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Repeated message about filling out survey for census Bureau


Sharon Hooley
 

Hi,

I keep getting a message that the Census needs for me to fill out a survey about Covid 19. WHAT would you do? Would we be in trouble if we ignore it?


Is it hard to communicate, even with hearing aids? Visit
www.CochlearAmericas.com


heather albright
 

Are you sure that is not spam cause, I never got that when I filled out mine, they do not send you e-mails, has to be spam be careful! Run your virus scann just in case! cheers Heather

----- Original Message -----
From: "Sharon Hooley" <shooley42@...>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, August 26, 2020 4:48 PM
Subject: [TechTalk] Repeated message about filling out survey for census Bureau


Hi,

I keep getting a message that the Census needs for me to fill out a survey about Covid 19. WHAT would you do? Would we be in trouble if we ignore it?


Is it hard to communicate, even with hearing aids? Visit
www.CochlearAmericas.com


Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

I have heard nothing about this specifically, but see:  

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Pandemic - Census.gov

paying particular attention to the section on the Household Pulse Survey, and on that page, the section discussing Phase 2.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


Gene
 

First, make sure it is from the census. Phishers can try to use almost anything to get people to go to malicious sites or go to sites that ask you for personal information that is sent to the criminals.

Don't follow any links. Do a search on whether the census bureau is, in fact, asking people for information about the coronavirus. it sounds very implausible to me. they are an organization to enumerate the number of people in the United States. I would think medical information would be solicited by a different agency. And I haven't heard a word, with all the coverage of the census controversy, of the census bureau collecting any such information.

Then, if you find there is such a legitimate survey, don't follow the link. Find out how to get to the site another way, or if you know how to check the link for authenticity, you can do that and follow it if it really is. But this sounds like classic phishing. Be very skeptical of any e-mail that claims to come from somewhere and wants you to do something.

Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: Sharon Hooley
Sent: Wednesday, August 26, 2020 4:48 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Repeated message about filling out survey for census Bureau

Hi,

I keep getting a message that the Census needs for me to fill out a survey about Covid 19. WHAT would you do? Would we be in trouble if we ignore it?


Is it hard to communicate, even with hearing aids? Visit
www.CochlearAmericas.com


Gene
 

Far down on this page I found a link to another page which may be what is being discussed.
https://www.census.gov/newsroom/press-releases/2020/second-phase-household-pulse.html

It appears the message may be valid, but I'd stilll want to try to verify it in some way.

Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel
Sent: Wednesday, August 26, 2020 4:55 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Repeated message about filling out survey for census Bureau

I have heard nothing about this specifically, but see:

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Pandemic - Census.gov

paying particular attention to the section on the Household Pulse Survey, and on that page, the section discussing Phase 2.

--


Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


Sharon Hooley
 

Actually, it's not an email, but a text message on my phone.

On 8/26/2020 4:13 PM, Gene wrote:
First, make sure it is from the census.  Phishers can try to use almost anything to get people to go to malicious sites or go to sites that ask you for personal information that is sent to the criminals.

Don't follow any links.  Do a search on whether the census bureau is, in fact, asking people for information about the coronavirus. it sounds very implausible to me.  they are an organization to enumerate the number of people in the United States.  I would think medical information would be solicited by a different agency.  And I haven't heard a word, with all the coverage of the census controversy, of the census bureau collecting any such information.

Then, if you find there is such a legitimate survey, don't follow the link. Find out how to get to the site another way, or if you know how to check the link for authenticity, you can do that and follow it if it really is.  But this sounds like classic phishing.  Be very skeptical of any e-mail that claims to come from somewhere and wants you to do something.

Gene
-----Original Message----- From: Sharon Hooley
Sent: Wednesday, August 26, 2020 4:48 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Repeated message about filling out survey for census Bureau

Hi,

I keep getting a message that the Census needs for me to fill out a survey about Covid 19.  WHAT would you do?  Would we be in trouble if we ignore it?


Is it hard to communicate, even with hearing aids?  Visit
www.CochlearAmericas.com




Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

Regardless of "the where" the general advice remains the same:   Look at the link, and by that I mean the click-through text AND what the actual link for said text is.

If you've participated in the US Census and supplied them with your cell number as part of that, it could very well be legitimate.  If the link indicates www.census.gov at the beginning it is almost certainly legitimate.

But, if you want to exercise the maximum caution, even if the link appears to be legitimate, don't activate it as presented.  Go to your web browser and hand-type the link in, and see if that takes you where you'd expect it to.

In this case, if it starts with census.gov I have little reason to believe it's fake, but it's not impossible.

But the basic principle with suspect links is you never activate them directly.   
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


Geoff Eden
 

"Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on."
 
Not entirely true. LEDs can be turned off and on millions of times per second with little fear of failure. Whereas, the filament of an incandescent bulb goes from room to temperature to 4500° in a split second. As with most materials, the light bulb filament will eventually deteriorate from temperature fatigue, and the frontal spike of switched on current can separate it.
 
Computers go from room temperature to approximately 80° see fairly gradually. Hence, temperature fatigue does not apply here. Furthermore, switching power supplies in modern computers utilize far less capacitance than the AC filter bridge networks applied in power supplies of yesteryear. Hence, frontal spikes are not of the same amplitude, resulting in a much lower risk of failure at startup. Hence, everyone needs to think of the power that's wasted by an idling computer that could better be used elsewhere.
 
Geoff
 
 

From: Brian Vogel
Sent: Thursday, August 27, 2020 11:04 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Repeated message about filling out survey for census Bureau
 
Regardless of "the where" the general advice remains the same:   Look at the link, and by that I mean the click-through text AND what the actual link for said text is.

If you've participated in the US Census and supplied them with your cell number as part of that, it could very well be legitimate.  If the link indicates www.census.gov at the beginning it is almost certainly legitimate.

But, if you want to exercise the maximum caution, even if the link appears to be legitimate, don't activate it as presented.  Go to your web browser and hand-type the link in, and see if that takes you where you'd expect it to.

In this case, if it starts with census.gov I have little reason to believe it's fake, but it's not impossible.

But the basic principle with suspect links is you never activate them directly.  
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com