Topics

Repairing Windows


lynn white
 

I have Windows 10. Could someone give tips how to run the sfc / scannow command?


Norman
 

Hi.

From the desktop press windows q to open the search dialog. Type com and you should here command prompt. press applications or shift f10 to bring up the right click menu and press down arrow until you here run as administrator.

press enter and alt y if you get the user account control dialog.

now you should be in the command prompt.

type sfc /scannow and hit enter.

Wait for the command to complete, note, it could take a while.


There are other ways to get to the command prompt as well, feel free to use any one that you wish, but you do have to run it as administrator for the command to work.


HTH.

On 10/24/2020 1:35 PM, lynn white wrote:
I have Windows 10. Could someone give tips how to run the sfc / scannow command?





Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

Using SFC (System File Checker) and DISM (Deployment Imaging Servicing and Management) to Repair Windows 8 & 10

You can ignore the section on DISM, which comes after using SFC anyway, but you may want to run both.

Might I ask why you are running the System File Checker?  Not that it hurts to run it, ever.  The worst that happens is it finds that everything's fine.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


Mike B
 


Hi Lynn,
 
This is from Brian Vogel:

[Last Update: 3/18/2020]

Britechguy’s Standard Advice Regarding Windows 10 Issues and their Repair

All of what follows presumes any issue that is occurring is not secondary to a malicious infection.  If you suspect it is, then your first order of business should be attempting to exorcise your system of said infection.  That’s a topic of its own and won’t be covered here.

Also, certain issues suggest that device drivers are the most likely culprits.  If that’s the case make sure you have gotten the latest device drivers from either your computer’s OEM support pages or the OEM support pages for the component (e.g., video card, WiFi card, printer, etc.) and installed those and tested afterward.  As the preceding indicates, these issues are usually with internal devices or peripherals behaving badly so it’s relatively clear which device needs attention.

The above having been said and considered, if you are experiencing unexpected issues immediately or very shortly after any Windows update has been applied, then the first thing you should do is use the Windows 10 built-in capability to uninstall the latest update that’s suspected of causing the issue:

1.        Open Settings, Update & Security.  This should take you to the Windows Update Pane by default.

2.        In the Windows Update Pane, locate the View update history control, and activate it.

3.        In the View Update History dialog, locate the Uninstall updates link and activate it.

4.       In the Installed Updates dialog, the updates will be listed in groupings, with the groups alphabetically ordered, and the items within each group ordered by date – most recently installed first (if no one has changed the defaults).  In most cases, you’ll be looking to uninstall a Microsoft Windows update, and those are generally the final group.  The number of updates available for uninstalling is shown in parentheses after the Microsoft Windows group name.

5.       Almost all Windows Updates will have a KB number associated with them, and if you know that use this as what you search on for the actual update.  Select it.

6.        Activate the Uninstall button located above the list of updates, and the selected update will be uninstalled.

If it’s not an update that’s suspected of causing an issue, there are other steps you can take.  Before going any further, it must be noted that a repair install (or feature update, when those are being done) allows one to keep all of one's files and apps (desktop/installed and store varieties).  This is in complete contrast to a Reset (which allows either keeping just one’s files or wiping everything), or a Refresh/Fresh Start or Completely Clean Reinstall, both of which wipe everything.

My standard advice, in virtually all cases, (and presuming any potential infection has already been addressed, first) is trying the following, in the order specified. 
It is also presumed that you will have made a complete system image backup, and a separate user data backup, prior to using options two or three (and, if you don’t already have a backup drive and a cyclic backup protocol going, this is your chance to start one, which is vital).  If the issue is fixed by option one then there's no need to go further.  Stop whenever your issue is fixed:

1. 
Using SFC (System File Checker) and DISM (Deployment Imaging Servicing and Management) to Repair Windows 8 & 10 


2. 
Doing a Windows 10 Repair Install or Feature Update Using the Windows 10 ISO file


3. Doing a completely clean reinstall (options a & b are downloadable PDF files):

           a) Completely Clean Win10 (Re)install Using MCT to Download Win10 ISO File

           b) Completely Clean Win10 (Re)install Using MCT to Create a Bootable USB Drive

           c) How to do a CLEAN Installation of Windows 10  (Tom’s Hardware Forums, with screen shots)

 

I never choose the “thermonuclear option,” the completely clean reinstall, until it's clear that this is the only viable option. I hate having to go through all the work of reconfiguring a machine from scratch if that can reasonably and safely be avoided.


Take care and stay safe.  Mike.  Sent from my iBarstool.  Go dodgers & Rams!
Main's Law:  For every action there is an equal and opposite government program.

----- Original Message -----
From: lynn white
Sent: Saturday, October 24, 2020 10:35 AM
Subject: [TechTalk] Repairing Windows

I have Windows 10. Could someone give tips how to run the sfc / scannow
command?






Brian Zolo
 

Hey there, Lynn, Brian Zolo here in Gahanna, Ohio, feel free to call me BZ, grin! 1. Hit your windows key plus the letter r which is the run command.
2. Type cmd and then press enter.
3. You'll hear your screen reader say colon backslash your user name.
4. Next, type sfc space forward slash scannow and then press enter.
5. The process will start and will take a while and you'll hear your screen reader telling you the percentage completed as the process proceeds and once it hits one hundred percent, the process will be completed. You will be told if there are corrupt files but you'll have to run the event viewer to get full details as to what corrupt files were found that could not be repaired. That will get you started and if I can be of assistance, don't hesitate to get in touch and I'll be happy to assist you further. Have a blessed day! Brian Zolo

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of lynn white
Sent: Saturday, October 24, 2020 1:36 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Repairing Windows

I have Windows 10. Could someone give tips how to run the sfc / scannow command?








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lynn white
 

I appreciate everyone's response to my question. I did the /scannow and found everything to be okay as far as Windows is concerned.

So now I have to look further as to how to solve my problem with Station Play List.

On 10/24/2020 1:14 PM, Norman wrote:
Hi.

From the desktop press windows q to open the search dialog. Type com and you should here command prompt. press applications or shift f10 to bring up the right click menu and press down arrow until you here run as administrator.

press enter and alt y if you get the user account control dialog.

now you should be in the command prompt.

type sfc /scannow and hit enter.

Wait for the command to complete, note, it could take a while.


There are other ways to get to the command prompt as well, feel free to use any one that you wish, but you do have to run it as administrator for the command to work.


HTH.



On 10/24/2020 1:35 PM, lynn white wrote:
I have Windows 10. Could someone give tips how to run the sfc / scannow command?