Virtual reality, will we be left behind once more?


Walter Ramage
 

Hi all.  I just heard part of a BBC world service programme about the growth and future impact of Virtual reality.  It was stated that to begin with the main users would be gamers but this will eventually expand to all walks of life giving the user a unique experience.  Now keeping in mind this experience is a mainly visual one then blind people are going to be excluded from taking advantage of this new technology.

 

Of course, it appeared that way when desk top computers arrived on the scene until screen readers made their appearance but regardless of that, with the increased use of graphics, screen readers are forever playing catch up and there are still some things we can't take advantage of, regardless of a screen reader.  Another example was touch screen mobiles.  When they became popular we blind folk had to  stick to mobiles with physical keypads.  Then along came voice over and talk back and we once more caught up somewhat.

 

What about visual reality though?  As this is almost entirely a visual experience will we be left behind once more and will we ever be able to catch up or will it be a situation where the rest of the world moves on with their virtual reality experiences but we blind folk just lose out?  Unless in future the equipment can bypass the eyes and send the signal direct to the part of the brain that deals with imagery then I can't see how we can enjoy that new tech.  But there is one factor that is a negative with going straight to the part of the brain that handles vision and imagery, what about those folk who have been born from birth and have no idea of what to expect, would  using virtual reality be a terrifying and traumatic experience.  Maybe there is some factor I've not taken into consideration or there are things in the pipeline I'm not aware of but I'd be interested in your opinions.  One final point, There are a group of blind folk who have never had sight, or have lost what sight they had decades ago and some of those I've spoke to wouldn't want any vision virtual or otherwise so I guess those individuals will have no interest how this technology develops.  Walter.


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Matt
 

Well, that is my fear but just don’t know how quick this will come into play and will be the norm as the only choice . I think it will be a long time before this is the only choice out there. Here is a podcast from Ted Talks on this. Well there is two podcast.

 

http://download.ted.com/talks/MeronGribetz_2016.mp4?apikey=TEDRSS

 

 

http://download.ted.com/talks/AlexKipman_2016.mp4?apikey=TEDRSS

 

 

 

 

From: Walter Ramage [mailto:wpr@...]
Sent: Sunday, April 03, 2016 6:59 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Virtual reality, will we be left behind once more?

 

Hi all.  I just heard part of a BBC world service programme about the growth and future impact of Virtual reality.  It was stated that to begin with the main users would be gamers but this will eventually expand to all walks of life giving the user a unique experience.  Now keeping in mind this experience is a mainly visual one then blind people are going to be excluded from taking advantage of this new technology.

 

Of course, it appeared that way when desk top computers arrived on the scene until screen readers made their appearance but regardless of that, with the increased use of graphics, screen readers are forever playing catch up and there are still some things we can't take advantage of, regardless of a screen reader.  Another example was touch screen mobiles.  When they became popular we blind folk had to  stick to mobiles with physical keypads.  Then along came voice over and talk back and we once more caught up somewhat.

 

What about visual reality though?  As this is almost entirely a visual experience will we be left behind once more and will we ever be able to catch up or will it be a situation where the rest of the world moves on with their virtual reality experiences but we blind folk just lose out?  Unless in future the equipment can bypass the eyes and send the signal direct to the part of the brain that deals with imagery then I can't see how we can enjoy that new tech.  But there is one factor that is a negative with going straight to the part of the brain that handles vision and imagery, what about those folk who have been born from birth and have no idea of what to expect, would  using virtual reality be a terrifying and traumatic experience.  Maybe there is some factor I've not taken into consideration or there are things in the pipeline I'm not aware of but I'd be interested in your opinions.  One final point, There are a group of blind folk who have never had sight, or have lost what sight they had decades ago and some of those I've spoke to wouldn't want any vision virtual or otherwise so I guess those individuals will have no interest how this technology develops.  Walter.

 

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Walter Ramage
 

Hi.  I'm not sure about that because as the programme pointed out they thought they would be common place now 20 years ago but things didn't pan out the way they thought.  However now a lot of companies are pushing this like Sony who launch their VR headset in a few days.  Samsung already have one and also the company owned by Face Book.  Google is getting in on the act with their budget version so a lot of the big boys are investing and when that happens, things move quickly.  Walter.

 

From: Matt [mailto:matt.from.florida@...]
Sent: 03 April 2016 12:06
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Virtual reality, will we be left behind once more?

 

Well, that is my fear but just don’t know how quick this will come into play and will be the norm as the only choice . I think it will be a long time before this is the only choice out there. Here is a podcast from Ted Talks on this. Well there is two podcast.

 

http://download.ted.com/talks/MeronGribetz_2016.mp4?apikey=TEDRSS

 

 

http://download.ted.com/talks/AlexKipman_2016.mp4?apikey=TEDRSS

 

 

 

 

From: Walter Ramage [mailto:wpr@...]
Sent: Sunday, April 03, 2016 6:59 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Virtual reality, will we be left behind once more?

 

Hi all.  I just heard part of a BBC world service programme about the growth and future impact of Virtual reality.  It was stated that to begin with the main users would be gamers but this will eventually expand to all walks of life giving the user a unique experience.  Now keeping in mind this experience is a mainly visual one then blind people are going to be excluded from taking advantage of this new technology.

 

Of course, it appeared that way when desk top computers arrived on the scene until screen readers made their appearance but regardless of that, with the increased use of graphics, screen readers are forever playing catch up and there are still some things we can't take advantage of, regardless of a screen reader.  Another example was touch screen mobiles.  When they became popular we blind folk had to  stick to mobiles with physical keypads.  Then along came voice over and talk back and we once more caught up somewhat.

 

What about visual reality though?  As this is almost entirely a visual experience will we be left behind once more and will we ever be able to catch up or will it be a situation where the rest of the world moves on with their virtual reality experiences but we blind folk just lose out?  Unless in future the equipment can bypass the eyes and send the signal direct to the part of the brain that deals with imagery then I can't see how we can enjoy that new tech.  But there is one factor that is a negative with going straight to the part of the brain that handles vision and imagery, what about those folk who have been born from birth and have no idea of what to expect, would  using virtual reality be a terrifying and traumatic experience.  Maybe there is some factor I've not taken into consideration or there are things in the pipeline I'm not aware of but I'd be interested in your opinions.  One final point, There are a group of blind folk who have never had sight, or have lost what sight they had decades ago and some of those I've spoke to wouldn't want any vision virtual or otherwise so I guess those individuals will have no interest how this technology develops.  Walter.

 

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Gerald Levy
 

 
Unfortunately, there are some things that blind people will never be able to experience, and virtual reality, because it is so dwependent on vision, is one of them. So get over it.  The blindness advocacy organizations do not seem to be at all concerned about virtual reality, so I wouldn’t worry too much about not being able to function without it.  They are more concerned about Braiile literacy, which is based on 19th century technology.  And if the overwhelming majority of blind folks can function without computers and smart phones, then they will be able to get by just fine without virtual reality.
Gerald
 
 
 

From: Matt
Sent: Sunday, April 03, 2016 7:05 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Virtual reality, will we be left behind once more?
 

Well, that is my fear but just don’t know how quick this will come into play and will be the norm as the only choice . I think it will be a long time before this is the only choice out there. Here is a podcast from Ted Talks on this. Well there is two podcast.

 

http://download.ted.com/talks/MeronGribetz_2016.mp4?apikey=TEDRSS

 

 

http://download.ted.com/talks/AlexKipman_2016.mp4?apikey=TEDRSS

 

 

 

 

From: Walter Ramage [mailto:wpr@...]
Sent: Sunday, April 03, 2016 6:59 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Virtual reality, will we be left behind once more?

 

Hi all.  I just heard part of a BBC world service programme about the growth and future impact of Virtual reality.  It was stated that to begin with the main users would be gamers but this will eventually expand to all walks of life giving the user a unique experience.  Now keeping in mind this experience is a mainly visual one then blind people are going to be excluded from taking advantage of this new technology.

 

Of course, it appeared that way when desk top computers arrived on the scene until screen readers made their appearance but regardless of that, with the increased use of graphics, screen readers are forever playing catch up and there are still some things we can't take advantage of, regardless of a screen reader.  Another example was touch screen mobiles.  When they became popular we blind folk had to  stick to mobiles with physical keypads.  Then along came voice over and talk back and we once more caught up somewhat.

 

What about visual reality though?  As this is almost entirely a visual experience will we be left behind once more and will we ever be able to catch up or will it be a situation where the rest of the world moves on with their virtual reality experiences but we blind folk just lose out?  Unless in future the equipment can bypass the eyes and send the signal direct to the part of the brain that deals with imagery then I can't see how we can enjoy that new tech.  But there is one factor that is a negative with going straight to the part of the brain that handles vision and imagery, what about those folk who have been born from birth and have no idea of what to expect, would  using virtual reality be a terrifying and traumatic experience.  Maybe there is some factor I've not taken into consideration or there are things in the pipeline I'm not aware of but I'd be interested in your opinions.  One final point, There are a group of blind folk who have never had sight, or have lost what sight they had decades ago and some of those I've spoke to wouldn't want any vision virtual or otherwise so I guess those individuals will have no interest how this technology develops.  Walter.

 

Virus-free. www.avast.com


Keith S
 

Good points.  When I was a big video gamer when I was sighted, games started coming out with epilepsy warnings (apparrantly, some lights and color combos in video games would cauase a person to have epileptic seizures.
 
If something is directly plugged into the visual cortex of the brain, I would imagine that a person who has never had vision would be shocked, if not outright terrified of what the stimulus is showing them.

----- Original Message ---
 
Keith--
Sent: Sunday, April 03, 2016 5:58 AM
Subject: [TechTalk] Virtual reality, will we be left behind once more?

Hi all.  I just heard part of a BBC world service programme about the growth and future impact of Virtual reality.  It was stated that to begin with the main users would be gamers but this will eventually expand to all walks of life giving the user a unique experience.  Now keeping in mind this experience is a mainly visual one then blind people are going to be excluded from taking advantage of this new technology.

 

Of course, it appeared that way when desk top computers arrived on the scene until screen readers made their appearance but regardless of that, with the increased use of graphics, screen readers are forever playing catch up and there are still some things we can't take advantage of, regardless of a screen reader.  Another example was touch screen mobiles.  When they became popular we blind folk had to  stick to mobiles with physical keypads.  Then along came voice over and talk back and we once more caught up somewhat.

 

What about visual reality though?  As this is almost entirely a visual experience will we be left behind once more and will we ever be able to catch up or will it be a situation where the rest of the world moves on with their virtual reality experiences but we blind folk just lose out?  Unless in future the equipment can bypass the eyes and send the signal direct to the part of the brain that deals with imagery then I can't see how we can enjoy that new tech.  But there is one factor that is a negative with going straight to the part of the brain that handles vision and imagery, what about those folk who have been born from birth and have no idea of what to expect, would  using virtual reality be a terrifying and traumatic experience.  Maybe there is some factor I've not taken into consideration or there are things in the pipeline I'm not aware of but I'd be interested in your opinions.  One final point, There are a group of blind folk who have never had sight, or have lost what sight they had decades ago and some of those I've spoke to wouldn't want any vision virtual or otherwise so I guess those individuals will have no interest how this technology develops.  Walter.


Virus-free. www.avast.com


Matt
 

Well, it depends on if they make the virtual reality a 3d touch type of thing where you can get audio feed back on what you are touching and going to grab . also being able to explore with touch with audio feed back. I think we can get in on this if it is implemented correctly and from the ground up. Just because these so call blind organization is not concern does not mean anything. They are still fighting over whether to have paper money accessible . So there you go.

 

 

 

From: Gerald Levy [mailto:bwaylimited@...]
Sent: Sunday, April 03, 2016 7:31 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Virtual reality, will we be left behind once more?

 

 

Unfortunately, there are some things that blind people will never be able to experience, and virtual reality, because it is so dwependent on vision, is one of them. So get over it.  The blindness advocacy organizations do not seem to be at all concerned about virtual reality, so I wouldn’t worry too much about not being able to function without it.  They are more concerned about Braiile literacy, which is based on 19th century technology.  And if the overwhelming majority of blind folks can function without computers and smart phones, then they will be able to get by just fine without virtual reality.

Gerald

 

 

 

From: Matt

Sent: Sunday, April 03, 2016 7:05 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Virtual reality, will we be left behind once more?

 

Well, that is my fear but just don’t know how quick this will come into play and will be the norm as the only choice . I think it will be a long time before this is the only choice out there. Here is a podcast from Ted Talks on this. Well there is two podcast.

 

http://download.ted.com/talks/MeronGribetz_2016.mp4?apikey=TEDRSS

 

 

http://download.ted.com/talks/AlexKipman_2016.mp4?apikey=TEDRSS

 

 

 

 

From: Walter Rampage [mailto:wpr@...]
Sent: Sunday, April 03, 2016 6:59 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Virtual reality, will we be left behind once more?

 

Hi all.  I just heard part of a BBC world service programme about the growth and future impact of Virtual reality.  It was stated that to begin with the main users would be gamers but this will eventually expand to all walks of life giving the user a unique experience.  Now keeping in mind this experience is a mainly visual one then blind people are going to be excluded from taking advantage of this new technology.

 

Of course, it appeared that way when desk top computers arrived on the scene until screen readers made their appearance but regardless of that, with the increased use of graphics, screen readers are forever playing catch up and there are still some things we can't take advantage of, regardless of a screen reader.  Another example was touch screen mobiles.  When they became popular we blind folk had to  stick to mobiles with physical keypads.  Then along came voice over and talk back and we once more caught up somewhat.

 

What about visual reality though?  As this is almost entirely a visual experience will we be left behind once more and will we ever be able to catch up or will it be a situation where the rest of the world moves on with their virtual reality experiences but we blind folk just lose out?  Unless in future the equipment can bypass the eyes and send the signal direct to the part of the brain that deals with imagery then I can't see how we can enjoy that new tech.  But there is one factor that is a negative with going straight to the part of the brain that handles vision and imagery, what about those folk who have been born from birth and have no idea of what to expect, would  using virtual reality be a terrifying and traumatic experience.  Maybe there is some factor I've not taken into consideration or there are things in the pipeline I'm not aware of but I'd be interested in your opinions.  One final point, There are a group of blind folk who have never had sight, or have lost what sight they had decades ago and some of those I've spoke to wouldn't want any vision virtual or otherwise so I guess those individuals will have no interest how this technology develops.  Walter.

 

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Matt
 

But they must learn to adjust and adapt the world is not going to stop because of blindness.

 

 

 

From: Keith S [mailto:ks.steinbach03@...]
Sent: Sunday, April 03, 2016 7:34 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Virtual reality, will we be left behind once more?

 

Good points.  When I was a big video gamer when I was sighted, games started coming out with epilepsy warnings (apparrantly, some lights and color combos in video games would cauase a person to have epileptic seizures.

 

If something is directly plugged into the visual cortex of the brain, I would imagine that a person who has never had vision would be shocked, if not outright terrified of what the stimulus is showing them.

----- Original Message ---

 

Keith--

Sent: Sunday, April 03, 2016 5:58 AM

Subject: [TechTalk] Virtual reality, will we be left behind once more?

 

Hi all.  I just heard part of a BBC world service programme about the growth and future impact of Virtual reality.  It was stated that to begin with the main users would be gamers but this will eventually expand to all walks of life giving the user a unique experience.  Now keeping in mind this experience is a mainly visual one then blind people are going to be excluded from taking advantage of this new technology.

 

Of course, it appeared that way when desk top computers arrived on the scene until screen readers made their appearance but regardless of that, with the increased use of graphics, screen readers are forever playing catch up and there are still some things we can't take advantage of, regardless of a screen reader.  Another example was touch screen mobiles.  When they became popular we blind folk had to  stick to mobiles with physical keypads.  Then along came voice over and talk back and we once more caught up somewhat.

 

What about visual reality though?  As this is almost entirely a visual experience will we be left behind once more and will we ever be able to catch up or will it be a situation where the rest of the world moves on with their virtual reality experiences but we blind folk just lose out?  Unless in future the equipment can bypass the eyes and send the signal direct to the part of the brain that deals with imagery then I can't see how we can enjoy that new tech.  But there is one factor that is a negative with going straight to the part of the brain that handles vision and imagery, what about those folk who have been born from birth and have no idea of what to expect, would  using virtual reality be a terrifying and traumatic experience.  Maybe there is some factor I've not taken into consideration or there are things in the pipeline I'm not aware of but I'd be interested in your opinions.  One final point, There are a group of blind folk who have never had sight, or have lost what sight they had decades ago and some of those I've spoke to wouldn't want any vision virtual or otherwise so I guess those individuals will have no interest how this technology develops.  Walter.

 

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Lenron
 

Agreed we don't know how far this will go. Lets just wait and see. I
am sure there will be things we can make use of. Look at how they are
trying to think of different ways to give sight to the blind.

On 4/3/16, Matt <matt.from.florida@gmail.com> wrote:
But they must learn to adjust and adapt the world is not going to stop
because of blindness.





<mailto:Matt.from.florida@gmail.com> Matt.from.florida@gmail.com



From: Keith S [mailto:ks.steinbach03@gmail.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 03, 2016 7:34 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Virtual reality, will we be left behind once more?



Good points. When I was a big video gamer when I was sighted, games
started
coming out with epilepsy warnings (apparrantly, some lights and color
combos
in video games would cauase a person to have epileptic seizures.



If something is directly plugged into the visual cortex of the brain, I
would imagine that a person who has never had vision would be shocked, if
not outright terrified of what the stimulus is showing them.

----- Original Message ---



Keith--

From: Walter Ramage <mailto:wpr@blueyonder.co.uk>

To: main@TechTalk.groups.io

Sent: Sunday, April 03, 2016 5:58 AM

Subject: [TechTalk] Virtual reality, will we be left behind once more?



Hi all. I just heard part of a BBC world service programme about the
growth
and future impact of Virtual reality. It was stated that to begin with the
main users would be gamers but this will eventually expand to all walks of
life giving the user a unique experience. Now keeping in mind this
experience is a mainly visual one then blind people are going to be
excluded
from taking advantage of this new technology.



Of course, it appeared that way when desk top computers arrived on the
scene
until screen readers made their appearance but regardless of that, with the
increased use of graphics, screen readers are forever playing catch up and
there are still some things we can't take advantage of, regardless of a
screen reader. Another example was touch screen mobiles. When they became
popular we blind folk had to stick to mobiles with physical keypads. Then
along came voice over and talk back and we once more caught up somewhat.



What about visual reality though? As this is almost entirely a visual
experience will we be left behind once more and will we ever be able to
catch up or will it be a situation where the rest of the world moves on
with
their virtual reality experiences but we blind folk just lose out? Unless
in future the equipment can bypass the eyes and send the signal direct to
the part of the brain that deals with imagery then I can't see how we can
enjoy that new tech. But there is one factor that is a negative with going
straight to the part of the brain that handles vision and imagery, what
about those folk who have been born from birth and have no idea of what to
expect, would using virtual reality be a terrifying and traumatic
experience. Maybe there is some factor I've not taken into consideration
or
there are things in the pipeline I'm not aware of but I'd be interested in
your opinions. One final point, There are a group of blind folk who have
never had sight, or have lost what sight they had decades ago and some of
those I've spoke to wouldn't want any vision virtual or otherwise so I
guess
those individuals will have no interest how this technology develops.
Walter.





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gn=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient>

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--
Lenron Brown
Cell: 985-271-2832
Skype: ron.brown762


Aman Singer
 

Hi,

 

              Certainly, the blind will be left behind. The entire history of technology has meant that first the rich get it, then the middle and lower classes get it, then it becomes more or less universal, then the disabled try to catch up. Of course, the technology may fail at any point in this process. The only exception I can think of is in reading where OCR was available to the blind far faster than it was to the sighted and electronic books were used by blind people long before the sighted took to it.

              Having said that, I don’t see why virtual reality will be any different. I wouldn’t be at all concerned that blind people will be left behind, of course they will and people will do what they can to catch up. That’s one of the annoyances of being blind.

Aman

  

 

From: Walter Ramage [mailto:wpr@...]
Sent: April 3, 2016 6:59 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Virtual reality, will we be left behind once more?

 

Hi all.  I just heard part of a BBC world service programme about the growth and future impact of Virtual reality.  It was stated that to begin with the main users would be gamers but this will eventually expand to all walks of life giving the user a unique experience.  Now keeping in mind this experience is a mainly visual one then blind people are going to be excluded from taking advantage of this new technology.

 

Of course, it appeared that way when desk top computers arrived on the scene until screen readers made their appearance but regardless of that, with the increased use of graphics, screen readers are forever playing catch up and there are still some things we can't take advantage of, regardless of a screen reader.  Another example was touch screen mobiles.  When they became popular we blind folk had to  stick to mobiles with physical keypads.  Then along came voice over and talk back and we once more caught up somewhat.

 

What about visual reality though?  As this is almost entirely a visual experience will we be left behind once more and will we ever be able to catch up or will it be a situation where the rest of the world moves on with their virtual reality experiences but we blind folk just lose out?  Unless in future the equipment can bypass the eyes and send the signal direct to the part of the brain that deals with imagery then I can't see how we can enjoy that new tech.  But there is one factor that is a negative with going straight to the part of the brain that handles vision and imagery, what about those folk who have been born from birth and have no idea of what to expect, would  using virtual reality be a terrifying and traumatic experience.  Maybe there is some factor I've not taken into consideration or there are things in the pipeline I'm not aware of but I'd be interested in your opinions.  One final point, There are a group of blind folk who have never had sight, or have lost what sight they had decades ago and some of those I've spoke to wouldn't want any vision virtual or otherwise so I guess those individuals will have no interest how this technology develops.  Walter.

 

Virus-free. www.avast.com


Matt
 

Don’t mind if it is catchup as long as we are included at some point and sooner the better!

 

 

 

From: Aman Singer [mailto:aman.singer@...]
Sent: Sunday, April 03, 2016 8:04 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Virtual reality, will we be left behind once more?

 

Hi,

 

              Certainly, the blind will be left behind. The entire history of technology has meant that first the rich get it, then the middle and lower classes get it, then it becomes more or less universal, then the disabled try to catch up. Of course, the technology may fail at any point in this process. The only exception I can think of is in reading where OCR was available to the blind far faster than it was to the sighted and electronic books were used by blind people long before the sighted took to it.

              Having said that, I don’t see why virtual reality will be any different. I wouldn’t be at all concerned that blind people will be left behind, of course they will and people will do what they can to catch up. That’s one of the annoyances of being blind.

Aman

  

 

From: Walter Ramage [mailto:wpr@...]
Sent: April 3, 2016 6:59 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Virtual reality, will we be left behind once more?

 

Hi all.  I just heard part of a BBC world service programme about the growth and future impact of Virtual reality.  It was stated that to begin with the main users would be gamers but this will eventually expand to all walks of life giving the user a unique experience.  Now keeping in mind this experience is a mainly visual one then blind people are going to be excluded from taking advantage of this new technology.

 

Of course, it appeared that way when desk top computers arrived on the scene until screen readers made their appearance but regardless of that, with the increased use of graphics, screen readers are forever playing catch up and there are still some things we can't take advantage of, regardless of a screen reader.  Another example was touch screen mobiles.  When they became popular we blind folk had to  stick to mobiles with physical keypads.  Then along came voice over and talk back and we once more caught up somewhat.

 

What about visual reality though?  As this is almost entirely a visual experience will we be left behind once more and will we ever be able to catch up or will it be a situation where the rest of the world moves on with their virtual reality experiences but we blind folk just lose out?  Unless in future the equipment can bypass the eyes and send the signal direct to the part of the brain that deals with imagery then I can't see how we can enjoy that new tech.  But there is one factor that is a negative with going straight to the part of the brain that handles vision and imagery, what about those folk who have been born from birth and have no idea of what to expect, would  using virtual reality be a terrifying and traumatic experience.  Maybe there is some factor I've not taken into consideration or there are things in the pipeline I'm not aware of but I'd be interested in your opinions.  One final point, There are a group of blind folk who have never had sight, or have lost what sight they had decades ago and some of those I've spoke to wouldn't want any vision virtual or otherwise so I guess those individuals will have no interest how this technology develops.  Walter.

 

Virus-free. www.avast.com


Carlos
 

Once you have developed the technology to send visual signals directly to the brain for the purposes of virtual reality, the same technology could be used to give someone sight.  Such a process is already being developed for bypassing the optic nerve and was mentioned in an article posted here a couple of days ago.  As for more conventional virtual reality, I couldn't care less.

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, April 03, 2016 6:58 AM
Subject: [TechTalk] Virtual reality, will we be left behind once more?

Hi all.  I just heard part of a BBC world service programme about the growth and future impact of Virtual reality.  It was stated that to begin with the main users would be gamers but this will eventually expand to all walks of life giving the user a unique experience.  Now keeping in mind this experience is a mainly visual one then blind people are going to be excluded from taking advantage of this new technology.

 

Of course, it appeared that way when desk top computers arrived on the scene until screen readers made their appearance but regardless of that, with the increased use of graphics, screen readers are forever playing catch up and there are still some things we can't take advantage of, regardless of a screen reader.  Another example was touch screen mobiles.  When they became popular we blind folk had to  stick to mobiles with physical keypads.  Then along came voice over and talk back and we once more caught up somewhat.

 

What about visual reality though?  As this is almost entirely a visual experience will we be left behind once more and will we ever be able to catch up or will it be a situation where the rest of the world moves on with their virtual reality experiences but we blind folk just lose out?  Unless in future the equipment can bypass the eyes and send the signal direct to the part of the brain that deals with imagery then I can't see how we can enjoy that new tech.  But there is one factor that is a negative with going straight to the part of the brain that handles vision and imagery, what about those folk who have been born from birth and have no idea of what to expect, would  using virtual reality be a terrifying and traumatic experience.  Maybe there is some factor I've not taken into consideration or there are things in the pipeline I'm not aware of but I'd be interested in your opinions.  One final point, There are a group of blind folk who have never had sight, or have lost what sight they had decades ago and some of those I've spoke to wouldn't want any vision virtual or otherwise so I guess those individuals will have no interest how this technology develops.  Walter.


Virus-free. www.avast.com


Ron Canazzi
 

Hi Group,

I've been hearing about this virtual reality business for several years now and it's frightening. We already have a mass media that is ever increasingly corporate, elitist and dominating. Just imagine if this is a total immersion experience rather than just a sight and sound you can be distracted from or that you at all times realize is just that--sight and sound--not any kind of reality.

taken to it's ultimate extreme, people could be taken back to 1930's Germany or 1930's Russia and get caught up in the emotion and drama of the situation and actually come to believe that those times were worth bringing to the present. Since the blind will probably never be fully immersed in that type of reality, It may be up to the blind in that case to save the world??!! At any rate, it's good fodder for a science fiction futuristic dystopian novel.

On 4/3/2016 6:58 AM, Walter Ramage wrote:
Hi all. I just heard part of a BBC world service programme about the growth
and future impact of Virtual reality. It was stated that to begin with the
main users would be gamers but this will eventually expand to all walks of
life giving the user a unique experience. Now keeping in mind this
experience is a mainly visual one then blind people are going to be excluded
from taking advantage of this new technology.


Of course, it appeared that way when desk top computers arrived on the scene
until screen readers made their appearance but regardless of that, with the
increased use of graphics, screen readers are forever playing catch up and
there are still some things we can't take advantage of, regardless of a
screen reader. Another example was touch screen mobiles. When they became
popular we blind folk had to stick to mobiles with physical keypads. Then
along came voice over and talk back and we once more caught up somewhat.


What about visual reality though? As this is almost entirely a visual
experience will we be left behind once more and will we ever be able to
catch up or will it be a situation where the rest of the world moves on with
their virtual reality experiences but we blind folk just lose out? Unless
in future the equipment can bypass the eyes and send the signal direct to
the part of the brain that deals with imagery then I can't see how we can
enjoy that new tech. But there is one factor that is a negative with going
straight to the part of the brain that handles vision and imagery, what
about those folk who have been born from birth and have no idea of what to
expect, would using virtual reality be a terrifying and traumatic
experience. Maybe there is some factor I've not taken into consideration or
there are things in the pipeline I'm not aware of but I'd be interested in
your opinions. One final point, There are a group of blind folk who have
never had sight, or have lost what sight they had decades ago and some of
those I've spoke to wouldn't want any vision virtual or otherwise so I guess
those individuals will have no interest how this technology develops.
Walter.



--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


Carlos
 

LOL if it were a direct brain to machine interface, the blind would be just as subject to it as anyone else.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Ron Canazzi" <aa2vm@roadrunner.com>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, April 03, 2016 8:31 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Virtual reality, will we be left behind once more?


Hi Group,

I've been hearing about this virtual reality business for several years now and it's frightening. We already have a mass media that is ever increasingly corporate, elitist and dominating. Just imagine if this is a total immersion experience rather than just a sight and sound you can be distracted from or that you at all times realize is just that--sight and sound--not any kind of reality.

taken to it's ultimate extreme, people could be taken back to 1930's Germany or 1930's Russia and get caught up in the emotion and drama of the situation and actually come to believe that those times were worth bringing to the present. Since the blind will probably never be fully immersed in that type of reality, It may be up to the blind in that case to save the world??!! At any rate, it's good fodder for a science fiction futuristic dystopian novel.



On 4/3/2016 6:58 AM, Walter Ramage wrote:
Hi all. I just heard part of a BBC world service programme about the growth
and future impact of Virtual reality. It was stated that to begin with the
main users would be gamers but this will eventually expand to all walks of
life giving the user a unique experience. Now keeping in mind this
experience is a mainly visual one then blind people are going to be excluded
from taking advantage of this new technology.


Of course, it appeared that way when desk top computers arrived on the scene
until screen readers made their appearance but regardless of that, with the
increased use of graphics, screen readers are forever playing catch up and
there are still some things we can't take advantage of, regardless of a
screen reader. Another example was touch screen mobiles. When they became
popular we blind folk had to stick to mobiles with physical keypads. Then
along came voice over and talk back and we once more caught up somewhat.


What about visual reality though? As this is almost entirely a visual
experience will we be left behind once more and will we ever be able to
catch up or will it be a situation where the rest of the world moves on with
their virtual reality experiences but we blind folk just lose out? Unless
in future the equipment can bypass the eyes and send the signal direct to
the part of the brain that deals with imagery then I can't see how we can
enjoy that new tech. But there is one factor that is a negative with going
straight to the part of the brain that handles vision and imagery, what
about those folk who have been born from birth and have no idea of what to
expect, would using virtual reality be a terrifying and traumatic
experience. Maybe there is some factor I've not taken into consideration or
there are things in the pipeline I'm not aware of but I'd be interested in
your opinions. One final point, There are a group of blind folk who have
never had sight, or have lost what sight they had decades ago and some of
those I've spoke to wouldn't want any vision virtual or otherwise so I guess
those individuals will have no interest how this technology develops.
Walter.



--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"



Walter Ramage
 

Hi. Actually, they are already doing that. One of the examples they gave
(and they played the sound track) was in Palestine and a little girl on the
street singing a song and a bomb exploded, apparently the VR made it so
real. The programme presenter explained that he let his wife have a go and
when she put the headset on she was shocked and backed up into a corner
because what she saw was a rhino charging at her. I'll try and find either
the download for the programme or a link to it, I only got a small part of
it. Walter.

-----Original Message-----
From: Ron Canazzi [mailto:aa2vm@roadrunner.com]
Sent: 03 April 2016 13:32
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Virtual reality, will we be left behind once more?

Hi Group,

I've been hearing about this virtual reality business for several years
now and it's frightening. We already have a mass media that is ever
increasingly corporate, elitist and dominating. Just imagine if this is
a total immersion experience rather than just a sight and sound you can
be distracted from or that you at all times realize is just that--sight
and sound--not any kind of reality.

taken to it's ultimate extreme, people could be taken back to 1930's
Germany or 1930's Russia and get caught up in the emotion and drama of
the situation and actually come to believe that those times were worth
bringing to the present. Since the blind will probably never be fully
immersed in that type of reality, It may be up to the blind in that case
to save the world??!! At any rate, it's good fodder for a science
fiction futuristic dystopian novel.



On 4/3/2016 6:58 AM, Walter Ramage wrote:
Hi all. I just heard part of a BBC world service programme about the
growth
and future impact of Virtual reality. It was stated that to begin with
the
main users would be gamers but this will eventually expand to all walks of
life giving the user a unique experience. Now keeping in mind this
experience is a mainly visual one then blind people are going to be
excluded
from taking advantage of this new technology.



Of course, it appeared that way when desk top computers arrived on the
scene
until screen readers made their appearance but regardless of that, with
the
increased use of graphics, screen readers are forever playing catch up and
there are still some things we can't take advantage of, regardless of a
screen reader. Another example was touch screen mobiles. When they
became
popular we blind folk had to stick to mobiles with physical keypads.
Then
along came voice over and talk back and we once more caught up somewhat.



What about visual reality though? As this is almost entirely a visual
experience will we be left behind once more and will we ever be able to
catch up or will it be a situation where the rest of the world moves on
with
their virtual reality experiences but we blind folk just lose out? Unless
in future the equipment can bypass the eyes and send the signal direct to
the part of the brain that deals with imagery then I can't see how we can
enjoy that new tech. But there is one factor that is a negative with
going
straight to the part of the brain that handles vision and imagery, what
about those folk who have been born from birth and have no idea of what to
expect, would using virtual reality be a terrifying and traumatic
experience. Maybe there is some factor I've not taken into consideration
or
there are things in the pipeline I'm not aware of but I'd be interested in
your opinions. One final point, There are a group of blind folk who have
never had sight, or have lost what sight they had decades ago and some of
those I've spoke to wouldn't want any vision virtual or otherwise so I
guess
those individuals will have no interest how this technology develops.
Walter.



--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


Matt
 

Yes don't know why they think the blind is going to be totally excluded from
this ! This is the kind of closed thinking is why we as blind people are not
as far along as we should be in things being accessible to us. We got to get
out of this thinking in the box only! We must think outside the box and be
willing to adjust and adapt to new things.


Matt.from.florida@gmail.com

-----Original Message-----
From: Carlos [mailto:carlos1106@nyc.rr.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 03, 2016 8:38 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Virtual reality, will we be left behind once more?

LOL if it were a direct brain to machine interface, the blind would be just
as subject to it as anyone else.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Ron Canazzi" <aa2vm@roadrunner.com>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, April 03, 2016 8:31 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Virtual reality, will we be left behind once more?


Hi Group,

I've been hearing about this virtual reality business for several
years now and it's frightening. We already have a mass media that is
ever increasingly corporate, elitist and dominating. Just imagine if
this is a total immersion experience rather than just a sight and
sound you can be distracted from or that you at all times realize is
just that--sight and sound--not any kind of reality.

taken to it's ultimate extreme, people could be taken back to 1930's
Germany or 1930's Russia and get caught up in the emotion and drama of
the situation and actually come to believe that those times were worth
bringing to the present. Since the blind will probably never be fully
immersed in that type of reality, It may be up to the blind in that
case to save the world??!! At any rate, it's good fodder for a
science fiction futuristic dystopian novel.



On 4/3/2016 6:58 AM, Walter Ramage wrote:
Hi all. I just heard part of a BBC world service programme about the
growth and future impact of Virtual reality. It was stated that to
begin with the main users would be gamers but this will eventually
expand to all walks of life giving the user a unique experience. Now
keeping in mind this experience is a mainly visual one then blind
people are going to be excluded from taking advantage of this new
technology.


Of course, it appeared that way when desk top computers arrived on
the scene until screen readers made their appearance but regardless
of that, with the increased use of graphics, screen readers are
forever playing catch up and there are still some things we can't
take advantage of, regardless of a screen reader. Another example
was touch screen mobiles. When they became popular we blind folk had
to stick to mobiles with physical keypads.
Then
along came voice over and talk back and we once more caught up somewhat.


What about visual reality though? As this is almost entirely a
visual experience will we be left behind once more and will we ever
be able to catch up or will it be a situation where the rest of the
world moves on with their virtual reality experiences but we blind
folk just lose out?
Unless
in future the equipment can bypass the eyes and send the signal
direct to the part of the brain that deals with imagery then I can't
see how we can enjoy that new tech. But there is one factor that is
a negative with going straight to the part of the brain that handles
vision and imagery, what about those folk who have been born from
birth and have no idea of what to expect, would using virtual
reality be a terrifying and traumatic experience. Maybe there is
some factor I've not taken into consideration or there are things in
the pipeline I'm not aware of but I'd be interested in your opinions.
One final point, There are a group of blind folk who have never had
sight, or have lost what sight they had decades ago and some of those
I've spoke to wouldn't want any vision virtual or otherwise so I
guess those individuals will have no interest how this technology
develops.
Walter.



--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"




Gerald Levy
 

If you are so concerned about being left behind because you cannot experience virtual reality, then I suggest that you join one of the blindness advocacy groups and demand that they make this a top priority. Right now, they are more interested in promoting Braille literacy. So join one of these groups and fight to make virtual reality "accessible", and see how far you get.

Gerald

-----Original Message-----
From: Walter Ramage
Sent: Sunday, April 03, 2016 8:39 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Virtual reality, will we be left behind once more?

Hi. Actually, they are already doing that. One of the examples they gave
(and they played the sound track) was in Palestine and a little girl on the
street singing a song and a bomb exploded, apparently the VR made it so
real. The programme presenter explained that he let his wife have a go and
when she put the headset on she was shocked and backed up into a corner
because what she saw was a rhino charging at her. I'll try and find either
the download for the programme or a link to it, I only got a small part of
it. Walter.

-----Original Message-----
From: Ron Canazzi [mailto:aa2vm@roadrunner.com]
Sent: 03 April 2016 13:32
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Virtual reality, will we be left behind once more?

Hi Group,

I've been hearing about this virtual reality business for several years
now and it's frightening. We already have a mass media that is ever
increasingly corporate, elitist and dominating. Just imagine if this is
a total immersion experience rather than just a sight and sound you can
be distracted from or that you at all times realize is just that--sight
and sound--not any kind of reality.

taken to it's ultimate extreme, people could be taken back to 1930's
Germany or 1930's Russia and get caught up in the emotion and drama of
the situation and actually come to believe that those times were worth
bringing to the present. Since the blind will probably never be fully
immersed in that type of reality, It may be up to the blind in that case
to save the world??!! At any rate, it's good fodder for a science
fiction futuristic dystopian novel.



On 4/3/2016 6:58 AM, Walter Ramage wrote:
Hi all. I just heard part of a BBC world service programme about the
growth
and future impact of Virtual reality. It was stated that to begin with
the
main users would be gamers but this will eventually expand to all walks of
life giving the user a unique experience. Now keeping in mind this
experience is a mainly visual one then blind people are going to be
excluded
from taking advantage of this new technology.



Of course, it appeared that way when desk top computers arrived on the
scene
until screen readers made their appearance but regardless of that, with
the
increased use of graphics, screen readers are forever playing catch up and
there are still some things we can't take advantage of, regardless of a
screen reader. Another example was touch screen mobiles. When they
became
popular we blind folk had to stick to mobiles with physical keypads.
Then
along came voice over and talk back and we once more caught up somewhat.



What about visual reality though? As this is almost entirely a visual
experience will we be left behind once more and will we ever be able to
catch up or will it be a situation where the rest of the world moves on
with
their virtual reality experiences but we blind folk just lose out? Unless
in future the equipment can bypass the eyes and send the signal direct to
the part of the brain that deals with imagery then I can't see how we can
enjoy that new tech. But there is one factor that is a negative with
going
straight to the part of the brain that handles vision and imagery, what
about those folk who have been born from birth and have no idea of what to
expect, would using virtual reality be a terrifying and traumatic
experience. Maybe there is some factor I've not taken into consideration
or
there are things in the pipeline I'm not aware of but I'd be interested in
your opinions. One final point, There are a group of blind folk who have
never had sight, or have lost what sight they had decades ago and some of
those I've spoke to wouldn't want any vision virtual or otherwise so I
guess
those individuals will have no interest how this technology develops.
Walter.



--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


Carlos
 

Everyone keeps falling back on this argument of how overwhelming it would be for someone who has never seen. Of course logically initially it would be overwhelming, but most don't ever seem to consider the possibility that you could eventually adapt. I personally believe it is all a matter of determination. If you are determined enough, even if it takes years, you could eventually adjust. If you start out with the mentality that it is impossible, then you will most likely never adapt.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Matt" <matt.from.florida@gmail.com>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, April 03, 2016 9:05 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Virtual reality, will we be left behind once more?


Yes don't know why they think the blind is going to be totally excluded from
this ! This is the kind of closed thinking is why we as blind people are not
as far along as we should be in things being accessible to us. We got to get
out of this thinking in the box only! We must think outside the box and be
willing to adjust and adapt to new things.


Matt.from.florida@gmail.com

-----Original Message-----
From: Carlos [mailto:carlos1106@nyc.rr.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 03, 2016 8:38 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Virtual reality, will we be left behind once more?

LOL if it were a direct brain to machine interface, the blind would be just
as subject to it as anyone else.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Ron Canazzi" <aa2vm@roadrunner.com>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, April 03, 2016 8:31 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Virtual reality, will we be left behind once more?


Hi Group,

I've been hearing about this virtual reality business for several
years now and it's frightening. We already have a mass media that is
ever increasingly corporate, elitist and dominating. Just imagine if
this is a total immersion experience rather than just a sight and
sound you can be distracted from or that you at all times realize is
just that--sight and sound--not any kind of reality.

taken to it's ultimate extreme, people could be taken back to 1930's
Germany or 1930's Russia and get caught up in the emotion and drama of
the situation and actually come to believe that those times were worth
bringing to the present. Since the blind will probably never be fully
immersed in that type of reality, It may be up to the blind in that
case to save the world??!! At any rate, it's good fodder for a
science fiction futuristic dystopian novel.



On 4/3/2016 6:58 AM, Walter Ramage wrote:
Hi all. I just heard part of a BBC world service programme about the
growth and future impact of Virtual reality. It was stated that to
begin with the main users would be gamers but this will eventually
expand to all walks of life giving the user a unique experience. Now
keeping in mind this experience is a mainly visual one then blind
people are going to be excluded from taking advantage of this new
technology.


Of course, it appeared that way when desk top computers arrived on
the scene until screen readers made their appearance but regardless
of that, with the increased use of graphics, screen readers are
forever playing catch up and there are still some things we can't
take advantage of, regardless of a screen reader. Another example
was touch screen mobiles. When they became popular we blind folk had
to stick to mobiles with physical keypads.
Then
along came voice over and talk back and we once more caught up somewhat.


What about visual reality though? As this is almost entirely a
visual experience will we be left behind once more and will we ever
be able to catch up or will it be a situation where the rest of the
world moves on with their virtual reality experiences but we blind
folk just lose out?
Unless
in future the equipment can bypass the eyes and send the signal
direct to the part of the brain that deals with imagery then I can't
see how we can enjoy that new tech. But there is one factor that is
a negative with going straight to the part of the brain that handles
vision and imagery, what about those folk who have been born from
birth and have no idea of what to expect, would using virtual
reality be a terrifying and traumatic experience. Maybe there is
some factor I've not taken into consideration or there are things in
the pipeline I'm not aware of but I'd be interested in your opinions.
One final point, There are a group of blind folk who have never had
sight, or have lost what sight they had decades ago and some of those
I've spoke to wouldn't want any vision virtual or otherwise so I
guess those individuals will have no interest how this technology
develops.
Walter.



--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"









Matt
 

Well, not going to get very far with them as they are a in box thinkers and
are still living in the dark ages most of them. Most of them that is running
these organization is people up in age of 50more! That is why they are so
hooked on Braille is everything ! I afraid in a lot of ways we are stuck on
this wheel because of them and their in box thinking! Sort of like you are
doing not willing to experience new things and adjusting and adapting to
them! But you know it might take another 30 years but the old will be going
out the young will be coming in with lots more open minds to things and
technology!


Matt.from.florida@gmail.com

-----Original Message-----
From: Gerald Levy [mailto:bwaylimited@verizon.net]
Sent: Sunday, April 03, 2016 9:12 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Virtual reality, will we be left behind once more?


If you are so concerned about being left behind because you cannot
experience virtual reality, then I suggest that you join one of the
blindness advocacy groups and demand that they make this a top priority.
Right now, they are more interested in promoting Braille literacy. So join
one of these groups and fight to make virtual reality "accessible", and see
how far you get.

Gerald



-----Original Message-----
From: Walter Rampage
Sent: Sunday, April 03, 2016 8:39 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Virtual reality, will we be left behind once more?

Hi. Actually, they are already doing that. One of the examples they gave
(and they played the sound track) was in Palestine and a little girl on the
street singing a song and a bomb exploded, apparently the VR made it so
real. The programme presenter explained that he let his wife have a go and
when she put the headset on she was shocked and backed up into a corner
because what she saw was a rhino charging at her. I'll try and find either
the download for the programme or a link to it, I only got a small part of
it. Walter.

-----Original Message-----
From: Ron Canazzi [mailto:aa2vm@roadrunner.com]
Sent: 03 April 2016 13:32
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Virtual reality, will we be left behind once more?

Hi Group,

I've been hearing about this virtual reality business for several years now
and it's frightening. We already have a mass media that is ever
increasingly corporate, elitist and dominating. Just imagine if this is a
total immersion experience rather than just a sight and sound you can be
distracted from or that you at all times realize is just that--sight and
sound--not any kind of reality.

taken to its ultimate extreme, people could be taken back to 1930's Germany
or 1930's Russia and get caught up in the emotion and drama of the situation
and actually come to believe that those times were worth bringing to the
present. Since the blind will probably never be fully immersed in that type
of reality, It may be up to the blind in that case to save the world??!! At
any rate, it's good fodder for a science fiction futuristic dystopian novel.



On 4/3/2016 6:58 AM, Walter Ramage wrote:
Hi all. I just heard part of a BBC world service programme about the
growth
and future impact of Virtual reality. It was stated that to begin
with
the
main users would be gamers but this will eventually expand to all
walks of life giving the user a unique experience. Now keeping in
mind this experience is a mainly visual one then blind people are
going to be
excluded
from taking advantage of this new technology.



Of course, it appeared that way when desk top computers arrived on the
scene
until screen readers made their appearance but regardless of that,
with
the
increased use of graphics, screen readers are forever playing catch up
and there are still some things we can't take advantage of, regardless
of a screen reader. Another example was touch screen mobiles. When
they
became
popular we blind folk had to stick to mobiles with physical keypads.
Then
along came voice over and talk back and we once more caught up somewhat.



What about visual reality though? As this is almost entirely a visual
experience will we be left behind once more and will we ever be able
to catch up or will it be a situation where the rest of the world
moves on
with
their virtual reality experiences but we blind folk just lose out?
Unless in future the equipment can bypass the eyes and send the signal
direct to the part of the brain that deals with imagery then I can't
see how we can enjoy that new tech. But there is one factor that is a
negative with
going
straight to the part of the brain that handles vision and imagery,
what about those folk who have been born from birth and have no idea
of what to expect, would using virtual reality be a terrifying and
traumatic experience. Maybe there is some factor I've not taken into
consideration
or
there are things in the pipeline I'm not aware of but I'd be
interested in your opinions. One final point, There are a group of
blind folk who have never had sight, or have lost what sight they had
decades ago and some of those I've spoke to wouldn't want any vision
virtual or otherwise so I
guess
those individuals will have no interest how this technology develops.
Walter.



--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


Matt
 

Agree!


Matt.from.florida@gmail.com

-----Original Message-----
From: Carlos [mailto:carlos1106@nyc.rr.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 03, 2016 9:20 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Virtual reality, will we be left behind once more?

Everyone keeps falling back on this argument of how overwhelming it would be
for someone who has never seen. Of course logically initially it would be
overwhelming, but most don't ever seem to consider the possibility that you
could eventually adapt. I personally believe it is all a matter of
determination. If you are determined enough, even if it takes years, you
could eventually adjust. If you start out with the mentality that it is
impossible, then you will most likely never adapt.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Matt" <matt.from.florida@gmail.com>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, April 03, 2016 9:05 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Virtual reality, will we be left behind once more?


Yes don't know why they think the blind is going to be totally
excluded from this ! This is the kind of closed thinking is why we as
blind people are not as far along as we should be in things being
accessible to us. We got to get out of this thinking in the box only!
We must think outside the box and be willing to adjust and adapt to
new things.


Matt.from.florida@gmail.com

-----Original Message-----
From: Carlos [mailto:carlos1106@nyc.rr.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 03, 2016 8:38 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Virtual reality, will we be left behind once more?

LOL if it were a direct brain to machine interface, the blind would be
just
as subject to it as anyone else.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Ron Canazzi" <aa2vm@roadrunner.com>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, April 03, 2016 8:31 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Virtual reality, will we be left behind once more?


Hi Group,

I've been hearing about this virtual reality business for several
years now and it's frightening. We already have a mass media that is
ever increasingly corporate, elitist and dominating. Just imagine if
this is a total immersion experience rather than just a sight and
sound you can be distracted from or that you at all times realize is
just that--sight and sound--not any kind of reality.

taken to it's ultimate extreme, people could be taken back to 1930's
Germany or 1930's Russia and get caught up in the emotion and drama of
the situation and actually come to believe that those times were worth
bringing to the present. Since the blind will probably never be fully
immersed in that type of reality, It may be up to the blind in that
case to save the world??!! At any rate, it's good fodder for a
science fiction futuristic dystopian novel.



On 4/3/2016 6:58 AM, Walter Ramage wrote:
Hi all. I just heard part of a BBC world service programme about the
growth and future impact of Virtual reality. It was stated that to
begin with the main users would be gamers but this will eventually
expand to all walks of life giving the user a unique experience. Now
keeping in mind this experience is a mainly visual one then blind
people are going to be excluded from taking advantage of this new
technology.


Of course, it appeared that way when desk top computers arrived on
the scene until screen readers made their appearance but regardless
of that, with the increased use of graphics, screen readers are
forever playing catch up and there are still some things we can't
take advantage of, regardless of a screen reader. Another example
was touch screen mobiles. When they became popular we blind folk had
to stick to mobiles with physical keypads.
Then
along came voice over and talk back and we once more caught up somewhat.


What about visual reality though? As this is almost entirely a
visual experience will we be left behind once more and will we ever
be able to catch up or will it be a situation where the rest of the
world moves on with their virtual reality experiences but we blind
folk just lose out?
Unless
in future the equipment can bypass the eyes and send the signal
direct to the part of the brain that deals with imagery then I can't
see how we can enjoy that new tech. But there is one factor that is
a negative with going straight to the part of the brain that handles
vision and imagery, what about those folk who have been born from
birth and have no idea of what to expect, would using virtual
reality be a terrifying and traumatic experience. Maybe there is
some factor I've not taken into consideration or there are things in
the pipeline I'm not aware of but I'd be interested in your opinions.
One final point, There are a group of blind folk who have never had
sight, or have lost what sight they had decades ago and some of those
I've spoke to wouldn't want any vision virtual or otherwise so I
guess those individuals will have no interest how this technology
develops.
Walter.



--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"










Gerald Levy
 

And everyone keeps conveniently forgetting that making virtual reality "accessible" to the blind costs money, probably millions of dollars. Where is this money going to come from? From the federal government? From the blindness groups? From Freedom Scientific or GW Micro? I don't think so.

Gerald

-----Original Message-----
From: Carlos
Sent: Sunday, April 03, 2016 9:19 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Virtual reality, will we be left behind once more?

Everyone keeps falling back on this argument of how overwhelming it would be
for someone who has never seen. Of course logically initially it would be
overwhelming, but most don't ever seem to consider the possibility that you
could eventually adapt. I personally believe it is all a matter of
determination. If you are determined enough, even if it takes years, you
could eventually adjust. If you start out with the mentality that it is
impossible, then you will most likely never adapt.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Matt" <matt.from.florida@gmail.com>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, April 03, 2016 9:05 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Virtual reality, will we be left behind once more?


Yes don't know why they think the blind is going to be totally excluded from
this ! This is the kind of closed thinking is why we as blind people are not
as far along as we should be in things being accessible to us. We got to get
out of this thinking in the box only! We must think outside the box and be
willing to adjust and adapt to new things.


Matt.from.florida@gmail.com

-----Original Message-----
From: Carlos [mailto:carlos1106@nyc.rr.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 03, 2016 8:38 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Virtual reality, will we be left behind once more?

LOL if it were a direct brain to machine interface, the blind would be just
as subject to it as anyone else.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Ron Canazzi" <aa2vm@roadrunner.com>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, April 03, 2016 8:31 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Virtual reality, will we be left behind once more?


Hi Group,

I've been hearing about this virtual reality business for several
years now and it's frightening. We already have a mass media that is
ever increasingly corporate, elitist and dominating. Just imagine if
this is a total immersion experience rather than just a sight and
sound you can be distracted from or that you at all times realize is
just that--sight and sound--not any kind of reality.

taken to it's ultimate extreme, people could be taken back to 1930's
Germany or 1930's Russia and get caught up in the emotion and drama of
the situation and actually come to believe that those times were worth
bringing to the present. Since the blind will probably never be fully
immersed in that type of reality, It may be up to the blind in that
case to save the world??!! At any rate, it's good fodder for a
science fiction futuristic dystopian novel.



On 4/3/2016 6:58 AM, Walter Ramage wrote:
Hi all. I just heard part of a BBC world service programme about the
growth and future impact of Virtual reality. It was stated that to
begin with the main users would be gamers but this will eventually
expand to all walks of life giving the user a unique experience. Now
keeping in mind this experience is a mainly visual one then blind
people are going to be excluded from taking advantage of this new
technology.


Of course, it appeared that way when desk top computers arrived on
the scene until screen readers made their appearance but regardless
of that, with the increased use of graphics, screen readers are
forever playing catch up and there are still some things we can't
take advantage of, regardless of a screen reader. Another example
was touch screen mobiles. When they became popular we blind folk had
to stick to mobiles with physical keypads.
Then
along came voice over and talk back and we once more caught up somewhat.


What about visual reality though? As this is almost entirely a
visual experience will we be left behind once more and will we ever
be able to catch up or will it be a situation where the rest of the
world moves on with their virtual reality experiences but we blind
folk just lose out?
Unless
in future the equipment can bypass the eyes and send the signal
direct to the part of the brain that deals with imagery then I can't
see how we can enjoy that new tech. But there is one factor that is
a negative with going straight to the part of the brain that handles
vision and imagery, what about those folk who have been born from
birth and have no idea of what to expect, would using virtual
reality be a terrifying and traumatic experience. Maybe there is
some factor I've not taken into consideration or there are things in
the pipeline I'm not aware of but I'd be interested in your opinions.
One final point, There are a group of blind folk who have never had
sight, or have lost what sight they had decades ago and some of those
I've spoke to wouldn't want any vision virtual or otherwise so I
guess those individuals will have no interest how this technology
develops.
Walter.



--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"