verizon and TMobile offering LTE fixed wireless home internet with no data caps


enes sarıbaş
 

Hi all,

I wanted to make you aware of these plans for rural areas. The advertised speeds on both are 25-50  mbps, and uploads I recall are between 3-5 mbps. They do not come with data caps. I think this is excellent for those who are  stuck on slow DSL like lower Uverse teers due to living in apartment complexes with exclusive contracts or rural areas. ADSL speeds, with its less than 1 megabit of upload is  woefully inadequate for even modern audio or video calling as well as the high latency and fluctuating speeds make it unsuitable for working too.


enes sarıbaş
 

Also,

I did some research, and appears they offer this in areas where they are able to give at least 25, but there isn't a hard cap on the maximum speed. People are mentioning above a hundred meg speeds and 40 megabits and up upload.

On 10/10/2020 4:19 AM, enes sarıbaş via groups.io wrote:
Hi all,

I wanted to make you aware of these plans for rural areas. The advertised speeds on both are 25-50  mbps, and uploads I recall are between 3-5 mbps. They do not come with data caps. I think this is excellent for those who are  stuck on slow DSL like lower Uverse teers due to living in apartment complexes with exclusive contracts or rural areas. ADSL speeds, with its less than 1 megabit of upload is  woefully inadequate for even modern audio or video calling as well as the high latency and fluctuating speeds make it unsuitable for working too.





Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

As an aside, for those "of a certain age" (read: 55 or older), T-Mobile offers its unlimited 55 Plus plans at great prices as far as I'm concerned.  My partner and I ditched our land line and our woefully slow DSL service and have been using the mobile hotspot feature of our phones as our exclusive internet service for just around 2 years now.

Even where we live, we have 4G LTE data service and that's way faster than what most home users need for what they do, and in our case that absolutely includes streaming Netflix while using the computers connected to the hotspots.

There is a cap of 20GB per line, per month, at 4G LTE speed but it drops to 3G speed after that.  During this period of the pandemic, when we're home much more than we typically would be, we sometimes run over that 40GB total, but still manage just fine for our computer use and since streaming from the phone is always at high speed, and I Chromecast that to our TV, that aspect is still fine, too.

You can also buy an additional 10GB of 4G LTE data for $10 per month, but I've never needed to do that based on our actual needs.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


enes sarıbaş
 

Hi Brian,

The thing is with mobile cell phone hotspot sharing, they will throttle your data past a point. If you got really good speeds, it may be worth considering the home internet, which removes throttling and data caps.  How an apartment complex thinks its a good idea to force people to use terrible DSL, mind you its ADSL, not VDSL, in 2020, and prevents any other providers from entering is beyond me.  I  was told in my area, the minimum speed would range from 50 mbps to 150 mbps download, and at least 15 mbps upload, Which is an astounding 1500% improvement in upload performance at least compared to DSL The celular coverage map also shows a 5g signal, so its only a matter of time before they upgrade this area to 5g home internet instead of LTE, which will likely double that 50 mbps minimum even further.

the list of cities are here

https://www.t-mobile.com/news/network/t-mobile-expands-home-internet-to-more-than-450-cities-towns-left-high-and-dry-by-att



On 10/10/2020 11:48 AM, Brian Vogel wrote:
As an aside, for those "of a certain age" (read: 55 or older), T-Mobile offers its unlimited 55 Plus plans at great prices as far as I'm concerned.  My partner and I ditched our land line and our woefully slow DSL service and have been using the mobile hotspot feature of our phones as our exclusive internet service for just around 2 years now.

Even where we live, we have 4G LTE data service and that's way faster than what most home users need for what they do, and in our case that absolutely includes streaming Netflix while using the computers connected to the hotspots.

There is a cap of 20GB per line, per month, at 4G LTE speed but it drops to 3G speed after that.  During this period of the pandemic, when we're home much more than we typically would be, we sometimes run over that 40GB total, but still manage just fine for our computer use and since streaming from the phone is always at high speed, and I Chromecast that to our TV, that aspect is still fine, too.

You can also buy an additional 10GB of 4G LTE data for $10 per month, but I've never needed to do that based on our actual needs.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


enes sarıbaş
 

Brian,

You know what is hilarious? I don't even live in a rural area, I live in a city with 80000+ people, but AT&T  the DSL provider, and the cable company are only local options, though several new fiber buildouts began. The AT&T tech actually bragged to me how they had switched from DSL, probably ADSL1 to ADSL2+ in 2011, and how they had made absolutely no improvements to  the equipment since., and how they had put in fiber behind the box, but they had refused to   replace the DSLAM to provide VDSL service because it wasn't profitable for them to do and didn't make economical sense. Well I would say it isn't profitable and doesn't make economical sense for me to get very little quality, while paying more than that home internet, in addition to a data cap. I hope the widespread deployment of home fixed wireless will motivate those DSL companies to improve their service and replace old equipment. But at this point I wouldn't want to switch to a phone company internet, even VDSL, unles it was FTTH.


On 10/10/2020 11:48 AM, Brian Vogel wrote:
As an aside, for those "of a certain age" (read: 55 or older), T-Mobile offers its unlimited 55 Plus plans at great prices as far as I'm concerned.  My partner and I ditched our land line and our woefully slow DSL service and have been using the mobile hotspot feature of our phones as our exclusive internet service for just around 2 years now.

Even where we live, we have 4G LTE data service and that's way faster than what most home users need for what they do, and in our case that absolutely includes streaming Netflix while using the computers connected to the hotspots.

There is a cap of 20GB per line, per month, at 4G LTE speed but it drops to 3G speed after that.  During this period of the pandemic, when we're home much more than we typically would be, we sometimes run over that 40GB total, but still manage just fine for our computer use and since streaming from the phone is always at high speed, and I Chromecast that to our TV, that aspect is still fine, too.

You can also buy an additional 10GB of 4G LTE data for $10 per month, but I've never needed to do that based on our actual needs.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

Enes,

           As I stated, for the mobile hotspot feature in the plan I mentioned, if you have 2 lines (which we do) on the $90/month plan, throttling begins after 20 GB of 4G LTE data.  I know many users who wouldn't come anywhere near to using that amount of data on a monthly basis, though I certainly do.  In my case, the throttling is very significant because we don't have 3G service in my area, it drops from 4G LTE speed to 2G via the hotspot, but even that's way more than sufficient for text-based work like web browsing with some graphics, emailing, etc.

            High speed data is truly unlimited, no caps, on the phones themselves, so if I have a desperate need I can hop on the phone to download something that's really data intensive.  I've done this on occasion when I want to download huge ISO files, and even before I reach the hotspot data cap, as anything I download to the phone from the phone is under the unlimited data.  I just hook my phone up to my computer afterward, using its microSD card like it was an external drive, and copy that honkin' big ISO file over.

             My main "data drain" comes from the amount of video streaming I do and how that interacts with Chromecast when casting it to the TV.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


enes sarıbaş
 

Brian,

Why do network providers in North America limit the hotspot feature of phones? In europe, this practice is unheard of. Any data package you have applies equally  whether you tether it to pc or not. In  Turkey once Turkcell and the other operaters tried to impose a 15 TL fee per month for using the existing package with hotspot, but they faced a massive backlash and backed down. 2g speed is truly terrible. How can you do anything at all with that connection? Even web pages will take minutes to load.



On 10/10/2020 2:12 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
Enes,

           As I stated, for the mobile hotspot feature in the plan I mentioned, if you have 2 lines (which we do) on the $90/month plan, throttling begins after 20 GB of 4G LTE data.  I know many users who wouldn't come anywhere near to using that amount of data on a monthly basis, though I certainly do.  In my case, the throttling is very significant because we don't have 3G service in my area, it drops from 4G LTE speed to 2G via the hotspot, but even that's way more than sufficient for text-based work like web browsing with some graphics, emailing, etc.

            High speed data is truly unlimited, no caps, on the phones themselves, so if I have a desperate need I can hop on the phone to download something that's really data intensive.  I've done this on occasion when I want to download huge ISO files, and even before I reach the hotspot data cap, as anything I download to the phone from the phone is under the unlimited data.  I just hook my phone up to my computer afterward, using its microSD card like it was an external drive, and copy that honkin' big ISO file over.

             My main "data drain" comes from the amount of video streaming I do and how that interacts with Chromecast when casting it to the TV.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

Enes,

            What service providers do, or I should say can get away with, varies widely by venue.  The fact that T-Mobile offers what it does offer here in the USA without requiring a contract (you can terminate at will) was (and largely remains) revolutionary.

             When I've mentioned to friends in Australia the service I have here, and the price I have it at, their jaws drop in the opposite direction.  They're shocked at how good I have it.

              I get throttled to a maximum of 600Kbps and that's still way more than sufficient for web surfing, at least to me.  Perhaps that's faster than 2G, but I know it's not as fast as 3G, as I used to have a Virgin Mobile MiFi hotspot (dedicated device) and it was slightly faster under 3G than my throttled speed is.

              I really cannot complain.  The cost savings I've achieved by dumping my landline telephone and DSL service, and getting two lines in the process with what is generally way more than enough hotspot data, free Netflix, and the ability to cancel service at will is way, way, way more than worth it.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


enes sarıbaş
 

Well Brian,

When I tell friends in Europe or Turkey their jaws would drop when they hear of the costs of wireless plans. When I was in the UK, I was paying like 10 gbp, about 13 dollars for a plan with 3gb of data or so, unlimited minutes, and SMS. When they increased prices and data alotments, I drop to the 7.5 gbp plan with less data. I think that price was extremely good for the service. I could have payed 20 instead of 10, and gotten unlimited data up to 30 gb without throttling, or another 10-20 to remove all the throttling. In turkey, I paid like 23 tl a month, less than 3 dollars now, for 750 minutes, 1000 sms, and like 3 gb of data.


On 10/10/2020 2:25 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
Enes,

            What service providers do, or I should say can get away with, varies widely by venue.  The fact that T-Mobile offers what it does offer here in the USA without requiring a contract (you can terminate at will) was (and largely remains) revolutionary.

             When I've mentioned to friends in Australia the service I have here, and the price I have it at, their jaws drop in the opposite direction.  They're shocked at how good I have it.

              I get throttled to a maximum of 600Kbps and that's still way more than sufficient for web surfing, at least to me.  Perhaps that's faster than 2G, but I know it's not as fast as 3G, as I used to have a Virgin Mobile MiFi hotspot (dedicated device) and it was slightly faster under 3G than my throttled speed is.

              I really cannot complain.  The cost savings I've achieved by dumping my landline telephone and DSL service, and getting two lines in the process with what is generally way more than enough hotspot data, free Netflix, and the ability to cancel service at will is way, way, way more than worth it.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


enes sarıbaş
 

Hi,

Brian, for reference to other members who might have heard about  this type of LTE internet, which protocols and speeds do you consider to be  woefully inadequate and that members should consider switching to wireless?

My opinion is, any speeds using ADSL: regardless what the download speed might be, this connection type has a high latency and very high overhead. Moreover, the upload speed is limited to less than a megabit, which makes it woefully inadequate. Any sort of backup will render the entire network unusable until it completes due to saturation. Depending on quality, for example in cities with VDSL, or higher than 25 mbps/5mbps uverse, switching will probably provide better speeds if cell towers support upwards of 100 mbps. Satallite internet is also inferior in most cases I have read.  For older cable, docsis 3.0 and lower, cell towers probably would provide good serrvice if the network is congested and less than 100 mbit is achieved. Cable of the 3.0 and lower veriety has low upload speeds, though not as bad as ADSL.


On 10/10/2020 2:40 PM, enes sarıbaş via groups.io wrote:

Well Brian,

When I tell friends in Europe or Turkey their jaws would drop when they hear of the costs of wireless plans. When I was in the UK, I was paying like 10 gbp, about 13 dollars for a plan with 3gb of data or so, unlimited minutes, and SMS. When they increased prices and data alotments, I drop to the 7.5 gbp plan with less data. I think that price was extremely good for the service. I could have payed 20 instead of 10, and gotten unlimited data up to 30 gb without throttling, or another 10-20 to remove all the throttling. In turkey, I paid like 23 tl a month, less than 3 dollars now, for 750 minutes, 1000 sms, and like 3 gb of data.


On 10/10/2020 2:25 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
Enes,

            What service providers do, or I should say can get away with, varies widely by venue.  The fact that T-Mobile offers what it does offer here in the USA without requiring a contract (you can terminate at will) was (and largely remains) revolutionary.

             When I've mentioned to friends in Australia the service I have here, and the price I have it at, their jaws drop in the opposite direction.  They're shocked at how good I have it.

              I get throttled to a maximum of 600Kbps and that's still way more than sufficient for web surfing, at least to me.  Perhaps that's faster than 2G, but I know it's not as fast as 3G, as I used to have a Virgin Mobile MiFi hotspot (dedicated device) and it was slightly faster under 3G than my throttled speed is.

              I really cannot complain.  The cost savings I've achieved by dumping my landline telephone and DSL service, and getting two lines in the process with what is generally way more than enough hotspot data, free Netflix, and the ability to cancel service at will is way, way, way more than worth it.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com