleagues approached him at work and said:
"Hey Travis, that was a nice thing you were doing on Saturday." Travis asked, "what nice thing was that?" His colleague responded, "Helping that blind man around the store." Travis said, "I wasn't helping him around, that's my best friend."
Some people can't fathem why a sighted person would want to be friends with a blind person, lol.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Pamela Dominguez
Sent: March 9, 2020 1:04 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] fake out!!

Oh, and it's just so wonderful, (not), when a stranger outside offers to help you, say, find a store, and when you get there, they expect that this stranger, who has kindly offered to help, is thought to be your caregiver.
It is so embarrassing, because you have to nip that in the bud before the person starts thinking: "Oh no! What did I get myself into?" Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Shelly Kane
Sent: Monday, March 09, 2020 3:36 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] fake out!!

Thanks for sharing that story about your friend. That is awesome for him to be in a job and happily married and living a normal life. People put labels on the disabled and think we can't do normal things and it really frustrates me. I had a rehabilitation counselor tell my mom when I was 18 years old that I couldn't go to college and I belonged in a sheltered workshop. He wouldn't pay for school for me so I went out and paid myself and took some secretarial classes and I had A's in all of them and I got one B. I felt like throwing my transcript in his face. I will also admit that it's very hard finding employment and dating.
Those are the things that I have struggled with.

Shelly

On 3/8/2020 3:37 PM, Pamela Dominguez wrote:
Yeah! She was sure living under a rock! (smile) Pam.

-----Original Message----- From: Ron Canazzi
Sent: Sunday, March 08, 2020 5:14 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] fake out!!

Hi Group,

As long as we're into this intense discussion about the nature and
purpose of education/life/existence, I thought I would add a little
levity to the discussion.

My very Catholic family knew a number of clergy when I was a little
boy. When I went blind at around twelve years old, I overheard my
mother being counseled by a nun. One of the things she said was:
"Well, I know this must be very difficult to deal with (having a blind
child) but think of it Ann, you won't have to worry about his teenage
years--you know--maturity--having sex before marriage--and so on.

This nun must have thought in her relatively restricted environment
that blind people wouldn't be sexual or involved in all that evils stuff.

(SOLID CAPS) IF SHE ONLY KNEW...!


On 3/8/2020 4:04 PM, Ann Parsons wrote:
Hi all,

With all the discussion today, I thought I would share the story of a
friend of mine. I won't share his name because that would not be wise.
However, I tell this story to emphasize the fact that everyone should
be encouraged to do his or her best!

This friend of mine is fully sighted. He was labeled as having
severe learning differences. When he was in Middle School, the head
of the special Ed dept. of his school told his parents that "I'm so
sorry, but we just don't think your son will amount to much because
of his learning difficulties.".

Needless to say, his parents took him out of that particular school and
enrolled him elsewhere. They also employed me to tutor him. I worked
with him for a couple of years.

My student and friend graduated from high school, Community College
with honors, Rochester Institute of Technology with honors. He is
currently working in a managerial position in a company here in
Rochester, earning six figures! He is happily married and his wife
is expecting! They own a house!

I would just love to stand in front of that Special Education twit of
an administrator and just say, "Fake out, you bastard!!" That would
give me extreme pleasure!! My friend is soccessful, in whatever way
you measure success!

So if somebody tells you that you won't amount to much, thank them
and then prove them wrong!!

Ann P.



--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


jan howells <gale7978@...>
 

Catholics are not permitted to be nuns, and they are not allowed to go to Catholic schools with sighted students. Thez have to go to Catholic schools for the blind. Myself, and two others friends were all told no when we wanted to be in the convent. I was told no for Catholic school with sighted students. A friend of mine was told that she could not be involved in a Franciscan order because she be blind. No disabled people can be in that particular order. They have to be "whole."


Carolyn Arnold
 

Wow, sounds pretty Christian, huh?

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of jan howells
via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, March 9, 2020 6:52 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] fake out!!

Catholics are not permitted to be nuns, and they are not
allowed to go to Catholic schools with sighted students.
Thez have to go to Catholic schools for the blind. Myself,
and two others friends were all told no when we wanted to be
in the convent. I was told no for Catholic school with
sighted students. A friend of mine was told that she could
not be involved in a Franciscan order because she be blind.
No disabled people can be in that particular order. They
have to be "whole."


Gene
 

I don't know about nuns, but Catholic blind students definitely are allowed to go to school with sighted students.  I'm not a Catholic, but I went to a Catholic high school for sighted students because the public school for the blind where I would have gone otherwise was such a bad school in a very dangerous neighborhood.  A number of other blind students, all Catholics, were in the same school.  And other blind students went to other Catholic schools in my area. 
 
I'm not saying that there is some sort of policy about this, in some areas, blind students may not be allowed to go to ordinary Catholic schools but this isn't something that can be generalized about, and given all the different orders of sisters, I doubt any generalizations can be made about blind women becoming nuns.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, March 09, 2020 5:51 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] fake out!!

Catholics are not permitted to be nuns, and they are not allowed
to go to Catholic schools with sighted students.  Thez have to go
to Catholic schools for the blind.  Myself, and two others
friends were all told no when we wanted to be in the convent.  I
was told no for Catholic school with sighted students.  A friend
of mine was told that she could not be involved in a Franciscan
order because she be blind.  No disabled people can be in that
particular order.  They have to be "whole."



Pamela Dominguez
 

Wow! You never know what you are going to hear out of some people. My husband and I were grocery shopping with my mother. We had a blind friend along. Somebody told my mother she was doing such a nice charitable thing, and wanted to know what school she had taken us on an outing from. She said she was my mother, and George was her son-in-law, and Lynnea was our friend, and we were all just shopping. The person drew in her breath like she was so surprised, and couldn't believe it. The same kind of thing happened when we were with my brother. Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: chris judge
Sent: Monday, March 09, 2020 1:37 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] fake out!!

My friend Travis was telling me about a year ago that one of his colleagues approached him at work and said:
"Hey Travis, that was a nice thing you were doing on Saturday." Travis asked, "what nice thing was that?" His colleague responded, "Helping that blind man around the store." Travis said, "I wasn't helping him around, that's my best friend."
Some people can't fathem why a sighted person would want to be friends with a blind person, lol.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Pamela Dominguez
Sent: March 9, 2020 1:04 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] fake out!!

Oh, and it's just so wonderful, (not), when a stranger outside offers to help you, say, find a store, and when you get there, they expect that this stranger, who has kindly offered to help, is thought to be your caregiver.
It is so embarrassing, because you have to nip that in the bud before the person starts thinking: "Oh no! What did I get myself into?" Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: Shelly Kane
Sent: Monday, March 09, 2020 3:36 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] fake out!!

Thanks for sharing that story about your friend. That is awesome for him to be in a job and happily married and living a normal life. People put labels on the disabled and think we can't do normal things and it really frustrates me. I had a rehabilitation counselor tell my mom when I was 18 years old that I couldn't go to college and I belonged in a sheltered workshop. He wouldn't pay for school for me so I went out and paid myself and took some secretarial classes and I had A's in all of them and I got one B. I felt like throwing my transcript in his face. I will also admit that it's very hard finding employment and dating.
Those are the things that I have struggled with.

Shelly

On 3/8/2020 3:37 PM, Pamela Dominguez wrote:
Yeah! She was sure living under a rock! (smile) Pam.

-----Original Message----- From: Ron Canazzi
Sent: Sunday, March 08, 2020 5:14 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] fake out!!

Hi Group,

As long as we're into this intense discussion about the nature and
purpose of education/life/existence, I thought I would add a little
levity to the discussion.

My very Catholic family knew a number of clergy when I was a little
boy. When I went blind at around twelve years old, I overheard my
mother being counseled by a nun. One of the things she said was:
"Well, I know this must be very difficult to deal with (having a blind
child) but think of it Ann, you won't have to worry about his teenage
years--you know--maturity--having sex before marriage--and so on.

This nun must have thought in her relatively restricted environment
that blind people wouldn't be sexual or involved in all that evils stuff.

(SOLID CAPS) IF SHE ONLY KNEW...!


On 3/8/2020 4:04 PM, Ann Parsons wrote:
Hi all,

With all the discussion today, I thought I would share the story of a
friend of mine. I won't share his name because that would not be wise.
However, I tell this story to emphasize the fact that everyone should
be encouraged to do his or her best!

This friend of mine is fully sighted. He was labeled as having
severe learning differences. When he was in Middle School, the head
of the special Ed dept. of his school told his parents that "I'm so
sorry, but we just don't think your son will amount to much because
of his learning difficulties.".

Needless to say, his parents took him out of that particular school and
enrolled him elsewhere. They also employed me to tutor him. I worked
with him for a couple of years.

My student and friend graduated from high school, Community College
with honors, Rochester Institute of Technology with honors. He is
currently working in a managerial position in a company here in
Rochester, earning six figures! He is happily married and his wife
is expecting! They own a house!

I would just love to stand in front of that Special Education twit of
an administrator and just say, "Fake out, you bastard!!" That would
give me extreme pleasure!! My friend is soccessful, in whatever way
you measure success!

So if somebody tells you that you won't amount to much, thank them
and then prove them wrong!!

Ann P.



--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


Pamela Dominguez
 

I know at least two blind people who were nuns. I also know blind people who went to regular catholic school. Pam.

-----Original Message-----
From: jan howells via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, March 09, 2020 6:51 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] fake out!!

Catholics are not permitted to be nuns, and they are not allowed
to go to Catholic schools with sighted students. Thez have to go
to Catholic schools for the blind. Myself, and two others
friends were all told no when we wanted to be in the convent. I
was told no for Catholic school with sighted students. A friend
of mine was told that she could not be involved in a Franciscan
order because she be blind. No disabled people can be in that
particular order. They have to be "whole."




--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com