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screwdriver set for opening laptop?


enes sarıbaş
 

Hi all,

So I had opted to have my laptop shipped without memory and a hard drive, so I could choose those components on my own. I got a piece screwdriver set, which had been advertised as for pcs. However, when screwing the battery cover of my LTE router, I noticed I lacked  the correct screwdriver. I had like a $10 set of magnetic bits,  and I tested the smallest, on my  laptop, however, they have no magnetism so the screw will just stay in. My question is, will this set, which I just ordered, have lal the drivers to open a laptop?

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07K1C744B/ref=ppx_od_dt_b_asin_title_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

From my previous full set, I have the phillips 0, 00, and 000 tips.


Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

enes,

          You seldom, very seldom, use a straight blade screwdriver for electronics.  And in Phillips, I'll be surprised if you go lower than a PH-0 on a laptop.  

           The problem here may be, and I can only say may, is that your computer maker may have chosen to use torx screws, which is not uncommon.  If you're not strapped for cash, I would go for the newer version of this set, Magnetic Screwdriver Set 57 PCS Includes Slotted/Phillips/Torx Mini Precision Screwdriver, CREMAX Non-Slip Repair Tool Kit with Replaceable Screwdriver Bits for Repair Home Improvement Craft, that has all of the straight blade and Phillips heads in the set you reference, plus a couple of Torx, too.  But the big plus is the one that takes interchangeable driver bits, and some of those are smaller torx and PoziDrive, Square, Phillips, Hex/Allen bits.  For the extra $10 it's well worth it if you expect to use these drivers for other purposes.  If not, provided your maker is not using any Torx screws, you should be fine with the one you were looking at.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

By the way, your computer maker should be able to tell you exactly what screws and sizes they use in any given model.  If they will supply you with the service manual (typically in PDF format) for it the fasteners should be presented for each part like the case, motherboard, screen, etc.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


enes sarıbaş
 

Hi Brian,

I  was concerned with buying a magnetic bit set, as I thought they were less durable than full size drivers. But this set appears to be better value for money. I will keep the smaller set though, as you never know when those might come in handy. Too bad probably the laptop will arrive before the screwdrivers lol.

On 10/14/2020 8:10 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
By the way, your computer maker should be able to tell you exactly what screws and sizes they use in any given model.  If they will supply you with the service manual (typically in PDF format) for it the fasteners should be presented for each part like the case, motherboard, screen, etc.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

Enes,

           I honestly can't speak to durability in these sorts of drivers, as when you're dealing with fasteners that are so small, and that require very minimal torque, you should never "ruin" a driver or driver bit anyway.

           In a regular sized screwdriver, I haven't found that there is much of any difference, either, but I'm someone who uses screwdrivers and bits (for the most part, unless I'm using a drill-driver) pretty gently.  I don't have any straight blade drivers that are magnetic that are even close to large enough for, say, prying a paint can lid off!  And that's one way I do "abuse" some larger straight blade screw drivers.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


enes sarıbaş
 

One question. So the really cheap set of bits I have has no magnitism that I can see. How do you remove screws in deep holes? The driver literally has no shaft for extention, and the screw will unlatch from the screwdriver and sit in the hole. I tested out on my current laptop a bit.

On 10/14/2020 8:23 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
Enes,

           I honestly can't speak to durability in these sorts of drivers, as when you're dealing with fasteners that are so small, and that require very minimal torque, you should never "ruin" a driver or driver bit anyway.

           In a regular sized screwdriver, I haven't found that there is much of any difference, either, but I'm someone who uses screwdrivers and bits (for the most part, unless I'm using a drill-driver) pretty gently.  I don't have any straight blade drivers that are magnetic that are even close to large enough for, say, prying a paint can lid off!  And that's one way I do "abuse" some larger straight blade screw drivers.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com


Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

Enes,

        I can't speak to your set, but in general, these bits are held in to the driver handles magnetically, and weak (but sufficient) magnetism is present in the bit to hold tiny screws.

        But that's different than screwdrivers that have magnetized tips, which is what you were discussing earlier.

         I have a very low cost precision screwdriver with LED lighting that holds the bits in it via magnetism, and it can and does hold on to the screws when I'm taking them out.  At least until I give the screw enough of a bump to knock it off the driver, which is very, very easy to do with tiny screws.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

Always remember that computers are just glorified light bulbs - they rarely fail in continuous use and usually go pop when turned off and on.

        ~ Technician with the username Computer Bloke, on Technibble.com