When did 'ribbons' start to appear


Nancy Hill
 

All this 'ribbon' talk got me to wondering about when 'ribbons' started.


Would some kind person give a bit of history about ribbons such as when they were started and what programs have them?


I have no clue and would love the education.


Thanks!


Nancy


Janet
 

Nancy,
As far as I know, I think ribbons started with Microsoft in 2007. Someone else might have more detailed information though. Ribbons aren't a bad thing either. Some people just don't like them, or they might have a difficult time learning how to use them. Some people just don't like change either. Some people just don't want or they don't have to be bothered with learning ribbons.
Janet

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Nancy Hill
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 5:45 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear

All this 'ribbon' talk got me to wondering about when 'ribbons' started.


Would some kind person give a bit of history about ribbons such as when they were started and what programs have them?


I have no clue and would love the education.


Thanks!


Nancy


Eleni Vamvakari
 

I don't see a reason to complicate things. Hence, I never understood
the reason behind ribbons. What is wrong with simply pressing alt to
enter a menu, and either up and down arrows to read it, or left and
right arrows to switch to another menu?

On 24/01/2018, janet gross <janet.harvard@outlook.com> wrote:
Nancy,
As far as I know, I think ribbons started with Microsoft in 2007. Someone
else might have more detailed information though. Ribbons aren't a bad
thing either. Some people just don't like them, or they might have a
difficult time learning how to use them. Some people just don't like change
either. Some people just don't want or they don't have to be bothered with
learning ribbons.
Janet

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Nancy Hill
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 5:45 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear

All this 'ribbon' talk got me to wondering about when 'ribbons' started.


Would some kind person give a bit of history about ribbons such as when they
were started and what programs have them?


I have no clue and would love the education.


Thanks!


Nancy







--
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anyaudio.net: elvam2167

Skype: elvam2167


David Moore <jesusloves1966@...>
 

Ribbons were implemented for the sighted to see more options in front of their eyes. We just have to learn to use them. After practice, I can use them just as much as the menus.

There are many more key tips on ribbons that you can memorize, and can do more with key commands by using ribbons.

David Moore

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 8:11 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear

 

I don't see a reason to complicate things.  Hence, I never understood

the reason behind ribbons.  What is wrong with simply pressing alt to

enter a menu, and either up and down arrows to read it, or left and

right arrows to switch to another menu?

 

On 24/01/2018, janet gross <janet.harvard@...> wrote:

> Nancy,

> As far as I know, I think ribbons started with Microsoft in 2007.  Someone

> else might have more detailed information though.  Ribbons aren't a bad

> thing either.  Some people just don't like them, or they might have a

> difficult time learning how to use them.  Some people just don't like change

> either.  Some people just don't want or they don't have to be bothered with

> learning ribbons.

> Janet

> -----Original Message-----

> From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of

> Nancy Hill

> Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 5:45 PM

> To: main@TechTalk.groups.io

> Subject: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear

> All this 'ribbon' talk got me to wondering about when 'ribbons' started.

> Would some kind person give a bit of history about ribbons such as when they

> were started and what programs have them?

> I have no clue and would love the education.

> Thanks!

> Nancy

>

 

 

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Eleni Vamvakari
 

So basically, they exist because sighted people are too lazy to open a
menu and view the options. Ah well. Good luck to the ribbon users,
and I mean that sincerely. *smile*

On 24/01/2018, David Moore <jesusloves1966@gmail.com> wrote:
Ribbons were implemented for the sighted to see more options in front of
their eyes. We just have to learn to use them. After practice, I can use
them just as much as the menus.
There are many more key tips on ribbons that you can memorize, and can do
more with key commands by using ribbons.
David Moore
Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 8:11 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear

I don't see a reason to complicate things. Hence, I never understood
the reason behind ribbons. What is wrong with simply pressing alt to
enter a menu, and either up and down arrows to read it, or left and
right arrows to switch to another menu?

On 24/01/2018, janet gross <janet.harvard@outlook.com> wrote:
Nancy,
As far as I know, I think ribbons started with Microsoft in 2007.
Someone
else might have more detailed information though. Ribbons aren't a bad
thing either. Some people just don't like them, or they might have a
difficult time learning how to use them. Some people just don't like
change
either. Some people just don't want or they don't have to be bothered
with
learning ribbons.
Janet

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf
Of
Nancy Hill
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 5:45 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear

All this 'ribbon' talk got me to wondering about when 'ribbons' started.


Would some kind person give a bit of history about ribbons such as when
they
were started and what programs have them?


I have no clue and would love the education.


Thanks!


Nancy








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anyaudio.net: elvam2167

Skype: elvam2167




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Skype: elvam2167


Janet
 

HI,
I don't think ribbons are complicated, but then again, it all depends on each person, and everyone is different.
If you don't like them, well, you don't like them! LOL!

Janet

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 7:12 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear

I don't see a reason to complicate things. Hence, I never understood the reason behind ribbons. What is wrong with simply pressing alt to enter a menu, and either up and down arrows to read it, or left and right arrows to switch to another menu?

On 24/01/2018, janet gross <janet.harvard@outlook.com> wrote:
Nancy,
As far as I know, I think ribbons started with Microsoft in 2007.
Someone else might have more detailed information though. Ribbons
aren't a bad thing either. Some people just don't like them, or they
might have a difficult time learning how to use them. Some people
just don't like change either. Some people just don't want or they
don't have to be bothered with learning ribbons.
Janet

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On
Behalf Of Nancy Hill
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 5:45 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear

All this 'ribbon' talk got me to wondering about when 'ribbons' started.


Would some kind person give a bit of history about ribbons such as
when they were started and what programs have them?


I have no clue and would love the education.


Thanks!


Nancy








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Gene
 

Ribbons allow sighted people to see a lot of things all the time when in the main window of a program.  You only see what is in a menu when you open it.
 
Blind people move to ribbons and then can move through them in a similar way to working with a menu.  A sighted person sees all the ribbons and everything on all the ribbons just by looking at what is displayed.  Ribbons are all displayed in the main window.  I'm not sure to what extent they may be displayed when in other windows of a program. 
 
If you were a sighted person, would you rather open menu after menu looking for something or be able to quickly look at every option in every ribbon just by looking. 
 
Ribbons do not significantly complicate things.  Did you read the tutorial I sent the list many months ago explaining the basics of ribbons?  There is more you need to know, but the essence of ribbons is that you tab and shift tab through a ribbon.  You up and down arrow through a menu.  It's a different way of organizing items.  It is not significantly more complicated, just different.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 7:11 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear

I don't see a reason to complicate things.  Hence, I never understood
the reason behind ribbons.  What is wrong with simply pressing alt to
enter a menu, and either up and down arrows to read it, or left and
right arrows to switch to another menu?

On 24/01/2018, janet gross <janet.harvard@...> wrote:
> Nancy,
> As far as I know, I think ribbons started with Microsoft in 2007.  Someone
> else might have more detailed information though.  Ribbons aren't a bad
> thing either.  Some people just don't like them, or they might have a
> difficult time learning how to use them.  Some people just don't like change
> either.  Some people just don't want or they don't have to be bothered with
> learning ribbons.
> Janet
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
> Nancy Hill
> Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 5:45 PM
> To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
> Subject: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear
>
> All this 'ribbon' talk got me to wondering about when 'ribbons' started.
>
>
> Would some kind person give a bit of history about ribbons such as when they
> were started and what programs have them?
>
>
> I have no clue and would love the education.
>
>
> Thanks!
>
>
> Nancy
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>


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Janet
 

Eleni,
I'm not for sure if they were implemented just for sighted people, we do live in a sighted world though, LOL, but at any rate, we as blind people can use them as well by using the tab and arrow keys. I don't use them as much anymore as I use to because I just don't have much reason to use them now. I used them from the very beginning, and they are not really that difficult once you learn them.

Janet

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 7:20 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear

So basically, they exist because sighted people are too lazy to open a menu and view the options. Ah well. Good luck to the ribbon users, and I mean that sincerely. *smile*

On 24/01/2018, David Moore <jesusloves1966@gmail.com> wrote:
Ribbons were implemented for the sighted to see more options in front
of their eyes. We just have to learn to use them. After practice, I
can use them just as much as the menus.
There are many more key tips on ribbons that you can memorize, and can
do more with key commands by using ribbons.
David Moore
Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 8:11 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear

I don't see a reason to complicate things. Hence, I never understood
the reason behind ribbons. What is wrong with simply pressing alt to
enter a menu, and either up and down arrows to read it, or left and
right arrows to switch to another menu?

On 24/01/2018, janet gross <janet.harvard@outlook.com> wrote:
Nancy,
As far as I know, I think ribbons started with Microsoft in 2007.
Someone
else might have more detailed information though. Ribbons aren't a
bad thing either. Some people just don't like them, or they might
have a difficult time learning how to use them. Some people just
don't like change either. Some people just don't want or they don't
have to be bothered with learning ribbons.
Janet

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On
Behalf Of Nancy Hill
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 5:45 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear

All this 'ribbon' talk got me to wondering about when 'ribbons' started.


Would some kind person give a bit of history about ribbons such as
when they were started and what programs have them?


I have no clue and would love the education.


Thanks!


Nancy








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Facebook: elvam2167@gmail.com

anyaudio.net: elvam2167

Skype: elvam2167





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Gene
 

It's really arrogant to disparage the way sighted people do things just because blind people don't.  It isn't a question of laziness.  It's a question of using vision efficiently. 

Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 7:19 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear

So basically, they exist because sighted people are too lazy to open a
menu and view the options.  Ah well.  Good luck to the ribbon users,
and I mean that sincerely. *smile*

On 24/01/2018, David Moore <jesusloves1966@...> wrote:
> Ribbons were implemented for the sighted to see more options in front of
> their eyes. We just have to learn to use them. After practice, I can use
> them just as much as the menus.
> There are many more key tips on ribbons that you can memorize, and can do
> more with key commands by using ribbons.
> David Moore
> Sent from Mail for Windows 10
>
> From: Eleni Vamvakari
> Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 8:11 PM
> To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear
>
> I don't see a reason to complicate things.  Hence, I never understood
> the reason behind ribbons.  What is wrong with simply pressing alt to
> enter a menu, and either up and down arrows to read it, or left and
> right arrows to switch to another menu?
>
> On 24/01/2018, janet gross <janet.harvard@...> wrote:
>> Nancy,
>> As far as I know, I think ribbons started with Microsoft in 2007.
>> Someone
>> else might have more detailed information though.  Ribbons aren't a bad
>> thing either.  Some people just don't like them, or they might have a
>> difficult time learning how to use them.  Some people just don't like
>> change
>> either.  Some people just don't want or they don't have to be bothered
>> with
>> learning ribbons.
>> Janet
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf
>> Of
>> Nancy Hill
>> Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 5:45 PM
>> To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
>> Subject: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear
>>
>> All this 'ribbon' talk got me to wondering about when 'ribbons' started.
>>
>>
>> Would some kind person give a bit of history about ribbons such as when
>> they
>> were started and what programs have them?
>>
>>
>> I have no clue and would love the education.
>>
>>
>> Thanks!
>>
>>
>> Nancy
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> Facebook: elvam2167@...
>
> anyaudio.net: elvam2167
>
> Skype: elvam2167
>
>
>
>
>


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Eleni Vamvakari
 

Computers and Windows have been dumbed down a great deal in general.
We live in a society where everyone wants everything immediately, and
where people rely on technology to think for them, instead of taking a
few seconds to do things and/or thinking for themselves. That's not
arrogance. It's just truth.

On 24/01/2018, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:
It's really arrogant to disparage the way sighted people do things just
because blind people don't. It isn't a question of laziness. It's a
question of using vision efficiently.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 7:19 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear


So basically, they exist because sighted people are too lazy to open a
menu and view the options. Ah well. Good luck to the ribbon users,
and I mean that sincerely. *smile*

On 24/01/2018, David Moore <jesusloves1966@gmail.com> wrote:
Ribbons were implemented for the sighted to see more options in front of
their eyes. We just have to learn to use them. After practice, I can use
them just as much as the menus.
There are many more key tips on ribbons that you can memorize, and can do
more with key commands by using ribbons.
David Moore
Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 8:11 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear

I don't see a reason to complicate things. Hence, I never understood
the reason behind ribbons. What is wrong with simply pressing alt to
enter a menu, and either up and down arrows to read it, or left and
right arrows to switch to another menu?

On 24/01/2018, janet gross <janet.harvard@outlook.com> wrote:
Nancy,
As far as I know, I think ribbons started with Microsoft in 2007.
Someone
else might have more detailed information though. Ribbons aren't a bad
thing either. Some people just don't like them, or they might have a
difficult time learning how to use them. Some people just don't like
change
either. Some people just don't want or they don't have to be bothered
with
learning ribbons.
Janet

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf
Of
Nancy Hill
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 5:45 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear

All this 'ribbon' talk got me to wondering about when 'ribbons' started.


Would some kind person give a bit of history about ribbons such as when
they
were started and what programs have them?


I have no clue and would love the education.


Thanks!


Nancy








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anyaudio.net: elvam2167

Skype: elvam2167





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Facebook: elvam2167@gmail.com

anyaudio.net: elvam2167

Skype: elvam2167


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Gene
 

Dumbing down is when you make something intellectually less challenging at the expense of intellectual quality or when you make something simpler to use at the expense of important or desirable functionality.  Ribbons does neither.  it is far more efficient from a standpoint of using sight efficiently.  Nothing is taken away from a program just because ribbons are used.  If something is removed, it's because the designers removed it but that has nothing to do with ribbons.  Ribbons are simply another way of organizing information.  You just don't like them. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 7:37 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear

Computers and Windows have been dumbed down a great deal in general.
We live in a society where everyone wants everything immediately, and
where people rely on technology to think for them, instead of taking a
few seconds to do things and/or thinking for themselves.  That's not
arrogance. It's just truth.

On 24/01/2018, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
> It's really arrogant to disparage the way sighted people do things just
> because blind people don't.  It isn't a question of laziness.  It's a
> question of using vision efficiently.
>
> Gene
> ----- Original Message -----
>
> From: Eleni Vamvakari
> Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 7:19 PM
> To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear
>
>
> So basically, they exist because sighted people are too lazy to open a
> menu and view the options.  Ah well.  Good luck to the ribbon users,
> and I mean that sincerely. *smile*
>
> On 24/01/2018, David Moore <jesusloves1966@...> wrote:
>> Ribbons were implemented for the sighted to see more options in front of
>> their eyes. We just have to learn to use them. After practice, I can use
>> them just as much as the menus.
>> There are many more key tips on ribbons that you can memorize, and can do
>> more with key commands by using ribbons.
>> David Moore
>> Sent from Mail for Windows 10
>>
>> From: Eleni Vamvakari
>> Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 8:11 PM
>> To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
>> Subject: Re: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear
>>
>> I don't see a reason to complicate things.  Hence, I never understood
>> the reason behind ribbons.  What is wrong with simply pressing alt to
>> enter a menu, and either up and down arrows to read it, or left and
>> right arrows to switch to another menu?
>>
>> On 24/01/2018, janet gross <janet.harvard@...> wrote:
>>> Nancy,
>>> As far as I know, I think ribbons started with Microsoft in 2007.
>>> Someone
>>> else might have more detailed information though.  Ribbons aren't a bad
>>> thing either.  Some people just don't like them, or they might have a
>>> difficult time learning how to use them.  Some people just don't like
>>> change
>>> either.  Some people just don't want or they don't have to be bothered
>>> with
>>> learning ribbons.
>>> Janet
>>>
>>> -----Original Message-----
>>> From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf
>>> Of
>>> Nancy Hill
>>> Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 5:45 PM
>>> To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
>>> Subject: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear
>>>
>>> All this 'ribbon' talk got me to wondering about when 'ribbons' started.
>>>
>>>
>>> Would some kind person give a bit of history about ribbons such as when
>>> they
>>> were started and what programs have them?
>>>
>>>
>>> I have no clue and would love the education.
>>>
>>>
>>> Thanks!
>>>
>>>
>>> Nancy
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Facebook: elvam2167@...
>>
>> anyaudio.net: elvam2167
>>
>> Skype: elvam2167
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> Facebook: elvam2167@...
>
> anyaudio.net: elvam2167
>
> Skype: elvam2167
>
>
>


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Eleni Vamvakari
 

Hence the last part of my sentence, "in general". I wasn't referring
to ribbons specifically. Anyway, I don't want to bring us off-topic.
Perhaps, others have more to say on the history of ribbons, and how
they have been implemented in Windows as a whole. I actually thought
that you couldn't use 10 without them.

On 24/01/2018, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:
Dumbing down is when you make something intellectually less challenging at
the expense of intellectual quality or when you make something simpler to
use at the expense of important or desirable functionality. Ribbons does
neither. it is far more efficient from a standpoint of using sight
efficiently. Nothing is taken away from a program just because ribbons are
used. If something is removed, it's because the designers removed it but
that has nothing to do with ribbons. Ribbons are simply another way of
organizing information. You just don't like them.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 7:37 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear


Computers and Windows have been dumbed down a great deal in general.
We live in a society where everyone wants everything immediately, and
where people rely on technology to think for them, instead of taking a
few seconds to do things and/or thinking for themselves. That's not
arrogance. It's just truth.

On 24/01/2018, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:
It's really arrogant to disparage the way sighted people do things just
because blind people don't. It isn't a question of laziness. It's a
question of using vision efficiently.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 7:19 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear


So basically, they exist because sighted people are too lazy to open a
menu and view the options. Ah well. Good luck to the ribbon users,
and I mean that sincerely. *smile*

On 24/01/2018, David Moore <jesusloves1966@gmail.com> wrote:
Ribbons were implemented for the sighted to see more options in front of
their eyes. We just have to learn to use them. After practice, I can use
them just as much as the menus.
There are many more key tips on ribbons that you can memorize, and can
do
more with key commands by using ribbons.
David Moore
Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 8:11 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear

I don't see a reason to complicate things. Hence, I never understood
the reason behind ribbons. What is wrong with simply pressing alt to
enter a menu, and either up and down arrows to read it, or left and
right arrows to switch to another menu?

On 24/01/2018, janet gross <janet.harvard@outlook.com> wrote:
Nancy,
As far as I know, I think ribbons started with Microsoft in 2007.
Someone
else might have more detailed information though. Ribbons aren't a bad
thing either. Some people just don't like them, or they might have a
difficult time learning how to use them. Some people just don't like
change
either. Some people just don't want or they don't have to be bothered
with
learning ribbons.
Janet

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On
Behalf
Of
Nancy Hill
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 5:45 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear

All this 'ribbon' talk got me to wondering about when 'ribbons'
started.


Would some kind person give a bit of history about ribbons such as when
they
were started and what programs have them?


I have no clue and would love the education.


Thanks!


Nancy








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Nancy Hill
 

Gene,


Would you please send the link for the Ribbon Info?


I'd like to take a look.


Thanks,

Nancy

On 1/24/2018 8:30 PM, Gene wrote:
Ribbons allow sighted people to see a lot of things all the time when in the main window of a program.  You only see what is in a menu when you open it.
Blind people move to ribbons and then can move through them in a similar way to working with a menu.  A sighted person sees all the ribbons and everything on all the ribbons just by looking at what is displayed.  Ribbons are all displayed in the main window.  I'm not sure to what extent they may be displayed when in other windows of a program.
If you were a sighted person, would you rather open menu after menu looking for something or be able to quickly look at every option in every ribbon just by looking.
Ribbons do not significantly complicate things.  Did you read the tutorial I sent the list many months ago explaining the basics of ribbons?  There is more you need to know, but the essence of ribbons is that you tab and shift tab through a ribbon.  You up and down arrow through a menu.  It's a different way of organizing items.  It is not significantly more complicated, just different.
Gene
----- Original Message -----

*From:* Eleni Vamvakari <mailto:elvam2167@gmail.com>
*Sent:* Wednesday, January 24, 2018 7:11 PM
*To:* main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
*Subject:* Re: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear

I don't see a reason to complicate things.  Hence, I never understood
the reason behind ribbons.  What is wrong with simply pressing alt to
enter a menu, and either up and down arrows to read it, or left and
right arrows to switch to another menu?

On 24/01/2018, janet gross <janet.harvard@outlook.com <mailto:janet.harvard@outlook.com>> wrote:
Nancy,
As far as I know, I think ribbons started with Microsoft in 2007. 
Someone
else might have more detailed information though.  Ribbons aren't a bad
thing either.  Some people just don't like them, or they might have a
difficult time learning how to use them.  Some people just don't
like change
either.  Some people just don't want or they don't have to be
bothered with
learning ribbons.
Janet

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
[mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Nancy Hill
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 5:45 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io <mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Subject: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear

All this 'ribbon' talk got me to wondering about when 'ribbons' started.


Would some kind person give a bit of history about ribbons such as
when they
were started and what programs have them?


I have no clue and would love the education.


Thanks!


Nancy








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Gene
 

There are ribbons in Windows 10.  But that doesn't mean that what you do in Windows for the most part has changed.  After you change whatever settings you want to change in Windows what do you use it for?  To run programs and Windows utilities and to open files using Windows Explorer or with whatever my computer is called.  Ribbons or not, though I don't use Windows 10, I doubt that what you regularly do is affected or not affected to any extent.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 8:16 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear

Hence the last part of my sentence, "in general".  I wasn't referring
to ribbons specifically.  Anyway, I don't want to bring us off-topic.
Perhaps, others have more to say on the history of ribbons, and how
they have been implemented in Windows as a whole.  I actually thought
that you couldn't use 10 without them.

On 24/01/2018, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
> Dumbing down is when you make something intellectually less challenging at
> the expense of intellectual quality or when you make something simpler to
> use at the expense of important or desirable functionality.  Ribbons does
> neither.  it is far more efficient from a standpoint of using sight
> efficiently.  Nothing is taken away from a program just because ribbons are
> used.  If something is removed, it's because the designers removed it but
> that has nothing to do with ribbons.  Ribbons are simply another way of
> organizing information.  You just don't like them.
>
> Gene
> ----- Original Message -----
>
> From: Eleni Vamvakari
> Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 7:37 PM
> To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear
>
>
> Computers and Windows have been dumbed down a great deal in general.
> We live in a society where everyone wants everything immediately, and
> where people rely on technology to think for them, instead of taking a
> few seconds to do things and/or thinking for themselves.  That's not
> arrogance. It's just truth.
>
> On 24/01/2018, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
>> It's really arrogant to disparage the way sighted people do things just
>> because blind people don't.  It isn't a question of laziness.  It's a
>> question of using vision efficiently.
>>
>> Gene
>> ----- Original Message -----
>>
>> From: Eleni Vamvakari
>> Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 7:19 PM
>> To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
>> Subject: Re: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear
>>
>>
>> So basically, they exist because sighted people are too lazy to open a
>> menu and view the options.  Ah well.  Good luck to the ribbon users,
>> and I mean that sincerely. *smile*
>>
>> On 24/01/2018, David Moore <jesusloves1966@...> wrote:
>>> Ribbons were implemented for the sighted to see more options in front of
>>> their eyes. We just have to learn to use them. After practice, I can use
>>> them just as much as the menus.
>>> There are many more key tips on ribbons that you can memorize, and can
>>> do
>>> more with key commands by using ribbons.
>>> David Moore
>>> Sent from Mail for Windows 10
>>>
>>> From: Eleni Vamvakari
>>> Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 8:11 PM
>>> To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
>>> Subject: Re: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear
>>>
>>> I don't see a reason to complicate things.  Hence, I never understood
>>> the reason behind ribbons.  What is wrong with simply pressing alt to
>>> enter a menu, and either up and down arrows to read it, or left and
>>> right arrows to switch to another menu?
>>>
>>> On 24/01/2018, janet gross <janet.harvard@...> wrote:
>>>> Nancy,
>>>> As far as I know, I think ribbons started with Microsoft in 2007.
>>>> Someone
>>>> else might have more detailed information though.  Ribbons aren't a bad
>>>> thing either.  Some people just don't like them, or they might have a
>>>> difficult time learning how to use them.  Some people just don't like
>>>> change
>>>> either.  Some people just don't want or they don't have to be bothered
>>>> with
>>>> learning ribbons.
>>>> Janet
>>>>
>>>> -----Original Message-----
>>>> From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On
>>>> Behalf
>>>> Of
>>>> Nancy Hill
>>>> Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 5:45 PM
>>>> To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
>>>> Subject: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear
>>>>
>>>> All this 'ribbon' talk got me to wondering about when 'ribbons'
>>>> started.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Would some kind person give a bit of history about ribbons such as when
>>>> they
>>>> were started and what programs have them?
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> I have no clue and would love the education.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Thanks!
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Nancy
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> Facebook: elvam2167@...
>>>
>>> anyaudio.net: elvam2167
>>>
>>> Skype: elvam2167
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
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>> Facebook: elvam2167@...
>>
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>>
>> Skype: elvam2167
>>
>>
>>
>
>
> --
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>
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>
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>
>
>


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Gene
 

The tutorial is below my signature.  I removed all quoted messages so the tutorial is the only thing there.
 
Gene
 
I'll provide a brief tutorial based on what I wrote years ago of how to work with ribbons. 
 
I've added a little to it here.
 
I don't know how the organization of Windows has changed in Windows 10 but this description should allow you to look through the Windows ribbons, or any other ribbons, and see how things are organized. 
 
First, I'll discuss a structure found in later versions of Windows that you need to know about-- the split button. 
One thing you will see as you look around ribbons and in other places in Windows are split buttons. A split button often allows you to see more options than just the default action.  Let's take an example. 
Let's say you come across a split button that says shut down Windows.  If you press enter on that button, Windows will shut down.  That is the default action.  Split buttons often show more options if you either right arrow while on the button or down arrow.  As an example, if you are on the shut down split button, you can right arrow and a list of options will open.  the items in the list include sleep, hibernate, restart, and others.  You up or down arrow through the list or use the short cut commands you hear announced as you move through the list.  the letter shortcuts often take actions without pressing enter so be careful when using them, just as you are in menus. 
 
So, let's review.  You find a split button that says shut down.  If you press enter, the computer will shut down. If you right arrow, other options may be displayed.  Or if you down arrow, other options may be displayed.  A split button won't work with both methods.  One method, either right arrowing or down arrowing will do so if it can be done with the button.  Try both methods if you don't know which one might work.  If you are on a tool bar which extends across the screen from left to right, down arrowing will open additional options.  If you think about this, it makes sense.  If you are in a menu, down arrowing will move you to the next item in the menu.  So you right arrow on the split button to cause it to display more options.  In a tool bar that extends across the screen from left to right, right arrowing will move you to the next item in the tool bar.  So you down arrow when on the split button to cause it to display more options.  But some tool bars run up and down the screen, as menus do.  And at times, you may not be sure which way a structure extends on screen.  So, as I said, if you are not sure or don't know, try both methods of causing the split button to display more options.  Often, one of them will work. If you open the options a split button offers and don't want to work with them, arrow in the opposite direction to move out of them.  For example, if you right arrowed to open more options, left arrow. 
Some split buttons don't do anything when you right arrow or down arrow.  In that case, open them with alt down arrow.  Then tab through the additional options.  I've almost never worked in this way with split buttons but if you want to close a split button, try alt up arrow if you've used alt down arrow to open it.
 
Now, to ribbons themselves.
 
Regarding ribbons, much of the complaining about them is not warranted if you understand how they work and how to use short cut commands effectively and efficiently.  and I would strongly recommend against using the JAWS virtual menus, no matter what the JAWS training material says about ribbons being difficult to use.  the training material is just plain wrong and using virtual menus, you will be unnecessarily dependent on one screen-reader.  There are other disadvantages to using them which I won't go into here.
 
Try looking at ribbons and doing what is described below in wordpad.  Everyone with Windows 7 has Wordpad on their machine.  Wordpad provides a good environment to look at and practice working with ribbons.  
 
The essence of working with ribbons is this:
Press alt to move to the upper ribbon.
You will probably be on an item that says home tab. Items on the upper ribbon are announced as tabs such as home tab, view tab, etc. 
To see what ribbons are available, right or left arrow repeatedly to move through the ribbons.  Move in one
direction to move through all of them, just as you would to move through all the menus.
 
For this demonstration, just so we are all doing the same thing, move with the right arrow. When you get back to where you started, you can keep right arrowing to move through the items again, if you wish.  You can move through all the items as many times as you want. Or you can move with the left arrow whenever you want to move in the opposite direction.  
 
Stop on view.  Then start tabbing.  You will move through all items in what is called the lower ribbon that are in the view ribbon. 
 
In other words you tab to see the items in a ribbon once you move to it.  Tab moves you forward through the items, shift tab moves you backword.
So tab and shift tab are used instead of up and down arrow. 
 
Many items in the lower ribbon are buttons.  Use either the space bar or enter to activate the button. You may find a button that opens a menu and if you press enter or the space bar, you will then be in a menu.
 
Each time you move to an item, you will hear the short cut command to work with that item. 
But JAWS has a bug and you often won't.  To hear the short cut, use the command JAWS key tab.  If you are using the default JAWS key, it is either insert.
 
Try tabbing to an item in a Wordpad ribbon and using the command insert tab.  You will hear some extraneous information.  The last thing you will hear is the short cut sequence.  You can repeat the information by repeating the command as often as you want.
 
Let's look at an item which is usually called the application menu.  Return to the main program window in wordpad by closing the ribbons.  You can either press escape repeatedly, if necessary, or you can press alt once.  Now, open the ribbons again with alt. 
Start right arrowing until you get to the application menu.
You will hear application menu and then something like button drop down grid.  Never mind drop down grid.  It's a description you don't have to worry about.  The important things are that you are on a button and at the application menu.  Press enter or the space bar to activate the button.  Activating the button opens the menu.  Start down arrowing. you will hear all the short cut commands necessary to open an item or take an action.  When you got to the menu item, you heard alt f.  When you open the menu and move through it, you will hear all the letters announced.  for example, if you down arrow to save as, you will hear alt f a.  that means that, when you are in the main program window, you open the menu as you always did, alt f, then type a.  Alt f opens the menau and a then opens save as.  Ribbon programs have one menu and you should look through it.  Many important and common commands and interfaces such as options may be there.  By options, I mean the kind of options interface you used to find in the tools menu.
 
Now the we have seen the menu, let's look at the ribbons structure some more.
To review, and add more information, as you have seen, you can move to the ribbon interface with alt.  Then right and left arrow, just as you would move from menu to menu. 
You can also move to a ribbon using alt and a letter.  So, alt h takes you to the home ribbon.  Alt v takes you to the view ribbon, etc.  Once you are on the ribbon you want to work with, tab to move forward through the items in a ribbon.  Shift tab to move back through the items.  So tab and shift tab are used instead of up and down arrow.
Ribbons are divided into categories which you will hear announced as you tab.  for example, in an e-mail program, a ribbon may have a category named respond.  You may hear this announced as respond tool bar.  As you tab, you will hear commands such as reply and forward in the respond category.  When you hear a category announced, don't tab until you hear everything spoken.  You will miss the first command in the category if you do.  I'm talking about working with an unfamiliar ribbon. 
there are often many more commands and items in a ribbon than in a menu.  So memorize command sequences for items you know you will use regularly. 
As I said, there are different categories in ribbons to help organize items.  You can quickly jump from category to category in a ribbon to help you see if there is a category you want to look through. 
Move to a ribbon in Wordpad.  For example, alt h for hhome or alt v for view.
Then repeatedly issue the command control right arrow to move forward from category to category and control left arrow to move back.  When you get to a category you want to hear the items in, start tabbing.  Of course, you can shift tab to move back. 
 
Open a ribbon in Wordpad and tab through it to see how it is organized by moving through it. 
Then use control right arrow to move by category and tab to see what is in a category. 
 
Commands such as control o, control n, control s, control r, etc. are mostly retained in programs
that use ribbons, though you won't hear them announced. If you don't already know them, you'll have to find them in ways such as by looking at a list of keyboard commands for the program.  Such lists are often available in the help for the program. If you already know the commands from having used an older version of the program, most or perhaps even all of the commands you know will work.  


Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
 

Ileni, once upon a time, the only way I could reach out to the sighted world
was by using a typewriter. I loved the noise it produced, I thought of it
as being musical to my warped ears! In fact, I still do use the typewriter
now and then just for fun and giggles; so, I'm still ancient!

A problem I had with using the typewriter: Even if I typed 100-plus words a
minute, I had to be extremely careful. Why? If I MAKE A MISTAKE on page
13, going back to FIX THE ERROR was a huge chore and I most definitely
needed a PAIR OF EYES! I am indelibly grateful to Ms. Fran Ostraf, one of
my many readers in college who meticulously spent hours on end proofreading
my typewritten essays; her husband, Greg, was a man from Heaven, not Mars!

Over time, the computer came. At first, she intimidated me. The drive to
be her friend made me become a SELF-STARTER, learning as best I could on my
own. Then mailing lists came along and lots of folks from across the globe
made me, the lazy bum, far better than I deserve at using my new toy!
Today, a mistake on page 13 of anything I write can be fixed with ease and I
don't even need a pair of eyes! Oh yes, I can proofread my own work, thanks
to the forerunners with great insights who developed the screen reader(s).
Now, I am fairly on a reasonable equal footing with my sighted counterparts
and collaboration on projects isn't as bad.

Now, Ms. Computer fits snugly in my pocket; she's labeled Ms. Smartphone
and, suddenly, a brand-new pandora box is opened to me!

Anyway, for me, change is good and great; sometimes, change DOES BREAK what
worked so well and I complain. My complaints must not be a reason why
change should be stifled. Change gives me more choices and a type of
freedom that I hardly ever campaigned for. So, let the bells of change keep
on ringing; I'll work hard at making the necessary adjustments to cope with
it and hopefully never stop learning in a positive way. Ribbons are here to
stay; they'll go away when a new change changes the landscape on which they
drive their carts!

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado


Olusegun -- Victory Associates LTD, Inc.
 

Thanks Gene; I'm sure if I can see, I shall use my vision to the maximum
extent possible! Whilst my needs are diferent, sighted folks DO NOT stop me
from putting my talents and skills to some good use. Heck, some of us are
married to them! I'm glad they can use their vision; back in college and at
times even now, I do borrow their vision to get a few things done.

I'm not angry at being blind, though I miss two things: First, I can't
drive YET! Second, I can't LOOK AT FACES and tell when an individual is in
bad mood. This one is of absolute importance to me because of my witty
sarcasms which I throw out 98% of the time even in my posts to this and
other lists.

To me, sighted and blind folks have their places in society, neither one is
going away any time soon. If change makes it easy for a sighted person to
get stuff done much faster and or quicker, I certainly want to find amongst
them someone that will help me understand the new change and also try to
find a way to help me take advantage of the new change so that I can use it
myself as well.

Sincerely,
Olusegun
Denver, Colorado


Jim Wohlgamuth
 

Hi there!

Ribbons began with Office 2007.  I remember because I thought the world had come to an end with no more drop down menus<SMILE!>.  Now the ribbon is just a part of my Office use.  Good Luck and Have A Good 1! de o

<KF8LT><Jim>. 


On 24-Jan-18 20:07, janet gross wrote:
Nancy, 
As far as I know, I think ribbons started with Microsoft in 2007.  Someone else might have more detailed information though.  Ribbons aren't a bad thing either.  Some people just don't like them, or they might have a difficult time learning how to use them.  Some people just don't like change either.  Some people just don't want or they don't have to be bothered with learning ribbons.    
Janet 

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Nancy Hill
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 5:45 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear

All this 'ribbon' talk got me to wondering about when 'ribbons' started.


Would some kind person give a bit of history about ribbons such as when they were started and what programs have them?


I have no clue and would love the education.


Thanks!


Nancy









Jim Wohlgamuth
 

I agree with you eleni as well as Gene.  You know we all benifit from advances in technology in one way or an other.  I believe there were those that complained loudly about the invention of the motor car and I will bet there isn't one of us that doesn't use some form of transportation.  The reason things get 'dumb down' is to make things more efficient for the most part.  A perfect example of that is the television, When I was a kid we had aTV with an antenna and we were able to receive only a few channels  Now we have in some cases hundreds of choices and yes I love it! What I am saying is that the reason things change for the most part is for the betterment of society.  I railed against ribbons when they first came out, but they are just a part of my computer use now  Just my opinions-Catch Ya Later! de
<KF8LT><Jim>.

On 24-Jan-18 20:37, Eleni Vamvakari wrote:
Computers and Windows have been dumbed down a great deal in general.
We live in a society where everyone wants everything immediately, and
where people rely on technology to think for them, instead of taking a
few seconds to do things and/or thinking for themselves. That's not
arrogance. It's just truth.

On 24/01/2018, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:
It's really arrogant to disparage the way sighted people do things just
because blind people don't. It isn't a question of laziness. It's a
question of using vision efficiently.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 7:19 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear


So basically, they exist because sighted people are too lazy to open a
menu and view the options. Ah well. Good luck to the ribbon users,
and I mean that sincerely. *smile*

On 24/01/2018, David Moore <jesusloves1966@gmail.com> wrote:
Ribbons were implemented for the sighted to see more options in front of
their eyes. We just have to learn to use them. After practice, I can use
them just as much as the menus.
There are many more key tips on ribbons that you can memorize, and can do
more with key commands by using ribbons.
David Moore
Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 8:11 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear

I don't see a reason to complicate things. Hence, I never understood
the reason behind ribbons. What is wrong with simply pressing alt to
enter a menu, and either up and down arrows to read it, or left and
right arrows to switch to another menu?

On 24/01/2018, janet gross <janet.harvard@outlook.com> wrote:
Nancy,
As far as I know, I think ribbons started with Microsoft in 2007.
Someone
else might have more detailed information though. Ribbons aren't a bad
thing either. Some people just don't like them, or they might have a
difficult time learning how to use them. Some people just don't like
change
either. Some people just don't want or they don't have to be bothered
with
learning ribbons.
Janet

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf
Of
Nancy Hill
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 5:45 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear

All this 'ribbon' talk got me to wondering about when 'ribbons' started.


Would some kind person give a bit of history about ribbons such as when
they
were started and what programs have them?


I have no clue and would love the education.


Thanks!


Nancy







--
Facebook: elvam2167@gmail.com

anyaudio.net: elvam2167

Skype: elvam2167




--
Facebook: elvam2167@gmail.com

anyaudio.net: elvam2167

Skype: elvam2167



 

I remember my mom telling me a story about my papaw ... when cassette
tapes came out he swore that they were a fad and would go away
soon....
Sometimes advancements stay and sometimes they go away. I can't think
of just one off the top of my head right now, but I can remember
"advancements" being invented that didn't go far or stand the test of
time.
How many remember the hype over new social media platforms that had
come out in the past few years? Aloe and one I think called orange or
peach? It was some fruit name I think. Either way they didn't last at
all ... while facebook and twitter have been here ... and even though
they change a lot and sometimes have done so too much people are just
too used to them to stop using them. I stopped using twitter because I
just couldn't see how to keep up with it and I can't type one handed
with my phone--plus I talk too much and the limitations irked me.
The only reason I use FB now is to keep up with my workout bootcamp
thing I joined last year and the few friends I started to have through
them. I'm still woefully behind with that, but man I'm trying to think
if being totally ignorant is worth being freaked out 24/7 by reading
what passes for news on FB. I see some of the things family members
and friends post and just think "WTF??"
Sorry I know that wasn't duley related to ribbons but I thought of
this tangent when I read the last few responses.

Melissa

On 1/25/18, Jim Wohlgamuth <wohlggie@gmail.com> wrote:

I agree with you eleni as well as Gene. You know we all benifit from
advances in technology in one way or an other. I believe there were
those that complained loudly about the invention of the motor car and I
will bet there isn't one of us that doesn't use some form of
transportation. The reason things get 'dumb down' is to make things
more efficient for the most part. A perfect example of that is the
television, When I was a kid we had aTV with an antenna and we were able
to receive only a few channels Now we have in some cases hundreds of
choices and yes I love it! What I am saying is that the reason things
change for the most part is for the betterment of society. I railed
against ribbons when they first came out, but they are just a part of my
computer use now Just my opinions-Catch Ya Later! de
<KF8LT><Jim>.
On 24-Jan-18 20:37, Eleni Vamvakari wrote:
Computers and Windows have been dumbed down a great deal in general.
We live in a society where everyone wants everything immediately, and
where people rely on technology to think for them, instead of taking a
few seconds to do things and/or thinking for themselves. That's not
arrogance. It's just truth.

On 24/01/2018, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:
It's really arrogant to disparage the way sighted people do things just
because blind people don't. It isn't a question of laziness. It's a
question of using vision efficiently.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 7:19 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear


So basically, they exist because sighted people are too lazy to open a
menu and view the options. Ah well. Good luck to the ribbon users,
and I mean that sincerely. *smile*

On 24/01/2018, David Moore <jesusloves1966@gmail.com> wrote:
Ribbons were implemented for the sighted to see more options in front
of
their eyes. We just have to learn to use them. After practice, I can
use
them just as much as the menus.
There are many more key tips on ribbons that you can memorize, and can
do
more with key commands by using ribbons.
David Moore
Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: Eleni Vamvakari
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 8:11 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear

I don't see a reason to complicate things. Hence, I never understood
the reason behind ribbons. What is wrong with simply pressing alt to
enter a menu, and either up and down arrows to read it, or left and
right arrows to switch to another menu?

On 24/01/2018, janet gross <janet.harvard@outlook.com> wrote:
Nancy,
As far as I know, I think ribbons started with Microsoft in 2007.
Someone
else might have more detailed information though. Ribbons aren't a
bad
thing either. Some people just don't like them, or they might have a
difficult time learning how to use them. Some people just don't like
change
either. Some people just don't want or they don't have to be bothered
with
learning ribbons.
Janet

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On
Behalf
Of
Nancy Hill
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 5:45 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] When did 'ribbons' start to appear

All this 'ribbon' talk got me to wondering about when 'ribbons'
started.


Would some kind person give a bit of history about ribbons such as
when
they
were started and what programs have them?


I have no clue and would love the education.


Thanks!


Nancy







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