talking braille watch from Independent living


Troy Burnham
 

Hi all,


I've had the combination talking and braille watch from Independent living aids since March this year, and I'm returning it for a replacement because I checked the time the other day and when I pressed the button all the watch said was "the time is" but no time was given. Also a month or 2 ago we noticed that the braille part of the watch wasn't keeping time anymore, so I had the battery changed yesterday and the voice still didn't give me the time when I pressed the button. I was wondering then if anyone on this list has a similar watch from I L S and if so if any of this has happened to you. As I said I'm receiving a replacement probably early next week, but I'm just wondering if there are known problems with this watch or if I just happened to get a bad one.


Thanks.


Troy


Gerald Levy
 


The problem with combination watches is that when you open the crystal to feel the position of the hands, you are exposing it to dirt and debris which can get inside and damage the delicate mechanism and electronic components.  I really don't understand the appeal of a combination watch.  If you want a Braille watch , then buy a an analog watch with Braille markings or another tactile watch like the Bradley timepiece.  If you want a talking watch, then buy a fully digital watch that is completely sealed and thus more impervious to dirt and debris. I suspect that your replacement watch will work fine initially, but if you frequently open the crystal to feel the position of the hands, the same thing may happen again a few months from now.  If you want to maximize the watch's  longevity, just use the talk feature and do not open the crystal once the hands are set to the correct time.  


Gerald



On 8/4/2022 9:02 PM, Troy Burnham wrote:
Hi all,


I've had the combination talking and braille watch from Independent living aids since March this year, and I'm returning it for a replacement because I checked the time the other day and when I pressed the button all the watch said was "the time is" but no time was given. Also a month or 2 ago we noticed that the braille part of the watch wasn't keeping time anymore, so I had the battery changed yesterday and the voice still didn't give me the time when I pressed the button. I was wondering then if anyone on this list has a similar watch from I L S and if so if any of this has happened to you. As I said I'm receiving a replacement probably early next week, but I'm just wondering if there are known problems with this watch or if I just happened to get a bad one.


Thanks.


Troy








Gene
 

What you appear to be saying is that any Braille watch you open would allow dirt to get in.  Why are you singling out combination watches?  If opening it means the watchis likely not to work for long, then that should be true of any watch, combination or not.  If someone's hands, their hands not the watch hands, are clean, they should be able to open a Braille watch and have the watch work  well for years.  I have seen many statements from Braille watch users that they have had good quality watches that they have used for years and they don't complain about almost constant maintenance. 

So the question is, is this watch poorly made or is this watch defective?

While I don't understand why someone would want a combination watch, a properly made one should function without a lot of maintenance.

Gene

On 8/5/2022 5:14 AM, Gerald Levy via groups.io wrote:


The problem with combination watches is that when you open the crystal to feel the position of the hands, you are exposing it to dirt and debris which can get inside and damage the delicate mechanism and electronic components.  I really don't understand the appeal of a combination watch.  If you want a Braille watch , then buy a an analog watch with Braille markings or another tactile watch like the Bradley timepiece.  If you want a talking watch, then buy a fully digital watch that is completely sealed and thus more impervious to dirt and debris. I suspect that your replacement watch will work fine initially, but if you frequently open the crystal to feel the position of the hands, the same thing may happen again a few months from now.  If you want to maximize the watch's  longevity, just use the talk feature and do not open the crystal once the hands are set to the correct time.  


Gerald



On 8/4/2022 9:02 PM, Troy Burnham wrote:
Hi all,


I've had the combination talking and braille watch from Independent living aids since March this year, and I'm returning it for a replacement because I checked the time the other day and when I pressed the button all the watch said was "the time is" but no time was given. Also a month or 2 ago we noticed that the braille part of the watch wasn't keeping time anymore, so I had the battery changed yesterday and the voice still didn't give me the time when I pressed the button. I was wondering then if anyone on this list has a similar watch from I L S and if so if any of this has happened to you. As I said I'm receiving a replacement probably early next week, but I'm just wondering if there are known problems with this watch or if I just happened to get a bad one.


Thanks.


Troy









Troy Burnham
 

I have always used a braille watch and never had a problem over a period of probably close to 40 years now, but the watch in question now was a birthday gift.


I realized early on when I started using this watch that I likely wasn't going to use the braille part of it because it appeared at least to me that the face was slightly angled. As such I only used the talking watch most of the time and only opened the braille part when I was showing the watch to somebody.]


I looked on the ILA website hoping that there might be some customer comments about the watch, but I couldn't even find the watch much less any comments. Apparently you have to find items that the company sells in their catalog as nothing seemed to be easily accessible from the site itself.


Troy


On 8/5/2022 8:05 AM, Gene wrote:
What you appear to be saying is that any Braille watch you open would allow dirt to get in.  Why are you singling out combination watches?  If opening it means the watchis likely not to work for long, then that should be true of any watch, combination or not.  If someone's hands, their hands not the watch hands, are clean, they should be able to open a Braille watch and have the watch work  well for years.  I have seen many statements from Braille watch users that they have had good quality watches that they have used for years and they don't complain about almost constant maintenance. 

So the question is, is this watch poorly made or is this watch defective?

While I don't understand why someone would want a combination watch, a properly made one should function without a lot of maintenance.

Gene

On 8/5/2022 5:14 AM, Gerald Levy via groups.io wrote:


The problem with combination watches is that when you open the crystal to feel the position of the hands, you are exposing it to dirt and debris which can get inside and damage the delicate mechanism and electronic components.  I really don't understand the appeal of a combination watch.  If you want a Braille watch , then buy a an analog watch with Braille markings or another tactile watch like the Bradley timepiece.  If you want a talking watch, then buy a fully digital watch that is completely sealed and thus more impervious to dirt and debris. I suspect that your replacement watch will work fine initially, but if you frequently open the crystal to feel the position of the hands, the same thing may happen again a few months from now.  If you want to maximize the watch's  longevity, just use the talk feature and do not open the crystal once the hands are set to the correct time.  


Gerald



On 8/4/2022 9:02 PM, Troy Burnham wrote:
Hi all,


I've had the combination talking and braille watch from Independent living aids since March this year, and I'm returning it for a replacement because I checked the time the other day and when I pressed the button all the watch said was "the time is" but no time was given. Also a month or 2 ago we noticed that the braille part of the watch wasn't keeping time anymore, so I had the battery changed yesterday and the voice still didn't give me the time when I pressed the button. I was wondering then if anyone on this list has a similar watch from I L S and if so if any of this has happened to you. As I said I'm receiving a replacement probably early next week, but I'm just wondering if there are known problems with this watch or if I just happened to get a bad one.


Thanks.


Troy









Gerald Levy
 


The cobination watches sold bythe blindness merchants are inexpensive Chinese junk that are usually unbranded.  The best Braille watches are made by reputable watch manufacturers like Seiko and cost over $100. A Seiko analog Braille watch can last for many years if properly handled and maintained.  But a schlocko combination watch sold by ILA or one of the other blindness merchants, which is much cheaper and uses inferior components is unlikely to last more than a few yew years if the crystal is opened frequently to check the position of the hands.  A friend of mine bought a combination watch from FutureAids three years ago that recently stopped working.  She brought it to a nearby jeweler who told her that it was a piece of garbage that didn't pay to fix, and that if she really wanted a reliable Braiile watch, then she should be prepared to spend at least $150 for a Seiko. Here's a link to the Braille talking watch sold by ILA for $40:


https://independentliving.com/braille-talking-watch-white-face-silver-band/?sku=857907%20MENS




Gerald


 

On 8/5/2022 9:05 AM, Gene wrote:
What you appear to be saying is that any Braille watch you open would allow dirt to get in.  Why are you singling out combination watches?  If opening it means the watchis likely not to work for long, then that should be true of any watch, combination or not.  If someone's hands, their hands not the watch hands, are clean, they should be able to open a Braille watch and have the watch work  well for years.  I have seen many statements from Braille watch users that they have had good quality watches that they have used for years and they don't complain about almost constant maintenance. 

So the question is, is this watch poorly made or is this watch defective?

While I don't understand why someone would want a combination watch, a properly made one should function without a lot of maintenance.

Gene

On 8/5/2022 5:14 AM, Gerald Levy via groups.io wrote:


The problem with combination watches is that when you open the crystal to feel the position of the hands, you are exposing it to dirt and debris which can get inside and damage the delicate mechanism and electronic components.  I really don't understand the appeal of a combination watch.  If you want a Braille watch , then buy a an analog watch with Braille markings or another tactile watch like the Bradley timepiece.  If you want a talking watch, then buy a fully digital watch that is completely sealed and thus more impervious to dirt and debris. I suspect that your replacement watch will work fine initially, but if you frequently open the crystal to feel the position of the hands, the same thing may happen again a few months from now.  If you want to maximize the watch's  longevity, just use the talk feature and do not open the crystal once the hands are set to the correct time.  


Gerald



On 8/4/2022 9:02 PM, Troy Burnham wrote:
Hi all,


I've had the combination talking and braille watch from Independent living aids since March this year, and I'm returning it for a replacement because I checked the time the other day and when I pressed the button all the watch said was "the time is" but no time was given. Also a month or 2 ago we noticed that the braille part of the watch wasn't keeping time anymore, so I had the battery changed yesterday and the voice still didn't give me the time when I pressed the button. I was wondering then if anyone on this list has a similar watch from I L S and if so if any of this has happened to you. As I said I'm receiving a replacement probably early next week, but I'm just wondering if there are known problems with this watch or if I just happened to get a bad one.


Thanks.


Troy









Gene
 

So the real ;problem isn't introducing dirt, but the poor quality of the watches.  This is important to clarify.  Opening a good quality Braille watch won't introduce frequent cleaning and maintenance problems if your hands are clean or reasonably clean. 

Gene

On 8/5/2022 9:55 AM, Gerald Levy via groups.io wrote:


The cobination watches sold bythe blindness merchants are inexpensive Chinese junk that are usually unbranded.  The best Braille watches are made by reputable watch manufacturers like Seiko and cost over $100. A Seiko analog Braille watch can last for many years if properly handled and maintained.  But a schlocko combination watch sold by ILA or one of the other blindness merchants, which is much cheaper and uses inferior components is unlikely to last more than a few yew years if the crystal is opened frequently to check the position of the hands.  A friend of mine bought a combination watch from FutureAids three years ago that recently stopped working.  She brought it to a nearby jeweler who told her that it was a piece of garbage that didn't pay to fix, and that if she really wanted a reliable Braiile watch, then she should be prepared to spend at least $150 for a Seiko. Here's a link to the Braille talking watch sold by ILA for $40:


https://independentliving.com/braille-talking-watch-white-face-silver-band/?sku=857907%20MENS




Gerald


 

On 8/5/2022 9:05 AM, Gene wrote:
What you appear to be saying is that any Braille watch you open would allow dirt to get in.  Why are you singling out combination watches?  If opening it means the watchis likely not to work for long, then that should be true of any watch, combination or not.  If someone's hands, their hands not the watch hands, are clean, they should be able to open a Braille watch and have the watch work  well for years.  I have seen many statements from Braille watch users that they have had good quality watches that they have used for years and they don't complain about almost constant maintenance. 

So the question is, is this watch poorly made or is this watch defective?

While I don't understand why someone would want a combination watch, a properly made one should function without a lot of maintenance.

Gene

On 8/5/2022 5:14 AM, Gerald Levy via groups.io wrote:


The problem with combination watches is that when you open the crystal to feel the position of the hands, you are exposing it to dirt and debris which can get inside and damage the delicate mechanism and electronic components.  I really don't understand the appeal of a combination watch.  If you want a Braille watch , then buy a an analog watch with Braille markings or another tactile watch like the Bradley timepiece.  If you want a talking watch, then buy a fully digital watch that is completely sealed and thus more impervious to dirt and debris. I suspect that your replacement watch will work fine initially, but if you frequently open the crystal to feel the position of the hands, the same thing may happen again a few months from now.  If you want to maximize the watch's  longevity, just use the talk feature and do not open the crystal once the hands are set to the correct time.  


Gerald



On 8/4/2022 9:02 PM, Troy Burnham wrote:
Hi all,


I've had the combination talking and braille watch from Independent living aids since March this year, and I'm returning it for a replacement because I checked the time the other day and when I pressed the button all the watch said was "the time is" but no time was given. Also a month or 2 ago we noticed that the braille part of the watch wasn't keeping time anymore, so I had the battery changed yesterday and the voice still didn't give me the time when I pressed the button. I was wondering then if anyone on this list has a similar watch from I L S and if so if any of this has happened to you. As I said I'm receiving a replacement probably early next week, but I'm just wondering if there are known problems with this watch or if I just happened to get a bad one.


Thanks.


Troy










Carolyn Arnold
 

Troy, I have heard that the talking Braille watches are not satisfactory, which is why, this spring, when I needed to replace my Braille watch, I replaced it with another Braille one.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Troy Burnham
Sent: Thursday, August 4, 2022 9:02 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] talking braille watch from Independent living

Hi all,


I've had the combination talking and braille watch from Independent living aids since March this year, and I'm returning it for a replacement because I checked the time the other day and when I pressed the button all the watch said was "the time is" but no time was given.
Also a month or 2 ago we noticed that the braille part of the watch wasn't keeping time anymore, so I had the battery changed yesterday and the voice still didn't give me the time when I pressed the button. I was wondering then if anyone on this list has a similar watch from I L S and if so if any of this has happened to you. As I said I'm receiving a replacement probably early next week, but I'm just wondering if there are known problems with this watch or if I just happened to get a bad one.


Thanks.


Troy


Carolyn Arnold
 

I prefer a Braille watch. I can use my phone for talking watch. The reason I prefer my Braille one is that it makes no sound, so I can checkin the middle of the night, in the middle of church and stuff like that. It is all a matter of preference.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Troy Burnham
Sent: Friday, August 5, 2022 9:32 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] talking braille watch from Independent living

I have always used a braille watch and never had a problem over a period of probably close to 40 years now, but the watch in question now was a birthday gift.




I realized early on when I started using this watch that I likely wasn't going to use the braille part of it because it appeared at least to me that the face was slightly angled. As such I only used the talking watch most of the time and only opened the braille part when I was showing the watch to somebody.]




I looked on the ILA website hoping that there might be some customer comments about the watch, but I couldn't even find the watch much less any comments. Apparently you have to find items that the company sells in their catalog as nothing seemed to be easily accessible from the site itself.




Troy




On 8/5/2022 8:05 AM, Gene wrote:


What you appear to be saying is that any Braille watch you open would allow dirt to get in. Why are you singling out combination watches? If opening it means the watchis likely not to work for long, then that should be true of any watch, combination or not. If someone's hands, their hands not the watch hands, are clean, they should be able to open a Braille watch and have the watch work well for years. I have seen many statements from Braille watch users that they have had good quality watches that they have used for years and they don't complain about almost constant maintenance.

So the question is, is this watch poorly made or is this watch defective?

While I don't understand why someone would want a combination watch, a properly made one should function without a lot of maintenance.

Gene


On 8/5/2022 5:14 AM, Gerald Levy via groups.io wrote:





The problem with combination watches is that when you open the crystal to feel the position of the hands, you are exposing it to dirt and debris which can get inside and damage the delicate mechanism and electronic components. I really don't understand the appeal of a combination watch. If you want a Braille watch , then buy a an analog watch with Braille markings or another tactile watch like the Bradley timepiece. If you want a talking watch, then buy a fully digital watch that is completely sealed and thus more impervious to dirt and debris. I suspect that your replacement watch will work fine initially, but if you frequently open the crystal to feel the position of the hands, the same thing may happen again a few months from now. If you want to maximize the watch's longevity, just use the talk feature and do not open the crystal once the hands are set to the correct time.





Gerald








On 8/4/2022 9:02 PM, Troy Burnham wrote:


Hi all,


I've had the combination talking and braille watch from Independent living aids since March this year, and I'm returning it for a replacement because I checked the time the other day and when I pressed the button all the watch said was "the time is" but no time was given. Also a month or 2 ago we noticed that the braille part of the watch wasn't keeping time anymore, so I had the battery changed yesterday and the voice still didn't give me the time when I pressed the button. I was wondering then if anyone on this list has a similar watch from I L S and if so if any of this has happened to you. As I said I'm receiving a replacement probably early next week, but I'm just wondering if there are known problems with this watch or if I just happened to get a bad one.


Thanks.


Troy


Gene
 

Gerald's message raised, indirectly, an interesting question and the answer appears to be, sometimes, you can't have it all in a satisfactory way even if you can trhy. 

Sighted people  who have talking watches can make the watch talk and see the time.  Blind people generally choose between a Braille watch and a talking watch.

While it should be possible to produce a combination Braille and talking watch, giving us equality, it appears a reliable, satisfactory one is not available, thus offering us a meaningless option.

Sometimes, trying to have it all is likely to produce bad results if the all option is poor.

Gene

On 8/5/2022 10:56 AM, Carolyn Arnold wrote:
Troy, I have heard that the talking Braille watches are not satisfactory, which is why, this spring, when I needed to replace my Braille watch, I replaced it with another Braille one. 

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Troy Burnham
Sent: Thursday, August 4, 2022 9:02 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] talking braille watch from Independent living

Hi all,


I've had the combination talking and braille watch from Independent living aids since March this year, and I'm returning it for a replacement because I checked the time the other day and when I pressed the button all the watch said was "the time is" but no time was given. 
Also a month or 2 ago we noticed that the braille part of the watch wasn't keeping time anymore, so I had the battery changed yesterday and the voice still didn't give me the time when I pressed the button. I was wondering then if anyone on this list has a similar watch from I L S and if so if any of this has happened to you. As I said I'm receiving a replacement probably early next week, but I'm just wondering if there are known problems with this watch or if I just happened to get a bad one.


Thanks.


Troy















Troy Burnham
 

I feel the same way Carolyn, I sleep by myself so I don't have to worry about the middle of the night but I would hate to check the time with a talking watch in the middle of church services. I wear that watch to church but never have to use it because everything is usually timed out pretty well.


I had just heard of these combination watches and mentioned that I was wondering about how well they worked so my mom surprised me with one for my birthday this year, but if the replacement that I'll be getting early next week still gives me problems after a few months like the first one did I'll just go back to using a regular braille watch.


Troy

On 8/5/2022 10:58 AM, Carolyn Arnold wrote:
I prefer a Braille watch. I can use my phone for talking watch. The reason I prefer my Braille one is that it makes no sound, so I can checkin the middle of the night, in the middle of church and stuff like that. It is all a matter of preference.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Troy Burnham
Sent: Friday, August 5, 2022 9:32 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] talking braille watch from Independent living

I have always used a braille watch and never had a problem over a period of probably close to 40 years now, but the watch in question now was a birthday gift.




I realized early on when I started using this watch that I likely wasn't going to use the braille part of it because it appeared at least to me that the face was slightly angled. As such I only used the talking watch most of the time and only opened the braille part when I was showing the watch to somebody.]




I looked on the ILA website hoping that there might be some customer comments about the watch, but I couldn't even find the watch much less any comments. Apparently you have to find items that the company sells in their catalog as nothing seemed to be easily accessible from the site itself.




Troy




On 8/5/2022 8:05 AM, Gene wrote:


What you appear to be saying is that any Braille watch you open would allow dirt to get in. Why are you singling out combination watches? If opening it means the watchis likely not to work for long, then that should be true of any watch, combination or not. If someone's hands, their hands not the watch hands, are clean, they should be able to open a Braille watch and have the watch work well for years. I have seen many statements from Braille watch users that they have had good quality watches that they have used for years and they don't complain about almost constant maintenance.

So the question is, is this watch poorly made or is this watch defective?

While I don't understand why someone would want a combination watch, a properly made one should function without a lot of maintenance.

Gene


On 8/5/2022 5:14 AM, Gerald Levy via groups.io wrote:





The problem with combination watches is that when you open the crystal to feel the position of the hands, you are exposing it to dirt and debris which can get inside and damage the delicate mechanism and electronic components. I really don't understand the appeal of a combination watch. If you want a Braille watch , then buy a an analog watch with Braille markings or another tactile watch like the Bradley timepiece. If you want a talking watch, then buy a fully digital watch that is completely sealed and thus more impervious to dirt and debris. I suspect that your replacement watch will work fine initially, but if you frequently open the crystal to feel the position of the hands, the same thing may happen again a few months from now. If you want to maximize the watch's longevity, just use the talk feature and do not open the crystal once the hands are set to the correct time.





Gerald








On 8/4/2022 9:02 PM, Troy Burnham wrote:


Hi all,


I've had the combination talking and braille watch from Independent living aids since March this year, and I'm returning it for a replacement because I checked the time the other day and when I pressed the button all the watch said was "the time is" but no time was given. Also a month or 2 ago we noticed that the braille part of the watch wasn't keeping time anymore, so I had the battery changed yesterday and the voice still didn't give me the time when I pressed the button. I was wondering then if anyone on this list has a similar watch from I L S and if so if any of this has happened to you. As I said I'm receiving a replacement probably early next week, but I'm just wondering if there are known problems with this watch or if I just happened to get a bad one.


Thanks.


Troy
















Carolyn Arnold
 

Also, I can pair my iPhone to my hearing aids and check time in church with no one hearing, whenever there is a problem with my Braille watch.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Troy Burnham
Sent: Friday, August 5, 2022 1:47 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] talking braille watch from Independent living

I feel the same way Carolyn, I sleep by myself so I don't have to worry about the middle of the night but I would hate to check the time with a talking watch in the middle of church services. I wear that watch to church but never have to use it because everything is usually timed out pretty well.


I had just heard of these combination watches and mentioned that I was wondering about how well they worked so my mom surprised me with one for my birthday this year, but if the replacement that I'll be getting early next week still gives me problems after a few months like the first one did I'll just go back to using a regular braille watch.


Troy


On 8/5/2022 10:58 AM, Carolyn Arnold wrote:
I prefer a Braille watch. I can use my phone for talking watch. The reason I prefer my Braille one is that it makes no sound, so I can checkin the middle of the night, in the middle of church and stuff like that. It is all a matter of preference.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On
Behalf Of Troy Burnham
Sent: Friday, August 5, 2022 9:32 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] talking braille watch from Independent living

I have always used a braille watch and never had a problem over a period of probably close to 40 years now, but the watch in question now was a birthday gift.




I realized early on when I started using this watch that I likely
wasn't going to use the braille part of it because it appeared at
least to me that the face was slightly angled. As such I only used the
talking watch most of the time and only opened the braille part when I
was showing the watch to somebody.]




I looked on the ILA website hoping that there might be some customer comments about the watch, but I couldn't even find the watch much less any comments. Apparently you have to find items that the company sells in their catalog as nothing seemed to be easily accessible from the site itself.




Troy




On 8/5/2022 8:05 AM, Gene wrote:


What you appear to be saying is that any Braille watch you open would allow dirt to get in. Why are you singling out combination watches? If opening it means the watchis likely not to work for long, then that should be true of any watch, combination or not. If someone's hands, their hands not the watch hands, are clean, they should be able to open a Braille watch and have the watch work well for years. I have seen many statements from Braille watch users that they have had good quality watches that they have used for years and they don't complain about almost constant maintenance.

So the question is, is this watch poorly made or is this watch defective?

While I don't understand why someone would want a combination watch, a properly made one should function without a lot of maintenance.

Gene


On 8/5/2022 5:14 AM, Gerald Levy via groups.io wrote:





The problem with combination watches is that when you open the crystal to feel the position of the hands, you are exposing it to dirt and debris which can get inside and damage the delicate mechanism and electronic components. I really don't understand the appeal of a combination watch. If you want a Braille watch , then buy a an analog watch with Braille markings or another tactile watch like the Bradley timepiece. If you want a talking watch, then buy a fully digital watch that is completely sealed and thus more impervious to dirt and debris. I suspect that your replacement watch will work fine initially, but if you frequently open the crystal to feel the position of the hands, the same thing may happen again a few months from now. If you want to maximize the watch's longevity, just use the talk feature and do not open the crystal once the hands are set to the correct time.





Gerald








On 8/4/2022 9:02 PM, Troy Burnham wrote:


Hi all,


I've had the combination talking and braille watch from Independent living aids since March this year, and I'm returning it for a replacement because I checked the time the other day and when I pressed the button all the watch said was "the time is" but no time was given. Also a month or 2 ago we noticed that the braille part of the watch wasn't keeping time anymore, so I had the battery changed yesterday and the voice still didn't give me the time when I pressed the button. I was wondering then if anyone on this list has a similar watch from I L S and if so if any of this has happened to you. As I said I'm receiving a replacement probably early next week, but I'm just wondering if there are known problems with this watch or if I just happened to get a bad one.


Thanks.


Troy

















Marda
 

Unfortunately I have heard other people that have problems with those combination watches too.  I hope your new one works better.

Marda

On 8/5/2022 12:46 PM, Troy Burnham wrote:
I feel the same way Carolyn, I sleep by myself so I don't have to worry about the middle of the night but I would hate to check the time with a talking watch in the middle of church services. I wear that watch to church but never have to use it because everything is usually timed out pretty well.


I had just heard of these combination watches and mentioned that I was wondering about how well they worked so my mom surprised me with one for my birthday this year, but if the replacement that I'll be getting early next week still gives me problems after a few months like the first one did I'll just go back to using a regular braille watch.


Troy


On 8/5/2022 10:58 AM, Carolyn Arnold wrote:
I prefer a Braille watch. I can use my phone for talking watch. The reason I prefer my Braille one is that it makes no sound, so I can checkin the middle of the night, in the middle of church and stuff like that. It is all a matter of preference.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@TechTalk.groups.io [mailto:main@TechTalk.groups.io] On Behalf Of Troy Burnham
Sent: Friday, August 5, 2022 9:32 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] talking braille watch from Independent living

I have always used a braille watch and never had a problem over a period of probably close to 40 years now, but the watch in question now was a birthday gift.




I realized early on when I started using this watch that I likely wasn't going to use the braille part of it because it appeared at least to me that the face was slightly angled. As such I only used the talking watch most of the time and only opened the braille part when I was showing the watch to somebody.]




I looked on the ILA website hoping that there might be some customer comments about the watch, but I couldn't even find the watch much less any comments. Apparently you have to find items that the company sells in their catalog as nothing seemed to be easily accessible from the site itself.




Troy




On 8/5/2022 8:05 AM, Gene wrote:


    What you appear to be saying is that any Braille watch you open would allow dirt to get in.  Why are you singling out combination watches?  If opening it means the watchis likely not to work for long, then that should be true of any watch, combination or not.  If someone's hands, their hands not the watch hands, are clean, they should be able to open a Braille watch and have the watch work  well for years.  I have seen many statements from Braille watch users that they have had good quality watches that they have used for years and they don't complain about almost constant maintenance.

    So the question is, is this watch poorly made or is this watch defective?

    While I don't understand why someone would want a combination watch, a properly made one should function without a lot of maintenance.

    Gene


    On 8/5/2022 5:14 AM, Gerald Levy via groups.io wrote:





        The problem with combination watches is that when you open the crystal to feel the position of the hands, you are exposing it to dirt and debris which can get inside and damage the delicate mechanism and electronic components.  I really don't understand the appeal of a combination watch.  If you want a Braille watch , then buy a an analog watch with Braille markings or another tactile watch like the Bradley timepiece. If you want a talking watch, then buy a fully digital watch that is completely sealed and thus more impervious to dirt and debris. I suspect that your replacement watch will work fine initially, but if you frequently open the crystal to feel the position of the hands, the same thing may happen again a few months from now.  If you want to maximize the watch's longevity, just use the talk feature and do not open the crystal once the hands are set to the correct time.





        Gerald








        On 8/4/2022 9:02 PM, Troy Burnham wrote:


            Hi all,


            I've had the combination talking and braille watch from Independent living aids since March this year, and I'm returning it for a replacement because I checked the time the other day and when I pressed the button all the watch said was "the time is" but no time was given. Also a month or 2 ago we noticed that the braille part of the watch wasn't keeping time anymore, so I had the battery changed yesterday and the voice still didn't give me the time when I pressed the button. I was wondering then if anyone on this list has a similar watch from I L S and if so if any of this has happened to you. As I said I'm receiving a replacement probably early next week, but I'm just wondering if there are known problems with this watch or if I just happened to get a bad one.


            Thanks.


            Troy



















Marda
 

There have been issues with these combination watches for years, ever since they came out.  I used braille watches for many years and they would last a long time.  I don't they are made as well as they used to be at least not the less expensive ones.  for some reason I can no longer use them because every one I have tried within the last few years will run really fast or stop working or other things.  Independent Living Aids was, I think, the first to start making these combination watches.  I thought that would be a good idea because if you wanted to access the watch in a situation like church where using a talking watch wouldn't be advisable you could open it but if noise was not a problem then you could just quickly hit the button and hear the sound and go on.  It would e like the best of both worlds.  But I have heard lots of people have problems with them for years so I am not impressed with them.

Marda

On 8/5/2022 8:05 AM, Gene wrote:
What you appear to be saying is that any Braille watch you open would allow dirt to get in.  Why are you singling out combination watches?  If opening it means the watchis likely not to work for long, then that should be true of any watch, combination or not.  If someone's hands, their hands not the watch hands, are clean, they should be able to open a Braille watch and have the watch work  well for years.  I have seen many statements from Braille watch users that they have had good quality watches that they have used for years and they don't complain about almost constant maintenance. 

So the question is, is this watch poorly made or is this watch defective?

While I don't understand why someone would want a combination watch, a properly made one should function without a lot of maintenance.

Gene

On 8/5/2022 5:14 AM, Gerald Levy via groups.io wrote:


The problem with combination watches is that when you open the crystal to feel the position of the hands, you are exposing it to dirt and debris which can get inside and damage the delicate mechanism and electronic components.  I really don't understand the appeal of a combination watch.  If you want a Braille watch , then buy a an analog watch with Braille markings or another tactile watch like the Bradley timepiece.  If you want a talking watch, then buy a fully digital watch that is completely sealed and thus more impervious to dirt and debris. I suspect that your replacement watch will work fine initially, but if you frequently open the crystal to feel the position of the hands, the same thing may happen again a few months from now.  If you want to maximize the watch's  longevity, just use the talk feature and do not open the crystal once the hands are set to the correct time.  


Gerald



On 8/4/2022 9:02 PM, Troy Burnham wrote:
Hi all,


I've had the combination talking and braille watch from Independent living aids since March this year, and I'm returning it for a replacement because I checked the time the other day and when I pressed the button all the watch said was "the time is" but no time was given. Also a month or 2 ago we noticed that the braille part of the watch wasn't keeping time anymore, so I had the battery changed yesterday and the voice still didn't give me the time when I pressed the button. I was wondering then if anyone on this list has a similar watch from I L S and if so if any of this has happened to you. As I said I'm receiving a replacement probably early next week, but I'm just wondering if there are known problems with this watch or if I just happened to get a bad one.


Thanks.


Troy









Marda
 

If I had a combination watch I would use the tactile featue at night, in church or other situations where it could be disruptive, in excessively loud situations where it would be difficult to hear a talking watch, in bed if my husband was sleepig etc.  That way I could use both features at times when they would be appropriate and hopefully increase the longevity of the watch.

Marda

On 8/5/2022 5:14 AM, Gerald Levy via groups.io wrote:


The problem with combination watches is that when you open the crystal to feel the position of the hands, you are exposing it to dirt and debris which can get inside and damage the delicate mechanism and electronic components.  I really don't understand the appeal of a combination watch.  If you want a Braille watch , then buy a an analog watch with Braille markings or another tactile watch like the Bradley timepiece.  If you want a talking watch, then buy a fully digital watch that is completely sealed and thus more impervious to dirt and debris. I suspect that your replacement watch will work fine initially, but if you frequently open the crystal to feel the position of the hands, the same thing may happen again a few months from now.  If you want to maximize the watch's  longevity, just use the talk feature and do not open the crystal once the hands are set to the correct time.  


Gerald



On 8/4/2022 9:02 PM, Troy Burnham wrote:
Hi all,


I've had the combination talking and braille watch from Independent living aids since March this year, and I'm returning it for a replacement because I checked the time the other day and when I pressed the button all the watch said was "the time is" but no time was given. Also a month or 2 ago we noticed that the braille part of the watch wasn't keeping time anymore, so I had the battery changed yesterday and the voice still didn't give me the time when I pressed the button. I was wondering then if anyone on this list has a similar watch from I L S and if so if any of this has happened to you. As I said I'm receiving a replacement probably early next week, but I'm just wondering if there are known problems with this watch or if I just happened to get a bad one.


Thanks.


Troy








Monte Single
 

Hi Marda,

 

I think independent living aids is a seller of the watch, not a manufacturer.

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Marda
Sent: August 6, 2022 2:02 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] talking braille watch from Independent living

 

There have been issues with these combination watches for years, ever since they came out.  I used braille watches for many years and they would last a long time.  I don't they are made as well as they used to be at least not the less expensive ones.  for some reason I can no longer use them because every one I have tried within the last few years will run really fast or stop working or other things.  Independent Living Aids was, I think, the first to start making these combination watches.  I thought that would be a good idea because if you wanted to access the watch in a situation like church where using a talking watch wouldn't be advisable you could open it but if noise was not a problem then you could just quickly hit the button and hear the sound and go on.  It would e like the best of both worlds.  But I have heard lots of people have problems with them for years so I am not impressed with them.

Marda

On 8/5/2022 8:05 AM, Gene wrote:

What you appear to be saying is that any Braille watch you open would allow dirt to get in.  Why are you singling out combination watches?  If opening it means the watchis likely not to work for long, then that should be true of any watch, combination or not.  If someone's hands, their hands not the watch hands, are clean, they should be able to open a Braille watch and have the watch work  well for years.  I have seen many statements from Braille watch users that they have had good quality watches that they have used for years and they don't complain about almost constant maintenance. 

So the question is, is this watch poorly made or is this watch defective?

While I don't understand why someone would want a combination watch, a properly made one should function without a lot of maintenance.

Gene

On 8/5/2022 5:14 AM, Gerald Levy via groups.io wrote:

 

The problem with combination watches is that when you open the crystal to feel the position of the hands, you are exposing it to dirt and debris which can get inside and damage the delicate mechanism and electronic components.  I really don't understand the appeal of a combination watch.  If you want a Braille watch , then buy a an analog watch with Braille markings or another tactile watch like the Bradley timepiece.  If you want a talking watch, then buy a fully digital watch that is completely sealed and thus more impervious to dirt and debris. I suspect that your replacement watch will work fine initially, but if you frequently open the crystal to feel the position of the hands, the same thing may happen again a few months from now.  If you want to maximize the watch's  longevity, just use the talk feature and do not open the crystal once the hands are set to the correct time.  

 

Gerald

 

 

On 8/4/2022 9:02 PM, Troy Burnham wrote:

Hi all,


I've had the combination talking and braille watch from Independent living aids since March this year, and I'm returning it for a replacement because I checked the time the other day and when I pressed the button all the watch said was "the time is" but no time was given. Also a month or 2 ago we noticed that the braille part of the watch wasn't keeping time anymore, so I had the battery changed yesterday and the voice still didn't give me the time when I pressed the button. I was wondering then if anyone on this list has a similar watch from I L S and if so if any of this has happened to you. As I said I'm receiving a replacement probably early next week, but I'm just wondering if there are known problems with this watch or if I just happened to get a bad one.


Thanks.


Troy






 


Marda
 

My mistake.  I know they manufactured some products under the "can do" label or trademark or whatever it was.  but I know they didn't tetechnically manufacture the watches.  I don't know who did and that was one thing that bothered me about that company that they didn't always give enough information about their products even when you called and asked questions.  I haven't ordered anything from them in a long time but I did get some good things from them.

Marda

On 8/6/2022 4:46 AM, Monte Single wrote:

Hi Marda,

 

I think independent living aids is a seller of the watch, not a manufacturer.

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Marda
Sent: August 6, 2022 2:02 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] talking braille watch from Independent living

 

There have been issues with these combination watches for years, ever since they came out.  I used braille watches for many years and they would last a long time.  I don't they are made as well as they used to be at least not the less expensive ones.  for some reason I can no longer use them because every one I have tried within the last few years will run really fast or stop working or other things.  Independent Living Aids was, I think, the first to start making these combination watches.  I thought that would be a good idea because if you wanted to access the watch in a situation like church where using a talking watch wouldn't be advisable you could open it but if noise was not a problem then you could just quickly hit the button and hear the sound and go on.  It would e like the best of both worlds.  But I have heard lots of people have problems with them for years so I am not impressed with them.

Marda

On 8/5/2022 8:05 AM, Gene wrote:

What you appear to be saying is that any Braille watch you open would allow dirt to get in.  Why are you singling out combination watches?  If opening it means the watchis likely not to work for long, then that should be true of any watch, combination or not.  If someone's hands, their hands not the watch hands, are clean, they should be able to open a Braille watch and have the watch work  well for years.  I have seen many statements from Braille watch users that they have had good quality watches that they have used for years and they don't complain about almost constant maintenance. 

So the question is, is this watch poorly made or is this watch defective?

While I don't understand why someone would want a combination watch, a properly made one should function without a lot of maintenance.

Gene

On 8/5/2022 5:14 AM, Gerald Levy via groups.io wrote:

 

The problem with combination watches is that when you open the crystal to feel the position of the hands, you are exposing it to dirt and debris which can get inside and damage the delicate mechanism and electronic components.  I really don't understand the appeal of a combination watch.  If you want a Braille watch , then buy a an analog watch with Braille markings or another tactile watch like the Bradley timepiece.  If you want a talking watch, then buy a fully digital watch that is completely sealed and thus more impervious to dirt and debris. I suspect that your replacement watch will work fine initially, but if you frequently open the crystal to feel the position of the hands, the same thing may happen again a few months from now.  If you want to maximize the watch's  longevity, just use the talk feature and do not open the crystal once the hands are set to the correct time.  

 

Gerald

 

 

On 8/4/2022 9:02 PM, Troy Burnham wrote:

Hi all,


I've had the combination talking and braille watch from Independent living aids since March this year, and I'm returning it for a replacement because I checked the time the other day and when I pressed the button all the watch said was "the time is" but no time was given. Also a month or 2 ago we noticed that the braille part of the watch wasn't keeping time anymore, so I had the battery changed yesterday and the voice still didn't give me the time when I pressed the button. I was wondering then if anyone on this list has a similar watch from I L S and if so if any of this has happened to you. As I said I'm receiving a replacement probably early next week, but I'm just wondering if there are known problems with this watch or if I just happened to get a bad one.


Thanks.


Troy






 


Pamela Dominguez
 

That’s one reason I don’t buy from Maxi-aids unless I have to, or I know what it is I’m buying.  Pam.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Marda
Sent: Saturday, August 6, 2022 5:54 AM
To: main@techtalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] talking braille watch from Independent living

 

My mistake.  I know they manufactured some products under the "can do" label or trademark or whatever it was.  but I know they didn't tetechnically manufacture the watches.  I don't know who did and that was one thing that bothered me about that company that they didn't always give enough information about their products even when you called and asked questions.  I haven't ordered anything from them in a long time but I did get some good things from them.

Marda

On 8/6/2022 4:46 AM, Monte Single wrote:

Hi Marda,

 

I think independent living aids is a seller of the watch, not a manufacturer.

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Marda
Sent: August 6, 2022 2:02 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] talking braille watch from Independent living

 

There have been issues with these combination watches for years, ever since they came out.  I used braille watches for many years and they would last a long time.  I don't they are made as well as they used to be at least not the less expensive ones.  for some reason I can no longer use them because every one I have tried within the last few years will run really fast or stop working or other things.  Independent Living Aids was, I think, the first to start making these combination watches.  I thought that would be a good idea because if you wanted to access the watch in a situation like church where using a talking watch wouldn't be advisable you could open it but if noise was not a problem then you could just quickly hit the button and hear the sound and go on.  It would e like the best of both worlds.  But I have heard lots of people have problems with them for years so I am not impressed with them.

Marda

On 8/5/2022 8:05 AM, Gene wrote:

What you appear to be saying is that any Braille watch you open would allow dirt to get in.  Why are you singling out combination watches?  If opening it means the watchis likely not to work for long, then that should be true of any watch, combination or not.  If someone's hands, their hands not the watch hands, are clean, they should be able to open a Braille watch and have the watch work  well for years.  I have seen many statements from Braille watch users that they have had good quality watches that they have used for years and they don't complain about almost constant maintenance. 

So the question is, is this watch poorly made or is this watch defective?

While I don't understand why someone would want a combination watch, a properly made one should function without a lot of maintenance.

Gene

On 8/5/2022 5:14 AM, Gerald Levy via groups.io wrote:

 

The problem with combination watches is that when you open the crystal to feel the position of the hands, you are exposing it to dirt and debris which can get inside and damage the delicate mechanism and electronic components.  I really don't understand the appeal of a combination watch.  If you want a Braille watch , then buy a an analog watch with Braille markings or another tactile watch like the Bradley timepiece.  If you want a talking watch, then buy a fully digital watch that is completely sealed and thus more impervious to dirt and debris. I suspect that your replacement watch will work fine initially, but if you frequently open the crystal to feel the position of the hands, the same thing may happen again a few months from now.  If you want to maximize the watch's  longevity, just use the talk feature and do not open the crystal once the hands are set to the correct time.  

 

Gerald

 

 

On 8/4/2022 9:02 PM, Troy Burnham wrote:

Hi all,


I've had the combination talking and braille watch from Independent living aids since March this year, and I'm returning it for a replacement because I checked the time the other day and when I pressed the button all the watch said was "the time is" but no time was given. Also a month or 2 ago we noticed that the braille part of the watch wasn't keeping time anymore, so I had the battery changed yesterday and the voice still didn't give me the time when I pressed the button. I was wondering then if anyone on this list has a similar watch from I L S and if so if any of this has happened to you. As I said I'm receiving a replacement probably early next week, but I'm just wondering if there are known problems with this watch or if I just happened to get a bad one.


Thanks.


Troy





 

 


Gerald Levy
 


To be perfectly blunt, the three major blindness products merchants, Independent Living Aids, Maxi-Aids and LS&S Products seem to have some sort of secret arrangement whereby they all charge the same price for the same item, impose the same order minimum to qualify for free shipping and pretty much offer minimal customer support once an order has shipped.  Under no circumstances should you order a BlindShell Classic 2 smart phone from any of them because if you have problems with the phone while it is under warranty, they will all tell you it's not their problem and to deal directly with the manufacturer or US distributor. Maxi-Aids seems to be the exclusive distributor of Reizon products in the US, but otherwise sells the same products as the other two merchants.  I avoid them as much as possible and try to find the same products on Amazon or EBay, where they are usually cheaper. 


Gerald



On 8/6/2022 5:54 AM, Marda wrote:

My mistake.  I know they manufactured some products under the "can do" label or trademark or whatever it was.  but I know they didn't tetechnically manufacture the watches.  I don't know who did and that was one thing that bothered me about that company that they didn't always give enough information about their products even when you called and asked questions.  I haven't ordered anything from them in a long time but I did get some good things from them.

Marda

On 8/6/2022 4:46 AM, Monte Single wrote:

Hi Marda,

 

I think independent living aids is a seller of the watch, not a manufacturer.

 

 

From: main@TechTalk.groups.io <main@TechTalk.groups.io> On Behalf Of Marda
Sent: August 6, 2022 2:02 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] talking braille watch from Independent living

 

There have been issues with these combination watches for years, ever since they came out.  I used braille watches for many years and they would last a long time.  I don't they are made as well as they used to be at least not the less expensive ones.  for some reason I can no longer use them because every one I have tried within the last few years will run really fast or stop working or other things.  Independent Living Aids was, I think, the first to start making these combination watches.  I thought that would be a good idea because if you wanted to access the watch in a situation like church where using a talking watch wouldn't be advisable you could open it but if noise was not a problem then you could just quickly hit the button and hear the sound and go on.  It would e like the best of both worlds.  But I have heard lots of people have problems with them for years so I am not impressed with them.

Marda

On 8/5/2022 8:05 AM, Gene wrote:

What you appear to be saying is that any Braille watch you open would allow dirt to get in.  Why are you singling out combination watches?  If opening it means the watchis likely not to work for long, then that should be true of any watch, combination or not.  If someone's hands, their hands not the watch hands, are clean, they should be able to open a Braille watch and have the watch work  well for years.  I have seen many statements from Braille watch users that they have had good quality watches that they have used for years and they don't complain about almost constant maintenance. 

So the question is, is this watch poorly made or is this watch defective?

While I don't understand why someone would want a combination watch, a properly made one should function without a lot of maintenance.

Gene

On 8/5/2022 5:14 AM, Gerald Levy via groups.io wrote:

 

The problem with combination watches is that when you open the crystal to feel the position of the hands, you are exposing it to dirt and debris which can get inside and damage the delicate mechanism and electronic components.  I really don't understand the appeal of a combination watch.  If you want a Braille watch , then buy a an analog watch with Braille markings or another tactile watch like the Bradley timepiece.  If you want a talking watch, then buy a fully digital watch that is completely sealed and thus more impervious to dirt and debris. I suspect that your replacement watch will work fine initially, but if you frequently open the crystal to feel the position of the hands, the same thing may happen again a few months from now.  If you want to maximize the watch's  longevity, just use the talk feature and do not open the crystal once the hands are set to the correct time.  

 

Gerald

 

 

On 8/4/2022 9:02 PM, Troy Burnham wrote:

Hi all,


I've had the combination talking and braille watch from Independent living aids since March this year, and I'm returning it for a replacement because I checked the time the other day and when I pressed the button all the watch said was "the time is" but no time was given. Also a month or 2 ago we noticed that the braille part of the watch wasn't keeping time anymore, so I had the battery changed yesterday and the voice still didn't give me the time when I pressed the button. I was wondering then if anyone on this list has a similar watch from I L S and if so if any of this has happened to you. As I said I'm receiving a replacement probably early next week, but I'm just wondering if there are known problems with this watch or if I just happened to get a bad one.


Thanks.


Troy






 


Howard Traxler
 

It's been my experience that the folks who sell these adapted watches don't tell you who is the manufacturer or where you can have it maintained or repaired.  I currently have two tactle watches that work just fine and keep almost perfect time.  However,  with lots of use, the lid hinges get loose and the friction-type closure will no longer keep the watch closed.  If I had a dollar for each time someone warned me, "your watch is open", I'd buy a new watch.  But I'd sure like to have these two fixed or adjusted; just don't know where.

I also have a talking watch with analog dial (that is not tactile, no opening lid) and the hands of time are never in step with the speech; but I don't have to care.

Howard

On 8/5/2022 8:05 AM, Gene wrote:
What you appear to be saying is that any Braille watch you open would allow dirt to get in.  Why are you singling out combination watches?  If opening it means the watchis likely not to work for long, then that should be true of any watch, combination or not.  If someone's hands, their hands not the watch hands, are clean, they should be able to open a Braille watch and have the watch work  well for years.  I have seen many statements from Braille watch users that they have had good quality watches that they have used for years and they don't complain about almost constant maintenance. 

So the question is, is this watch poorly made or is this watch defective?

While I don't understand why someone would want a combination watch, a properly made one should function without a lot of maintenance.

Gene

On 8/5/2022 5:14 AM, Gerald Levy via groups.io wrote:


The problem with combination watches is that when you open the crystal to feel the position of the hands, you are exposing it to dirt and debris which can get inside and damage the delicate mechanism and electronic components.  I really don't understand the appeal of a combination watch.  If you want a Braille watch , then buy a an analog watch with Braille markings or another tactile watch like the Bradley timepiece.  If you want a talking watch, then buy a fully digital watch that is completely sealed and thus more impervious to dirt and debris. I suspect that your replacement watch will work fine initially, but if you frequently open the crystal to feel the position of the hands, the same thing may happen again a few months from now.  If you want to maximize the watch's  longevity, just use the talk feature and do not open the crystal once the hands are set to the correct time.  


Gerald



On 8/4/2022 9:02 PM, Troy Burnham wrote:
Hi all,


I've had the combination talking and braille watch from Independent living aids since March this year, and I'm returning it for a replacement because I checked the time the other day and when I pressed the button all the watch said was "the time is" but no time was given. Also a month or 2 ago we noticed that the braille part of the watch wasn't keeping time anymore, so I had the battery changed yesterday and the voice still didn't give me the time when I pressed the button. I was wondering then if anyone on this list has a similar watch from I L S and if so if any of this has happened to you. As I said I'm receiving a replacement probably early next week, but I'm just wondering if there are known problems with this watch or if I just happened to get a bad one.


Thanks.


Troy









-- 
It's so convenient when you folks sign your messages with your name (or even an alias).  Then I don't have to close the message and look through the headings to find the originator.


Marda
 

Well if you have a jewelry store they might be able to repair your watch.  Some jewelry stores will do it.

Marda

On 8/7/2022 7:40 AM, Howard Traxler wrote:
It's been my experience that the folks who sell these adapted watches don't tell you who is the manufacturer or where you can have it maintained or repaired.  I currently have two tactle watches that work just fine and keep almost perfect time.  However,  with lots of use, the lid hinges get loose and the friction-type closure will no longer keep the watch closed.  If I had a dollar for each time someone warned me, "your watch is open", I'd buy a new watch.  But I'd sure like to have these two fixed or adjusted; just don't know where.

I also have a talking watch with analog dial (that is not tactile, no opening lid) and the hands of time are never in step with the speech; but I don't have to care.

Howard

On 8/5/2022 8:05 AM, Gene wrote:
What you appear to be saying is that any Braille watch you open would allow dirt to get in.  Why are you singling out combination watches?  If opening it means the watchis likely not to work for long, then that should be true of any watch, combination or not.  If someone's hands, their hands not the watch hands, are clean, they should be able to open a Braille watch and have the watch work  well for years.  I have seen many statements from Braille watch users that they have had good quality watches that they have used for years and they don't complain about almost constant maintenance. 

So the question is, is this watch poorly made or is this watch defective?

While I don't understand why someone would want a combination watch, a properly made one should function without a lot of maintenance.

Gene

On 8/5/2022 5:14 AM, Gerald Levy via groups.io wrote:


The problem with combination watches is that when you open the crystal to feel the position of the hands, you are exposing it to dirt and debris which can get inside and damage the delicate mechanism and electronic components.  I really don't understand the appeal of a combination watch.  If you want a Braille watch , then buy a an analog watch with Braille markings or another tactile watch like the Bradley timepiece.  If you want a talking watch, then buy a fully digital watch that is completely sealed and thus more impervious to dirt and debris. I suspect that your replacement watch will work fine initially, but if you frequently open the crystal to feel the position of the hands, the same thing may happen again a few months from now.  If you want to maximize the watch's  longevity, just use the talk feature and do not open the crystal once the hands are set to the correct time.  


Gerald



On 8/4/2022 9:02 PM, Troy Burnham wrote:
Hi all,


I've had the combination talking and braille watch from Independent living aids since March this year, and I'm returning it for a replacement because I checked the time the other day and when I pressed the button all the watch said was "the time is" but no time was given. Also a month or 2 ago we noticed that the braille part of the watch wasn't keeping time anymore, so I had the battery changed yesterday and the voice still didn't give me the time when I pressed the button. I was wondering then if anyone on this list has a similar watch from I L S and if so if any of this has happened to you. As I said I'm receiving a replacement probably early next week, but I'm just wondering if there are known problems with this watch or if I just happened to get a bad one.


Thanks.


Troy









-- 
It's so convenient when you folks sign your messages with your name (or even an alias).  Then I don't have to close the message and look through the headings to find the originator.