Topics

NVDA, A Space Hog


Joe Orozco
 

I was looking at my C drive. It was showing over 200 GB of space used.
I thought that strange and assumed Windows must have bloated at some
point. But as Brian pointed out, the OS does not take up much space,
so I started poking around and damned if I didn’t discover NVDA alone
was hogging up 80 gigs all on its own. There’s a recycling bin that
alone was taking up 40 gigs. The library folder was also heavy in
data. Can someone explain why this might be happening? I don’t want to
take an ax to things without understanding why it might be doing this.
Thanks for any info.

Joe


Sam Taylor <sjt1982@...>
 

Hi Joe,

You may like to go through your NVDA subfolders to insure something hasn't been inadvertently placed there. Mine is 120MB in size, that includes addons.


On 2/11/2020 2:02 pm, Joe Orozco wrote:
I was looking at my C drive. It was showing over 200 GB of space used.
I thought that strange and assumed Windows must have bloated at some
point. But as Brian pointed out, the OS does not take up much space,
so I started poking around and damned if I didn’t discover NVDA alone
was hogging up 80 gigs all on its own. There’s a recycling bin that
alone was taking up 40 gigs. The library folder was also heavy in
data. Can someone explain why this might be happening? I don’t want to
take an ax to things without understanding why it might be doing this.
Thanks for any info.

Joe






Mike B
 


Hi Joe and Sam,
 
This is my total info.
 
NVDA
Type: File folder
Location: C:\Program Files (x86)
Size: 126 MB (132,564,098 bytes)
Size on disk: 75.2 MB (78,905,607 bytes)
Contains: 1,614 Files, 277 Folders
Created: Saturday, November 28, 2015, 12:39:42 PM
 
Take care and stay safe.  Mike.  Sent from my iBarstool.  Go Rams!
Main's Law:  For every action there is an equal and opposite government program.

----- Original Message -----
From: Sam Taylor
Sent: Sunday, November 01, 2020 8:07 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] NVDA, A Space Hog

Hi Joe,

You may like to go through your NVDA subfolders to insure something hasn't been inadvertently placed there. Mine is 120MB in size, that includes addons.


On 2/11/2020 2:02 pm, Joe Orozco wrote:
I was looking at my C drive. It was showing over 200 GB of space used.
I thought that strange and assumed Windows must have bloated at some
point. But as Brian pointed out, the OS does not take up much space,
so I started poking around and damned if I didn’t discover NVDA alone
was hogging up 80 gigs all on its own. There’s a recycling bin that
alone was taking up 40 gigs. The library folder was also heavy in
data. Can someone explain why this might be happening? I don’t want to
take an ax to things without understanding why it might be doing this.
Thanks for any info.

Joe






Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

On Sun, Nov 1, 2020 at 11:07 PM, Sam Taylor wrote:
Mine is 120MB in size, that includes addons.
-
Same here.

It is very, very easy to accidentally save downloads in unexpected locations if you use the "ask me where to save" each time and aren't paying attention every time you download.  We've all done it at one point or another.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


Mike B
 


My 1st post was of my Windows 7 64 bit system, the below is for my Windows 10 installation:
 
NVDA
Type: File folder
Location: C:\Program Files (x86)
Size: 131 MB (137,902,803 bytes)
Size on disk: 76.0 MB (79,753,216 bytes)
Contains: 1,312 Files, 263 Folders
Created: Monday, October 8, 2018, 1:41:40 PM

Take care and stay safe.  Mike.  Sent from my iBarstool.  Go Rams!
Main's Law:  For every action there is an equal and opposite government program.

----- Original Message -----
From: Mike B
Sent: Sunday, November 01, 2020 8:41 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] NVDA, A Space Hog

Hi Joe and Sam,
 
This is my total info.
 
NVDA
Type: File folder
Location: C:\Program Files (x86)
Size: 126 MB (132,564,098 bytes)
Size on disk: 75.2 MB (78,905,607 bytes)
Contains: 1,614 Files, 277 Folders
Created: Saturday, November 28, 2015, 12:39:42 PM
 
Take care and stay safe.  Mike.  Sent from my iBarstool.  Go Rams!
Main's Law:  For every action there is an equal and opposite government program.
----- Original Message -----
From: Sam Taylor
Sent: Sunday, November 01, 2020 8:07 PM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] NVDA, A Space Hog

Hi Joe,

You may like to go through your NVDA subfolders to insure something hasn't been inadvertently placed there. Mine is 120MB in size, that includes addons.


On 2/11/2020 2:02 pm, Joe Orozco wrote:
I was looking at my C drive. It was showing over 200 GB of space used.
I thought that strange and assumed Windows must have bloated at some
point. But as Brian pointed out, the OS does not take up much space,
so I started poking around and damned if I didn’t discover NVDA alone
was hogging up 80 gigs all on its own. There’s a recycling bin that
alone was taking up 40 gigs. The library folder was also heavy in
data. Can someone explain why this might be happening? I don’t want to
take an ax to things without understanding why it might be doing this.
Thanks for any info.

Joe






Monte Single
 

Yes, my nvda folder is also 120 megabytes.

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sam Taylor
Sent: November 1, 2020 10:07 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] NVDA, A Space Hog

 

Hi Joe,

You may like to go through your NVDA subfolders to insure something hasn't been inadvertently placed there. Mine is 120MB in size, that includes addons.

 

On 2/11/2020 2:02 pm, Joe Orozco wrote:

I was looking at my C drive. It was showing over 200 GB of space used.
I thought that strange and assumed Windows must have bloated at some
point. But as Brian pointed out, the OS does not take up much space,
so I started poking around and damned if I didn’t discover NVDA alone
was hogging up 80 gigs all on its own. There’s a recycling bin that
alone was taking up 40 gigs. The library folder was also heavy in
data. Can someone explain why this might be happening? I don’t want to
take an ax to things without understanding why it might be doing this.
Thanks for any info.
 
Joe
 
 
 
 
 


Dave
 

Hi,


Just for laughs, I checked my own installation of NVDA on a Win 10
System, up to date with all Windows and NVDA updates.  Total space on
this Machine was 125 MB, and not GB.


Not sure why yours is claiming 80 Gigabits of valuable HD space.


Grumpy Dave

On 11/1/2020 8:02 PM, Joe Orozco wrote:
I was looking at my C drive. It was showing over 200 GB of space used.
I thought that strange and assumed Windows must have bloated at some
point. But as Brian pointed out, the OS does not take up much space,
so I started poking around and damned if I didn’t discover NVDA alone
was hogging up 80 gigs all on its own. There’s a recycling bin that
alone was taking up 40 gigs. The library folder was also heavy in
data. Can someone explain why this might be happening? I don’t want to
take an ax to things without understanding why it might be doing this.
Thanks for any info.

Joe




Joe Orozco
 

I'm also at a loss. There are folders in there that don't seem to
belong, like that recycling bin folder. When I get home from work I'll
have to share the list of folders and files to see if someone can help
me compare the file directory they see on their system. I remember
creating a portable version of the application when I reloaded the app
on that particular laptop, but that should not create bulk over 80
gigs. Hell, even JAWS does not take up as much space as I thought it
might.

Joe

On 11/2/20, Dave <dlh007@centurylink.net> wrote:
Hi,


Just for laughs, I checked my own installation of NVDA on a Win 10
System, up to date with all Windows and NVDA updates.  Total space on
this Machine was 125 MB, and not GB.


Not sure why yours is claiming 80 Gigabits of valuable HD space.


Grumpy Dave

On 11/1/2020 8:02 PM, Joe Orozco wrote:
I was looking at my C drive. It was showing over 200 GB of space used.
I thought that strange and assumed Windows must have bloated at some
point. But as Brian pointed out, the OS does not take up much space,
so I started poking around and damned if I didn’t discover NVDA alone
was hogging up 80 gigs all on its own. There’s a recycling bin that
alone was taking up 40 gigs. The library folder was also heavy in
data. Can someone explain why this might be happening? I don’t want to
take an ax to things without understanding why it might be doing this.
Thanks for any info.

Joe









Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

Joe,

            I would suggest using a disk space analysis tool to get a really clear picture of what's being stored where.  If you have any interest in doing that, I will check if SpaceSniffer or TreeSizeFree (which are free, and SpaceSniffer can produce a very nice text based report) is accessible.  But I won't slog through that unless I know you're interested.

            There is no way that NVDA itself has created an 80GB folder.  Something else has to be involved.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


Joe Orozco
 

Yes, I would be interested. The only thing I can think of that would
have generated such volume is an addon I may have installed. I could
just delete my copy of NVDA and start over, but if there's something
else causing the issue, I'd like to know. Thanks in advance.--Joe

On 11/2/20, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
Joe,

I would suggest using a disk space analysis tool to get a really clear
picture of what's being stored where.  If you have any interest in doing
that, I will check if SpaceSniffer or TreeSizeFree (which are free, and
SpaceSniffer can produce a very nice text based report) is accessible.  But
I won't slog through that unless I know you're interested.

There is no way that NVDA itself has created an 80GB folder.  Something else
has to be involved.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041

*Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely
fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.*

~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com






Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

Joe, this is going to have to be a collaborative effort due to a couple of complications.   SpaceSniffer is able to generate a text report, but believe it or not, it's entirely accessible until you hit the screen where you generate it.  I can't find any way to activate the Export button on that page with a screen reader.

TreeSize Free generates an exported PDF report, which most don't like, but I just found that its actual space analysis report in the program appears to be accessible, so you can go down through it line by line there once its done the scan.  Here's what I've put together as the "tutorial starter" and you'll need to give me feedback regarding what happens after the report is up and you've attempted to read through it to see what's hogging the space.  It could go perfectly smoothly or you could hit bumps.  It's your job to report back about that.
-----------------------------------

TreeSize Free Download Page – You can select either the installable version or portable version from the dropdown on that page.  Either will get the information you  need.  There is also a cluster of 3 radio buttons to indicate the region of the world for which you’re downloading:  North America/Europe/Other, followed by the Download Button.

This tutorial will presume you’ve downloaded the portable version (ZIP format) and have already unzipped it to the folder from which you wish to run the program and are sitting in that folder.

1.       Fire up TreeSizeFree.exe.

2.       Hit ALT+S,D [Scan Tab/Ribbon, Select Directory], you will then be presented with your drive options as well as a Select Directory to Scan option at the end of the submenu.  Pick what’s appropriate for what you’re doing.  I will choose a directory for the rest of this tutorial, and that directory will end up being C:\Program Files (x86)\NVDA.  If you use the directory option you will be presented with a typical File Explorer navigation dialog to select the folder you want.  You can, of course, type out the path in the Folder edit box if you know it.  The choice is yours.  As soon as you've selected/typed a folder hit the Select Folder button and the scan begins.

3.       If you keep focus on the TreeSizeFree window it will begin reading out the result of its analysis when it finishes, and for folder that will be very quickly.  What starts the report is the folder or drive level you chose to scan.  Down arrowing will take you through the various subfolders and files associated with it, reading out names, sizes, etc.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


Quentin Christensen
 

I had a look at the first option Brian suggested: SpaceSniffer

The download page is:
http://www.uderzo.it/main_products/space_sniffer/download.html

The direct download is:
https://www.fosshub.com/SpaceSniffer.html?dwl=spacesniffer_1_3_0_2.zip

Brian is right, everything up to actually saving the report is accessible.  I did manage to save the report using object navigation: So, first run a report, then:
1. Press "Next object" command: NVDA+numpad 6 (NVDA+shift+right arrow) until the focus goes past the vertical and horizontal scrollbars to the "Toolbar".  Note that if you go to previous object you will eventually get to another toolbar - that is a DIFFERENT toolbar!
2. On the toolbar, press Move to first contained object (NVDA+2 or NVDA+shift+down arrow).  The object navigator goes to "button".
3. Press "Move mouse to current navigator object" (NVDA+numpad divide or NVDA+shift+m).
4. Press the left mouse button click (numpad divide or NVDA+[)

That opens a file save dialog where you can specify where to save the file.

Otherwise, yes maybe use Tree Size Free *grin*

On Tue, Nov 3, 2020 at 5:09 AM Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:
Joe, this is going to have to be a collaborative effort due to a couple of complications.   SpaceSniffer is able to generate a text report, but believe it or not, it's entirely accessible until you hit the screen where you generate it.  I can't find any way to activate the Export button on that page with a screen reader.

TreeSize Free generates an exported PDF report, which most don't like, but I just found that its actual space analysis report in the program appears to be accessible, so you can go down through it line by line there once its done the scan.  Here's what I've put together as the "tutorial starter" and you'll need to give me feedback regarding what happens after the report is up and you've attempted to read through it to see what's hogging the space.  It could go perfectly smoothly or you could hit bumps.  It's your job to report back about that.
-----------------------------------

TreeSize Free Download Page – You can select either the installable version or portable version from the dropdown on that page.  Either will get the information you  need.  There is also a cluster of 3 radio buttons to indicate the region of the world for which you’re downloading:  North America/Europe/Other, followed by the Download Button.

This tutorial will presume you’ve downloaded the portable version (ZIP format) and have already unzipped it to the folder from which you wish to run the program and are sitting in that folder.

1.       Fire up TreeSizeFree.exe.

2.       Hit ALT+S,D [Scan Tab/Ribbon, Select Directory], you will then be presented with your drive options as well as a Select Directory to Scan option at the end of the submenu.  Pick what’s appropriate for what you’re doing.  I will choose a directory for the rest of this tutorial, and that directory will end up being C:\Program Files (x86)\NVDA.  If you use the directory option you will be presented with a typical File Explorer navigation dialog to select the folder you want.  You can, of course, type out the path in the Folder edit box if you know it.  The choice is yours.  As soon as you've selected/typed a folder hit the Select Folder button and the scan begins.

3.       If you keep focus on the TreeSizeFree window it will begin reading out the result of its analysis when it finishes, and for folder that will be very quickly.  What starts the report is the folder or drive level you chose to scan.  Down arrowing will take you through the various subfolders and files associated with it, reading out names, sizes, etc.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com



--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager


Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

Quentin,

           Thank you very much for "solving the mystery" I had not yet solved with regard to using object navigation to activate that button.  The text report format, and the range of available formats in text, from SpaceSniffer are definitely more screen reader user friendly than what comes in PDF from TreeSize Free.

           Although I have played with it some, object navigation still remains a personal weak point in my NVDA world.  I just don't seem to get the relationships between objects in any clear way.

           By the way, you may be able to explain this to me, why is it that NVDA "gets trapped" in the report preview part of the ScreenSniffer report generation process if you tab into it.  Once I do that I cannot extract myself no matter what I do.  I have to either close that window and start again or resort to sighted point and click to force my way out of that text box.  This is not something I've encountered before.  I could be doing something entirely wrong, but I have absolutely no idea what that might be.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


Quentin Christensen
 

You're welcome - I must admit, I initially got confused by the fact that if you move backwards from the edit, you get to a "toolbar" which only has one button in it - and not the one I wanted (it's the config button so you can change the properties of the report).

Re why it gets stuck in that edit, I'm not sure, something about the edit, you can arrow around it so it's not that it just ignores keyboard input, but they have done something funny to it - As far as I could find though, the only two controls you can get to on that dialog with the keyboard normally are the drop down (if you do it first up) and the edit, unless there is a shortcut key they haven't made obvious, I can't figure out how to access that save button aside from either using the mouse, or NVDA's object navigation (which basically emulates using the mouse for this task).

On Wed, Nov 4, 2020 at 5:11 PM Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:
Quentin,

           Thank you very much for "solving the mystery" I had not yet solved with regard to using object navigation to activate that button.  The text report format, and the range of available formats in text, from SpaceSniffer are definitely more screen reader user friendly than what comes in PDF from TreeSize Free.

           Although I have played with it some, object navigation still remains a personal weak point in my NVDA world.  I just don't seem to get the relationships between objects in any clear way.

           By the way, you may be able to explain this to me, why is it that NVDA "gets trapped" in the report preview part of the ScreenSniffer report generation process if you tab into it.  Once I do that I cannot extract myself no matter what I do.  I have to either close that window and start again or resort to sighted point and click to force my way out of that text box.  This is not something I've encountered before.  I could be doing something entirely wrong, but I have absolutely no idea what that might be.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com



--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager


Blaster
 

Another option you may consider is WinDirStat, downloadable from
NiNite.com. This program is perfectly suited to do what you need.
When you launch the program your presented with a list of available
drives on your pc to scan. Pressing enter on your C: drive will start
the scan. The List box will fill up with all of the folders and files
on the root directory of your C: drive, sorting them with the biggest
ones on top by percentage of disk space used. For example, my "Users"
folder was on the top of the list as it was the largest one on my C:
drive. When you arrow to the right it expands the folder and presents
a list of the folders and files in that root folder, again listing the
largest ones on top. This program should zero in on your 80 gig
offending disk hog very quickly.

HTH,
Blaster

On 11/4/20, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
Quentin,

Thank you *very* much for "solving the mystery" I had not yet solved with
regard to using object navigation to activate that button. The text report
format, and the range of available formats in text, from SpaceSniffer are
definitely more screen reader user friendly than what comes in PDF from
TreeSize Free.

Although I have played with it some, object navigation still remains a
personal weak point in my NVDA world. I just don't seem to get the
relationships between objects in any clear way.

By the way, you may be able to explain this to me, why is it that NVDA "gets
trapped" in the report preview part of the ScreenSniffer report generation
process if you tab into it. Once I do that I cannot extract myself no
matter what I do. I have to either close that window and start again or
resort to sighted point and click to force my way out of that text box.
This is not something I've encountered before. I could be doing something
entirely wrong, but I have absolutely no idea what that might be.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041

*Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely
fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.*

~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com






Monte Single
 

Yes, I had a friend help me with a disk space problem using windirsstat.
It found where all the space was being used.
So, I do not know if it is good with screenreaders, but it sure worked for my situation.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Blaster
Sent: November 4, 2020 9:14 AM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] NVDA, A Space Hog

Another option you may consider is WinDirStat, downloadable from NiNite.com. This program is perfectly suited to do what you need.
When you launch the program your presented with a list of available drives on your pc to scan. Pressing enter on your C: drive will start the scan. The List box will fill up with all of the folders and files on the root directory of your C: drive, sorting them with the biggest ones on top by percentage of disk space used. For example, my "Users"
folder was on the top of the list as it was the largest one on my C:
drive. When you arrow to the right it expands the folder and presents a list of the folders and files in that root folder, again listing the largest ones on top. This program should zero in on your 80 gig offending disk hog very quickly.

HTH,
Blaster


On 11/4/20, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
Quentin,

Thank you *very* much for "solving the mystery" I had not yet solved
with regard to using object navigation to activate that button. The
text report format, and the range of available formats in text, from
SpaceSniffer are definitely more screen reader user friendly than what
comes in PDF from TreeSize Free.

Although I have played with it some, object navigation still remains a
personal weak point in my NVDA world. I just don't seem to get the
relationships between objects in any clear way.

By the way, you may be able to explain this to me, why is it that NVDA
"gets trapped" in the report preview part of the ScreenSniffer report
generation process if you tab into it. Once I do that I cannot
extract myself no matter what I do. I have to either close that
window and start again or resort to sighted point and click to force my way out of that text box.
This is not something I've encountered before. I could be doing
something entirely wrong, but I have absolutely no idea what that might be.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041

*Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they
rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and
on.*

~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com