Talking battery meter


Melissa
 

Hello list. I need some accessible way to test the percentage of
double a, tripple a, c, d, and 9V batteries. Is there one accessible
product that will do all of this? Thanks in advance for your help.
Melissa


john s
 

Melissa, for 9 volts, just use your tongue. It works well and it is very accessable.

At 07:40 PM 5/8/2021, Melissa, wrote:
Hello list. I need some accessible way to test the percentage of
double a, tripple a, c, d, and 9V batteries. Is there one accessible
product that will do all of this? Thanks in advance for your help.
Melissa


John


Gene
 

I don’t know how battery measuring instruments determine the percent of charge used but I wouldn’t consider the tongue method reliable.  It can tell you when a battery is so much depleted that the voltage produced isn’t near the amount intended, even after a period of disuse.  But Batteries often produce more current when they haven’t been used, and when used, the amount of current produced quickly goes down, perhaps significantly.  So the amount of current you feel on your tongue doesn’t necessarily tell you anything about the true state of the battery. 
 
I would hope instruments to determine the battery state are smart enough to determine the true state. 
 
Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: john s
Sent: Sunday, May 09, 2021 6:42 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Talking battery meter
 
Melissa, for 9 volts, just use your tongue.  It works well and it is
very accessable.

At 07:40 PM 5/8/2021, Melissa, wrote:
>Hello list. I need some accessible way to test the percentage of
>double a, tripple a, c, d, and 9V batteries. Is there one accessible
>product that will do all of this? Thanks in advance for your help.
>Melissa
>
>
>

                 John






Gerald Levy
 


This is not a rliable means of determining battry strength, and besides, it only workds with 9V batteries and not with AA, AAA C and D batteries.  Years ago ILA used to sell an audible battery tester that was made by Radio Shack, which of course went bye bye  years ago.  I am not aware of any affordable, audible battery testers that are still on the market. To test AA and AAA batteries, which are the sizes most commonly used, I use single battery, inexpensive  vibrators that I purchased on EBay.  I have one that takes a single AA battery and another one that takes a single AAA battery.  I just insert a battery and twist the cap, and if the battery is okay, the unit vibrates strongly, and if is weak, it vibrates feeblely.  And of corse, besides being excellent battery testers, they are useful for other purposes which I won't describe here, if you get my drift.


Gerald



On 5/9/2021 7:42 AM, john s wrote:
Melissa, for 9 volts, just use your tongue.  It works well and it is very accessable.

At 07:40 PM 5/8/2021, Melissa, wrote:
Hello list. I need some accessible way to test the percentage of
double a, tripple a, c, d, and 9V batteries. Is there one accessible
product that will do all of this? Thanks in advance for your help.
Melissa




                John







emile
 

The talking magazine called: newsreel used to sell them.  You might want to check at Walmart.

Emile.

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Sunday, May 9, 2021 7:08 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Talking battery meter

 

I don’t know how battery measuring instruments determine the percent of charge used but I wouldn’t consider the tongue method reliable.  It can tell you when a battery is so much depleted that the voltage produced isn’t near the amount intended, even after a period of disuse.  But Batteries often produce more current when they haven’t been used, and when used, the amount of current produced quickly goes down, perhaps significantly.  So the amount of current you feel on your tongue doesn’t necessarily tell you anything about the true state of the battery. 

 

I would hope instruments to determine the battery state are smart enough to determine the true state. 

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

From: john s

Sent: Sunday, May 09, 2021 6:42 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Talking battery meter

 

Melissa, for 9 volts, just use your tongue.  It works well and it is
very accessable.

At 07:40 PM 5/8/2021, Melissa, wrote:
>Hello list. I need some accessible way to test the percentage of
>double a, tripple a, c, d, and 9V batteries. Is there one accessible
>product that will do all of this? Thanks in advance for your help.
>Melissa
>
>
>

                 John





John Holcomb II
 

Radio Shack is not gone, they are still around and have apps on both Google Play and Apple app stores now.

John

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gerald Levy via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, May 09, 2021 10:15 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Talking battery meter

 

 

This is not a rliable means of determining battry strength, and besides, it only workds with 9V batteries and not with AA, AAA C and D batteries.  Years ago ILA used to sell an audible battery tester that was made by Radio Shack, which of course went bye bye  years ago.  I am not aware of any affordable, audible battery testers that are still on the market. To test AA and AAA batteries, which are the sizes most commonly used, I use single battery, inexpensive  vibrators that I purchased on EBay.  I have one that takes a single AA battery and another one that takes a single AAA battery.  I just insert a battery and twist the cap, and if the battery is okay, the unit vibrates strongly, and if is weak, it vibrates feeblely.  And of corse, besides being excellent battery testers, they are useful for other purposes which I won't describe here, if you get my drift.

 

Gerald

 

 

On 5/9/2021 7:42 AM, john s wrote:

Melissa, for 9 volts, just use your tongue.  It works well and it is very accessable.

At 07:40 PM 5/8/2021, Melissa, wrote:

Hello list. I need some accessible way to test the percentage of
double a, tripple a, c, d, and 9V batteries. Is there one accessible
product that will do all of this? Thanks in advance for your help.
Melissa



                John






John Holcomb II
 

What ever happened to newsreel?

They were on c cassette at 15/16IPS if I I remember correctly. And blind people would talk about different things.

Jhon

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of emile
Sent: Sunday, May 09, 2021 10:45 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Talking battery meter

 

The talking magazine called: newsreel used to sell them.  You might want to check at Walmart.

Emile.

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Sunday, May 9, 2021 7:08 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Talking battery meter

 

I don’t know how battery measuring instruments determine the percent of charge used but I wouldn’t consider the tongue method reliable.  It can tell you when a battery is so much depleted that the voltage produced isn’t near the amount intended, even after a period of disuse.  But Batteries often produce more current when they haven’t been used, and when used, the amount of current produced quickly goes down, perhaps significantly.  So the amount of current you feel on your tongue doesn’t necessarily tell you anything about the true state of the battery. 

 

I would hope instruments to determine the battery state are smart enough to determine the true state. 

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

From: john s

Sent: Sunday, May 09, 2021 6:42 AM

Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Talking battery meter

 

Melissa, for 9 volts, just use your tongue.  It works well and it is
very accessable.

At 07:40 PM 5/8/2021, Melissa, wrote:
>Hello list. I need some accessible way to test the percentage of
>double a, tripple a, c, d, and 9V batteries. Is there one accessible
>product that will do all of this? Thanks in advance for your help.
>Melissa
>
>
>

                 John




Gerald Levy
 


For all intents an purposes, the Radio Shack we used to know is gone.  They no longer sell a wide range of hard to find electronic accessories under their own lable, and they only have a handful of stores. And they no longer sell audible battery testers on their web site.


Gerald




Gerald


 

On 5/9/2021 11:05 AM, John Holcomb II wrote:

Radio Shack is not gone, they are still around and have apps on both Google Play and Apple app stores now.

John

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gerald Levy via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, May 09, 2021 10:15 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Talking battery meter

 

 

This is not a rliable means of determining battry strength, and besides, it only workds with 9V batteries and not with AA, AAA C and D batteries.  Years ago ILA used to sell an audible battery tester that was made by Radio Shack, which of course went bye bye  years ago.  I am not aware of any affordable, audible battery testers that are still on the market. To test AA and AAA batteries, which are the sizes most commonly used, I use single battery, inexpensive  vibrators that I purchased on EBay.  I have one that takes a single AA battery and another one that takes a single AAA battery.  I just insert a battery and twist the cap, and if the battery is okay, the unit vibrates strongly, and if is weak, it vibrates feeblely.  And of corse, besides being excellent battery testers, they are useful for other purposes which I won't describe here, if you get my drift.

 

Gerald

 

 

On 5/9/2021 7:42 AM, john s wrote:

Melissa, for 9 volts, just use your tongue.  It works well and it is very accessable.

At 07:40 PM 5/8/2021, Melissa, wrote:

Hello list. I need some accessible way to test the percentage of
double a, tripple a, c, d, and 9V batteries. Is there one accessible
product that will do all of this? Thanks in advance for your help.
Melissa



                John






John Holcomb II
 

To me gone means gone , period.

I’ve seen things on there like parts for stuff and things I haven’t saw elsewhere.

Yes a lot of the physical stores isn’t there and its not the same, but to say its completely gone is not correct or accurate.

I know that radios are still being made under their name, which how many brands do you know of making AM/FM radios these days? There isn’t a lot. I get why, but I’m saying that there are still things the  shack does that I haven’t seen a lot elsewhere.

John

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gerald Levy via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, May 09, 2021 11:13 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Talking battery meter

 

 

For all intents an purposes, the Radio Shack we used to know is gone.  They no longer sell a wide range of hard to find electronic accessories under their own lable, and they only have a handful of stores. And they no longer sell audible battery testers on their web site.

 

Gerald

 

 

 

Gerald

 

 

On 5/9/2021 11:05 AM, John Holcomb II wrote:

Radio Shack is not gone, they are still around and have apps on both Google Play and Apple app stores now.

John

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gerald Levy via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, May 09, 2021 10:15 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Talking battery meter

 

 

This is not a rliable means of determining battry strength, and besides, it only workds with 9V batteries and not with AA, AAA C and D batteries.  Years ago ILA used to sell an audible battery tester that was made by Radio Shack, which of course went bye bye  years ago.  I am not aware of any affordable, audible battery testers that are still on the market. To test AA and AAA batteries, which are the sizes most commonly used, I use single battery, inexpensive  vibrators that I purchased on EBay.  I have one that takes a single AA battery and another one that takes a single AAA battery.  I just insert a battery and twist the cap, and if the battery is okay, the unit vibrates strongly, and if is weak, it vibrates feeblely.  And of corse, besides being excellent battery testers, they are useful for other purposes which I won't describe here, if you get my drift.

 

Gerald

 

 

On 5/9/2021 7:42 AM, john s wrote:

Melissa, for 9 volts, just use your tongue.  It works well and it is very accessable.

At 07:40 PM 5/8/2021, Melissa, wrote:

Hello list. I need some accessible way to test the percentage of
double a, tripple a, c, d, and 9V batteries. Is there one accessible
product that will do all of this? Thanks in advance for your help.
Melissa


                John





James Bentley
 

Why not just try a battery powered tooth brush.  Some use AA and some of the smaller tooth brushes use AAA.

 

James B 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gerald Levy via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, May 9, 2021 9:15 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Talking battery meter

 

 

This is not a rliable means of determining battry strength, and besides, it only workds with 9V batteries and not with AA, AAA C and D batteries.  Years ago ILA used to sell an audible battery tester that was made by Radio Shack, which of course went bye bye  years ago.  I am not aware of any affordable, audible battery testers that are still on the market. To test AA and AAA batteries, which are the sizes most commonly used, I use single battery, inexpensive  vibrators that I purchased on EBay.  I have one that takes a single AA battery and another one that takes a single AAA battery.  I just insert a battery and twist the cap, and if the battery is okay, the unit vibrates strongly, and if is weak, it vibrates feeblely.  And of corse, besides being excellent battery testers, they are useful for other purposes which I won't describe here, if you get my drift.

 

Gerald

 

 

On 5/9/2021 7:42 AM, john s wrote:

Melissa, for 9 volts, just use your tongue.  It works well and it is very accessable.

At 07:40 PM 5/8/2021, Melissa, wrote:

Hello list. I need some accessible way to test the percentage of
double a, tripple a, c, d, and 9V batteries. Is there one accessible
product that will do all of this? Thanks in advance for your help.
Melissa



                John






Dave
 

If we are speaking of the typical Battery used by Flashlights and Portable Radio's, I use a talking Multimeter. 


Cost me about $50, and has worked for the last 15 years of use. 


Grumpy Dave




On 5/9/2021 5:07 AM, Gene wrote:
I don’t know how battery measuring instruments determine the percent of charge used but I wouldn’t consider the tongue method reliable.  It can tell you when a battery is so much depleted that the voltage produced isn’t near the amount intended, even after a period of disuse.  But Batteries often produce more current when they haven’t been used, and when used, the amount of current produced quickly goes down, perhaps significantly.  So the amount of current you feel on your tongue doesn’t necessarily tell you anything about the true state of the battery. 
 
I would hope instruments to determine the battery state are smart enough to determine the true state. 
 
Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: john s
Sent: Sunday, May 09, 2021 6:42 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Talking battery meter
 
Melissa, for 9 volts, just use your tongue.  It works well and it is
very accessable.

At 07:40 PM 5/8/2021, Melissa, wrote:
>Hello list. I need some accessible way to test the percentage of
>double a, tripple a, c, d, and 9V batteries. Is there one accessible
>product that will do all of this? Thanks in advance for your help.
>Melissa
>
>
>

                 John






Gerald Levy
 


The problem with using a battery-powered toothbrush to test batteries is that they usually require two batteries, so it would be difficult to determine which of the two batteries might be weak. That's why I use vibrators that only require a single AA or AAA battery.


Gerald




Gerald



On 5/9/2021 12:12 PM, James Bentley wrote:

Why not just try a battery powered tooth brush.  Some use AA and some of the smaller tooth brushes use AAA.

 

James B 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gerald Levy via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, May 9, 2021 9:15 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Talking battery meter

 

 

This is not a rliable means of determining battry strength, and besides, it only workds with 9V batteries and not with AA, AAA C and D batteries.  Years ago ILA used to sell an audible battery tester that was made by Radio Shack, which of course went bye bye  years ago.  I am not aware of any affordable, audible battery testers that are still on the market. To test AA and AAA batteries, which are the sizes most commonly used, I use single battery, inexpensive  vibrators that I purchased on EBay.  I have one that takes a single AA battery and another one that takes a single AAA battery.  I just insert a battery and twist the cap, and if the battery is okay, the unit vibrates strongly, and if is weak, it vibrates feeblely.  And of corse, besides being excellent battery testers, they are useful for other purposes which I won't describe here, if you get my drift.

 

Gerald

 

 

On 5/9/2021 7:42 AM, john s wrote:

Melissa, for 9 volts, just use your tongue.  It works well and it is very accessable.

At 07:40 PM 5/8/2021, Melissa, wrote:

Hello list. I need some accessible way to test the percentage of
double a, tripple a, c, d, and 9V batteries. Is there one accessible
product that will do all of this? Thanks in advance for your help.
Melissa



                John






James Bentley
 

I have been using two discarded tooth brushes for around ten years now.  Both use a single battery.

 

But, oh well, which ever works  will get the job done.

 

James B 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gerald Levy via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, May 9, 2021 11:23 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Talking battery meter

 

 

The problem with using a battery-powered toothbrush to test batteries is that they usually require two batteries, so it would be difficult to determine which of the two batteries might be weak. That's why I use vibrators that only require a single AA or AAA battery.

 

Gerald

 

 

 

Gerald

 

 

On 5/9/2021 12:12 PM, James Bentley wrote:

Why not just try a battery powered tooth brush.  Some use AA and some of the smaller tooth brushes use AAA.

 

James B 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gerald Levy via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, May 9, 2021 9:15 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Talking battery meter

 

 

This is not a rliable means of determining battry strength, and besides, it only workds with 9V batteries and not with AA, AAA C and D batteries.  Years ago ILA used to sell an audible battery tester that was made by Radio Shack, which of course went bye bye  years ago.  I am not aware of any affordable, audible battery testers that are still on the market. To test AA and AAA batteries, which are the sizes most commonly used, I use single battery, inexpensive  vibrators that I purchased on EBay.  I have one that takes a single AA battery and another one that takes a single AAA battery.  I just insert a battery and twist the cap, and if the battery is okay, the unit vibrates strongly, and if is weak, it vibrates feeblely.  And of corse, besides being excellent battery testers, they are useful for other purposes which I won't describe here, if you get my drift.

 

Gerald

 

 

On 5/9/2021 7:42 AM, john s wrote:

Melissa, for 9 volts, just use your tongue.  It works well and it is very accessable.

At 07:40 PM 5/8/2021, Melissa, wrote:

Hello list. I need some accessible way to test the percentage of
double a, tripple a, c, d, and 9V batteries. Is there one accessible
product that will do all of this? Thanks in advance for your help.
Melissa


                John





Mich Verrier
 

I think that what the person is after is a battery meader that will read out the voltage of different batteries and I seem to recall seeing one on a websight somewhere maybe maxiades or something that was a talking battery meeter that had a austrlaion voice and you could put different batteries in it and it would read out what they would be etc. from Mich.

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of James Bentley
Sent: May 9, 2021 12:31 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Talking battery meter

 

I have been using two discarded tooth brushes for around ten years now.  Both use a single battery.

 

But, oh well, which ever works  will get the job done.

 

James B 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gerald Levy via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, May 9, 2021 11:23 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Talking battery meter

 

 

The problem with using a battery-powered toothbrush to test batteries is that they usually require two batteries, so it would be difficult to determine which of the two batteries might be weak. That's why I use vibrators that only require a single AA or AAA battery.

 

Gerald

 

 

 

Gerald

 

 

On 5/9/2021 12:12 PM, James Bentley wrote:

Why not just try a battery powered tooth brush.  Some use AA and some of the smaller tooth brushes use AAA.

 

James B 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gerald Levy via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, May 9, 2021 9:15 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Talking battery meter

 

 

This is not a rliable means of determining battry strength, and besides, it only workds with 9V batteries and not with AA, AAA C and D batteries.  Years ago ILA used to sell an audible battery tester that was made by Radio Shack, which of course went bye bye  years ago.  I am not aware of any affordable, audible battery testers that are still on the market. To test AA and AAA batteries, which are the sizes most commonly used, I use single battery, inexpensive  vibrators that I purchased on EBay.  I have one that takes a single AA battery and another one that takes a single AAA battery.  I just insert a battery and twist the cap, and if the battery is okay, the unit vibrates strongly, and if is weak, it vibrates feeblely.  And of corse, besides being excellent battery testers, they are useful for other purposes which I won't describe here, if you get my drift.

 

Gerald

 

 

On 5/9/2021 7:42 AM, john s wrote:

Melissa, for 9 volts, just use your tongue.  It works well and it is very accessable.

At 07:40 PM 5/8/2021, Melissa, wrote:

Hello list. I need some accessible way to test the percentage of
double a, tripple a, c, d, and 9V batteries. Is there one accessible
product that will do all of this? Thanks in advance for your help.
Melissa


                John




Gerald Levy
 


I don't think either ILA or Maxi-Aids sells an accessible battery tester any longer.


Gerald



On 5/9/2021 12:38 PM, Mich Verrier wrote:

I think that what the person is after is a battery meader that will read out the voltage of different batteries and I seem to recall seeing one on a websight somewhere maybe maxiades or something that was a talking battery meeter that had a austrlaion voice and you could put different batteries in it and it would read out what they would be etc. from Mich.

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of James Bentley
Sent: May 9, 2021 12:31 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Talking battery meter

 

I have been using two discarded tooth brushes for around ten years now.  Both use a single battery.

 

But, oh well, which ever works  will get the job done.

 

James B 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gerald Levy via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, May 9, 2021 11:23 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Talking battery meter

 

 

The problem with using a battery-powered toothbrush to test batteries is that they usually require two batteries, so it would be difficult to determine which of the two batteries might be weak. That's why I use vibrators that only require a single AA or AAA battery.

 

Gerald

 

 

 

Gerald

 

 

On 5/9/2021 12:12 PM, James Bentley wrote:

Why not just try a battery powered tooth brush.  Some use AA and some of the smaller tooth brushes use AAA.

 

James B 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gerald Levy via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, May 9, 2021 9:15 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Talking battery meter

 

 

This is not a rliable means of determining battry strength, and besides, it only workds with 9V batteries and not with AA, AAA C and D batteries.  Years ago ILA used to sell an audible battery tester that was made by Radio Shack, which of course went bye bye  years ago.  I am not aware of any affordable, audible battery testers that are still on the market. To test AA and AAA batteries, which are the sizes most commonly used, I use single battery, inexpensive  vibrators that I purchased on EBay.  I have one that takes a single AA battery and another one that takes a single AAA battery.  I just insert a battery and twist the cap, and if the battery is okay, the unit vibrates strongly, and if is weak, it vibrates feeblely.  And of corse, besides being excellent battery testers, they are useful for other purposes which I won't describe here, if you get my drift.

 

Gerald

 

 

On 5/9/2021 7:42 AM, john s wrote:

Melissa, for 9 volts, just use your tongue.  It works well and it is very accessable.

At 07:40 PM 5/8/2021, Melissa, wrote:

Hello list. I need some accessible way to test the percentage of
double a, tripple a, c, d, and 9V batteries. Is there one accessible
product that will do all of this? Thanks in advance for your help.
Melissa


                John




James Bentley
 

I found this at APH.  That is asuming that this is still a good link.

 

Kind of expensive...I’ll just stick with my tooth brushes.

 

https://www.aph.org/product/ez-test-battery-tester-audio-tactile-feedback-version/#main-menu

 

James B 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gerald Levy via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, May 9, 2021 11:44 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Talking battery meter

 

 

I don't think either ILA or Maxi-Aids sells an accessible battery tester any longer.

 

Gerald

 

 

On 5/9/2021 12:38 PM, Mich Verrier wrote:

I think that what the person is after is a battery meader that will read out the voltage of different batteries and I seem to recall seeing one on a websight somewhere maybe maxiades or something that was a talking battery meeter that had a austrlaion voice and you could put different batteries in it and it would read out what they would be etc. from Mich.

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of James Bentley
Sent: May 9, 2021 12:31 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Talking battery meter

 

I have been using two discarded tooth brushes for around ten years now.  Both use a single battery.

 

But, oh well, which ever works  will get the job done.

 

James B 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gerald Levy via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, May 9, 2021 11:23 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Talking battery meter

 

 

The problem with using a battery-powered toothbrush to test batteries is that they usually require two batteries, so it would be difficult to determine which of the two batteries might be weak. That's why I use vibrators that only require a single AA or AAA battery.

 

Gerald

 

 

 

Gerald

 

 

On 5/9/2021 12:12 PM, James Bentley wrote:

Why not just try a battery powered tooth brush.  Some use AA and some of the smaller tooth brushes use AAA.

 

James B 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gerald Levy via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, May 9, 2021 9:15 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Talking battery meter

 

 

This is not a rliable means of determining battry strength, and besides, it only workds with 9V batteries and not with AA, AAA C and D batteries.  Years ago ILA used to sell an audible battery tester that was made by Radio Shack, which of course went bye bye  years ago.  I am not aware of any affordable, audible battery testers that are still on the market. To test AA and AAA batteries, which are the sizes most commonly used, I use single battery, inexpensive  vibrators that I purchased on EBay.  I have one that takes a single AA battery and another one that takes a single AAA battery.  I just insert a battery and twist the cap, and if the battery is okay, the unit vibrates strongly, and if is weak, it vibrates feeblely.  And of corse, besides being excellent battery testers, they are useful for other purposes which I won't describe here, if you get my drift.

 

Gerald

 

 

On 5/9/2021 7:42 AM, john s wrote:

Melissa, for 9 volts, just use your tongue.  It works well and it is very accessable.

At 07:40 PM 5/8/2021, Melissa, wrote:

Hello list. I need some accessible way to test the percentage of
double a, tripple a, c, d, and 9V batteries. Is there one accessible
product that will do all of this? Thanks in advance for your help.
Melissa


                John



Melissa
 

Hello all. I'll be using it at church to test wireless microphone
batteries. I found something that might work and it will arrive on
Wednesday. I will let you guys know how it works when it gets here.
Thanks for all the suggestions.
Melissa

On 5/9/21, James Bentley <bentleyj1952@gmail.com> wrote:
Why not just try a battery powered tooth brush. Some use AA and some of the
smaller tooth brushes use AAA.



James B



From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gerald
Levy via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, May 9, 2021 9:15 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Talking battery meter





This is not a rliable means of determining battry strength, and besides, it
only workds with 9V batteries and not with AA, AAA C and D batteries. Years
ago ILA used to sell an audible battery tester that was made by Radio Shack,
which of course went bye bye years ago. I am not aware of any affordable,
audible battery testers that are still on the market. To test AA and AAA
batteries, which are the sizes most commonly used, I use single battery,
inexpensive vibrators that I purchased on EBay. I have one that takes a
single AA battery and another one that takes a single AAA battery. I just
insert a battery and twist the cap, and if the battery is okay, the unit
vibrates strongly, and if is weak, it vibrates feeblely. And of corse,
besides being excellent battery testers, they are useful for other purposes
which I won't describe here, if you get my drift.



Gerald





On 5/9/2021 7:42 AM, john s wrote:

Melissa, for 9 volts, just use your tongue. It works well and it is very
accessable.

At 07:40 PM 5/8/2021, Melissa, wrote:



Hello list. I need some accessible way to test the percentage of
double a, tripple a, c, d, and 9V batteries. Is there one accessible
product that will do all of this? Thanks in advance for your help.
Melissa





John















James Bentley
 

Can you share a link with us.

James B

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Melissa
Sent: Sunday, May 9, 2021 11:59 AM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Talking battery meter

Hello all. I'll be using it at church to test wireless microphone
batteries. I found something that might work and it will arrive on
Wednesday. I will let you guys know how it works when it gets here.
Thanks for all the suggestions.
Melissa

On 5/9/21, James Bentley <bentleyj1952@gmail.com> wrote:
Why not just try a battery powered tooth brush. Some use AA and some of the
smaller tooth brushes use AAA.



James B



From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gerald
Levy via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, May 9, 2021 9:15 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Talking battery meter





This is not a rliable means of determining battry strength, and besides, it
only workds with 9V batteries and not with AA, AAA C and D batteries. Years
ago ILA used to sell an audible battery tester that was made by Radio Shack,
which of course went bye bye years ago. I am not aware of any affordable,
audible battery testers that are still on the market. To test AA and AAA
batteries, which are the sizes most commonly used, I use single battery,
inexpensive vibrators that I purchased on EBay. I have one that takes a
single AA battery and another one that takes a single AAA battery. I just
insert a battery and twist the cap, and if the battery is okay, the unit
vibrates strongly, and if is weak, it vibrates feeblely. And of corse,
besides being excellent battery testers, they are useful for other purposes
which I won't describe here, if you get my drift.



Gerald





On 5/9/2021 7:42 AM, john s wrote:

Melissa, for 9 volts, just use your tongue. It works well and it is very
accessable.

At 07:40 PM 5/8/2021, Melissa, wrote:



Hello list. I need some accessible way to test the percentage of
double a, tripple a, c, d, and 9V batteries. Is there one accessible
product that will do all of this? Thanks in advance for your help.
Melissa





John















Melissa
 

I want to make sure it works to my specifications first and then I'll
share the link.
I don't want to recommend a product that turns out not to be accessible.
Melissa

On 5/9/21, James Bentley <bentleyj1952@gmail.com> wrote:
Can you share a link with us.

James B

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of
Melissa
Sent: Sunday, May 9, 2021 11:59 AM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Talking battery meter

Hello all. I'll be using it at church to test wireless microphone
batteries. I found something that might work and it will arrive on
Wednesday. I will let you guys know how it works when it gets here.
Thanks for all the suggestions.
Melissa

On 5/9/21, James Bentley <bentleyj1952@gmail.com> wrote:
Why not just try a battery powered tooth brush. Some use AA and some of
the
smaller tooth brushes use AAA.



James B



From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of
Gerald
Levy via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, May 9, 2021 9:15 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Talking battery meter





This is not a rliable means of determining battry strength, and besides,
it
only workds with 9V batteries and not with AA, AAA C and D batteries.
Years
ago ILA used to sell an audible battery tester that was made by Radio
Shack,
which of course went bye bye years ago. I am not aware of any
affordable,
audible battery testers that are still on the market. To test AA and AAA
batteries, which are the sizes most commonly used, I use single battery,
inexpensive vibrators that I purchased on EBay. I have one that takes a
single AA battery and another one that takes a single AAA battery. I
just
insert a battery and twist the cap, and if the battery is okay, the unit
vibrates strongly, and if is weak, it vibrates feeblely. And of corse,
besides being excellent battery testers, they are useful for other
purposes
which I won't describe here, if you get my drift.



Gerald





On 5/9/2021 7:42 AM, john s wrote:

Melissa, for 9 volts, just use your tongue. It works well and it is very
accessable.

At 07:40 PM 5/8/2021, Melissa, wrote:



Hello list. I need some accessible way to test the percentage of
double a, tripple a, c, d, and 9V batteries. Is there one accessible
product that will do all of this? Thanks in advance for your help.
Melissa





John

























James Bentley
 

Shareing a link is not a reccomendation.

James B

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Melissa
Sent: Sunday, May 9, 2021 12:03 PM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Talking battery meter

I want to make sure it works to my specifications first and then I'll
share the link.
I don't want to recommend a product that turns out not to be accessible.
Melissa

On 5/9/21, James Bentley <bentleyj1952@gmail.com> wrote:
Can you share a link with us.

James B

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of
Melissa
Sent: Sunday, May 9, 2021 11:59 AM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Talking battery meter

Hello all. I'll be using it at church to test wireless microphone
batteries. I found something that might work and it will arrive on
Wednesday. I will let you guys know how it works when it gets here.
Thanks for all the suggestions.
Melissa

On 5/9/21, James Bentley <bentleyj1952@gmail.com> wrote:
Why not just try a battery powered tooth brush. Some use AA and some of
the
smaller tooth brushes use AAA.



James B



From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of
Gerald
Levy via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, May 9, 2021 9:15 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Talking battery meter





This is not a rliable means of determining battry strength, and besides,
it
only workds with 9V batteries and not with AA, AAA C and D batteries.
Years
ago ILA used to sell an audible battery tester that was made by Radio
Shack,
which of course went bye bye years ago. I am not aware of any
affordable,
audible battery testers that are still on the market. To test AA and AAA
batteries, which are the sizes most commonly used, I use single battery,
inexpensive vibrators that I purchased on EBay. I have one that takes a
single AA battery and another one that takes a single AAA battery. I
just
insert a battery and twist the cap, and if the battery is okay, the unit
vibrates strongly, and if is weak, it vibrates feeblely. And of corse,
besides being excellent battery testers, they are useful for other
purposes
which I won't describe here, if you get my drift.



Gerald





On 5/9/2021 7:42 AM, john s wrote:

Melissa, for 9 volts, just use your tongue. It works well and it is very
accessable.

At 07:40 PM 5/8/2021, Melissa, wrote:



Hello list. I need some accessible way to test the percentage of
double a, tripple a, c, d, and 9V batteries. Is there one accessible
product that will do all of this? Thanks in advance for your help.
Melissa





John