Topics

respecting leaving computers on, or not


Geoff Eden
 

Please excuse my incorrect title.
 
"Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on."
 
Not entirely true. LEDs can be turned off and on millions of times per second with little fear of failure. Whereas, the filament of an incandescent bulb goes from room to temperature to 4500° in a split second. As with most materials, the light bulb filament will eventually deteriorate from temperature fatigue, and the frontal spike of switched on current can separate it.
 
Computers go from room temperature to approximately 80° see fairly gradually. Hence, temperature fatigue does not apply here. Furthermore, switching power supplies in modern computers utilize far less capacitance than the AC filter bridge networks applied in power supplies of yesteryear. Hence, frontal spikes are not of the same amplitude, resulting in a much lower risk of failure at startup. Hence, everyone needs to think of the power that's wasted by an idling computer that could better be used elsewhere.
 
Geoff
 

From: Brian Vogel
Sent: Thursday, August 27, 2020 11:04 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Repeated message about filling out survey for census Bureau
 
Regardless of "the where" the general advice remains the same:   Look at the link, and by that I mean the click-through text AND what the actual link for said text is.

If you've participated in the US Census and supplied them with your cell number as part of that, it could very well be legitimate.  If the link indicates www.census.gov at the beginning it is almost certainly legitimate.

But, if you want to exercise the maximum caution, even if the link appears to be legitimate, don't activate it as presented.  Go to your web browser and hand-type the link in, and see if that takes you where you'd expect it to.

In this case, if it starts with census.gov I have little reason to believe it's fake, but it's not impossible.

But the basic principle with suspect links is you never activate them directly.  
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

Geoff,

          I don't think that most of us think of LEDs as "light bulbs" in the conventional sense, and you're 100% correct on the difference between them and incandescents, which is what was being referred to at the time that quotation was written.  True LED bulbs are a very recent thing as far as consumer lighting in traditional screw-in bulb form goes.

           Until and unless computers are all using SSDs, the biggest stress on HDDs is generally at boot time.  So computers do tend to "pop" when turned off and on far more often than when in continuous use.  Unfortunately, I still see that all the time.   Almost all of my service calls for dead machines are secondary to either power supply failure or HDD failure that comes when the owner tries to power up their machine.  There's no way of knowing whether the failure occurred during the previous power down, or the actual power up, but it's one of the two.

            The issue of power savings is a thing of its own, and does deserve consideration.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


 

most of the service calls are on monday as people put off their
computer on friday and go to start on monday and it doesnt work.
an idel computer only sips power.
you can turn off your display but keep the cpu on.
if you dont believe how much power a idel computer takes then get this
device from amazon.
https://www.amazon.com/P3-P4400-Electricity-Usage-Monitor/dp/B00009MDBU/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=kilowat&qid=1598545665&sr=8-1
connect it to the wall and plug in your computer and let it sit idel.

On 8/27/20, Brian Vogel <@britechguy> wrote:
Geoff,

I don't think that most of us think of LEDs as "light bulbs" in the
conventional sense, and you're 100% correct on the difference between them
and incandescents, which is what was being referred to at the time that
quotation was written.  True LED bulbs are a very recent thing as far as
consumer lighting in traditional screw-in bulb form goes.

Until and unless computers are all using SSDs, the biggest stress on HDDs is
generally at boot time.  So computers do tend to "pop" when turned off and
on far more often than when in continuous use.  Unfortunately, I still see
that all the time.   Almost all of my service calls for dead machines are
secondary to either power supply failure or HDD failure that comes when the
owner tries to power up their machine.  There's no way of knowing whether
the failure occurred during the previous power down, or the actual power up,
but it's one of the two.

The issue of power savings is a thing of its own, and does deserve
consideration.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041

*Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely
fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.*

~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com



--
search for me on facebook, google+, orkut..
@austin
follow me on twitter.
austinmpinto
contact me on skype.
austin.pinto3


Jim Wohlgamuth
 

Hi There!

I generally leave my system on 24/7 and the only time it gets a restart is when I receive an update.  Of course when there is nasty weather on top of us I will turn it off temporarily.  The only thing I generally turn off on a regular basis is my monitor which is a new solid state monitor and probably uses very little current.  I have had my 1 TB HD for about a year and a half now at it appears to be functioning very well! Just my 2-sense worth! Catch Ya Later!

de

<wohlggie@...><KF8LT><Jim Wohlgamuth>.


On 27-Aug-20 12:28, Austin Pinto wrote:
most of the service calls are on monday as people put off their
computer on friday and go to start on monday and it doesnt work.
an idel computer only sips power.
you can turn off your display but keep the cpu on.
if you dont believe how much power a idel computer takes then get this
device from amazon.
https://www.amazon.com/P3-P4400-Electricity-Usage-Monitor/dp/B00009MDBU/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=kilowat&qid=1598545665&sr=8-1
connect it to the wall and plug in your computer and let it sit idel.

On 8/27/20, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:
Geoff,

I don't think that most of us think of LEDs as "light bulbs" in the
conventional sense, and you're 100% correct on the difference between them
and incandescents, which is what was being referred to at the time that
quotation was written.  True LED bulbs are a very recent thing as far as
consumer lighting in traditional screw-in bulb form goes.

Until and unless computers are all using SSDs, the biggest stress on HDDs is
generally at boot time.  So computers do tend to "pop" when turned off and
on far more often than when in continuous use.  Unfortunately, I still see
that all the time.   Almost all of my service calls for dead machines are
secondary to either power supply failure or HDD failure that comes when the
owner tries to power up their machine.  There's no way of knowing whether
the failure occurred during the previous power down, or the actual power up,
but it's one of the two.

The issue of power savings is a thing of its own, and does deserve
consideration.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041

*Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely
fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.*

~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com






Gene
 

If you leave a system on, you should restart it now and then. If you don't, performance problems will start to occur and maybe program crashes. I can't tell you how often to restart. You can determine that from experience with your specific computer, I would think most people would start to have problems within five or seven days or maybe less. It may be a good idea, even if you don't have problems for five or seven days, to restart after that time just to keep from having problems later. Its inconvenient and at times important not to have problems, depending on what you are doing.

Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: Jim Wohlgamuth
Sent: Thursday, August 27, 2020 12:11 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] respecting leaving computers on, or not



Hi There!

I generally leave my system on 24/7 and the only time it gets a restart is when I receive an update. Of course when there is nasty weather on top of us I will turn it off temporarily. The only thing I generally turn off on a regular basis is my monitor which is a new solid state monitor and probably uses very little current. I have had my 1 TB HD for about a year and a half now at it appears to be functioning very well! Just my 2-sense worth! Catch Ya Later!

de

mailto:wohlggie@...<KF8LT><Jim Wohlgamuth>.





On 27-Aug-20 12:28, Austin Pinto wrote:
most of the service calls are on monday as people put off their computer on friday and go to start on monday and it doesnt work. an idel computer only sips power. you can turn off your display but keep the cpu on. if you dont believe how much power a idel computer takes then get this device from amazon. https://www.amazon.com/P3-P4400-Electricity-Usage-Monitor/dp/B00009MDBU/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=kilowat&qid=1598545665&sr=8-1 connect it to the wall and plug in your computer and let it sit idel. On 8/27/20, Brian Vogel mailto:@britechguy wrote: Geoff, I don't think that most of us think of LEDs as "light bulbs" in the conventional sense, and you're 100% correct on the difference between them and incandescents, which is what was being referred to at the time that quotation was written. True LED bulbs are a very recent thing as far as consumer lighting in traditional screw-in bulb form goes. Until and unless computers are all using SSDs, the biggest stress on HDDs is generally at boot time. So computers do tend to "pop" when turned off and on far more often than when in continuous use. Unfortunately, I still see that all the time. Almost all of my service calls for dead machines are secondary to either power supply failure or HDD failure that comes when the owner tries to power up their machine. There's no way of knowing whether the failure occurred during the previous power down, or the actual power up, but it's one of the two. The issue of power savings is a thing of its own, and does deserve consideration. -- Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041 *Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.* ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


Geoff Eden
 

Good afternoon, mechanical hard drives, you make a case! Not only is there a large current draw for startup, but you are essentially rolling on dry bearings for a few revolutions until their floating design puts the platter spindle airborne.
 
During boot up the head rack also gets a good workout.
 
I'm all SSD here, but my avarice kicks in when viewing the monthly electric bill. So I still turn my computers off, at least, most of the time.
 
Geoff
 

From: Brian Vogel
Sent: Thursday, August 27, 2020 12:20 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] respecting leaving computers on, or not
 
Geoff,

          I don't think that most of us think of LEDs as "light bulbs" in the conventional sense, and you're 100% correct on the difference between them and incandescents, which is what was being referred to at the time that quotation was written.  True LED bulbs are a very recent thing as far as consumer lighting in traditional screw-in bulb form goes.

           Until and unless computers are all using SSDs, the biggest stress on HDDs is generally at boot time.  So computers do tend to "pop" when turned off and on far more often than when in continuous use.  Unfortunately, I still see that all the time.   Almost all of my service calls for dead machines are secondary to either power supply failure or HDD failure that comes when the owner tries to power up their machine.  There's no way of knowing whether the failure occurred during the previous power down, or the actual power up, but it's one of the two.

            The issue of power savings is a thing of its own, and does deserve consideration.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

I'm the "perfect inbetween" of Gene's and Jim's approaches.   I will do restarts anytime I see performance change that goes outside "normal limits," which can be hours, days or weeks, and usually weeks (1.5 to 2).

And I absolutely agree that doing the occasional cyclic restart can be helpful.  What I have found unhelpful, over my years of repairing computers, is the practice of powering down completely either multiple times per day or even nightly on a routine basis.  The systems where that's been the owner's standard practice virtually always have shorter service lives, if not for the machine as a whole then for specific parts that have to be replaced.

I've been using laptops exclusively for well over 10 years now as my "daily driver" machines.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


Dave
 

Speaking of Power Drain, I've been curious, what sort of Power does an I7 chip with a 500 watt power supply require? 


Which draws more, the Computer, or the refrigerator?


Grumpy Dave



On 8/27/2020 11:13 AM, Geoff Eden wrote:
Good afternoon, mechanical hard drives, you make a case! Not only is there a large current draw for startup, but you are essentially rolling on dry bearings for a few revolutions until their floating design puts the platter spindle airborne.
 
During boot up the head rack also gets a good workout.
 
I'm all SSD here, but my avarice kicks in when viewing the monthly electric bill. So I still turn my computers off, at least, most of the time.
 
Geoff
 
From: Brian Vogel
Sent: Thursday, August 27, 2020 12:20 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] respecting leaving computers on, or not
 
Geoff,

          I don't think that most of us think of LEDs as "light bulbs" in the conventional sense, and you're 100% correct on the difference between them and incandescents, which is what was being referred to at the time that quotation was written.  True LED bulbs are a very recent thing as far as consumer lighting in traditional screw-in bulb form goes.

           Until and unless computers are all using SSDs, the biggest stress on HDDs is generally at boot time.  So computers do tend to "pop" when turned off and on far more often than when in continuous use.  Unfortunately, I still see that all the time.   Almost all of my service calls for dead machines are secondary to either power supply failure or HDD failure that comes when the owner tries to power up their machine.  There's no way of knowing whether the failure occurred during the previous power down, or the actual power up, but it's one of the two.

            The issue of power savings is a thing of its own, and does deserve consideration.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


Monte Single
 

I’m  no techy,  but that 500 watt power supply  is probably using very little power most of the time.

 

ON the other hand, my side by side fridge freezer probably  uses the most power  of all items in my condo.  Sometimes when I walk in front of the fridge in my bare feet, the floor is nicely warm.

As I do not have a  tv, the only other things in my home that use much power is the dryer, and oven.

P S,  I’m in a condo so  heat and hot water are provided centrally.

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave
Sent: August 27, 2020 7:13 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] respecting leaving computers on, or not

 

Speaking of Power Drain, I've been curious, what sort of Power does an I7 chip with a 500 watt power supply require? 

 

Which draws more, the Computer, or the refrigerator?

 

Grumpy Dave

 

 

On 8/27/2020 11:13 AM, Geoff Eden wrote:

Good afternoon, mechanical hard drives, you make a case! Not only is there a large current draw for startup, but you are essentially rolling on dry bearings for a few revolutions until their floating design puts the platter spindle airborne.

 

During boot up the head rack also gets a good workout.

 

I'm all SSD here, but my avarice kicks in when viewing the monthly electric bill. So I still turn my computers off, at least, most of the time.

 

Geoff

 

From: Brian Vogel

Sent: Thursday, August 27, 2020 12:20 PM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] respecting leaving computers on, or not

 

Geoff,

          I don't think that most of us think of LEDs as "light bulbs" in the conventional sense, and you're 100% correct on the difference between them and incandescents, which is what was being referred to at the time that quotation was written.  True LED bulbs are a very recent thing as far as consumer lighting in traditional screw-in bulb form goes.

           Until and unless computers are all using SSDs, the biggest stress on HDDs is generally at boot time.  So computers do tend to "pop" when turned off and on far more often than when in continuous use.  Unfortunately, I still see that all the time.   Almost all of my service calls for dead machines are secondary to either power supply failure or HDD failure that comes when the owner tries to power up their machine.  There's no way of knowing whether the failure occurred during the previous power down, or the actual power up, but it's one of the two.

            The issue of power savings is a thing of its own, and does deserve consideration.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


Hope Williamson
 

I used to power my last system off nightly, and it was around for 6
years. It was only decommissioned because the friend I passed it on to
got a newer system, so actually around 9 years.

    I don't do this any more though. Mostly because I forget, or get
preoccupied with something. I try to remember to power down every 7-10
days though.