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Windows 10, Run UserCommand?


John Sanfilippo
 

Hello all,

Right now on Windows 10, 2004, we can open the Windows Run command and type commands like:

documents

downloads

dropbox

and windows will open the user documents folder, or the downloads folder, or the dropbox app.

There are probably many more things just like that.

My question is:

Can users design their own commands which work exactly the same way?

I know about batch files, but I decidedly do not mean to use those.

How would one learn how to do this, if indeed such user commands are possible to implement?

Thanks in advance.

John Sanfilippo


--
- JS o m -


Gene
 

You could do it but just what do you want to do? Doing this requires what is called a full path statement if the run dialog isn't preprogrammed to look in certain places to open something. If you type notepad in the run dialog, it is preprogrammed to look in the folder containing the notepad.exe file.

How do you want to use the run dialog? While you can create commands like this, there are so many ways to run things in Windows that you may be overlooking other much easier ones.

Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: John Sanfilippo
Sent: Thursday, December 24, 2020 5:16 PM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: [TechTalk] Windows 10, Run UserCommand?

Hello all,

Right now on Windows 10, 2004, we can open the Windows Run command and
type commands like:

documents

downloads

dropbox

and windows will open the user documents folder, or the downloads
folder, or the dropbox app.

There are probably many more things just like that.

My question is:

Can users design their own commands which work exactly the same way?

I know about batch files, but I decidedly do not mean to use those.

How would one learn how to do this, if indeed such user commands are
possible to implement?

Thanks in advance.

John Sanfilippo


--
- JS o m -


John Sanfilippo
 
Edited

Well, for instance, Right now I have  a shortcut to Google Drive on my desktop, but I'd far rather press win r, then type gDrive. or be able to use gDrive as a path in a copy command.
 Same for iCloud Drive. Then there are one or two python scripts I'd like to run the same way.

I hope this is clear.

Where could I read up on this?


Gene
 

As I say from time to time, if people would explain what they want to do as well as ask how to do something, they would get faster and better help. Now that we know what you want to do, we can discuss a much better way to do it. Create a short cut command.
The following is the procedure for Windows 7. it is probably the same for Windows 10.
Move to the item on the desktop.
Issue the command alt enter to open the properties of the icon.
Hold alt while you type enter.
tab until you get to an item that says short cut key. Any letter or number key you press will be the short cut key. Don't do anything else in the field. Tab to the ok button and press enter.
From now on, if you use the command control alt and the key you pressed, the program will open. It will open almost anywhere you are. In other words, you don't have to be on the desktop to use the command.
If you start running out of keys you want to use, instead of just pressing one when you create a command, press and holdd control shift and press a key. Using control shift gives you a whole new series of commands you can create, as many as the control alt series.

Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: John Sanfilippo
Sent: Friday, December 25, 2020 6:17 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Windows 10, Run UserCommand?

Well, for instance Right now I have a shortcut to Google Drive on my desktop, but I'd far rather press win r, then type gDrive. or be able to us gDrive as a path in a copy command.
Same for iCloud Drive. Then there are one or two python scripts I'd like to run the same way.

I hope this is clear.

Where could I read up on this?


John Sanfilippo
 
Edited

Yeah, those are great instructions, Gene, thanks. except I know about desktop shortcuts, but that is Not what I want to do.

Actually, I looked further and found that the desktop shortcut could now be copied or moved to c:\windows, renamed as desired, and now, voila, that is closer to what I want. A bit more effort all around, but closer to what I want.


Rob Hudson
 

You can edit your environment variables and add directories to your %path%

----- Original Message -----
From: "John Sanfilippo" <johnsanfilippo@outlook.com>
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Date: Sat, 26 Dec 2020 04:55:27 -0800
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Windows 10, Run UserCommand?

[Edited Message Follows]

Yeah, those are great instructions, Gene, thanks. except I know about desktop shortcuts, but that is Not what I want to do.

Actually, I looked further and found that the desktop shortcut could now be copied or moved to c:\windows, renamed as desired, and now, voila, that is closer to what I want. A bit more effort all around, but closer to what I want.







Gene
 

What do you want to do?

I said yesterday that you would need a full path statement, but maybe you wouldn't. There are ways, I never looked into them to indicate where you want to get to by using the percent sign. I know about DOS but this question uses aspects of using a command line in the run dialog and I don't know details about that which may be useful or im;portant.

Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: John Sanfilippo
Sent: Saturday, December 26, 2020 6:55 AM
To: main@TechTalk.groups.io
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Windows 10, Run UserCommand?

Yeah, those are great instructions, Gene, thanks. except I know about desktop shortcuts, but that is Not what I want to do.


Richard
 

You can do the same with any executable, but what is the importance to you
for using the run dialogue?

HTH,
Rick

----- Original Message -----
From: "John Sanfilippo" <johnsanfilippo@outlook.com>
To: <main@TechTalk.groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, December 26, 2020 7:55 AM
Subject: Re: [TechTalk] Windows 10, Run UserCommand?


[Edited Message Follows]

Yeah, those are great instructions, Gene, thanks. except I know about
desktop shortcuts, but that is Not what I want to do.

Actually, I looked further and found that the desktop shortcut could now be
copied or moved to c:\windows, renamed as desired, and now, voila, that is
closer to what I want. A bit more effort all around, but closer to what I
want.